Alexandria History Museum at The Lyceum

Alexandria History Museum at The Lyceum The Lyceum, built in 1839, is a historic site, community history museum, and venue for all sorts of public and private events in Alexandria, Virginia.
(10)

Operating as usual

Timeline Photos
08/20/2021

Timeline Photos

On August 21, 1939, five young African American men sat down to read at the Alexandria Library on Queen Street after being refused a library card. Civil Rights attorney Samuel Tucker had coached them on how to comport themselves + was their legal defense when they were later charged with disorderly conduct. When the small new segregated facility, Robert Robinson Library, opened the following year, Tucker refused the invitation of a library card. The goal of integrating the library on Queen Street would take another 20 years. Learn more about Tucker and the sit-in: Alexandriava.gov/73256 #HistoricALX2U

Timeline Photos
08/17/2021

Timeline Photos

August is Black Business Owner Month! We are excited to highlight a variety of African American owned enterprises in Alexandria through the years. First are Cora + James Holmes. Cora Holmes, a confectioner, ran a grocery store at 533 S. Columbus St. during the late 1800s/early 1900s. Her son, John T. Holmes + his family later ran a tourist home at 803 Gibbon Street that was listed in the Green Book between 1938-1960. After John's death in 1945, his widow Arsenius + daughter Ruth, who worked as a teacher, continued to operate the establishment. Running tourist homes allowed families to supplement their income + provided traveling African Americans with a safe place to stay in a segregated landscape. Learn more about the Green Book herehttps://www.alexandriava.gov/uploadedFiles/historic/attic/Attic20200507GreenBook.pdf #HistoricALX2U

08/16/2021

One drink you could see at a tavern or at home in the 18th century was rum punch. Punch is derived from the Hindi word for five. Five ingredients are needed to make rum punch - sugar, water, spices, citrus, + of course rum. Thanks to archaeology done at Gadsby's Tavern Museum, we know what the tavern's bowl would look like. So as you think of the specialized glasses we have for our drinks today, consider this early fancy cocktail vessel from Gadsby's. #NationalRumDay #HistoricALX2U

08/15/2021

What is going on over at the Murray-Dick-Fawcett House? Important renovations! Overseen by Oak Grove Restoration, work includes chimney repointing, dormer window renewal, plus a historically accurate replacement of the wood shingle roof. During these renovations, the garden will be closed. #HistoricALX2U

08/14/2021

The team busily working on the first floor exhibit at the Freedom House Museum has recently acquired several historic images from newspapers and other periodicals. Images are an important part of all exhibits because they provide vivid visual representations of the stories being told. These historic documents will help illustrate the history of 1315 Duke Street. #FreedomHouseFriday #HistoricALX2U

Photos from Historic Alexandria, VA's post
08/08/2021

Photos from Historic Alexandria, VA's post

Photos from Historic Alexandria, VA's post
08/07/2021

Photos from Historic Alexandria, VA's post

08/07/2021

Come on by tomorrow, Saturday, August 7th from 9am to 2pm for the festivities! The museum will be open for timed tours, the Fire Department will have some of its equipment there for kids to explore! Live music and vendors!

08/07/2021

This weekend, we remember Benjamin Thomas – a 16 year old African American Alexandrian who was lynched at the corner of King + S. Fairfax Streets on August 8, 1899. Please join the Alexandria Community Remembrance Project August 8th at 7 p.m. on Market Square in honoring Thomas + the 15 members of the African American community who tried to prevent the lynching. For more information, visit https://www.alexandriava.gov/116918

08/05/2021

Can't make it to the Friendship Firehouse Festival this Sat, Aug. 7? Celebrate Friendship Firehouse's 247th birthday all month with a free Family Summer Fun Kit! The pickup kit includes a plastic Friendship fire helmet, instructions, plus coloring and activity pages. Recommended for families with children ages 4-8. *While supplies last*, pick up the kit beginning Aug. 12 at the Alexandria History Museum at The Lyceum (Thurs + Fri 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. + Sat 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.).

07/29/2021

One of our summer interns is tracking down historical documents to create detailed biographies of signers of the 1831 James Evans’ petition. Andrew Bell was one of several Black men who volunteered to help rebuild Fort Washington after the Royal Navy left during the War of 1812. Thousands of enslaved African Americans in the Chesapeake allied themselves with the British to gain freedom, while many free Blacks hoped supporting the American cause would bring them closer to equality. When Bell signed Evans’ 1831 petition espousing loyalty to Alexandria, he may have been motivated by the same desire to improve, or at least protect, his standing in a white-dominated society. Learn about the petition here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CEKdbsos_dw&ab_channel=AlexandriaArchaeology

Timeline Photos
07/29/2021

Timeline Photos

The Friendship Firehouse Festival is back August 7! Join us on the 100 block of South Alfred Street from 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Come visit the historic Friendship Firehouse Museum, learn about fire safety, + see City firefighting equipment up close. There will be displays by community organizations, craft vendors, + food and beverages available. Plus children receive free Friendship fire hats! For more info: https://apps.alexandriava.gov/Calendar/Detail.aspx?si=37564

07/29/2021

This summer, one of our interns is helping create a historic interpretive marker for 506 North Overlook Drive. Hampshire Fractious, an African American plasterer, built this house in 1878. He and his family would go on to live in the home for 10 years. Fractious’ ability to build this property is one example of the varied Black experience in post-Civil War Alexandria. Interpretive markers are an important part of the preservation process in the city and this one will commemorate Fractious' life and achievements. 506 North Overlook Drive in 1916 is circled on the right side of this photo.

Learn more at:https://www.alexandriava.gov/uploadedFiles/historic/info/archaeology/SiteReportFesler506NOverlookDrPrelimResearchPub129.pdf https://www.alexandriava.gov/HeritageTrail

Timeline Photos
07/18/2021

Timeline Photos

For #NationalLotteryDay, we take you back over 200 years. The Virginia Journal & Alexandria Advertiser reported on Sept. 2, 1790 that a lottery was authorized, "for raising the sum of $5,000 to be applied to paving certain streets in the town of Alexandria." Lotteries like this one were common in early America to raise funds for municipal projects, rather than using taxes. Early dirt roads could be treacherous + drainage issues meant an increased risk of disease. By the end of 1795, several blocks of King, Fairfax, Lee, Prince, Royal, + Union streets were paved with cobblestone. Not only was the first paving effort centered in the town's commercial area, it also happened to be home to some of the wealthiest residents. #HistoricALX2U

Timeline Photos
07/16/2021

Timeline Photos

Research continues at Freedom House. Our team is using a variety of primary source documents - from census records to court cases - to piece together the stories of those trafficked through this building. One example is Burdett Washington. His struggle to free and reunite his family comes to light in ship manifests, newspapers, and manumission records. Learn more about his story:https://www.alexandriava.gov/uploadedFiles/historic/info/freedomhouse/BurdettandWilliamHenryWashington.pdf #FreedomHouseFriday #HistoricALX2U

Timeline Photos
07/16/2021

Timeline Photos

Beat the heat and venture down to the Friendship Firehouse Museum between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. on July 17! Check out early fire fighting equipment including fire buckets and an elaborately decorated suction engine that helped put an end to the labor-intensive bucket brigades of the past. Purchase tickets in advance at alexandriava.gov/shop for a discount for parties of two or more – advance tickets are only $2 for parties of up to ten. Free for Alexandria residents! #HistoricALX2U

Timeline Photos
07/14/2021

Timeline Photos

For #BastilleDay, we spotlight our favorite fighting Frenchman - Lafayette! He served on George Washington’s staff during the Revolution + helped to defeat Cornwallis at Yorktown. Lafayette’s triumphal tour of America in 1824 was celebrated throughout the country. When he visited Alexandria in October, he was greeted with a large parade, public dinner at the City Tavern, + resided in town for close to a month. To honor his national visit, numerous souvenirs were available from clothing to ceramics. On September 24 1825, King Street china merchant Robert H. Miller offered, “China cups and saucers, Tea plates & s***f boxes...mugs and cans With a drawing of La Fayette & the surrender of Cornwallis.” This mug was found in a well located at 104 S. St. Asaph Street and was likely deposited by Ann Buckland's household who occupied the lot between 1810 and 1834. Learn more about other commemorative wares: www.alexandriava/38854 #HistoricALX2U

Timeline Photos
07/10/2021

Timeline Photos

We are able to tell stories throughout 1315 Duke Street when we reopen thanks to one important piece of equipment - a working elevator! This critical infrastructure provides accessibility to guests to all three floors. This has opened up hundreds of square feet to tell the African American history of Alexandria. #FreedomHouseFriday #HistoricALX2U

Timeline Photos
07/07/2021

Timeline Photos

Cheers to #WorldChocolateDay! Packaged products like this Blue Label Chocolate Food Beverage sold at the Apothecary were aimed at satisfying the public’s desire for the sweet treat at the end of the 19th century. Though not as popular as their Blue Label ketchup line, the Curtice Brothers Company in Rochester, N.Y. produced their beverage version to appeal to what newspapers referred to at the time as “chocolate fiends.” #HistoricALX2U

Timeline Photos
07/02/2021

Timeline Photos

An important first step for Freedom House is a Historic Structures Report, or HSR. This document will serve as guide for restoring the building and understanding the footprint of the Alexandria Slave Pen. Work includes paint and mortar analysis, mechanical and structural systems analysis, and digital documentation of the structure. This report will be available online in the coming weeks! #FreedomHouseFriday #HistoricALX2U

Timeline Photos
07/02/2021

Timeline Photos

It is #USPostageStampDay! In July of 1949, the City of Alexandria celebrated its 200th birthday with pageants, souvenirs, a parade, + a stamp. This 6 cent United States air mail stamp featured Carlyle House + Gadsby’s Tavern Museum. Check out 1949 Alexandria with its commemorative brochure:https://www.alexandriava.gov/uploadedFiles/oha/info/AlexandriaBicentennialBooklet1949.pdf #HistoricALX2U

07/02/2021

On June 28, Alexandria’s Contrabands and Freedmen Cemetery Memorial became one of the newest sites listed by the National Park Service in the African American Civil Rights Network. The Network’s collection of 57 powerful historic resources from across the country commemorates, honors, and interprets the Civil Rights Movement in the United States and the continuing struggle for racial equality. Contrabands and Freedmen Cemetery Memorial is the oldest and first site in Virginia to be added to the network. For more information on the African American Civil Rights Network, visit nps.gov/subjects/civilrights/african-american-civil-rights-network.htm. To learn more about the history of the Contrabands and Freedmen Cemetery Memorial, visit alexandriava.gov/FreedmenMemorial.

06/30/2021

History is not just the past, but what we write about the past. For democracy to thrive it needs ALL of our stories. But, not all voices have been included in telling our story. Telling a more complete history of the U.S. means acknowledging the complex, sometimes contradictory, truths we collectively hold. Gadsby’s Tavern Museum explores the complexity of the young Republic. Freedom House Museum tells the full story of the domestic slave trade in Alexandria. As we work to tell the history of all people, get involved in what matters most to you and write the next chapter in our country’s history. Join #CivicSeason at TheCivicSeason.com

06/27/2021

White catfish (Ictalurus catus) is a common freshwater species in the Potomac River. Archaeologically, it has been found frequently, including in three privies + a warehouse at the Hotel Indigo Site (44AX229). In her cookbook The Virginia Housewife, Mary Randolph provides a recipe for “curry of catfish” using white channel catfish + curry powder. Enslaved men + women did most of the cooking in the 18th + 19th centuries for people like Mary. Their impact can be seen through certain flavor profiles + the use of decidedly non-European ingredients. #CatfishDay #HistoricALX2U

06/25/2021

Happy #NationalHandshakeDay! By the time Alexandria's first fire company was formed in 1774, The Religious Society of Friends (aka the Quakers), had popularized the handshake as a greeting of fraternity + equality. Besides firefighting, Friendship Fire Company was a fraternal organization that supported members + their families during challenging times. In 1838, the Company adopted “badges with gilt hands,” which local artisan + Friendship member R.F. Prettyman incorporated into the company’s hose carriage twenty years later. #HistoricALX2U

06/23/2021

#OTD “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?” premiered. Remember how the villain’s dastardly plot was to erase Toontown + dismantle the trolley system to make way for freeways? Well it happened here in Alexandria. The rising popularity of automobiles led to the dissolution of interurban trains like the Washington-Virginia Railway. It connected commuters + tourists from DC, through Alexandria, to the Mount Vernon Estate beginning in 1892. This photo shows the trolley on its way from Del Ray to Old Town about a decade before the line closed in 1932. And soon it will be gracing your Xmas tree - this year’s Historic Alexandria ornament is the 1918 Trolley Car! On Sale September 1. #HistoricALX2U

06/21/2021

School’s out, but you can still enjoy photographs from the Parker-Gray School. Learn more about the history of the school, which celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2020. Browse through our photography collection with Historic Alexandria Collection Online. Recognize anyone in the photos? If you are able to identify anyone, we would love to hear about it. Just use our online form! Learn more: https://www.alexandriava.gov/118945

06/20/2021

Happy Father’s Day! To honor this day, we offer a few good Dad Jokes:
✔️I don’t trust *stairs* - they are always up to something.
✔️ I used to hate *facial hair*, but then it grew on me.
✔️How does the moon cut his *hair*? Eclipse it.
✔️If the early *bird* gets the worm, I’ll sleep in until there’s pancakes.
#HistoricALX2U

06/18/2021

Juneteenth is tomorrow! This Juneteenth flag, created in 1997, is filled with symbolism. The Lone Star, the burst, the arc and the colors red, white and blue all have special meaning to the story of Juneteenth. Learn more about the history of Juneteenth and the symbolism captured within this flag, as well as programs happening tomorrow: https://www.alexandriava.gov/122734 #Juneteenth #HistoricALX2U

06/17/2021

This past month, Friendship Firehouse Museum recently underwent minor repairs and painting. Come check out the finished product on June 19 from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m when the Museum is open for tours! Contractors repointed bricks on the exterior of the building, made minor repairs to the cupola, and painted. The cupola now reflects the 19th-century paint scheme. Purchase tickets in advance at alexandriava.gov/shop for a discount for parties of two or more – advance tickets are only $2 for parties of up to ten. Free for Alexandria residents! #HistoricALX2U

06/16/2021

On June 6, 1990, two le****ns were kicked out of GW’s on King Street because they were dancing together - the Texas two-step to be specific. They filed a complaint with the City - after all, Alexandria had an ordinance to protect against this type of discrimination. They ultimately won the complaint and were issued an apology by the bar’s owner, but it illuminated a 1934 Virginia law that banned bars from serving gay people. This complaint opened the door for others to bring a court case challenging the 1934 law and in 1991, it was ruled unconstitutional. #HistoricALX2U #PrideMonth

06/15/2021

Juneteenth celebrates emancipation in the United States + for the second year, Virginia + the City of Alexandria will celebrate it as a state holiday. Get outdoors in the City + celebrate the path to freedom with our waterfront trail. Reflect at the Contrabands & Freedman’s Cemetery + the African American Heritage Park. Join virtual webinars “Exploring the Alexandria African American Trail” + “Making Reconstruction Count.” Fill your home with song with the Washington Revels Jubilee Voices’ virtual concert. Learn more about all these ways to celebrate: https://www.alexandriava.gov/122734 #Juneteenth #HistoricALX2U

06/05/2021

June is #PrideMonth! Throughout the month, we will share some of Alexandria's LGBTQ+ history. In the 1930s, Black night clubs in large cities like D.C., Baltimore, + New York regularly featured female impersonators offering popular entertainment during what was labeled the “pansy craze.” A few of those gender nonconforming entertainers like Louis Diggs (also known as the “Sepia Garbo”) made appearances locally, including Alexandria’s Capitol Theatre. A Washington newspaper wrote that Diggs “sang and danced ‘her’ way to the title of Alexandria’s queen” and ran “up and down the aisle, switching ‘her’ lovely dress as if ‘she’ were Mae West.” After the show, Diggs reportedly had to navigate a crowd of men, women, + children to reach a waiting car. Read more about Diggs:https://www.alexandriava.gov/uploadedFiles/historic/info/attic/2021/Attic20210603FemaleImpersonators.pdf #HistoricALX2U (Thanks to Afro-American Newspapers for assistance with this story)

Address

201 S Washington St
Alexandria, VA
22314

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 5pm
Tuesday 10am - 5pm
Wednesday 10am - 5pm
Thursday 10am - 5pm
Friday 10am - 5pm
Saturday 10am - 5pm
Sunday 1pm - 5pm

Telephone

(703) 746-4994

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Alexandria History Museum at The Lyceum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos


Comments

I what building(s) did the Restored Government of Virginia meeti in Alexandria during the Civil War? Thanks.
If you create an event for the Jan. 21 talk then we will advertize it on our page to our members.
“Transforming the Lee Boyhood Home in Alexandria, Virginia into the Headquarters of an Interpretive Center and Urban Walking Trails on the Civil War” Various media sites reported at the end of March that the boyhood home of Robert E. Lee, at 614 Orinoco Street, in Alexandria, Virginia, is being sold by its private owners. The sale of the historic home of the Civil War general, educator, and pre-war head of West Point presents a unique opportunity to make Old Town Alexandria an even greater center of American history than it already is, as the hometown of George Washington, the Lees, and many other important figures and events in U.S. history. We propose, and ask interested parties to support, the purchase of the Lee Home, and transforming it into the headquarters of a city, state, and/or federally designated Interpretive Center, along with Urban Walking Trails, on the Civil War. Such a headquarters, visitors center and related trails would be a perfect complement to, and spur to, the expansion of Old Town Alexandria’s already rich array of events, locales, and personalities relating to America’s greatest saga, the Civil War, which speaks to the proud heritage of all Americans. The Lee Home was in the past a museum, and is time to return it to its traditional, historic status. The abode was the boyhood home of Robert Edward Lee, the former superintendant of the Federal Army’s West Point military academy, and important staff officer during the Mexican-American War, then the Confederate commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, and after the war the President of what became Washington and Lee University, in Lexington, VA. Across the street from the well-maintained private residence and grounds is the Lee-Fendall House, built by businessman Philip Kendall, a Lee relation. During the Civil War the Union Army, after taking control of the town, turned the house into a hospital, where surgeons performed the first successful blood transfusion. (And outside of which a later owner, United Mine Workers leader John L. Lewis, was burned in effigy during World War II for staging labor strikes during that conflict.) Walking trails, along the lines of the self-guided Cultural Tourism walks in Washington, D.C., or Boston’s Freedom Trails, could be readily & fairly inexpensively constructed throughout Old Town. They would complement the historic markers the city has recently placed in Old Town, as well as the famed series of markers the state of Virginia has placed throughout the Commonwealth. There could be a multitude of trails, on different aspects of the war, such the Union Army, Confederate spies, African-American institutions, war-time medicine, and many other themes. The trails would be made up of attractive posters showing the trail map, explanatory text, and illustrations. Along with fostering interest in Alexandria’s history and scholarship on the war, the Center and trails would be a boon to the city’s economy by bolstering its growing tourism industry. -------------------- A brief outline of the historic places just on a major Old Town thoroughfare, Washington Street, just yards west of the Lee and Lee-Fendall homes, shows what a unique opportunity the area presents for exploring the Civil War. On the west side of Washington Street is the historic home of Edmund Lee, a backer of the American Colonization Society for free “men and women of color”, which led to the establishment of the African nation of Liberia. (Liberia’s capital city is Monrovia, named for one of the antebellum Presidents, James Monroe, who held inaugural festivities at Old Town’s Gadsby’s Tavern.) Within a block to the north is a vast, 1840s-era cotton mill (now condominiums), the perfect symbol of the antebellum South’s economy. Several blocks south on Washington St. is the stately Lloyd House. It became a schoolhouse for noted Quaker educator Benjamin Hallowell; one of his math students was the young Robert E. Lee, who went on to study engineering at West Point. Another prominent Alexandria Quaker family were the Janneys. John Janney ran the two state assemblies whereby Virginia decided against, and then for, seceding from the Union. (John Janney’s home is three blocks away.) Around the corner is the Kate Waller Barrett Library, where in 1939 a group of African-American men staged one of the first sit-down protests against “separate but equal” segregationism. Not far from where Mary Custis Lee--the elderly daughter of Robert E. Lee--had a similar, personal protest, in 1902, on one of the segregated trolley cars of the time. (The home of town heroine Kate Waller Barrett, who grew up on a post-bellum plantation and dedicated her life to public service, is several blocks to the southeast.) A block further south is the magnificent English country-style edifice, Christ Church, by the architect James Wren, designer of the eponymous church in Falls Church, Virginia, and descendent of Christopher Wren, architect of London’s St. Paul’s Cathedral. Confederate soldiers who died in the city’s many war-time hospitals are buried in mounds by the Church entrance. In the Church itself is a commemoration of its most prominent member, Washington, who freed and educated all his slaves based in part on his experiences with black soldiers in the American Revolution. Robert E. Lee contributed a substantial sum of money to the Church. Across the street and a block north you’ll find a house of the Society of Odd Fellows, a fraternal order of black and other professionals formed after the conflict. One of whose members was the black architect George Seaton, whose mother was a servant of Martha Washington, who endowed a school on the site. Seaton served on the jury that presided over the trial of former Confederate President Jefferson Davis. (Seaton’s own home is located a half a dozen blocks away.) Two blocks further south on Washington St. is the Appomattox statue, with its Confederate soldier meditating on the war and the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse by General Lee to General Ulysses S Grant. The bronze figure was sculpted by Czech immigrant Caspar Buberle, who created as well the elegant frieze of Union Army soldiers on the old Pension Building for Union Army veterans, in Washington, D.C., now the National Building Museum. Buberle was selected for that task by Union Army General Montgomery Miegs, designer of Arlington National Cemetery, originally laid out on the grounds of Lee’s Arlington House during the war. The Appomattox statue was unveiled in 1889 by Virginia Governor Fitzhugh Lee, nephew of Robert E. Lee, and a former Confederate general, as well as a future Federal Army general of the Spanish-American War. This intersection at Washington St. and Duke St. is primed with poignant reminders of many facets of the Civil War. Next to the statue is the Lyceum, Alexandria’s history museum, and a speakers hall that featured such ante-bellum luminaries as John Quincy Adams, the President and congressman responsible for the successful Supreme Court defense of the escaped slaves from the Amistad ship. Half a block north is the attractive façade of the United Methodist Church which, reflecting the nation’s divisions, split into North and South denominations in the run-up to the War Between the States. Occupied as a stable by the Union Army, the federal government later paid the Church restitution. One block further south is the Beulah Baptist Church, one of the town’s initial African-American places of worship, and one of its first black schools, noted for the education of the free men and women fleeing, or emancipated from, slavery. Prominent African-American leaders such as Booker T. Washington and Frederick Douglass visited it and other, extant black churches a few blocks to the south and west. Up the street from the Beulah Church is the Downtown Baptist Church, turned into a hospital where Alexandrian women were blocked by Union soldiers from bringing linen and food to wounded Confederate soldiers treated inside by Union doctors. Another block south of it is the Alexandria Academy, founded by George Washington as a free public school, for boys and girls, at the same time he endowed what became Washington and Lee University and George Washington University. Before the Civil War, children of James Madison and Lighthorse Harry Lee, the latter Washington’s cavalry commander and Robert E. Lee’s father, were educated there, as were groups of black children. During the Civil War, the Academy became a school and a hospital for freedmen. The amazingly rich Civil War heritage of Alexandria isn’t limited to Washington St. of course. Old Town and its environs boast scores of other sites. The heritage trails would connect all the sites, but in a compact area only several miles across. Several of the most prominent locales are: • The Carlyle Mansion, home to the Green family and a Union Army hospital that was the real-life locale of the “Mercy Street” PBS television series • The Marshall House hotel, now the site of the Alexandrian Hotel, where Union Colonel Elmer Ellsworth and pro-Southern hotel owner John W. Jackson killed each other in a firefight, over a Confederate flag that Jackson had unfurled at his hotel, thus becoming among the first fatalities of the war. • The unique “Bank of the Two States”, a grand merchant bank that hosted the twin, war-time governments of Union Virginia, as opposed to the Confederate state of Virginia, as well as the breakaway state of West Virginia. Confederate General John Mosby, later a U.S. ambassador in the Far East for President Grant, conducted secret war-time surveillance of the place. • The former publishing house of the Alexandria Gazette newspaper, burned by Union troops after its editorials backed the refusal of the reverend of a nearby church, designed by architect of the U.S. Capitol Benjamin Latrobe, to endorse “either President”, Abraham Lincoln or Jefferson Davis, in his sermons. The fire-blackened walls are still visible, as is the fire house, across the street (now a private home), whose firemen attempted to douse the blaze. -------------------- This notion for an interpretative visitors center and walking trails on Alexandria’s large role in the Civil War is a preliminary one. It is hoped this document will spur discussion and generate interest in this fascinating and educational topic. The next step may be to establish a group to attract interested parties and funds for the purchase of the Lee Home, and to begin planning its transformation into a Civil War museum and interpretative center, as well as the construction of themed walking trails in Old Town. If you or your organization is intrigued by this exciting, once-in-a century project of living history, kindly respond with interest and ideas. Together, we could transform Alexandria into one of the prime places in America--along with Gettysburg, Richmond, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.--on the exploration of the Civil War, America’s most enthralling saga! Respectfully yours, Edward P. Moser Historian, author, professional tour guide Alexandria, VA [email protected] (https://www.meetup.com/Lafayette-Sq-Tours-of-Scandal-Assassination-Spies-Meetup/) (https://www.amazon.com/Patriots-America-Thigngs-American-Should/dp/1596525495/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1517173322&sr=8-1&keywords=america+a+z+moser)