Leader’s Recon

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10/23/2023

Want to go to Harvard on the Army's dime? This episode is for you! This week Leader's Recon sits down with Capt Wilson to discuss the Harvard Strategist Program and Functional Area 59: Strategist.

10/16/2023

This week, Lt Gen Jon Jensen sat down with Leader's Recon to discuss his vision for the Army National Guard of 2030. He also touches on his priorities and even sends out a special message to the troops and their families.

This week, Lt Gen Jon Jensen, the Director of the Army National Guard, sat down with Leader's Recon to discuss his visio...
10/02/2023

This week, Lt Gen Jon Jensen, the Director of the Army National Guard, sat down with Leader's Recon to discuss his vision for the Army National Guard of 2030. He also touches on his priorities and even sends out a special message to the troops and their families.

Army National Guard The National Guard Director of the Army National Guard U.S. Army

This week, Lt Gen Jon Jensen sat down with Leader's Recon to discuss his vision for the Army National Guard of 2030. He also touches on his priorities and ev...

09/29/2023

Lt Gen Jensen sat down with Leader's Recon, and spoke to the value of service by soldiers, their families, and their employers. Full Episode coming Monday!

08/08/2023

Welcome back to Leader's Recon! In this episode we discuss Credentialing Assistance in our Education Benefits series.

07/25/2023

In this week's episode of Leader's Recon, We break down Federal Tuition Assistance, and how to make the most of it!

06/27/2023

In this episode of Leader's Recon, we discuss all things the GI Bill, to include the Post 9/11 GI Bill and the Montgomery GI Bill.

06/13/2023

1st LT Tamayo joins Leader's Recon to discuss tools available to soldiers to aid in planning their educational paths.

06/12/2023

1st LT Tamayo discusses tools available to soldiers to plan their education on our upcoming episode of Leader's Recon. Full episode tomorrow!

  We at Leader’s Recon hope everyone is starting off the week on a high note and expect a lot of you are traveling this ...
12/19/2022

We at Leader’s Recon hope everyone is starting off the week on a high note and expect a lot of you are traveling this week for the holidays! Let us know in the comments below if you have a trip or event planned that really has you pumped up!

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Battered and beaten, but not broken, Pennsylvania's 28th Infantry Division emerged from the Hurtgen Forest with over 248...
12/15/2022

Battered and beaten, but not broken, Pennsylvania's 28th Infantry Division emerged from the Hurtgen Forest with over 248 officers and 5,452 enlisted men as casualties (42%). Sent to a quiet sector, Maj. Gen. Norman Cota conducted an aggressive reconstruction of his unit, instituting training and combat patrolling combined with personnel swaps and replacements at the Senior Officer level. While these processes saw the 28th return to strength rapidly, their quiet sector, the Ardennes, would become a critical point in the Allied lines. On the 16th of December, the 28th Infantry Division was savagely attacked by the 5th Panzer Army. Thanks to MG Cota's planning, the 28th was able to delay the German offensive and provide time for units like the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions to move to key terrain and establish prepared defenses.

For more information read, Lt. Col. Adam R. Grove's SAMS paper on the 28th Infantry Division's reconstruction prior to the Battle of the Bulge
(https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/pdfs/AD1111588.pdf)

Photo by Army Signal Corps

  The First MusterThe history of the National Guard began on December 13, 1636, when the General Court of the Massachuse...
12/13/2022

The First Muster

The history of the National Guard began on December 13, 1636, when the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony ordered the organization of the Colony's militia companies into three regiments: The North, South and East Regiments.

Since 1636 the Army National Guard has continued a tradition of service to the nation both domestically and abroad. Today we
mark 386 years of carrying on the tradition began by the Massachusetts National Guard — The Nation's First 101st Engineer Battalion.

Hawaii National Guard Dec 7thDecember 7th, 1941, is "a date that will live in infamy" as the start of the US entry into ...
12/08/2022

Hawaii National Guard Dec 7th

December 7th, 1941, is "a date that will live in infamy" as the start of the US entry into WWII. The Army National Guard was in action on December 7th, as elements of the Hawaii Army National Guard 299th and 298th Infantry had been federalized earlier in the year and were serving on construction projects and coastal defense positions that day, with many on a weekend pass in Oahu. After the attack the remaining members of the units reported for duty and began improving defensive positions along the coast and preparing for a possible amphibious invasion.

On December 8th, 1941 While on beach patrol, Corporal David M. Akui captured Ensign Kazuo Sakamaki, a commander of one of the “midget submarines” intended as part of the invasion. This would be the first enemy combatant captured by US forces in WWII.

Due to fear concerning the Japanese ancestry of many members of the Hawaii National Guard, hundreds of members of the 298th and 299th were transferred to the newly formed "100th Infantry Battalion" which eventually became the 442nd RCT, one of the most highly decorated units in the US Army in WWII which served above and beyond the call of duty in the European Theatre. The 299th Infantry was folded into the 298th due to this loss of manpower, and would continue their service in the pacific participating in the Central and Western Pacific, Leyte and Ryukyu


12/07/2022

Col. Andy Dziengeleski walks us through the importance of have nation state military partners in an global stage. For the full episode, checkout Ep 5 - Understanding Strategic Planning With Col. Andy Dziengeleski on YouTube via the Linktree in our bio!

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  Coming at you with new opportunities! Today's are the December Newsletter from TRL, the Strategic Broadening Seminars ...
12/06/2022

Coming at you with new opportunities! Today's are the December Newsletter from TRL, the Strategic Broadening Seminars from the BOP and, if you've been trying to find the SUPGUID, we have a link to it now!

Let us know if there are any resources you want us to track down! We'd love to hear from you!

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  Whether it's the pandemic, civil unrest, Capitol Hill riot, or deployments, the Wisconsin National Guard answered the ...
12/05/2022

Whether it's the pandemic, civil unrest, Capitol Hill riot, or deployments, the Wisconsin National Guard answered the call to help. After giving so much, the state is taking care of their Soldiers through a new program called Comprehensive Health and Wellness Program! Check out the news video below to hear the story and learn more about CHW!

https://www.channel3000.com/paying-them-back-the-new-wellness-program-keeping-the-wisconsin-national-guard-in-peak-health/

Story by Channel3000 News

11/21/2022

Happy Early Thanksgiving to all Soldiers and their families! This week's episode is focused on grocery shopping at your local commissary. This week, Lt. Col. Brenda Bustillos is walking you through her local commissary at Ft. Eustis to show you some of the best features you can take advantage of at your commissary!

U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

  HE DID NOT KNOW FEAR, AND GIVEN A JOB TO DO, HE WOULD STICK TO IT TO THE END–1st Lieutenant William Bradford Turner, a...
11/17/2022

HE DID NOT KNOW FEAR, AND GIVEN A JOB TO DO, HE WOULD STICK TO IT TO THE END–1st Lieutenant William Bradford Turner, acting M Co Commander, 105th Infantry, 27th Division. Medal of Honor Recipient for actions on 27 September 1918

Enlisting in the New York National Guard’s Squadron A, William “Brad” Turner first saw service at the Border, enduring “hardships of [on the] trip and subsequent duties on the Border were never equaled in the hottest action of the World War.” For his performance at the Border, Pvt. Turner received a commission to 2nd Lieutenant and was transferred to the 12th New York Infantry’s Machine Gun Company. Volunteering to go to the front lines, then 1Lt. Turner transferred to the 105th Infantry of the 27th Division where he quickly distinguished himself through his tireless efforts towards improving the Company’s logistical situation and instructing the men on the British Lewis Gun.

As a part of the British Fourth Army, British Field Marshall Sir Douglas Haig tasked the 27th Division with an assault of the Hindenburg Line in the Somme Region. The Battle of the St. Quentin Canal would see some of the 27th’s fiercest fighting. With his Company Commander detached, 1Lt. Turner took charge of Company M and their mission to protect the 106th Infantry’s flank on their advance towards the Knoll near Vendhuile, France. As the artillery shells rained down around the advancing infantry, 1Lt. Turner advanced as his fellow Officers and NCOs were cut down around him. Coming to within twenty yards of a trench, a machine gun opened up on him and his thirty men. 1Lt. Bradford quickly went into action, silencing it before dropping into the German trench. Like diving into a lake, 1Lt. Turner was quickly surrounded by his cold enemy. As he shot one German with his pistol in his left hand, he used his athletic prowess to deliver a haymaker blow with his right on another, dropping his enemy to the floor of the trench. As his Soldiers leapt in, the abrupt shock quickly became an American overwhelming blow to the German defense. The shocking melee became a swift route as 1Lt. Turner and his platoon cleared one, two and then three trenches, utilizing shock and awe in the form of gunfire and hand grenades. Arriving at the fourth trench, 1Lt. Turner surveyed the battlefield and identified Germans to the north, south and east of his position, emplacing machine guns all around him. “Lieutenant Turner saw that there was only one thing to do. ‘We can't hold this position; we have got to go back,’ he told his men”. As he began his withdrawal, 1Lt. Turner raised his head to take a look at his situation only to find the bullet with his name. Struck in the head, 1Lt. William Turner fell dead. He was twenty-five.

1Lt. William Turner’s Medal of Honor Citation reads:

“He led a small group of men to the attack, under terrific artillery and machine-gun fire, after they had become separated from the rest of the company in the darkness. Singlehandedly he rushed an enemy machine gun which had suddenly opened fire on his group and killed the crew with his pistol. He then pressed forward to another machine-gun post 25 yards away and had killed one gunner himself by the time the remainder of his detachment arrived and put the gun out of action. With the utmost bravery he continued to lead his men over three lines of hostile trenches, cleaning up each one as they advanced, regardless of the fact that he had been wounded three times, and killed several of the enemy in hand-to-hand encounters. After his pistol ammunition was exhausted, this gallant officer seized the rifle of a dead soldier, bayoneted several members of a machine-gun crew, and shot the other. Upon reaching the fourth-line trench, which was his objective, 1st Lt. Turner captured it with the nine men remaining in his group and resisted a hostile counterattack until he was finally surrounded and killed.”

New York Army National Guard 27th Division, AEF

Photo Credit:

1: Charles Turner’s William Bradford Turner, published 1920

2: NARA

3: TRL

4: TRL

  In part three of our Domestic Operations series, Col. Brandye Williams walks us through how the National Guard conduct...
11/07/2022

In part three of our Domestic Operations series, Col. Brandye Williams walks us through how the National Guard conducts interagency partnerships and maintains crucial relationships that allow the Guard to enhance its capacity to assist communities in times of crisis!

🇺🇸 DC Army National Guard

  On November 3rd, 1944, approx. two months after marching through Paris’s Champs Elysees, Pennsylvania’s 28th Infantry ...
11/03/2022

On November 3rd, 1944, approx. two months after marching through Paris’s Champs Elysees, Pennsylvania’s 28th Infantry Division was fighting one of the longest battles on German ground in World War 2. The Battle of Hürtgen Forest was an effort to pin down German forces to stop reinforcements of the Siegfried Line farther north. The area was heavily defended by towns fortified with tank traps and minefield. The cost of the battle was significantly higher for Allied forces and were able to capture the city of Aachen, just short of the Rur river and its dams. The area was so heavily defended because it was the staging area for Germany’s 1944 winter offensive, which would come to be known infamously as the Battle of the Bulge.

Photos by Army Signal Corp and US Nat’l Archives and Records Administration

Pennsylvania Army National Guard Team Greensburg Pennsylvania Army National Guard Elizabethtown Armory. Pennsylvania Army National Guard Recruiting. Pennsylvania Army National Guard Stroudsburg. Pennsylvania Army National Guard Readiness Center

  Want to go to United Kingdom? Above is an opportunity for senior captains to study with the British military and learn...
11/01/2022

Want to go to United Kingdom? Above is an opportunity for senior captains to study with the British military and learn global military strategy! Also keep your eye on new series coming out from Leader’s Recon and the rest of the Leader Development Branch programs!

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  Come see a peek at the newest series of Leader’s Recon! The full episode is now available on YouTube and can be found ...
10/31/2022

Come see a peek at the newest series of Leader’s Recon! The full episode is now available on YouTube and can be found via our platforms through the Linktree here:

https://linktr.ee/leadersrecon

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  JE SUIS PRET–THEY WERE READY– 164th Infantry (NDARNG) at Battle of Henderson FieldAs the US reinforcements to Guadalca...
10/27/2022

JE SUIS PRET–THEY WERE READY– 164th Infantry (NDARNG) at Battle of Henderson Field

As the US reinforcements to Guadalcanal poured in, Japanese forces also delivered fresh troops in preparations for another assault on Henderson Field. Unable to pry it from the Marine Defenders, the addition of the 164th Infantry Regiment (NDARNG) added much needed firepower to the Marine’s defenses. As the Japanese delivered ~15,000 troops for the offense, the Marines and Guardsmen established a perimeter of interlocking fields of fire, emplacing obstacles and defensive positions in preparation. As the Japanese had already attempted attacks from the east (Battle of the Tenaru) and from the southwest (Battle of Edson’s Ridge), they now planned a 2-pronged attack from the south and west to break the American perimeter.

As the Japanese force under General Hyakutake struggled to reach their assault positions, General Tadashi Sumiyoshi force failed to receive an order delaying his assault and instead launched his attack of the western perimeter without the southern force, receiving heavy casualties. Twenty-four hours later, Hyakutake’s force attacked the southern perimeter, firing light artillery on the 164th’s positions. Marking their targets with Japanese bayonets, clearing the tall grass to improve their fields of fire and adding additional crew-served weapons such as 37mm anti-tank guns with cannister rounds greatly improved the Guardsmen’s defense. When the Japanese finally attacked, they were met with a hail of gunfire, artillery and cannister shells. Each rush of the American lines resulted in heavy Japanese casualties and a renewed American determination to hold. As barrels became red-hot, ammunition came up and the Americans fought on against the onslaught. For 3 days, the forces clashed until the Japanese were spent. The retrograding Japanese left 3,000 dead in front of the 164th Infantry’s positions.

For their service, Marine General Alexander Vandergrift gave the 164th Infantry Regiment the nickname of the “164th Marines”, an accolade earned through the blood of the North Dakotans’ sacrifice to protect Henderson Field.

Photo credits by Univ. of N. Dakota

Feeling dried out from the cold weather? Lt. Col. Bustillos is back with expert opinion in this episode of Fueling Perfo...
10/21/2022

Feeling dried out from the cold weather? Lt. Col. Bustillos is back with expert opinion in this episode of Fueling Performance; Fluid Facts!

Full episode Monday!

The National Guard National Guard Professional Education Center U.S. Army Center for Initial Military Training U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

  On October 19th, 1781, the Continental Army concluded its last major engagement of the Revolutionary War as British fo...
10/20/2022

On October 19th, 1781, the Continental Army concluded its last major engagement of the Revolutionary War as British forces surrender at Yorktown, Virginia. After claiming illness, Gen. Charles Cornwallis sent out his deputy to conduct negotiations with the surrounding joint American and French forces. In an attempt to save face and not surrender to their colonies, the French commander directed the deputy to Gen. Washington, who directed the British deputy to his second-in-command, Maj. Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, a former Major General of the Massachusetts Bay Militia, the predecessors to the Maryland Army National Guard.

The British filled the soon-to-be-named Surrender Field with approximately seven thousand soldiers who marched out to relinquish their weapons. After their victory, Gen. Washington proceeded north to New York to make battle with the remaining British forces. While minor action would occur for the next two years, the British would officially surrender the American colonies on September 3rd, 1783.

Some current units of the National Guard that trace their lineage to units present at the Battle of Yorktown:
116th Infantry, VAARNG (Stonewall Brigade)
175th Infantry, MDARNG (Fifth Maryland)
113th Infantry, NJARNG (First New Jersey)
198th Signal Battalion, DEARNG (First Delaware)

Photos by U.S. Army and the Museum of the American Revolution

We’ve been busy! CFS just returned from France and we have more trips in the works! Reach out if you want to take advant...
10/19/2022

We’ve been busy! CFS just returned from France and we have more trips in the works! Reach out if you want to take advantage of some of the best leader development programs in the National Guard!

🇫🇷 .nationalguard

  80th Anniversary- Landing of the 164th Infantry Regiment (North Dakota National Guard) on Guadalcanal- 13 October 1942...
10/13/2022

80th Anniversary- Landing of the 164th Infantry Regiment (North Dakota National Guard) on Guadalcanal- 13 October 1942.

After six months of defending New Caledonia, North Dakota National Guardsmen of the 164th Infantry Regiment deployed to aid the besieged 1st Marine Division trapped on Guadalcanal.

As part of the AMERICAL Division, the regiment was one of three National Guard Regiments (132nd Infantry-Illinois National Guard, 164th Infantry, & 182nd-Massachusetts National Guard — The Nation's First) and supporting elements joined together to form an Infantry Division.

The AMERICAL Division received its name by joining American and New Caledonia (the islands where the division was formed) and given a patch to represent the division’s formation under the Southern Cross of Stars.

Sent to Guadalcanal, the 164th Infantry Regiment was the first to land, bringing with it 2,852 fresh troops, ready to fight.The North Dakotans would not have to wait long for their first taste of combat, as that Japanese bitterly contested the landing with bombing raids and shelling throughout the day. The Guardsmen would spend the next week helping to re-orient General Vandergrift’s defensive perimeter, filling gaps in the line to protect the vital Henderson Field.

Follow on AMERICAL Division forces would follow on a month later, bringing in the 182nd Infantry Regiment (MAARNG) and other Divisional supporting assets to help facilitate the relief of the 1st Marine Division. By the end of the year, the Army would assume the fight to clear Guadalcanal of the remaining Japanese resistance. Not until 9 February 1942 did General Alexander Patch, Commanding General of the AMERICAL Division, declare the island as secure.

Photo Credit: University of North Dakota’s Elwyn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections & Army Center of Military History

National Guard North Dakota Army National Guard Recruiting U.S. Army Center of Military History Marine Corps History Division

10/05/2022

If you need a tool to help you stay on target in your unit, Command Sgt. Maj. Sampa recommends the tried and true Leaders Book.

  Meuse-Argonne Offensive.This week marks the beginning of the Meuse-Argonne Offensive on 26 September, 1918. The larges...
09/29/2022

Meuse-Argonne Offensive.

This week marks the beginning of the Meuse-Argonne Offensive on 26 September, 1918. The largest battle to date in American History, the Meuse Argonne involved over 1 Million American servicemen in 23 Divisions and support elements. The Army National Guard provided 10 of these Divisions, and many smaller formations in the battle, helping to ensure American victory by November 11th, 1918. During this offensive National Guard units from across the country would participate in some of the bloodiest fighting of World War I, in six weeks the American Expeditionary Force lost 26,277 killed and 95,786 wounded.

Does your unit have a battle streamer for the Meuse Argonne? Let us know below!

27th Infantry Brigade Combat Team 28th Infantry Division 29th Infantry Division 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team (ABCT) 32nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team 35th Infantry Division37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team 42nd Infantry Division 369th Sustainment Brigade

  29 Let’s Go! - Combat Field Studies executed the last of its pre-COVID Battle Staff Rides with Maryland National Guard...
09/27/2022

29 Let’s Go! - Combat Field Studies executed the last of its pre-COVID Battle Staff Rides with Maryland National Guard Soldiers following in the footsteps of the 29th Infantry Division in the Normandy Invasion. Members of Army Institute of Military History guided them across the beaches and up the Vierville draw at OMAHA before visiting the graves of MDARNG Soldiers buried at the Normandy American Cemetery. Participants than followed the Division as it broke out of the beachhead and drove towards St. Lo, visiting famous locations such as Isigny-sur-Mer, Le Carrefour, Purple Heart Hill and Bois de Bretel, ending at the church where the “Major of St. Lo”, Guardsmen Maj. Thomas Howie was laid after he was killed in action during the capture of the city, concluding a poignant trip. As one participant put it: “To walk on the ground that these men marched on, ran on, fought on and died on, I realized just how enormous the cost was and how important it is as a leader to make sure you and your men are well trained, well equipped and mentally prepared.”

  Today in National Guard history, we go back to 1776. Former Connecticut school teacher turned spy Captain Nathan Hale ...
09/22/2022



Today in National Guard history, we go back to 1776. Former Connecticut school teacher turned spy Captain Nathan Hale is hanged by the British. Hale was recruited by General George Washington to slip into the enemy's camp and learn where they planned to strike the Continental Army next, having just forced it from Long Island back into New York City. After spending several days in the disguise of a Dutch school teacher, all the time making notes about British activities, Hale was captured one night when a boat he thought was dispatched to pick him up turned out to be an enemy craft. When searched his notes were found and he was quickly sentenced to death. While most people think he said ‘I regret I have but one life to give for my country' in a fact what he said, as recorded by British Adjutant Major John Andre was "I am so satisfied with the cause in which I have engaged that my only regret is that I have not more lives to offer in its service." It is interesting to note that Major Andre himself would be hanged by the Americans as a spy for his part in the failed attempt by General Benedict Arnold to turn West Point over to the British later in the war.

Photo Credit- Christopher De Coro

  “True courage is being afraid, and going ahead and doing your job”. - Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf Jr.How does this stateme...
09/21/2022



“True courage is being afraid, and going ahead and doing your job”. - Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf Jr.

How does this statement resonate with you? It isn’t always easy being a leader. Sometimes we have tough decisions to make, no matter the MOS, but we all take that big step forward to get done what needs to be done. That’s why our junior enlisted and junior officers look to us for guidance and courage in whatever they may face. So go out there and make those brave and bold decisions to strengthen the force. 🔥🤘🏼🤙🏼

 Last week, our team had the opportunity to take part in the Tactical Stress Marksmanship Assessment, with a team from D...
09/20/2022


Last week, our team had the opportunity to take part in the Tactical Stress Marksmanship Assessment, with a team from Devcom soldiers center, to test todays warfighter in reaction time, survivability, and more. This team is mobile and able to accommodate any unit in your state. This program is a great opportunity to better understand training requirements to help develop your soldiers.

  Strategic Awareness Seminars has been knocking out some fantastic visits to the       and  ! This rotation is halfway ...
09/16/2022

Strategic Awareness Seminars has been knocking out some fantastic visits to the and ! This rotation is halfway done so reach out if you’d like to apply for a future trip to experience some of the most important and historic places of the and U.S. government!

  Battle of AntietamThis weekend marks the anniversary of the climax of the Maryland 1862 Campaign when armies of the No...
09/15/2022

Battle of Antietam

This weekend marks the anniversary of the climax of the Maryland 1862 Campaign when armies of the North and South clashed near Sharpsburg Maryland.

The battle would become the bloodiest day in United States history, with a combined tally of 22,717 dead, wounded, or missing.

At the end of the single bloodiest day in American military history, both Union and Confederate armies arrayed along Antietam Creek stop fighting due to exhaustion. After the 18th passed quietly Confederate General Robert E. Lee started withdrawing his army on the morning of the 19th back into Virginia without interference.

Army National Guard units from the North and South participated in the battle, and many of our units carry the Blue and Gray Streamer marked Antietam on their colors to this day.

Want to learn more about Antietam? Check out our videos section for an exclusive Combat Field Studies episode with CPT Jonathan Bratten of the Maine National Guard for an in depth look at their states soldiers in this climactic battle!

Wisdom Wednesday- “Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen....
09/14/2022

Wisdom Wednesday- “Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.” -Winston Churchill

In light of mens mental health this month, check in your battle buddies, and if you having trouble with something, reach out and ask for help. Take care of each other and be the leaders you need to be. Not just for your soldiers, but for everyone around you.

Portrait by: Yousuf Karsh

  - last week our team went down to PEC, the National Guards Professional Education Center, and had the opportunity to s...
09/13/2022

- last week our team went down to PEC, the National Guards Professional Education Center, and had the opportunity to sit in on some of the MHPO-I course, along with filming some long format workout videos, which we hope to get to you guys in the near future. We also learned the importance of stretching and foam rolling after a workout, thanks to the Combat Athlete Performance Team. Stay lethal and stay driven.

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User Agreement

The following User Agreement (“Agreement”) governs the use of official Department of Defense social media sites and pages to include social networking pages, web blogs and file sharing sites, along with all policies applicable to the .mil domain. Please read the rules contained in this Agreement carefully. You can access this Agreement any time. Your use of any aspect of the Web sites will constitute your agreement to comply with these rules. If you cannot agree with these rules, please do not use the Web sites. The Agreement may be modified from time to time; the date of the most recent revisions will appear on this page, so check back often. Continued access of the Web site by you will constitute your acceptance of any changes or revisions to the Agreement. Your failure to follow these rules, whether listed below or in bulletins posted at various points in the Web site, may result in suspension or termination of your access to the Web site, without notice. COMMENTS BY OTHERS ARE NOT ENDORSED The Department of Defense does not necessarily endorse, support, sanction, encourage, verify or agree with the comments, opinions, or statements posted on the Web site. Any information or material placed online, including advice and opinions, are the views and responsibility of those making the comments and do not necessarily represent the views of The Department of Defense, the United States Government or its third party service providers. By submitting a comment for posting, you agree that the Department of Defense, the United States Government and its third party service providers are not responsible, and shall have no liability to you, with respect to any information or materials posted by others, including defamatory, offensive or illicit material, even material that violates this Agreement. EDITING AND DELETIONS The Department of Defense reserves the right, but undertakes no duty, to review, edit, move or delete any material submitted as a comment to the information provided for display or placed on the social media web sites in its sole discretion, without notice. Comments submitted to these sites will be reviewed and a representative sample may be posted on the Web site, or in the case of social networking sites, inappropriate comments may be deleted at the sole discretion of the Department of Defense. We hope to receive submissions from all viewpoints, but we ask that all participants agree to the following Terms of Participation: * To ensure constructive questions, please post only questions directly related and relevant to the Department of Defense. * Refrain from posting questions that contain threats, obscenity, material that would violate the law if published here, abusive, defamatory or s*xually explicit material. * Submissions containing the following will be deleted: o Contains obscene or threatening language or discrimination (hate speech) based on race, s*x, gender, religion, national origin, age, or disability. o Promotes services or products (not including non-commercial links that are relevant to the topic) o Includes any personal or sensitive information (phone numbers, email or postal addresses) o Operational Security (OPSEC). All personnel (including families and friends of service members) have a responsibility to ensure that no information that might put our military members in jeopardy or would be of use to our adversaries is posted to websites that are readily accessible to the public. Not surprisingly, that information includes, among other things, technical information, operation plans, troop movement schedules, current and future locations of military units and ships, descriptions of overseas bases, details of weapons system, or discussions of areas frequented by service members overseas. Other information that’s not as obvious but should also not be discussed in an open forum includes daily military activities and operations, equipment status, unit morale, and results of operations. Any of these topics, if released in an open medium, have the ability to provide our adversaries opportunities to harm our military members. External Links (including Advertising Links) The appearance of external hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the United States Department of Defense of the linked web sites, or the information, products or services contained therein. The United States Department of Defense does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations. All links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of these Department of Defense (DoD) web sites. DISCLAIMER: Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. With respect to documents available from this server, neither the United States Government nor any of its service members or employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, including the warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.ought to be included. Please let us know about existing external links which you believe are inappropriate and about specific additional external links which you believe ought to be included. Thank you for your continued support of Leader’s Recon.


Comments

Thanks for the invite!