Arlington VA Public Library

Arlington VA Public Library The Arlington Public Library provides free access to information, creates connections among people and promotes reading and culture. Arlington County's Social Media General Terms of Use: https://newsroom.arlingtonva.us/social-media-general-terms-use/.

At this time, all Arlington Public Library locations remain closed to the public. Central Library is open for holds pickup only.

Operating as usual

All Arlington County offices, including all Library locations and services, will be closed Friday, June 18 and Saturday,...
06/16/2021

All Arlington County offices, including all Library locations and services, will be closed Friday, June 18 and Saturday, June 19, in honor of Juneteenth.

Juneteenth celebrates June 19, 1865. On this date the Emancipation Proclamation reached Galveston Bay, Texas, along with Union troops - two and a half years after the Proclamation was signed in 1863. Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States.

Learn more: https://libcat.arlingtonva.us/MyAccount/MyList/30400

All Arlington County offices, including all Library locations and services, will be closed Friday, June 18 and Saturday, June 19, in honor of Juneteenth.

Juneteenth celebrates June 19, 1865. On this date the Emancipation Proclamation reached Galveston Bay, Texas, along with Union troops - two and a half years after the Proclamation was signed in 1863. Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States.

Learn more: https://libcat.arlingtonva.us/MyAccount/MyList/30400

Do you know a teen poet age 13-19? 1455 Literary Arts will award $5,000 in their 3rd annual Teen Poetry Contest to one p...
06/16/2021

Do you know a teen poet age 13-19? 1455 Literary Arts will award $5,000 in their 3rd annual Teen Poetry Contest to one previously unpublished poem (any length and style) on the theme "Finding Community During Crisis."

The winning author – and three finalists– will have an opportunity to read their poem at an online reception during the 1455 Summer Festival. In addition, selected poems, including all chosen as finalists, will be featured in the next issue of 1455's bi-monthly magazine Movable Type.
Deadline: 12am, July 1.

There is no entry fee, and all submissions must be entered through the online form. More info and submissions: https://web.cvent.com/event/09e46134-4022-438e-9297-72ee3f323a1d/summary

Do you know a teen poet age 13-19? 1455 Literary Arts will award $5,000 in their 3rd annual Teen Poetry Contest to one previously unpublished poem (any length and style) on the theme "Finding Community During Crisis."

The winning author – and three finalists– will have an opportunity to read their poem at an online reception during the 1455 Summer Festival. In addition, selected poems, including all chosen as finalists, will be featured in the next issue of 1455's bi-monthly magazine Movable Type.
Deadline: 12am, July 1.

There is no entry fee, and all submissions must be entered through the online form. More info and submissions: https://web.cvent.com/event/09e46134-4022-438e-9297-72ee3f323a1d/summary

Interested in learning about native pollinator plants?Our Master Gardeners and naturalists have identified over 50 diffe...
06/15/2021

Interested in learning about native pollinator plants?

Our Master Gardeners and naturalists have identified over 50 different species at the Central Library gardens. Learn about native plants while picking up your materials at the Holds Pickup Service at Central Library — or just stop by to explore the garden!

The Library gardens are lovingly planted, tended, watered, weeded, and harvested year-round by a dedicated group of volunteers.

The Arlington Farmers Market is one of the oldest in Virginia, and for over 40 years has been a great place to find fres...
06/15/2021

The Arlington Farmers Market is one of the oldest in Virginia, and for over 40 years has been a great place to find fresh produce and shop locally. #TimeTravelTuesday🎛️ 🛫

The Arlington Farmers Market at 14th Street North and Courthouse Road was established in 1979 by County Board member Ellen Bozman, who along with citizen activists initiated the idea for the market. The market logistics were organized by the County’s Extension Service, which enlisted volunteers to help coordinate and staff the weekly event. The market debuted in June 1980 in the Courthouse parking lot and had eight stalls selling a variety of produce, baked goods, and flowers.

Pictured here in June 1986, the Farmers Market quickly grew in just a few years, with more vendors adding to the variety of goods available at the increasingly numerous stalls. One of the frequent vendors at the market was Arlingtonian Floyd Hawkins, who was well-known for his beekeeping practice and honey production.

Arlington now has nine Farmers Markets across the County in addition to the original Courthouse location, including Arlington Heights, Ballston, Columbia Pike, Crystal City, Fairlington, Lubber Run, National Landing, Rosslyn, and Westover.

Check out photos 3 through 5 for additional scenes from the June 1986 market.

This year’s Summer Reading Challenge theme is “Food for Thought” - register on the Arlington County Library app to track your progress!

06/11/2021

Rain, Rain, go away!
We have to postpone today's Spinning into Summer Reading: Kickoff Celebration with Spinny Johnson to a less wet day... new date to be announced later.
Family Zumba at the Library with CocoFitness! has also been canceled due to the rain.

Arlington County has reopened the call for submissions for a new community logo. From now until Thursday, June 17, submi...
06/10/2021

Arlington County has reopened the call for submissions for a new community logo. From now until Thursday, June 17, submit your idea that best represents the people and community of Arlington.
See the updated guidelines and form on the logo submission page.
https://www.arlingtonva.us/submit-logo/

Arlington County has reopened the call for submissions for a new community logo. From now until Thursday, June 17, submit your idea that best represents the people and community of Arlington.
See the updated guidelines and form on the logo submission page.
https://www.arlingtonva.us/submit-logo/

Oral History: Arlington’s First Openly LGBTQ Elected OfficialIn 1997, Jay Fisette became the first openly LGBTQ+ person ...
06/10/2021

Oral History: Arlington’s First Openly LGBTQ Elected Official

In 1997, Jay Fisette became the first openly LGBTQ+ person elected to office in the state of Virginia when he won a seat on the Arlington County Board.

Fisette served for six terms on the Board, from 1998 to 2017, and served as Board Chair five times, including in his final year on the Board.

Fisette focused on numerous issues during his tenure, including strong environmental policies, local affordable housing, and urban planning. He also has held leadership positions in organizations such as the Metropolitan Council of Governments, the Virginia Housing Development Authority, and the Arlington Gay and Lesbian Alliance.

In his work with the Alliance, which was founded in 1981 as a local branch of the Virginia Gay Alliance, the group successfully advocated for the inclusion of sexual orientation protections in the County’s human rights ordinance.

Prior to being elected to the Board, Fisette worked as a Government Accountability Office auditor, and as director of the Whitman-Walker Clinic of Northern Virginia, which focuses on helping patients with HIV/AIDS.

Reflecting on his career in Arlington, Fisette said in an announcement stating he would not run for re-election that the County “embraced me as a gay man long before such an endorsement could be presumed, long before it became the norm.”

In this oral history interview from the Smart Growth documentary series, Jay Fisette discusses his time on the County Board, as well as development in the County.

Narrator: Jay Fisette
Interviewer: Mary Curtius
Date: April 12, 2008
Note: The audio for this interview is currently unavailable.

Mary Curtius: So Jay, what I want to know is what made you run for the board in the first place?

Jay Fisette: That’s a good question. You know I’d always been interested in studying public policy and always thought about it. When I went to California and came out it was possible there. But as a gay man, it just didn’t seem feasible honestly.

MC: Didn’t seem feasible here in Virginia?

JF: To be elected. You know most places in the country you take it off the list. It’s just not practical. But after living here for five years or so, six years, seven years, and getting to know the community it just sort of crept back into my consciousness as something that in a community like this was really feasible and I had a real connection to what I understood to be the values here and the character of this community and sort of just woke up.

06/08/2021

Central's holds-only service is closed to the public today - Tuesday, June 8 - in order to accommodate voting in the auditorium.
All other currently-available Library services are open.

The Weenie Beenie has been a fixture in Arlington for over 60 years! Pictured here in 1996 and 2021, much about the rest...
06/08/2021

The Weenie Beenie has been a fixture in Arlington for over 60 years! Pictured here in 1996 and 2021, much about the restaurant has stood the test of time, making it one of the most recognizable eateries in Arlington.
#TimeTravelTuesday🎛️ 🛫

The Weenie Beenie was established in Arlington in the 1950s and got its start as a local chain of simple hot dog stands with multiple locations around the County. The Weenie Beenie location still standing today at 2680 Shirlington Road is the last of the chain still in operation.

Founder Bill Staton - nicknamed “Weenie Beenie” - was a world-famous pool player, and funded the restaurant with $27,000 of winnings from an Arkansas gambling trip in 1960. One of the Weenie Beenie’s claims to fame is being “home of the original half-smoke."

The restaurant was also commemorated in the song “Weenie Beenie” by the Foo Fighters – inspired by frontman Dave Grohl’s childhood in the Northern Virginia region.

This year’s Summer Reading Challenge theme is “Food for Thought” - register on the Arlington County Library app to track your progress!

Dorothy Hamm: Speaking OutDorothy Hamm was born in 1919 in Caroline County, Virginia. The only school that accepted Afri...
06/03/2021

Dorothy Hamm: Speaking Out

Dorothy Hamm was born in 1919 in Caroline County, Virginia. The only school that accepted African-American students was six miles away from her home, and in 1926 her family moved to Fairfax County where the children could attend elementary school. When Hamm graduated from primary school, the family found that there was no accessible junior high or high school for African-American students. Because her mother was a government employee, Dorothy attended secondary schools in Washington, D.C., and went on to enroll in Miner Teacher’s College.

Hamm married Edward Leslie Hamm, Sr., in 1942 and the couple moved to Arlington in 1950, where they raised their three children. In 1954, the Supreme Court ruled segregation illegal in the public schools in Brown vs. Board of Education. In 1956, the Hamms became plaintiffs in the first civil action case filed to integrate the Arlington Public School system. When no action had been taken a year after the suit was filed, Dorothy and her husband took their oldest son, Edward Leslie, Jr., to enroll at Stratford Junior High School, and were not allowed to admit him to the school.

A few days after the opening day of the school year in September 1957, crosses were burned on the lawns of two Arlington families and the Calloway United Methodist Church. The church was a central location for desegregation organizers.

On January 19, 1959, Senator Harry F. Byrd’s policy of statewide “massive resistance” was outlawed by the Virginia Supreme Court. On February 2, 1959, Ronald Deskins, Michael Jones, Lance Newman, and Gloria Thompson were enrolled in Stratford Junior High. Hamm’s sons entered Stratford later that year.

In 1960, Hamm was a plaintiff in a court action to eliminate the pupil placement form, which was used to exclusively assign African-American students to certain schools to get around the Supreme Court’s ruling on desegregation. In 1961, Hamm was a plaintiff in a court action to integrate the athletic program of the Arlington Public Schools. Hamm’s son had been barred from participating in Stratford’s wrestling program because of the physical contact between Black and white students. As a result of the court action, discrimination in Arlington athletic programs was declared to be illegal.

In 1963, Hamm was the plaintiff in a civil action case to eliminate the poll tax and remove the race designation from public forms and voting records in Arlington County. The same year, she initiated legal action and helped to organize picketing efforts in protest of segregation of Arlington’s theaters. Along with four other protesters, Hamm was arrested for picketing at the Glebe Theater. Their efforts were ultimately successful, and Hamm and her son Edward Leslie, Jr., became the first African-American customers to be admitted to the theater.

Hamm continued her political activism as an officer of elections in the County for more than 27 years and worked with the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE). She and her husband also participated in the 1963 March on Washington and the Poor People’s March on Washington in 1968.

Hamm passed away in 2004, but her legacy in Arlington lives on.

You might have dropped your mail off at the post office in Clarendon before, but did you know its history goes back near...
06/01/2021

You might have dropped your mail off at the post office in Clarendon before, but did you know its history goes back nearly 85 years? #TimeTravelTuesday🎛️ 🛫

This post office building was the first federal building constructed in Arlington. In May 1937 there was a large celebration held as the first cornerstone was laid on the site, including a 40-float parade. The stone was also laid with the same trowel used to place the foundational stones of the Capitol building and the Washington Monument. The branch opened in December of that same year, with several signature features in the Georgian Revival style.

Land for the Clarendon post office had been purchased the year prior, in 1936, and this new outpost consolidated several separate postal services that had previously existed around the County. This consolidation coincided with two major developments in Arlington: the gradual urbanization of the County and, in 1935, the standardization of Arlington’s street names, which allowed for more streamlined mail delivery.

In these historic photos from 1998, 1971, and their counterparts in 2021, much about the existing post office building is the same, while development around Clarendon has greatly changed the surrounding landscape.

To learn more about the Arlington Post Office, check out the Arlington Historic Preservation Programs blog post linked in our bio.

05/31/2021

All Library locations are closed today, Monday May 31, for Memorial Day.

The History of Arlington’s Logo and SealArlington is currently in the process of changing its iconography. Let's take a ...
05/27/2021

The History of Arlington’s Logo and Seal

Arlington is currently in the process of changing its iconography. Let's take a look back at the previous versions of the Arlington Logo as the County begins the process of updating its visual identity.

Arlington County was formally designated in 1920, changing its name from Alexandria County in order to distinguish itself from the nearby City of Alexandria. The County initially used the Virginia state seal in official documents, which depicts the Roman goddess Virtus conquering Tyranny. It is accompanied by Virginia's state motto, “Sic Semper Tyrannis,” or “Thus Always to Tyrants.”

Arlington House

Around the mid-1960s, Arlington began using an unofficial County seal. However, the Commonwealth’s Attorney decided that the County Board did not have the authority to adopt a seal. The County Board subsequently authorized the use of a visual signature on documentation, but in 1969 declined to make it a seal based on this legal guidance. Because of this designation, then-County Manager Vernon Ford described the seal as a “decorative medallion.”

The unofficial seal featured Arlington House and the date 1801 in later versions. This was contested by Arlington history expert Eleanor Templeman. The date was chosen to represent the formal establishment of the County of Alexandria, but Templeman argued that it could be incorrectly interpreted as the date of construction of Arlington House, which commenced in 1802. The 1801 date prevailed, however, remaining on the County seal into the 1980s.

The main image on the seal, Arlington House, was the longtime home of Robert E. Lee, leader of the Confederate Army. The building was constructed by slave labor for George Washington Parke Custis, who was George Washington’s step-grandson and Lee’s father-in-law. After the start of the Civil War, the Lee family fled and the property was used by Union troops as a burial site, and the location would eventually become part of Arlington National Cemetery.

Since 1972, the site has formally been known as “Arlington House, the Robert E. Lee Memorial,” reinstating its ties to the Confederate leader. In 2020, legislation was proposed to remove Lee’s name from the historical site, citing the erasure of Black Americans who lived in slavery on the property.

The "A" Logo

In 1976, the County began using an unofficial logo in the form of a stylized “A,” with Arlington House also appearing on this image. The logo was designed by Susan Neighbors, a professional illustrator from Arlington, who produced five designs based on County guidance. These options were then voted on by the public at ballot boxes placed at the County libraries, and the “A” logo won the contest.

County Flag Design

In September 1982, the County set out to adopt an official design for the County flag, and the County Board adopted a resolution for a flag design competition and a Flag Selection Panel to choose the design. In March of 1983, the County released a call for entries for the design of the flag to the public. Design requirements included the use of blue and white colors, and the words “Arlington County, Virginia,” as well as “1920.”

One hundred and ten people submitted designs for the contest, and Harvey J. Wilcox was selected as the winner in April of 1983. Wilcox, a deputy general counsel for the Navy, had no formal design experience and came up with the design while homebound with the flu. His imagery reflected the County’s unofficial logo and seal with a depiction of Arlington House, accompanied by a white ring and sprays of dogwoods underneath. Yellow was chosen as the background color for the flag.

After consulting with the Virginia Attorney General, who issued a different opinion than the one about 20 years prior, the County’s authority to have a flag was dependent on the County having a seal. So, Wilcox’s design then became the County seal, which would subsequently be presented on the County flag.

The inclusion of “1920” from the original design rules was also dropped for the final iteration, due in part to the issues that were raised by Templeman decades before. One of the issues was Arlington had multiple dates in its history that could be considered equally significant in its history. The County seal and flag were officially adopted on June 18, 1983.

The Future of the Logo

The next major step in Arlington’s formal iconography was when the County created and adopted an official logo in 2004. The logo came along with a redesign of the County website that same year and was designed by the D.C. office of Gensler Studio 585. Focus groups were held with design professionals, members of the business community, and members of the general public.

The resulting design was adopted in the summer of 2004, and, like the County seal, included a stylized representation of Arlington House, but the design drew some criticism. In a public poll of more than 1,000 responses conducted by the Arlington Sun Gazette, 81 percent opposed the new design, 15 percent supported it and 3 percent voted, 'it's OK, I guess.’ In October 2004, a petition was circulated calling for the removal of the logo, and it “even inspired a piece of folk art by an artist, who rendered the new logo in dead cicada shells."

The County seal and logo were then used concurrently, but for different outlined purposes. In general, the seal is used for items relating to the County Board and for more permanent items (such as the County flag, permanent signage, and certificates).

The logo is considered a marketing sign and is used on departmental materials (such as County vehicles, and general correspondence). In 2007, the County sought public comment and issued an update to the seal due to persistent inconsistencies in its rendering. The update kept the same imagery on the seal, but restored the original “Arlington blue” and refined it for online use.

In September 2020, the County announced that it would adopt a process to develop a new logo and seal, moving away from imagery related to Arlington House in County iconography. In January 2021, a Logo Review Panel was assembled to review concept submissions from the community, and in April announced five options selected from a pool of more than 250 ideas.

Stay tuned to the County’s homepage to submit your art for the next round of logo design submissions.

Address

1015 N Quincy St
Arlington, VA
22201

Opening Hours

Monday 12:00 - 21:00
Tuesday 12:00 - 21:00
Wednesday 12:00 - 21:00
Thursday 12:00 - 19:00
Friday 12:00 - 17:00
Saturday 12:00 - 17:00
Sunday 12:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(703) 228-5990

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Arlington VA Public Library posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Arlington VA Public Library:

Videos

Our Story

Arlington Public Library promises to:

• inspire and quench your thirst to know. • encourage you to ask why and why not? • embrace inclusion and diverse points of view. • be a wellspring for ideas, for conversation, for disagreement, for enlightenment. • create opportunities for an increased understanding: of our world, of our community and of each other.

We will do all of this with good will, humor and kindness. Through books and community programs. Within our walls and outside in the community.

We are here for you.

Nearby government services


Other Government Organizations in Arlington

Show All