Alexandria History Museum at The Lyceum

Alexandria History Museum at The Lyceum The Lyceum, built in 1839, is a historic site, community history museum, and venue for all sorts of public and private events in Alexandria, Virginia.
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Operating as usual

Historic Alexandria, VA
07/13/2020

Historic Alexandria, VA

It is official! Historic Alexandria is excited to reopen the Alexandria History Museum at The Lyceum Friday - Sunday. Enhanced safety procedures and policies have been put in place to welcome you back safely. The Timberman sign and the Jones Point Fresnel lens is excited to see you! And during your visit, don’t miss the new special exhibition, “Witnessing Worship: A Photographic Study of Faith in Alexandria.”

Visit the link for more information and to reserve your time slot: https://www.alexandriava.gov/historic/lyceum/default.aspx?id=115635

07/12/2020
WMPA's 30th Annual Chamber Music Series - July 12, 2020

Join the Washington Metropolitan Philharmonic Association (WMPA) online today at 3 p.m. for "The Mysterious Beethoven" with pianist Haskell Small. He will be performing live from The Lyceum on WMPA's YouTube channel. He will be performing Beethoven, 32 Variations in C minor, WoO 80; Corigliano, Fantasia on an Ostinato (a fascinating minimalist setting of the 2nd movement of Beethoven's Seventh Symphony); and Beethoven, Sonata No 31 in A-flat Major, op. 110 T.

The Washington Metropolitan Philharmonic Association will be streaming live from the Alexandria History Museum at The Ly...
07/05/2020

The Washington Metropolitan Philharmonic Association will be streaming live from the Alexandria History Museum at The Lyceum at 3 p.m. today. Zanoli* Duo (Heather Haughn, violin, and Jay DeWire, piano) will perform Brahms' Violin Sonata No. 1 in G Major, Op. 78 and William Grant Still's Suite for Violin and Piano. The livestream will be on WMPA's YouTube channel. While there will be no live audience for the concert, please tune in at 3 p.m. here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUZ54WGpwIbtg2upE82FNVw

#HamilFilm
07/03/2020

#HamilFilm

Getting ready for the #HamilFilm tomorrow? Some might say this is the Room Where It Happened…No, Hamilton probably never partied in the Ballroom at the City Tavern (now known as Gadsby's Tavern Museum) but many of his friends and frenemies did. The Pride of Mount Vernon celebrated his birthday in 1798+1799, America's Favorite Fighting Frenchman visited in 1824, and Mr. Age of Enlightenment celebrated his inauguration in 1801. #HistoricALX2U

Tour the Ballroom: https://www.google.com/maps/uv?hl=en&pb=!1s0x89b7b0f79511eb27%3A0xcd9ce83f59095ddb!3m1!7e115!4s%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com%2Fproxy%2F6s2movykbFYLZcPjlL8R3eXP_NMNaoQp-6K6NxQkuUlUA3TeguiiVjsVH2pB2i7rT6GhxM__Iweinw9J866UXulUTnXzZPnoMjiA0a9j6MvGk0KBDPOYVGZgsKgV2hDq3d1JW3592rTsc_hnHICGkSHf7iw%3Dw360-h240-k-no!5sgadsby%27s%20tavern%20museum%20-%20Google%20Search!15sCgIgARICCAI&imagekey=!1e2!2sJ2lBkol6-Ht-16fVh_yoOQ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi7-PPyxonqAhVWTDABHTixCkUQoiowDHoECBkQBg

The Washington Metropolitan Philharmonic Association will be streaming a concert from The Lyceum on their YouTube page o...
07/03/2020

The Washington Metropolitan Philharmonic Association will be streaming a concert from The Lyceum on their YouTube page on Sunday at 3 p.m. The Zarlino Duo will perform Brahms' Violin Sonata No. 1 in G Major, Op. 78 and William Grant Still's Suite for Violin and Piano. This concert will be entirely online with no live audience. Please visit wmpamusic.org for more information and a link to their YouTube page. Please tune in!

#HistoricALX2U
06/30/2020

#HistoricALX2U

As we move into summer, #HistoricALX2U will be slowing down. We hope you have enjoyed the crafts and exploring new facts about Alexandria - but don’t worry, we still will be sharing throughout the summer! And speaking of days full of sunshine, our staff is diving into a variety of readings for research and professional development. Here are a few - what are you reading?

#FactCheckFriday
06/27/2020

#FactCheckFriday

#FactCheckFriday In 1987, DC native Ben Holt made his New York City Opera debut as Malcolm X at the world premiere of Anthony Davis’ opera, “X, The Life and Times of Malcolm X.” Throughout his career, Holt continued to celebrate his African American heritage through song with performances of Martin Luther King, Jr’s “I have a dream” speech set to music by Lee Holby, and Thomas H. Kerr’s composition of Paul Lawrence Dunbar’s “Riding to Town.” Ben passed away shortly after in 1990.

Thanks to the devotion of his mother (and longtime volunteer at the Alexandria Black History Museum), Mayme Holt, Ben’s legacy lives on, not only in the Ben Holt Memorial Scholarship at the Juilliard School, but also in his collection at the museum. It will be cataloged and scanned so it will be accessible through the Office of Historic Alexandria’s online collections website. Another Alexandria connection - Anthony Davis is the cousin of Audrey Davis, the director of the Alexandria Black History Museum. Learn more: https://www.alexandriava.gov/114283 #HistoricALX2U

#ThrowBackThursday
06/26/2020

#ThrowBackThursday

#ThrowbackThursday Today in 1788, Virginia became the tenth state to ratify the Constitution. Virginia was one of the largest states in terms of land and population, and Federalists (pro-Constitution) worried the nation could split if Virginia did not ratify. They had reason to worry. Patrick Henry + George Mason opposed the ratification because they believed the rights of the states + the people were not protected. Locally, Col. Charles Simms and Dr. David Stuart, who supported ratification, were nominated to represent Fairfax County, of which Alexandria was a part. Ultimately, the Virginia Convention voted yes, but only by 10 votes. As we consider the beginning words of the Constitution, “We the People,” what’s your wish for our future? https://www.alexandriava.gov/114283 #HistoricALX2U #MyWishforUS

#WaterfrontWednesday
06/25/2020

#WaterfrontWednesday

#WaterfrontWednesday Researchers at Texas A&M University’s Conservation Research Lab are working hard on documenting three historic ships found at the Robinson Terminal South Site (44X235). They’ve made great progress on the 3D models for two of the vessels (Ships #2 and #3). These digital models will help us learn more about the size and shape of the ships and what they may have been used for in the past. Check them out: https://www.alexandriava.gov/114283 #HistoricALX2U

#TourTuesday
06/23/2020

#TourTuesday

#TourTuesday Historic Alexandria has officially launched a new website to showcase a select portion of its vast collection online. From silver to samplers, photos to forks, over 30,000 items are held in OHA's museums. To offer a taste of this variety, tour the different collections available now. Can you find Carlton Funn’s posters on Crispus Attucks, John Gadsby’s wine cooler, and a student chorus photograph from Parker-Gray High School? https://www.alexandriava.gov/114283 #HistoricALX2U

#MakeItMonday
06/23/2020

#MakeItMonday

#MakeItMonday Is it Alexandria or Belhaven? In 1749 a young George Washington wasn’t sure what to call this new town, so on his survey he titled it “A Plan of Alexandria, now Belhaven.” Most 18th-century Alexandrians called the town ”Alexandria” while the more upper-class citizens with aspirations of gentility chose the fancier sounding “Belhaven.” Learn more about this age-old question and what maps can tell us: https://www.alexandriava.gov/114283 #HistoricALX2U

Historic Alexandria, VA
06/21/2020

Historic Alexandria, VA

The removal of Alexandria’s Confederate monument Appomattox has brought conversations about its meaning to the forefront. Since its unveiling in 1889, the monument has always carried vastly different meanings to different people. For African Americans, Appomattox represented a past held in bondage and was a reminder that resisting the status quo carried potentially fatal consequences. For the white community, this monument was an opportunity to remember the Confederate soldiers who died throughout the war, however it also was a symbol of the “Lost Cause.” A public reframing of the Civil War, this mythology formed almost immediately after the war, reshaping the reason for war. Removing the monument does not erase the past, but it does add a new chapter to Alexandria’s story. One where we can begin to come to terms with our shared past and value all Alexandrians, honoring the full diversity of people who call this City home.

Learn more – Out of the Attic, June 18, 2020:https://www.alexandriava.gov/uploadedFiles/historic/info/attic/2020/Attic20200618Appomattox.pdf

#FactCheckFriday
06/20/2020

#FactCheckFriday

#FactCheckFriday Although dates of emancipation vary from state to state, June 19th has come to be celebrated throughout the United States as a day to commemorate the end of slavery. Why this date? In 1865, General Granger announced that the enslaved people in Texas were free. Texans began celebrating Juneteenth in 1866; Alexandrians have celebrated since 1889 on different days of the year and in different months. Celebrate this important date by immersing yourself in local African American history online: https://www.alexandriava.gov/114283 #HistoricALX2U

#WaterfrontWednesday
06/17/2020

#WaterfrontWednesday

#WaterfrontWednesday What exactly is a shoreline and where is it located? This seemingly simple question is actually very hard to answer. The shoreline is a fluid (pun intended) entity. On maps it is often depicted as a static line, unchanging in both time and space. In reality, a shoreline is shifting all of the time, subject to tidal forces, erosion, and precipitation. A mapmaker may depict a shoreline as representing any number of natural features—the bluff line, the high water mark, the low marker, and so on. Check out these brief research excerpts to further ponder the nature of shorelines in our city: https://www.alexandriava.gov/114283. #HistoricALX2U #WhatIsaShoreline

06/16/2020
Historic Alexandria, VA

#TourTuesday

#TourTuesday You may have walked through the gates of Fort Ward, but have you ever stopped to consider its symbolism? Examine the reconstructed ceremonial gate with Assistant Director Brian Briones, and discover why the gate includes cannonballs and a castle. Fort Ward is the best preserved of the system of Union forts and batteries built to protect DC during the American Civil War (1861-1865). Visit their website to learn more about the Fort itself, its Civil War history, and the African American community known as “The Fort” that grew after the war: https://www.alexandriava.gov/historic/info/default.aspx?id=114283 #HistoricALX2U

Historic Alexandria, VA
06/14/2020

Historic Alexandria, VA

At this defining moment in our nation’s history, peaceful vigils, protests and other events are taking place in Alexandria, following the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. Recognizing the importance of this moment in history, the Office of Historic Alexandria invites the community to share signs, t-shirts, flyers, photographs, journals, personal stories, and artifacts that document local vigils and protests surrounding the murders of black and brown victims at the hands of police. For more information and how you can participate, visit https://bit.ly/3dVTSnp

Historic Alexandria, VA
06/14/2020

Historic Alexandria, VA

As we experience this unprecedented time in the history of our town and the world, OHA is embarking on a project to record our City’s response to the pandemic by conducting oral histories and collecting select memories, objects, and documents from across the Alexandria community. The initiative will reach out to residents, businesses, schools, health care workers, churches, and civic organizations to collect and record our community’s response to this public health crisis.

To encourage conversations at home, the education team has created an activity packet for elementary students to use with their family.

For more information on Chronicling the Pandemic, the activity, and how you can participate, visit: https://www.alexandriava.gov/historic/info/default.aspx?id=115435

#TourTuesday
06/11/2020

#TourTuesday

#TourTuesday Constructed around 1796-1797, the Lloyd House is one of the best Georgian style buildings in Alexandria. It has seen a lot – as the home of John Wise (who owned the City Tavern, now Gadsby's Tavern Museum) and WAVES (the Navy Women’s Reserve during WWII). The building currently serves as the administrative offices for OHA and is a great rental space. See if you can find the beautiful garden, a doll house, and John Gadsby Chapman’s painting “Hagar Fainting in the Wilderness:” https://www.alexandriava.gov/114283 #HistoricALX2U

#WaterfrontWednesday
06/11/2020

#WaterfrontWednesday

While a constant influence in Alexandria’s story past and present, the waterfront is also a natural feature that is always shifting. Starting this #waterfrontwednesday and for the next few weeks, we are going to ponder the nature of shorelines. For Alexandria, the Potomac River is the boundary between our city, the District of Columbia and the state of Maryland. While a boundary, it also served as a connection to the rest of the world. This natural element was, and still is, a critical part of the local economy, to be developed and shaped to meet the financial interests of the landowners and city. Learn more about the Alexandria shoreline: https://www.alexandriava.gov/114283 #HistoricALX2U

#MakeItMonday
06/08/2020

#MakeItMonday

#MakeItMonday In the days before refrigeration was widely available, many people relied on their local dairy to deliver fresh milk and other dairy products to their door. In 1930, the Alexandria Dairy Products Company opened a new facility on the southwest corner of North Pitt and Princess Streets. Learn how to make butter and find out why the Alexandria Dairy was a leader in innovation: https://www.alexandriava.gov/114283 #HistoricALX2U

A quick survey about Historic Alexandria's #HistoricALX2U content. Thank you!
06/08/2020

A quick survey about Historic Alexandria's #HistoricALX2U content. Thank you!

While our content through #HistoricALX2U was created to fill an immediate need when our museums abruptly closed and programming and events were canceled, we need your help to chart a new path for the summer and fall! Please take a few minutes to fill out this survey about what you would like to see from OHA digitally in the coming months: https://www.research.net/r/AlexandriaVA-OHADigitalSurvey

Alexandria Community Remembrance Project
06/02/2020
Alexandria Community Remembrance Project

Alexandria Community Remembrance Project

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama includes over 800 steel monuments, one for each county in the United States where a racial terror lynching took place. Their Community Remembrance Project invites jurisdictions to claim and install a copy of their monument. The City....

AlexandriaVA.gov
06/02/2020

AlexandriaVA.gov

TOWN HALL :: City and community leaders will come together for the first in a series of virtual town halls on Tuesday, June 2, from 7 to 8:30 p.m., in the wake of the killing of George Floyd, a black man who died at the knee of a white police officer in Minneapolis on May 25. For more information, follow the link below. https://alexandriava.gov/115666

Alexandria Community Remembrance Project
06/01/2020
Alexandria Community Remembrance Project

Alexandria Community Remembrance Project

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama includes over 800 steel monuments, one for each county in the United States where a racial terror lynching took place. Their Community Remembrance Project invites jurisdictions to claim and install a copy of their monument. The City....

#ThrowBackThursday
05/29/2020

#ThrowBackThursday

#ThrowbackThursday The Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) began during the Great Depression in December 1933, when the National Park Service submitted a proposal for one thousand out-of-work architects to spend ten weeks documenting "America's antique buildings." The program soon became permanent, expanding into other media (photographs) and other types of surveys (landscapes, engineering-HAER). These records are a critical resource for preservationists. For example, these photos of the Murray Dick Fawcett House help city staff guide work at this historic site by helping us understand how this building changed over time: https://www.alexandriava.gov/114283 #HistoricALX2U #MuseumFromHome #PreservationMonth

#WaterfrontWednesday
05/28/2020

#WaterfrontWednesday

#HistoricALX2U #WaterfrontWednesday Newspaper advertisements also provide us with important information about Alexandria’s changing shoreline. A July 11, 1793 Virginia Gazette and Alexandria Advertiser notice describes the boundaries of a property south of the foot of Duke Street. This portion of Fleming’s wharf for sale “fronts the River Patowmack 55 ½ feet or thereabouts ... and extends back 110 feet or thereabouts.” Pairing this description with other documents that describe the eastern boundary of the property just to the west helps us understand how far land extended into the Potomac at this time and location. Historical research involves piecing together a lot of little nuggets of information to create a bigger picture of the past. Understanding when the Alexandria's shoreline was filled in will also help us better understand when the merchant ships were buried. For more information: https://www.alexandriava.gov/historic/info/default.aspx?id=114283

Address

201 S Washington St
Alexandria, VA
22314

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 13:00 - 17:00

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(703) 746-4994

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Comments

I what building(s) did the Restored Government of Virginia meeti in Alexandria during the Civil War? Thanks.
If you create an event for the Jan. 21 talk then we will advertize it on our page to our members.
“Transforming the Lee Boyhood Home in Alexandria, Virginia into the Headquarters of an Interpretive Center and Urban Walking Trails on the Civil War” Various media sites reported at the end of March that the boyhood home of Robert E. Lee, at 614 Orinoco Street, in Alexandria, Virginia, is being sold by its private owners. The sale of the historic home of the Civil War general, educator, and pre-war head of West Point presents a unique opportunity to make Old Town Alexandria an even greater center of American history than it already is, as the hometown of George Washington, the Lees, and many other important figures and events in U.S. history. We propose, and ask interested parties to support, the purchase of the Lee Home, and transforming it into the headquarters of a city, state, and/or federally designated Interpretive Center, along with Urban Walking Trails, on the Civil War. Such a headquarters, visitors center and related trails would be a perfect complement to, and spur to, the expansion of Old Town Alexandria’s already rich array of events, locales, and personalities relating to America’s greatest saga, the Civil War, which speaks to the proud heritage of all Americans. The Lee Home was in the past a museum, and is time to return it to its traditional, historic status. The abode was the boyhood home of Robert Edward Lee, the former superintendant of the Federal Army’s West Point military academy, and important staff officer during the Mexican-American War, then the Confederate commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, and after the war the President of what became Washington and Lee University, in Lexington, VA. Across the street from the well-maintained private residence and grounds is the Lee-Fendall House, built by businessman Philip Kendall, a Lee relation. During the Civil War the Union Army, after taking control of the town, turned the house into a hospital, where surgeons performed the first successful blood transfusion. (And outside of which a later owner, United Mine Workers leader John L. Lewis, was burned in effigy during World War II for staging labor strikes during that conflict.) Walking trails, along the lines of the self-guided Cultural Tourism walks in Washington, D.C., or Boston’s Freedom Trails, could be readily & fairly inexpensively constructed throughout Old Town. They would complement the historic markers the city has recently placed in Old Town, as well as the famed series of markers the state of Virginia has placed throughout the Commonwealth. There could be a multitude of trails, on different aspects of the war, such the Union Army, Confederate spies, African-American institutions, war-time medicine, and many other themes. The trails would be made up of attractive posters showing the trail map, explanatory text, and illustrations. Along with fostering interest in Alexandria’s history and scholarship on the war, the Center and trails would be a boon to the city’s economy by bolstering its growing tourism industry. -------------------- A brief outline of the historic places just on a major Old Town thoroughfare, Washington Street, just yards west of the Lee and Lee-Fendall homes, shows what a unique opportunity the area presents for exploring the Civil War. On the west side of Washington Street is the historic home of Edmund Lee, a backer of the American Colonization Society for free “men and women of color”, which led to the establishment of the African nation of Liberia. (Liberia’s capital city is Monrovia, named for one of the antebellum Presidents, James Monroe, who held inaugural festivities at Old Town’s Gadsby’s Tavern.) Within a block to the north is a vast, 1840s-era cotton mill (now condominiums), the perfect symbol of the antebellum South’s economy. Several blocks south on Washington St. is the stately Lloyd House. It became a schoolhouse for noted Quaker educator Benjamin Hallowell; one of his math students was the young Robert E. Lee, who went on to study engineering at West Point. Another prominent Alexandria Quaker family were the Janneys. John Janney ran the two state assemblies whereby Virginia decided against, and then for, seceding from the Union. (John Janney’s home is three blocks away.) Around the corner is the Kate Waller Barrett Library, where in 1939 a group of African-American men staged one of the first sit-down protests against “separate but equal” segregationism. Not far from where Mary Custis Lee--the elderly daughter of Robert E. Lee--had a similar, personal protest, in 1902, on one of the segregated trolley cars of the time. (The home of town heroine Kate Waller Barrett, who grew up on a post-bellum plantation and dedicated her life to public service, is several blocks to the southeast.) A block further south is the magnificent English country-style edifice, Christ Church, by the architect James Wren, designer of the eponymous church in Falls Church, Virginia, and descendent of Christopher Wren, architect of London’s St. Paul’s Cathedral. Confederate soldiers who died in the city’s many war-time hospitals are buried in mounds by the Church entrance. In the Church itself is a commemoration of its most prominent member, Washington, who freed and educated all his slaves based in part on his experiences with black soldiers in the American Revolution. Robert E. Lee contributed a substantial sum of money to the Church. Across the street and a block north you’ll find a house of the Society of Odd Fellows, a fraternal order of black and other professionals formed after the conflict. One of whose members was the black architect George Seaton, whose mother was a servant of Martha Washington, who endowed a school on the site. Seaton served on the jury that presided over the trial of former Confederate President Jefferson Davis. (Seaton’s own home is located a half a dozen blocks away.) Two blocks further south on Washington St. is the Appomattox statue, with its Confederate soldier meditating on the war and the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse by General Lee to General Ulysses S Grant. The bronze figure was sculpted by Czech immigrant Caspar Buberle, who created as well the elegant frieze of Union Army soldiers on the old Pension Building for Union Army veterans, in Washington, D.C., now the National Building Museum. Buberle was selected for that task by Union Army General Montgomery Miegs, designer of Arlington National Cemetery, originally laid out on the grounds of Lee’s Arlington House during the war. The Appomattox statue was unveiled in 1889 by Virginia Governor Fitzhugh Lee, nephew of Robert E. Lee, and a former Confederate general, as well as a future Federal Army general of the Spanish-American War. This intersection at Washington St. and Duke St. is primed with poignant reminders of many facets of the Civil War. Next to the statue is the Lyceum, Alexandria’s history museum, and a speakers hall that featured such ante-bellum luminaries as John Quincy Adams, the President and congressman responsible for the successful Supreme Court defense of the escaped slaves from the Amistad ship. Half a block north is the attractive façade of the United Methodist Church which, reflecting the nation’s divisions, split into North and South denominations in the run-up to the War Between the States. Occupied as a stable by the Union Army, the federal government later paid the Church restitution. One block further south is the Beulah Baptist Church, one of the town’s initial African-American places of worship, and one of its first black schools, noted for the education of the free men and women fleeing, or emancipated from, slavery. Prominent African-American leaders such as Booker T. Washington and Frederick Douglass visited it and other, extant black churches a few blocks to the south and west. Up the street from the Beulah Church is the Downtown Baptist Church, turned into a hospital where Alexandrian women were blocked by Union soldiers from bringing linen and food to wounded Confederate soldiers treated inside by Union doctors. Another block south of it is the Alexandria Academy, founded by George Washington as a free public school, for boys and girls, at the same time he endowed what became Washington and Lee University and George Washington University. Before the Civil War, children of James Madison and Lighthorse Harry Lee, the latter Washington’s cavalry commander and Robert E. Lee’s father, were educated there, as were groups of black children. During the Civil War, the Academy became a school and a hospital for freedmen. The amazingly rich Civil War heritage of Alexandria isn’t limited to Washington St. of course. Old Town and its environs boast scores of other sites. The heritage trails would connect all the sites, but in a compact area only several miles across. Several of the most prominent locales are: • The Carlyle Mansion, home to the Green family and a Union Army hospital that was the real-life locale of the “Mercy Street” PBS television series • The Marshall House hotel, now the site of the Alexandrian Hotel, where Union Colonel Elmer Ellsworth and pro-Southern hotel owner John W. Jackson killed each other in a firefight, over a Confederate flag that Jackson had unfurled at his hotel, thus becoming among the first fatalities of the war. • The unique “Bank of the Two States”, a grand merchant bank that hosted the twin, war-time governments of Union Virginia, as opposed to the Confederate state of Virginia, as well as the breakaway state of West Virginia. Confederate General John Mosby, later a U.S. ambassador in the Far East for President Grant, conducted secret war-time surveillance of the place. • The former publishing house of the Alexandria Gazette newspaper, burned by Union troops after its editorials backed the refusal of the reverend of a nearby church, designed by architect of the U.S. Capitol Benjamin Latrobe, to endorse “either President”, Abraham Lincoln or Jefferson Davis, in his sermons. The fire-blackened walls are still visible, as is the fire house, across the street (now a private home), whose firemen attempted to douse the blaze. -------------------- This notion for an interpretative visitors center and walking trails on Alexandria’s large role in the Civil War is a preliminary one. It is hoped this document will spur discussion and generate interest in this fascinating and educational topic. The next step may be to establish a group to attract interested parties and funds for the purchase of the Lee Home, and to begin planning its transformation into a Civil War museum and interpretative center, as well as the construction of themed walking trails in Old Town. If you or your organization is intrigued by this exciting, once-in-a century project of living history, kindly respond with interest and ideas. Together, we could transform Alexandria into one of the prime places in America--along with Gettysburg, Richmond, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.--on the exploration of the Civil War, America’s most enthralling saga! Respectfully yours, Edward P. Moser Historian, author, professional tour guide Alexandria, VA [email protected] (https://www.meetup.com/Lafayette-Sq-Tours-of-Scandal-Assassination-Spies-Meetup/) (https://www.amazon.com/Patriots-America-Thigngs-American-Should/dp/1596525495/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1517173322&sr=8-1&keywords=america+a+z+moser)