USGS Science in New Mexico

USGS Science in New Mexico The USGS serves the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth, and minimize damage and loss from nature.
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Operating as usual

New Mexico Water Science Center Hydrologist Shaleene Chavarria weighs in on how climate change has landed New Mexico in ...
07/10/2020
The New York Times

New Mexico Water Science Center Hydrologist Shaleene Chavarria weighs in on how climate change has landed New Mexico in the middle of a megadrought despite near average snowfall last season.

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
06/25/2020

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

Reliable and accurate high-resolution mapping of the Nation’s waters are critical inputs to models and decision support systems used to predict risk and enable response to impacts on water resources. It is necessary to know where the water is and how it relates to features beyond the stream network like forests, cities, and infrastructure. An up-to-date, high-resolution national hydrography framework is required to support these important needs.
To address those needs, the USGS has released NHDPlus High Resolution. NHDPlus HR is built by integrating high-resolution National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD) data with 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) 10-meter digital elevation model (DEM) data into a suite of vector, raster, and tabular datasets.
A new fact sheet with details has been released: http://ow.ly/Cuuc50AgJqe

From mountain streams to desert wells, the New Mexico Water Science Center collects a variety of hydrologic data across ...
06/11/2020

From mountain streams to desert wells, the New Mexico Water Science Center collects a variety of hydrologic data across New Mexico. Want to see our site locations? Then visit NWISmapper. Sites can be viewed by site type (e.g. surface-water, groundwater, spring, etc.) and date of most recent data (e.g. active and inactive).

Check out NWISmapper at: http://ow.ly/FJYa50zRVeF

Learn more about this interface at: http://ow.ly/IOVG50zRVeG

Thanks for the shout-out Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge!  USGS relies on and greatly appreciates funding from loc...
06/09/2020
USGS Current Conditions for USGS 345843106410701 VALLE DE ORO MET STATION

Thanks for the shout-out Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge! USGS relies on and greatly appreciates funding from local cooperators to support gages such as this. Please voice your support for USGS gages with our cooperators!

U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey Title: USGS Current Conditions for New Mexico URL: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nm/nwis/uv? Page Contact Information: New Mexico Water Data Support Team Page Last Modified: 2020-06-03 08:30:12 EDT

#FieldworkFriday  Scientists from the New Mexico Water Science Center (NMWSC) are collecting data from Western New Mexic...
06/05/2020

#FieldworkFriday Scientists from the New Mexico Water Science Center (NMWSC) are collecting data from Western New Mexico in order to develop a better understanding of the sources of water and salt to the Zuni Salt Lake.

In the photos below, NMWSC staff collect lake water samples and perform drone mapping of the Zuni Salt Lake during fall 2019.

Interested in groundwater quality across the US?  Since 2012 the USGS has performed groundwater sampling to assess the w...
06/02/2020

Interested in groundwater quality across the US? Since 2012 the USGS has performed groundwater sampling to assess the water quality of fifteen regional aquifers across the US. The High Plains and Rio Grande Aquifer Systems, which both underlie New Mexico, are among the studied aquifers.

Read the 2019 fact sheet on groundwater quality in the High Plains Aquifer at: http://ow.ly/e8J950zRUYT

Read the 2017 fact sheet on groundwater quality in the Rio Grande Aquifer System at: http://ow.ly/4LYK50zRUYS

The latest results from other regional aquifers across the US recently became available. Learn more about the quality of the Nation’s groundwater at: http://ow.ly/XVrY50zRUYV

Interested in the current drought outlook for New Mexico?  The New Mexico DroughtWatch map shows 7-day average streamflo...
05/27/2020

Interested in the current drought outlook for New Mexico? The New Mexico DroughtWatch map shows 7-day average streamflow conditions as compared to historic conditions for this day of the year.

Check it out at: http://ow.ly/uqHN50zRGFT

When measuring groundwater, the depth is recorded from a specific measuring point (MP) at a well, which is then correcte...
05/22/2020

When measuring groundwater, the depth is recorded from a specific measuring point (MP) at a well, which is then corrected to land surface. To ensure that differences between measurement values are reflections of a changing water table and not a changing MP height, the MP is surveyed over time against an independent land-surface point.

This past winter, independent land-surface points were established at USGS continuous groundwater monitoring wells in Albuquerque and Santa Fe. In the photos below, Hydrologic Technician Joe Beman augers a hole and then sets a new point in concrete.

A new USGS study reports that human management of land and water resources have modified natural patterns of streamflow ...
05/19/2020

A new USGS study reports that human management of land and water resources have modified natural patterns of streamflow along an estimated 1.2 million stream miles—more than one-third—of the Nation’s streams and rivers.

Some management actions, such as flood control, water storage, and water transfers, directly affect streamflow. Other actions, such as groundwater pumping and the creation of impermeable surfaces in the watershed, indirectly and unintentionally affect streamflow. Climate variability also has induced changes in streamflow; however, human management over the last 3 decades has modified streamflows more than variation in climate has over the same period.

Learn about how these changes are affecting streamflow in New Mexico: http://ow.ly/gpZq50zDiSt

The New Mexico Water Science Center continues to monitor changing groundwater levels in the greater Albuquerque area.  R...
05/14/2020

The New Mexico Water Science Center continues to monitor changing groundwater levels in the greater Albuquerque area. Reduced groundwater pumping has resulted in rising groundwater levels since 2008 in portions of the aquifer underlying Albuquerque, which has impacted the monitoring and assessment of the Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) Bulk Fuels Facility (BFF) Ethylene Dibormide (EDB) plume.

A recently released interactive map shows changes in groundwater levels in the Albuquerque area over time: http://ow.ly/jd2f50zFeeX

This interactive tool will be used by decision makers to help evaluate the efficacy of KAFB BFF EDB plume monitoring and groundwater treatment system.

Access the associated publication at: http://ow.ly/mDDQ50zFeeZ

Still looking for educational resources for the kids?  The USGS Youth and Education in Science (YES) office has been upd...
05/12/2020

Still looking for educational resources for the kids? The USGS Youth and Education in Science (YES) office has been updating their 'Learning From Home' web page weekly throughout the spring of 2020.

Check it out at: http://ow.ly/wAoP50zAZ5x

Reminder: The information session for NSF-supported graduate student internships is TODAY 1-2:30 pm Eastern Time (11-12:...
05/11/2020
USGS_YES on Twitter

Reminder: The information session for NSF-supported graduate student internships is TODAY 1-2:30 pm Eastern Time (11-12:30 pm Mountain time).

Get more information and join the conference call at: http://ow.ly/8qZh50zAXk5

http://ow.ly/GfBp50zAXk6

“Graduate Students - come do an internship at @USGS - we'd really love to have you. Information session about @NSF -supported internships at USGS Monday 5/11, 1-2:30 E. Details here: https://t.co/jPEDy7mM6Q”

Attention graduate students: The USGS is hosting an information session for NSF-supported graduate student internships t...
05/08/2020
USGS_YES on Twitter

Attention graduate students: The USGS is hosting an information session for NSF-supported graduate student internships this Monday, May 11, 2020, 1-2:30 pm Eastern time (11-12:30 pm Mountain time).

Get more information at: http://ow.ly/V2h850zAXl5

http://ow.ly/sFhg50zAXl6

“Graduate Students - come do an internship at @USGS - we'd really love to have you. Information session about @NSF -supported internships at USGS Monday 5/11, 1-2:30 E. Details here: https://t.co/jPEDy7mM6Q”

Scientists from the New Mexico Water Science Center recently collected bacteria samples from the Rio Grande in Albuquerq...
05/04/2020

Scientists from the New Mexico Water Science Center recently collected bacteria samples from the Rio Grande in Albuquerque to assess E. coli concentrations. The objective of the project is to determine the amount and the source of the E. coli in the river. Microbial source tracking is used to determine if the E.coli is from human, dog, or bird sources .

This sampling effort is part of the Urban Waters Partnership, which is a collaboration between federal and local entities.

Learn more about microbial source tracking at http://ow.ly/1cQa50ztylX
Learn more about the Urban Waters Partnership at https://www.epa.gov/urbanwaterspartners/urban-waters-and-middle-rio-grandealbuquerque-new-mexico

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
04/07/2020

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

Step Up to the Challenge! Calling all volunteer citizen mappers interested in making major contributions to Nation’s structure database. The National Map Corps is looking for current and past participants to focus on specific points that need editing. A point represents a structure or manmade feature on a map such as a school, cemetery, hospital, post office, police station or other important public buildings. Using an online web mapping application, volunteers research and update data that become part of The National Map structures dataset. More information on the Map Challenge program: http://ow.ly/RZtY50z6Spa

Looking for online educational resources while your kids are at home?  The USGS provides K-12 science activities in Wate...
03/30/2020

Looking for online educational resources while your kids are at home? The USGS provides K-12 science activities in Water, Geology, Biology, Oceanography, and more.

Check it out at http://ow.ly/EDEw50yWzsO

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
03/26/2020

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

“Citizen Science-ing From Where You Are”: Are you looking for some science-based volunteer opportunities that you can do from home? Something that is entertaining and informative, while contributing to the nation’s map updating efforts? An activity that can further your geographic knowledge? If so, The National Map Corps has you covered.

TNMCorps is a recognized citizen science program that leverages crowd sourcing techniques and volunteers to update structure data on USGS map products. To reward, recognize and motivate these participants, the program awards “virtual badges” as they increase their number of submitted “points”.

A point represents a structure or manmade feature on a map such as a school, cemetery, hospital, post office, police station and other important public buildings. Using an online web mapping application, volunteers research and update data that ultimately become part of The National Map structures dataset, which is available for download free of charge.

TNMCorps encourages you to see for yourself what all the excitement is about. The only requirements to be an editor are a willingness to learn and access to the internet. Check out the online map editor, where you’ll also find links to the project overview, questions and answers (Q&A), user guides, and much more. See you on the map! http://ow.ly/gde950yWpwK

Timeline Photos
03/25/2020

Timeline Photos

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
03/23/2020

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

This week we have highlighted research and citizen science at work in the USGS supported USA - National Phenology Network (NPN).

You can get involved and track spring activity of plants and animals where you live by joining the USA-NPN's Nature's Notebook. It's a great activity for families to do together at home. Set up an observation site in your own backyard at http://ow.ly/DnLW50yNhcy

Image courtesy of Brian F Powell.

#spring #springfever #springequinox #citizenscience #stem

Spring has sprung!
03/16/2020

Spring has sprung!

Got #springfever?

This week we are highlighting work coming out of the USGS supported USA - National Phenology Network (NPN).

NPN tracks spring leaf out and bloom across the country. In places where spring has sprung, how typical is this year at that location? In this map of the contiguous U.S., darker colors represent springs that are unusually early or late in the long-term record.

Learn more at http://ow.ly/P2IJ50yLsyO

#USGS #spring #greenup #springequinox

The New Mexico Water Science Center currently has an opening for a GS-13 Supervisory Hydrologist in Albuquerque, New Mex...
02/08/2020

The New Mexico Water Science Center currently has an opening for a GS-13 Supervisory Hydrologist in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This position is open to current USGS employees and current or former employees of a land management agency (i.e., Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, or U.S. Forest Service).

For more informtion and to apply, view the vacancy announcement on USAJOBSy: http://ow.ly/IB9y50ygJwm

Last November USGS scientists from the New Mexico and Texas Water Science Centers collected sediment core samples from F...
01/30/2020

Last November USGS scientists from the New Mexico and Texas Water Science Centers collected sediment core samples from Farmington Lake in Farmington, New Mexico. Now, it’s time for sample analysis!

Incremental subsamples from each core were dried and crushed in the New Mexico Water Science Center lab. The samples will next be analyzed for major and trace elements to understand deposition over time.

Congratulations to Nathan Myers, NM Water Science Center Scientist Emeritus, and recipient of this year's New Mexico Ear...
01/21/2020
Bureau of Geology Names Nathan C. Myers as 2020 Earth Science Achievement Award Winner

Congratulations to Nathan Myers, NM Water Science Center Scientist Emeritus, and recipient of this year's New Mexico Earth Science Achievement Award! Nathan will receive the award in the Santa Fe Roundhouse Rotunda at noon on Monday, February 3rd, as part of Earth Sciences/ NM Tech Day. This event is free and open to the public.

The announcement can be found at: http://ow.ly/eGaH50xYg0M

Please join us at noon, Monday February 3rd, in the rotunda of the state capitol building when the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources (a research division of New Mexico Tech) presents the 2020 Earth Science Achievement Award for Research and Education to Nathan C. Myers for an outsta...

Water quality can change rapidly, creating a need for continuous water-quality monitoring. Continuous data, such as temp...
01/17/2020

Water quality can change rapidly, creating a need for continuous water-quality monitoring. Continuous data, such as temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen and turbidity, can provide information on changing conditions between discrete sampling events.

In the photos below, Hydrologic Technician Kate Wilkins services a continuous water-quality probe at the Rio Grande Below Cochiti Dam.

View the data from this site at: http://ow.ly/Jx2l50xXkQV

Working at the USGS can include collecting and interpreting data, communicating results, and... construction work??  Yes...
12/23/2019

Working at the USGS can include collecting and interpreting data, communicating results, and... construction work?? Yes, it's true! USGS employees build and service all gages, so power tools are a necessity for this job!

The photos below show Hydrologic Technicians Casey Lovato and Fletcher Brinkerhoff constructing new gages on the San Juan and Animas Rivers. These new sites will monitor river stage and discharge.

Learn more about USGS gages on the San Juan and Animas Rivers at: http://ow.ly/CrZC50xDnOG

How do you collect a water sample that represents the entire cross section of a river?   If the channel has relatively u...
12/18/2019

How do you collect a water sample that represents the entire cross section of a river? If the channel has relatively uniform depth and water velocity a composite sample can be collected using the Equal-Width Increment (EWI) method. Using the EWI method the cross section is divided into equal-sized segments that are each sampled. The overall sample is collected and processed from a composite of the individual samples.

The photos show Hydrologic Technician Natalia Romero collecting a sample from the Gila River near Gila, NM using the EWI method, and then processing that sample for pesticide analysis.

Check out the data from this site at: http://ow.ly/uvtx50xzKaV

It's sedimentary, my dear Watson!USGS scientists from the New Mexico and Texas Water Science Centers collected sediment ...
12/10/2019

It's sedimentary, my dear Watson!

USGS scientists from the New Mexico and Texas Water Science Centers collected sediment core samples from Farmington Lake in Farmington, New Mexico in November. The sediments will be measured for major and trace element chemistry to understand the record of sediment chemistry in the lake over time.

As part of a study on water availability in the Rio San Jose Basin, springs' flow and water-quality parameters were meas...
12/05/2019

As part of a study on water availability in the Rio San Jose Basin, springs' flow and water-quality parameters were measured. Water-quality parameters, such as temperature, specific conductance, pH and dissolved oxygen are measured in-situ using sondes, like the one pictured here.

The photo shows a sonde being deployed during sampling at a spring located on the flanks of Mount Taylor.

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
10/23/2019

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

Call for submissions: The FY19/20 Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) is open for submission. The BAA provides detailed information on how to partner with the USGS and other Federal agencies to acquire high-quality 3D Elevation data.
The primary goal of 3DEP is to systematically collect nationwide lidar coverage (IfSAR in Alaska) over an 8-year period to provide more than $690 million annually in benefits to government entities, the private sector and citizens. 3DEP presents a unique opportunity for collaboration between all levels of government to leverage the services and expertise of private sector mapping firms that acquire the data, and to create jobs now and in the future.
Proposals are due by Nov. 8, 2019. More information: http://ow.ly/D3hi50wSql1

Gravity changes?  Yes!  Changes in underground water storage cause changes in local gravity.  Increases in gravity at a ...
10/16/2019

Gravity changes? Yes! Changes in underground water storage cause changes in local gravity. Increases in gravity at a station over time are associated with increased groundwater storage, while decreases in gravity are associated with decreased storage.

The New Mexico Water Science Center measures gravity at sites across Albuquerque and Rio Rancho to monitor changes in aquifer storage and to gain information on aquifer properties. The photo shows a gravity meter in Rio Rancho.

Our gravity meter is famous! The Google Maps car drove by while Hydrologist Meghan Bell was taking a measurement at the Lincoln Middle School site in Rio Rancho. Check out the footage at: http://ow.ly/MS7P50wLXgL

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Comments

What are the chances that over the last couple of years in the North East, and the South East are indications that, that part of the U.S. is getting hit with the beginnings of a miniature ice age or longer? The last one was over 10,000 years ago. That time frame for our part of the world is normal, so we are long over due. The only other thing I would take a guess at would be that the Earth's poles are starting to shift. ???
Just got back from the field, To a splendid double rainbow at the office!