Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR)

Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) SIGAR provides independent & objective oversight of Afghanistan reconstruction. To report fraud, waste & abuse, contact us:

Afghanistan: 070010300
United States: 1-866-329-8893
Email: [email protected]

Congress created the Office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) to provide independent and objective oversight of Afghanistan reconstruction projects and activities. Under the authority of Section 1229 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (P.L. 110-181), SIGAR conducts audits and investigations to: 1) promote efficiency and effectivenes

Congress created the Office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) to provide independent and objective oversight of Afghanistan reconstruction projects and activities. Under the authority of Section 1229 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (P.L. 110-181), SIGAR conducts audits and investigations to: 1) promote efficiency and effectivenes

Operating as usual

According to the #UnitedNations, the number of #Afghans requiring humanitarian assistance in 2021 has reached approximat...
12/16/2021

According to the #UnitedNations, the number of #Afghans requiring humanitarian assistance in 2021 has reached approximately half of #Afghanistan’s total estimated population. This figure is nearly double that of 2020, and a six-fold increase compared to four years ago.

In January 2021 — well before the Taliban takeover and resulting economic collapse — the United Nations said Afghanistan’s Humanitarian Response Plan for 2021 would already require an additional $1.3 billion to address the growing number of Afghans in need of humanitarian aid, including around 10 million children, stemming from a combination of ongoing conflict, drought, poverty, and #COVID19.

https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf#page=17

AFP Photo by Farshad Usyan
Follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ for daily updates.

According to the #UnitedNations, the number of #Afghans requiring humanitarian assistance in 2021 has reached approximately half of #Afghanistan’s total estimated population. This figure is nearly double that of 2020, and a six-fold increase compared to four years ago.

In January 2021 — well before the Taliban takeover and resulting economic collapse — the United Nations said Afghanistan’s Humanitarian Response Plan for 2021 would already require an additional $1.3 billion to address the growing number of Afghans in need of humanitarian aid, including around 10 million children, stemming from a combination of ongoing conflict, drought, poverty, and #COVID19.

https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf#page=17

AFP Photo by Farshad Usyan
Follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ for daily updates.

Following the U.S. suspension of #Afghanistan’s foreign assets, the United Nations Secretary General’s special represent...
12/09/2021

Following the U.S. suspension of #Afghanistan’s foreign assets, the United Nations Secretary General’s special representative for Afghanistan said, “The understandable purpose is to deny these funds to the de facto Taliban administration. The inevitable effect, however, will be a severe economic downturn that could throw many more millions into poverty and hunger, may generate a massive wave of refugees from Afghanistan, and indeed set Afghanistan back for generations.”

Read more here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf#page=12

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ

Following the U.S. suspension of #Afghanistan’s foreign assets, the United Nations Secretary General’s special representative for Afghanistan said, “The understandable purpose is to deny these funds to the de facto Taliban administration. The inevitable effect, however, will be a severe economic downturn that could throw many more millions into poverty and hunger, may generate a massive wave of refugees from Afghanistan, and indeed set Afghanistan back for generations.”

Read more here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf#page=12

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ

On September 23, 2021, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 4350, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for ...
12/02/2021

On September 23, 2021, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 4350, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2022. The bill and accompanying committee report direct SIGAR to conduct an evaluation of ANDSF performance between February 2020 and August 2021.

SIGAR is required to address:
• why the ANDSF proved unable to defend Afghanistan from the Taliban following the withdrawal of U.S. military personnel
• the impact the withdrawal of U.S. military personnel had on the performance of the ANDSF
• elements of the U.S. military’s efforts since 2001 to provide training, assistance, and advising to the ANDSF that impacted the ANDSF’s performance following the U.S. military withdrawal
• current status of U.S.-provided equipment to the ANDSF
• current status of U.S.-trained ANDSF personnel
• any other matters SIGAR deems appropriate

Read more here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf#page=17

Photo By U.S. Air Force TSgt Jonathan Snyder
Follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ for daily updates.

On September 23, 2021, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 4350, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2022. The bill and accompanying committee report direct SIGAR to conduct an evaluation of ANDSF performance between February 2020 and August 2021.

SIGAR is required to address:
• why the ANDSF proved unable to defend Afghanistan from the Taliban following the withdrawal of U.S. military personnel
• the impact the withdrawal of U.S. military personnel had on the performance of the ANDSF
• elements of the U.S. military’s efforts since 2001 to provide training, assistance, and advising to the ANDSF that impacted the ANDSF’s performance following the U.S. military withdrawal
• current status of U.S.-provided equipment to the ANDSF
• current status of U.S.-trained ANDSF personnel
• any other matters SIGAR deems appropriate

Read more here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf#page=17

Photo By U.S. Air Force TSgt Jonathan Snyder
Follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ for daily updates.

See U.S. troop levels in #Afghanistan from 2002-2021 in the figure below. On January 15, 2021, the number of U.S. troops...
11/24/2021

See U.S. troop levels in #Afghanistan from 2002-2021 in the figure below.

On January 15, 2021, the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan was 2,500; the number dropped to 650 by late June/early July as U.S. forces withdrew; peaked at 5,784 in late August as the U.S. deployed forces to assist with the Noncombatant Evacuation Operation; and went to zero on August 30, 2021.
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf#page=14

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ

See U.S. troop levels in #Afghanistan from 2002-2021 in the figure below.

On January 15, 2021, the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan was 2,500; the number dropped to 650 by late June/early July as U.S. forces withdrew; peaked at 5,784 in late August as the U.S. deployed forces to assist with the Noncombatant Evacuation Operation; and went to zero on August 30, 2021.
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf#page=14

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ

The speed with which the Taliban completed their military reconquest of #Afghanistan came as a shock not only to U.S. mi...
11/18/2021

The speed with which the Taliban completed their military reconquest of #Afghanistan came as a shock not only to U.S. military and civilian leaders and to Coalition partners, but also to #Afghans and even the Taliban.

The ANDSF disintegrated quickly and completely, despite allegedly superior force numbers, training, and equipment—including a capable air force—compared to the Taliban. “How did we miss the collapse of an army and a government that big, that fast, and [in] only 11 days?” General Milley asked during a Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC) hearing on September 28, 2021.

SIGAR is conducting a more thorough examination of this question at the request of Congress, but the agency and other observers have raised some possible factors. Read about these eight factors here:
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf#page=15

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ

The speed with which the Taliban completed their military reconquest of #Afghanistan came as a shock not only to U.S. military and civilian leaders and to Coalition partners, but also to #Afghans and even the Taliban.

The ANDSF disintegrated quickly and completely, despite allegedly superior force numbers, training, and equipment—including a capable air force—compared to the Taliban. “How did we miss the collapse of an army and a government that big, that fast, and [in] only 11 days?” General Milley asked during a Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC) hearing on September 28, 2021.

SIGAR is conducting a more thorough examination of this question at the request of Congress, but the agency and other observers have raised some possible factors. Read about these eight factors here:
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf#page=15

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ

On the other hand, the value of #Afghan exports to #Pakistan increased by 142% from August 16 to September 30, as compar...
11/12/2021

On the other hand, the value of #Afghan exports to #Pakistan increased by 142% from August 16 to September 30, as compared to the period July 1–August 15. A customs official reportedly attributed this increase in trade from #Afghanistan to a decline in the corrupt activities at the border crossings, such as government officials extorting drivers to pass into Pakistan with their goods, a practice that had inhibited trade.

Read more about trade in #Afghanistan here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr.pdf#page=139

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ

On the other hand, the value of #Afghan exports to #Pakistan increased by 142% from August 16 to September 30, as compared to the period July 1–August 15. A customs official reportedly attributed this increase in trade from #Afghanistan to a decline in the corrupt activities at the border crossings, such as government officials extorting drivers to pass into Pakistan with their goods, a practice that had inhibited trade.

Read more about trade in #Afghanistan here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr.pdf#page=139

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ

Prior to #COVID19, an estimated 55% of #Afghans livedbelow the poverty line (defined as 2,064 afghanis per person per mo...
11/03/2021

Prior to #COVID19, an estimated 55% of #Afghans lived
below the poverty line (defined as 2,064 afghanis per person per month or around $1 in daily income), according to the most recent household survey data, an increase from 34% in 2008.

In 2020, during the early months of the pandemic, the World Bank projected that #Afghanistan’s poverty levels could rise to as high as 73% due to the socioeconomic effects of COVID-19.

United Nations Development Programme projects that by mid-2022, poverty levels in #Afghanistan could increase by between seven and 25 percentage points, compared to 2020.

Continue reading here:
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr.pdf#page=137

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ

Prior to #COVID19, an estimated 55% of #Afghans lived
below the poverty line (defined as 2,064 afghanis per person per month or around $1 in daily income), according to the most recent household survey data, an increase from 34% in 2008.

In 2020, during the early months of the pandemic, the World Bank projected that #Afghanistan’s poverty levels could rise to as high as 73% due to the socioeconomic effects of COVID-19.

United Nations Development Programme projects that by mid-2022, poverty levels in #Afghanistan could increase by between seven and 25 percentage points, compared to 2020.

Continue reading here:
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr.pdf#page=137

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ

🚨 Today, SIGAR released its 53rd Quarterly Report to Congress, examining the aftermath of the U.S. withdrawal, the colla...
10/29/2021

🚨 Today, SIGAR released its 53rd Quarterly Report to Congress, examining the aftermath of the U.S. withdrawal, the collapse of the #Afghan government and security forces, and risks to the Afghan people.

📍 Read the full report here:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr.pdf

📍 Status of Funds Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-funding.pdf

📍 Security Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf

📍 Economic and Social Development Section:
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf

📍 Governance Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-governance.pdf

📍 Counternarcotics: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-governance.pdf#page=12

Check out @SIGARHQ on Twitter for more Quarterly Report highlights.

🚨 Today, SIGAR released its 53rd Quarterly Report to Congress, examining the aftermath of the U.S. withdrawal, the collapse of the #Afghan government and security forces, and risks to the Afghan people.

📍 Read the full report here:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr.pdf

📍 Status of Funds Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-funding.pdf

📍 Security Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf

📍 Economic and Social Development Section:
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf

📍 Governance Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-governance.pdf

📍 Counternarcotics: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-governance.pdf#page=12

Check out @SIGARHQ on Twitter for more Quarterly Report highlights.

10/05/2021
Development Assistance During Conflict: Lessons from Afghanistan

🚨Happening Tomorrow: Special Inspector General John F. Sopko to testify before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on International Development, International Organizations and Global Corporate Social Impact.

Topic: Development Assistance During Conflict: Lessons from Afghanistan

The hearing will be held tomorrow starting at 1:00PM Eastern.

Development Assistance During Conflict: Lessons from Afghanistan October 6, 2021 1:00 PM Subcommittee: International Development, International Organizations and Global Corporate Social Impact WITNESSES:              The Honorable John F. Sopko Inspector General Special Inspector General...

SIGAR’s new Lessons Learned report, What We Need to Learn: Lessons from Twenty Years of #Afghanistan Reconstruction, exa...
08/17/2021

SIGAR’s new Lessons Learned report, What We Need to Learn: Lessons from Twenty Years of #Afghanistan Reconstruction, examines the past two decades of the U.S. reconstruction effort in Afghanistan.

There have been bright spots—such as lower child mortality rates, increases in per capita GDP, and increased literacy rates. But after spending 20 years and $145 billion trying to rebuild #Afghanistan, the U.S. government has many lessons it needs to learn.

Read the full report here:
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/lessonslearned/SIGAR-21-46-LL.pdf

View the interactive version here:
https://www.sigar.mil/interactive-reports/what-we-need-to-learn/index.html

SIGAR’s new Lessons Learned report, What We Need to Learn: Lessons from Twenty Years of #Afghanistan Reconstruction, examines the past two decades of the U.S. reconstruction effort in Afghanistan.

There have been bright spots—such as lower child mortality rates, increases in per capita GDP, and increased literacy rates. But after spending 20 years and $145 billion trying to rebuild #Afghanistan, the U.S. government has many lessons it needs to learn.

Read the full report here:
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/lessonslearned/SIGAR-21-46-LL.pdf

View the interactive version here:
https://www.sigar.mil/interactive-reports/what-we-need-to-learn/index.html

As of July 1, 2021, the number of confirmed #COVID19 cases had reached 120,216, with 4,962 deaths. Yet, a test-positivit...
08/10/2021

As of July 1, 2021, the number of confirmed #COVID19 cases had reached 120,216, with 4,962 deaths. Yet, a test-positivity rate of 42% suggests the actual spread, case numbers, and deaths are far higher. Afghan public-health officials estimated that the Delta variant is responsible for approximately 60% of new infections.

Continue reading here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr.pdf#page=155

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ

As of July 1, 2021, the number of confirmed #COVID19 cases had reached 120,216, with 4,962 deaths. Yet, a test-positivity rate of 42% suggests the actual spread, case numbers, and deaths are far higher. Afghan public-health officials estimated that the Delta variant is responsible for approximately 60% of new infections.

Continue reading here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr.pdf#page=155

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ

🚨 Today, SIGAR released its 52nd Quarterly Report to Congress, examining security conditions in #Afghanistan, rise in CO...
07/29/2021

🚨 Today, SIGAR released its 52nd Quarterly Report to Congress, examining security conditions in #Afghanistan, rise in COVID-19 infection rates, increase in opium-poppy cultivation, and much more.

Read the full report here:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr.pdf

Status of Funds Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-funding.pdf

Security Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-security.pdf

Economic and Social Development Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-economic.pdf

Governance Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-governance.pdf

Counternarcotics: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-governance.pdf#page=13

Check out @SIGARHQ on Twitter for more Quarterly Report highlights.

🚨 Today, SIGAR released its 52nd Quarterly Report to Congress, examining security conditions in #Afghanistan, rise in COVID-19 infection rates, increase in opium-poppy cultivation, and much more.

Read the full report here:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr.pdf

Status of Funds Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-funding.pdf

Security Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-security.pdf

Economic and Social Development Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-economic.pdf

Governance Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-governance.pdf

Counternarcotics: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-governance.pdf#page=13

Check out @SIGARHQ on Twitter for more Quarterly Report highlights.

Address

2530 Crystal Dr
Arlington, VA
22202

General information

While this is an open forum, please keep your comments and posts clean.

Telephone

(703) 545-6000

Products

Public Law 110-181 directs SIGAR to submit a quarterly report to Congress. This congressionally mandated report summarizes SIGAR's audits and investigative activities. The report also provides an overview of reconstruction activities in Afghanistan and includes a detailed statement of all obligations, expenditures, and revenues associated with reconstruction. http://www.sigar.mil/quarterlyreports/

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR):

Videos

Nearby government services


Comments

According to the #UnitedNations, the number of #Afghans requiring humanitarian assistance in 2021 has reached approximately half of #Afghanistan’s total estimated population. This figure is nearly double that of 2020, and a six-fold increase compared to four years ago. In January 2021 — well before the Taliban takeover and resulting economic collapse — the United Nations said Afghanistan’s Humanitarian Response Plan for 2021 would already require an additional $1.3 billion to address the growing number of Afghans in need of humanitarian aid, including around 10 million children, stemming from a combination of ongoing conflict, drought, poverty, and #COVID19. https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf#page=17 AFP Photo by Farshad Usyan Follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ for daily updates.
Following the U.S. suspension of #Afghanistan’s foreign assets, the United Nations Secretary General’s special representative for Afghanistan said, “The understandable purpose is to deny these funds to the de facto Taliban administration. The inevitable effect, however, will be a severe economic downturn that could throw many more millions into poverty and hunger, may generate a massive wave of refugees from Afghanistan, and indeed set Afghanistan back for generations.” Read more here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf#page=12 For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ
On September 23, 2021, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 4350, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2022. The bill and accompanying committee report direct SIGAR to conduct an evaluation of ANDSF performance between February 2020 and August 2021. SIGAR is required to address: • why the ANDSF proved unable to defend Afghanistan from the Taliban following the withdrawal of U.S. military personnel • the impact the withdrawal of U.S. military personnel had on the performance of the ANDSF • elements of the U.S. military’s efforts since 2001 to provide training, assistance, and advising to the ANDSF that impacted the ANDSF’s performance following the U.S. military withdrawal • current status of U.S.-provided equipment to the ANDSF • current status of U.S.-trained ANDSF personnel • any other matters SIGAR deems appropriate Read more here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf#page=17 Photo By U.S. Air Force TSgt Jonathan Snyder Follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ for daily updates.
See U.S. troop levels in #Afghanistan from 2002-2021 in the figure below. On January 15, 2021, the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan was 2,500; the number dropped to 650 by late June/early July as U.S. forces withdrew; peaked at 5,784 in late August as the U.S. deployed forces to assist with the Noncombatant Evacuation Operation; and went to zero on August 30, 2021. https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf#page=14 For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ
The speed with which the Taliban completed their military reconquest of #Afghanistan came as a shock not only to U.S. military and civilian leaders and to Coalition partners, but also to #Afghans and even the Taliban. The ANDSF disintegrated quickly and completely, despite allegedly superior force numbers, training, and equipment—including a capable air force—compared to the Taliban. “How did we miss the collapse of an army and a government that big, that fast, and [in] only 11 days?” General Milley asked during a Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC) hearing on September 28, 2021. SIGAR is conducting a more thorough examination of this question at the request of Congress, but the agency and other observers have raised some possible factors. Read about these eight factors here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf#page=15 For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ
On the other hand, the value of #Afghan exports to #Pakistan increased by 142% from August 16 to September 30, as compared to the period July 1–August 15. A customs official reportedly attributed this increase in trade from #Afghanistan to a decline in the corrupt activities at the border crossings, such as government officials extorting drivers to pass into Pakistan with their goods, a practice that had inhibited trade. Read more about trade in #Afghanistan here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr.pdf#page=139 For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ
Prior to #COVID19, an estimated 55% of #Afghans lived below the poverty line (defined as 2,064 afghanis per person per month or around $1 in daily income), according to the most recent household survey data, an increase from 34% in 2008. In 2020, during the early months of the pandemic, the World Bank projected that #Afghanistan’s poverty levels could rise to as high as 73% due to the socioeconomic effects of COVID-19. United Nations Development Programme projects that by mid-2022, poverty levels in #Afghanistan could increase by between seven and 25 percentage points, compared to 2020. Continue reading here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr.pdf#page=137 For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ
🚨 Today, SIGAR released its 53rd Quarterly Report to Congress, examining the aftermath of the U.S. withdrawal, the collapse of the #Afghan government and security forces, and risks to the Afghan people. 📍 Read the full report here:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr.pdf 📍 Status of Funds Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-funding.pdf 📍 Security Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf 📍 Economic and Social Development Section: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf 📍 Governance Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-governance.pdf 📍 Counternarcotics: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-governance.pdf#page=12 Check out @SIGARHQ on Twitter for more Quarterly Report highlights.
🚨Happening Tomorrow: Special Inspector General John F. Sopko to testify before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on International Development, International Organizations and Global Corporate Social Impact. Topic: Development Assistance During Conflict: Lessons from Afghanistan The hearing will be held tomorrow starting at 1:00PM Eastern.
SIGAR’s new Lessons Learned report, What We Need to Learn: Lessons from Twenty Years of #Afghanistan Reconstruction, examines the past two decades of the U.S. reconstruction effort in Afghanistan. There have been bright spots—such as lower child mortality rates, increases in per capita GDP, and increased literacy rates. But after spending 20 years and $145 billion trying to rebuild #Afghanistan, the U.S. government has many lessons it needs to learn. Read the full report here:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/lessonslearned/SIGAR-21-46-LL.pdf View the interactive version here: https://www.sigar.mil/interactive-reports/what-we-need-to-learn/index.html
As of July 1, 2021, the number of confirmed #COVID19 cases had reached 120,216, with 4,962 deaths. Yet, a test-positivity rate of 42% suggests the actual spread, case numbers, and deaths are far higher. Afghan public-health officials estimated that the Delta variant is responsible for approximately 60% of new infections. Continue reading here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr.pdf#page=155 For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter @SIGARHQ
🚨 Today, SIGAR released its 52nd Quarterly Report to Congress, examining security conditions in #Afghanistan, rise in COVID-19 infection rates, increase in opium-poppy cultivation, and much more. Read the full report here:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr.pdf Status of Funds Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-funding.pdf Security Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-security.pdf Economic and Social Development Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-economic.pdf Governance Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-governance.pdf Counternarcotics: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-governance.pdf#page=13 Check out @SIGARHQ on Twitter for more Quarterly Report highlights.