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Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR)

Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) SIGAR provides independent & objective oversight of Afghanistan reconstruction.

Congress created the Office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) to provide independent and objective oversight of Afghanistan reconstruction projects and activities. Under the authority of Section 1229 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (P.L. 110-181), SIGAR conducts audits and investigations to: 1) promote efficiency and effectivenes

Congress created the Office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) to provide independent and objective oversight of Afghanistan reconstruction projects and activities. Under the authority of Section 1229 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (P.L. 110-181), SIGAR conducts audits and investigations to: 1) promote efficiency and effectivenes

Operating as usual

The Taliban’s repressive actions and its inability to effectively govern or provide services threaten to return Afghan c...
01/05/2023

The Taliban’s repressive actions and its inability to effectively govern or provide services threaten to return Afghan civil society to where it was when the Taliban were in power in the 1990s: “…worse off than almost any country in the world.”

Read summaries of the condition of women and girls, journalists and media, education, health care, and NGOs in Afghanistan under Taliban rule from 1996 to 2001, as well as the reported U.S. investment and improvements in those areas from late 2001 to August 2021 here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/evaluations/SIGAR-23-02-IP.pdf#page=11

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter

International donor funding has been pivotal in preventing a collapse of the Afghan health sector by ensuring essential ...
12/29/2022

International donor funding has been pivotal in preventing a collapse of the Afghan health sector by ensuring essential staff continue to be paid. UNOCHA reported that the Afghanistan Humanitarian Fund and Central Emergency Reserve Fund helped ensure that some 7.7 million people received sustained health services in 2022, including three million women and girls who
received primary, reproductive, and maternal health support, contributing to reduced excess maternal, neonatal, and child deaths.

While humanitarian actors have kept Afghanistan’s fragile health care system afloat, UN and NGO reports note that this cannot be not a long-term solution. “Humanitarian organizations and funding mechanisms will never be a substitute for a well-functioning public health system. Afghans urgently need a health care system that meets their needs,” wrote Médecins Sans Frontières.

Continue reading here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-10-30qr.pdf#page=133

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter

UNHCR Afghanistan photo: Student midwives in UNHCR’s two-year training program in Daykundi Province.

12/21/2022
www.sigar.mil

UNICEF estimates that over three million girls who previously attended secondary school have been denied their right to education in the year since the Taliban took power. Close to half, they said, are unlikely to return should schools reopen. In 2019, girls made up 38% of the estimated 9.2 million Afghan students. Even before the political transition, 4.2 million children were out of school, 60% of them girls.

UNICEF estimates that the Taliban ban on girls’ secondary education
may end up costing the Afghan economy up to $5.4 billion in lifetime earnings potential.

Continue reading here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-10-30qr.pdf#page=130

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter

UNICEF photo by Mohammad Haya Burhan.

All 34 provinces in Afghanistan are facing crisis or emergency levels of acute food insecurity.An estimated 18.9 million...
12/15/2022

All 34 provinces in Afghanistan are facing crisis or emergency levels of acute food insecurity.

An estimated 18.9 million Afghans faced potentially life-threatening levels of hunger—including nearly six million facing near-famine conditions—from June to November 2022.

Citing the most recent Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) study, World Food Program reported in September that 4.7 million children and pregnant and lactating women are at risk of acute malnutrition in 2022, and 3.9 million children are acutely malnourished.

According to these reports, nearly half of the population suffers from high levels of acute food insecurity—food insecurity at the Crisis, Emergency, or Catastrophe (famine) levels—requiring urgent action to save their lives, reduce food gaps, and protect livelihoods.

Continue reading: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf#page=5

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter

Stability Policing in Afghanistan: A missed opportunity?Watch IG Sopko discuss the Police in Conflict report tomorrow at...
12/12/2022
Stability Policing in Afghanistan: a missed opportunity?

Stability Policing in Afghanistan: A missed opportunity?

Watch IG Sopko discuss the Police in Conflict report tomorrow at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

Date: Tuesday, December 13th
Time: 1:40pm – 3:00pm EST
Register for the event in-person or online here:

Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction and NATO Stability Policing Centre of Excellence discuss "Police in Conflict"

🚨 IG Sopko signed a cooperation agreement with leadership of NATO’s Stability Policing Centre of Excellence (), marking ...
12/08/2022

🚨 IG Sopko signed a cooperation agreement with leadership of NATO’s Stability Policing Centre of Excellence (), marking continued partnership. Past efforts led to Police in Conflict: Lessons from U.S. Experience in .

IG Sopko signed the agreement with Col. Giuseppe De Magistris, Director of , based in Vincenza, Italy, during a meeting at SIGAR headquarters in Arlington, Virginia, on December 5th.

On Tuesday, IG Sopko and Col. De Magistris discussed policing in conflict-affected settings at the event, Filling the Security Gap: International Approaches to Policing in Conflict. Watch here:
https://www.usip.org/events/filling-security-gap-international-approaches-policing-conflict

🚨 Happening Now: Filling the Security Gap: International Approaches to Policing in Conflict. IG Sopko is speaking at the...
12/06/2022
Filling the Security Gap: International Approaches to Policing in Conflict

🚨 Happening Now: Filling the Security Gap: International Approaches to Policing in Conflict.

IG Sopko is speaking at the United States Institute of Peace () to discuss past international policing and reform efforts and how they can be applied to current and emerging conflicts.

Watch here:

Join USIP for a conversation that will explore how past international policing and reform efforts make the case for specialized policing interventions, what these specialized models look like in practice, and how they could be applied to current and emerging conflicts.

🚨 Happening Tomorrow: IG Sopko to speak at the United States Institute of Peace () to discuss past international policin...
12/05/2022
Filling the Security Gap: International Approaches to Policing in Conflict

🚨 Happening Tomorrow: IG Sopko to speak at the United States Institute of Peace () to discuss past international policing and reform efforts and how they can be applied to current and emerging conflicts.

Event: Filling the Security Gap: International Approaches to Policing in Conflict.

Date and Time: Tuesday, December 6th from 10:00-11:30 am EST

For more information and to register for the event, click here:

Join USIP for a conversation that will explore how past international policing and reform efforts make the case for specialized policing interventions, what these specialized models look like in practice, and how they could be applied to current and emerging conflicts.

12/02/2022
www.sigar.mil

🚨 U.S. Navy Reserves Officer Indicted on Conspiracy, Bribery, Money Laundering Charges related to Alleged Visa Fraud Scheme.

The Indictment alleges that Jeromy Pittmann, currently serving as officer in U.S. Navy Reserves, was paid bribes to write, sign, and falsely verify letters of recommendation to for Afghans seeking Special Immigrant Visas (SIVs).

“This indictment alleges crimes that disregarded the thousands of Afghan translators who helped the United States and are still trying to get out of Afghanistan," said John F. Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. “His abuse of his position of trust shows no regard for qualified Afghans asking for help, or national security implications when vetting foreign nationals.”

Exclusion from U.S.-Taliban talks and the subsequent signing of the February 2020 agreement was a blow to the credibilit...
12/01/2022

Exclusion from U.S.-Taliban talks and the subsequent signing of the February 2020 agreement was a blow to the credibility of the Afghan government. Despite these developments, the Afghan government insisted during intra-Afghan negotiations that the Taliban be integrated into the Republic. As Fatima Gailani, a member of the Republic’s negotiating team told SIGAR, after 6 months of negotiations, it was clear to her that not everyone, but most people close to President Ghani, were delusional because they were unwilling to compromise.

President Ghani was isolated from voices and opinions beyond his handpicked inner circle of confidants. Eventually, this circumstance contributed to the unraveling of Afghanistan’s loosely knit government.

Continue reading here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/evaluations/SIGAR-23-05-IP.pdf#page=25

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter

NEW 🚨 SIGAR released its latest evaluation report, Why the Afghan Government Collapsed. The United States sought to buil...
11/17/2022

NEW 🚨 SIGAR released its latest evaluation report, Why the Afghan Government Collapsed.

The United States sought to build stable, democratic, representative, gender-sensitive, and accountable Afghan governance institutions. It failed.

SIGAR identified six factors that contributed to the collapse of the Afghan government:
- The Afghan government failed to recognize that the United States would actually leave;
- The exclusion of the Afghan government from U.S.-Taliban talks weakened and undermined it;
- Despite its weakened position, the Afghan government insisted that the Taliban be effectively integrated into the Republic, making progress on peace negotiations difficult;
- The Taliban were unwilling to compromise;
- Former Afghan President Ashraf Ghani governed through a highly selective, narrow circle of loyalists, destabilizing the government at a critical juncture;
- The Afghan government’s high level of centralization, endemic corruption, and struggle to attain legitimacy were long-term contributors to its eventual collapse.

Read here:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/evaluations/SIGAR-23-05-IP.pdf

For daily update, follow SIGAR on Twitter

Restrictions on girls’ education have economic costs, too, and are likely to deepen Afghanistan’s economic crisis and le...
11/10/2022

Restrictions on girls’ education have economic costs, too, and are likely to deepen Afghanistan’s economic crisis and lead to greater insecurity, poverty, and isolation, according to the UN.

UNICEF estimates that the Taliban ban on girls’ secondary education
may end up costing the Afghan economy up to $5.4 billion in lifetime earnings potential.

Continue reading here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-10-30qr.pdf#page=130

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter

🚨 Today, SIGAR released its 57th Quarterly Report to Congress, examining the effects of a contracting economy and the co...
11/02/2022

🚨 Today, SIGAR released its 57th Quarterly Report to Congress, examining the effects of a contracting economy and the continuing humanitarian crisis; the Taliban’s international relations; and the impacts of restrictions on the rights of women and girls, and on the media.

📍 Read the full report here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-10-30qr.pdf

📍 Status of Funds Section: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-10-30qr-section3-funding.pdf

📍 Security and Governance Section: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf

📍 Economic and Social Development Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter
AFP Photo

Grazie to the Carabinieri Officer’s School for hosting the  report conference by SIGAR and the  Stability Policing Centr...
10/28/2022

Grazie to the Carabinieri Officer’s School for hosting the report conference by SIGAR and the Stability Policing Centre of Excellence last week.

IG Sopko: “This report is unique since it is the only one of our 12 lessons learned reports where we partnered with another agency to examine U.S. and international police assistance activities, including conducting joint fieldwork in Afghanistan”
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/speeches/SIGAR_Stability_Policing_Conf_Remarks_2022-10-20.pdf

With women and girls largely excluded from employment opportunities and access to education, local media reported more f...
10/20/2022

With women and girls largely excluded from employment opportunities and access to education, local media reported more forced marriages, including the marriage of underage girls last quarter. UNAMA’s June human-rights report noted several instances of women and girls being beaten and jailed by Taliban authorities for resisting forced marriage, despite a December decree allowing women the right to refuse marriage.

UNAMA said in July that domestic violence victims face a similar lack of legal protection, as the Taliban have not processed any charges of r**e, assault and battery, forced marriage, or child marriage through a formal court system.

Read more here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-07-30qr.pdf#page=18

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter

Data from Pakistan show that Afghanistan’s imports from Pakistan between July 2021 and May 2022 decreased by 38% versus ...
10/05/2022

Data from Pakistan show that Afghanistan’s imports from Pakistan between July 2021 and May 2022 decreased by 38% versus the same year-ago period. On the other hand, Afghanistan’s exports to Pakistan between July 2021 and May 2022 increased by around 34%. As a result, Afghanistan enjoys a trade surplus of $112.5 million in absolute terms with Pakistan.

By World Bank estimates, overall border traffic into and out of
Afghanistan decreased 40–50% year-on-year since the Taliban took over
the country in August 2021. According to the State Department, political tensions, border security issues, criminal activity (including narcotics trade and human smuggling), and refugee flows contribute to limited transit and trade with Afghanistan’s neighbors.

Read more here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-07-30qr-section3-economic.pdf#page=16

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter

According to the United Nations, the Taliban intensified their diplomatic and economic interactions with regional neighb...
09/30/2022

According to the United Nations, the Taliban intensified their diplomatic and economic interactions with regional neighbors last quarter. While none have formally recognized the Taliban as a government to date, some states have accepted Taliban diplomats.

Pakistan: There have been some disagreements between Pakistan and the Taliban since the Taliban took power in August 2021, centering on Taliban compliance with its February 29, 2020, U.S.-Taliban agreement commitment to prevent any terrorists from using Afghan soil to attack the United States or its allies, including Pakistan.

China: On March 24, China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi met with acting Deputy Prime Minister Mullah Baradar and acting Foreign Minister Amir Khan Muttaqi in Kabul. The ministers reportedly discussed Afghanistan’s mining sector and its potential role in China’s Belt and Road Initiative. China also hosted a regional conference in central China with Afghanistan and its neighbors in March.

Iran: Iran confirmed on April 26 that it accepted three Taliban diplomats in the Afghan embassy in Tehran. However, Iran said official recognition cannot precede Taliban formation of an inclusive government. Iran also suspended consular services in Afghanistan earlier in April.

India: On July 7, India reestablished a diplomatic presence in Kabul by reopening its embassy. Earlier, the Taliban on June 2 hosted officials from the Indian Ministry of External Affairs for the first time since the Taliban takeover. The meeting reportedly focused on diplomatic relations, as well as trade and humanitarian aid.

Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan: Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan have called for increased engagement with the Taliban; both countries have significant economic interests in Afghanistan.

Tajikistan: Tajikistan appears wary of the Taliban and has been the only neighboring country to publicly oppose the Taliban’s return to power. Nonetheless, Tajikistan has kept its embassy open in Kabul, engaged with the Taliban at the Chinese-led foreign ministers conference on March 30, and has provided Afghanistan with electricity.

For more information, click the link: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-07-30qr.pdf#page=83

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter

09/22/2022
www.sigar.mil

From SIGAR's July Quarterly Report to Congress:

The Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), citing open-source reporting, said the Taliban regime facilitated an indefinite ceasefire agreement between Tehrik-e Taliban Pakistan (TTP)— also known as the Pakistani Taliban— and the Pakistan government on May 31.

DIA said the Taliban likely did this “to prove to the international community that it is a reliable partner” and “almost certainly to reduce tensions with Islamabad.”

Pakistan has pressed the Taliban to curtail TTP cross-border operations from Afghanistan in light of mounting attacks on Pakistani security forces. But rather than directly targeting the TTP, the Taliban have moved the group away from the border to prevent it from attacking Pakistan.

https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-07-30qr.pdf#page=79

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter

The United Nations World Food Programme projected that 18.9 million Afghans will face acute food insecurity between June...
09/15/2022

The United Nations World Food Programme projected that 18.9 million Afghans will face acute food insecurity between June and November 2022, including 4.7 million children and pregnant and lactating women. Some 19.7 million Afghans faced acute malnutrition between March and May 2022.

United Nations agencies have been at the forefront of providing humanitarian food assistance. The World Food Program planned to reach 10 million people with food, nutrition, and resilience support in June, and a cumulative total of 23 million in 2022. UNICEF and its implementing partners reported providing lifesaving nutrition treatment to over 45,000 children in May 2022 alone.

For more information on the humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan, click the link below:
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-07-30qr.pdf#page=108

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter

On June 3, the World Bank and Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF) approved three new projects totaling $793 mil...
09/08/2022

On June 3, the World Bank and Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF) approved three new projects totaling $793 million to provide urgent and essential food, livelihood, and health services to the people of Afghanistan.

Three new projects:
- The Afghanistan Emergency Food Security Project
- The Afghanistan Community Resilience and Livelihoods Project
- The Afghanistan Health Emergency Response (HER) Project

All three projects will be implemented off-budget, out of the interim Taliban administration’s control, through United Nations agencies and nongovernmental organizations and coordinated with other multilateral and bilateral funding pledges for Afghanistan. Each has features specifically designed to benefit women and girls.

Read about the three new projects here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2022-07-30qr-section3-economic.pdf#page=11

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter

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According to the , the number of requiring humanitarian assistance in 2021 has reached approximately half of ’s total estimated population. This figure is nearly double that of 2020, and a six-fold increase compared to four years ago.

In January 2021 — well before the Taliban takeover and resulting economic collapse — the United Nations said Afghanistan’s Humanitarian Response Plan for 2021 would already require an additional $1.3 billion to address the growing number of Afghans in need of humanitarian aid, including around 10 million children, stemming from a combination of ongoing conflict, drought, poverty, and .

https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf#page=17

AFP Photo by Farshad Usyan
Follow SIGAR on Twitter for daily updates.
Following the U.S. suspension of ’s foreign assets, the United Nations Secretary General’s special representative for Afghanistan said, “The understandable purpose is to deny these funds to the de facto Taliban administration. The inevitable effect, however, will be a severe economic downturn that could throw many more millions into poverty and hunger, may generate a massive wave of refugees from Afghanistan, and indeed set Afghanistan back for generations.”

Read more here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf#page=12

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter
On September 23, 2021, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 4350, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2022. The bill and accompanying committee report direct SIGAR to conduct an evaluation of ANDSF performance between February 2020 and August 2021.

SIGAR is required to address:
• why the ANDSF proved unable to defend Afghanistan from the Taliban following the withdrawal of U.S. military personnel
• the impact the withdrawal of U.S. military personnel had on the performance of the ANDSF
• elements of the U.S. military’s efforts since 2001 to provide training, assistance, and advising to the ANDSF that impacted the ANDSF’s performance following the U.S. military withdrawal
• current status of U.S.-provided equipment to the ANDSF
• current status of U.S.-trained ANDSF personnel
• any other matters SIGAR deems appropriate

Read more here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf#page=17

Photo By U.S. Air Force TSgt Jonathan Snyder
Follow SIGAR on Twitter for daily updates.
See U.S. troop levels in from 2002-2021 in the figure below.

On January 15, 2021, the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan was 2,500; the number dropped to 650 by late June/early July as U.S. forces withdrew; peaked at 5,784 in late August as the U.S. deployed forces to assist with the Noncombatant Evacuation Operation; and went to zero on August 30, 2021.
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf#page=14

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter
The speed with which the Taliban completed their military reconquest of came as a shock not only to U.S. military and civilian leaders and to Coalition partners, but also to and even the Taliban.

The ANDSF disintegrated quickly and completely, despite allegedly superior force numbers, training, and equipment—including a capable air force—compared to the Taliban. “How did we miss the collapse of an army and a government that big, that fast, and [in] only 11 days?” General Milley asked during a Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC) hearing on September 28, 2021.

SIGAR is conducting a more thorough examination of this question at the request of Congress, but the agency and other observers have raised some possible factors. Read about these eight factors here:
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf#page=15

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter
On the other hand, the value of exports to increased by 142% from August 16 to September 30, as compared to the period July 1–August 15. A customs official reportedly attributed this increase in trade from to a decline in the corrupt activities at the border crossings, such as government officials extorting drivers to pass into Pakistan with their goods, a practice that had inhibited trade.

Read more about trade in here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr.pdf#page=139

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter
Prior to , an estimated 55% of lived
below the poverty line (defined as 2,064 afghanis per person per month or around $1 in daily income), according to the most recent household survey data, an increase from 34% in 2008.

In 2020, during the early months of the pandemic, the World Bank projected that ’s poverty levels could rise to as high as 73% due to the socioeconomic effects of COVID-19.

United Nations Development Programme projects that by mid-2022, poverty levels in could increase by between seven and 25 percentage points, compared to 2020.

Continue reading here:
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr.pdf#page=137

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter
🚨 Today, SIGAR released its 53rd Quarterly Report to Congress, examining the aftermath of the U.S. withdrawal, the collapse of the government and security forces, and risks to the Afghan people.

📍 Read the full report here:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr.pdf

📍 Status of Funds Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-funding.pdf

📍 Security Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-security.pdf

📍 Economic and Social Development Section:
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-economic.pdf

📍 Governance Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-governance.pdf

📍 Counternarcotics: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-10-30qr-section3-governance.pdf#page=12

Check out on Twitter for more Quarterly Report highlights.
🚨Happening Tomorrow: Special Inspector General John F. Sopko to testify before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on International Development, International Organizations and Global Corporate Social Impact.

Topic: Development Assistance During Conflict: Lessons from Afghanistan

The hearing will be held tomorrow starting at 1:00PM Eastern.
SIGAR’s new Lessons Learned report, What We Need to Learn: Lessons from Twenty Years of Reconstruction, examines the past two decades of the U.S. reconstruction effort in Afghanistan.

There have been bright spots—such as lower child mortality rates, increases in per capita GDP, and increased literacy rates. But after spending 20 years and $145 billion trying to rebuild , the U.S. government has many lessons it needs to learn.

Read the full report here:
https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/lessonslearned/SIGAR-21-46-LL.pdf

View the interactive version here:
https://www.sigar.mil/interactive-reports/what-we-need-to-learn/index.html
As of July 1, 2021, the number of confirmed cases had reached 120,216, with 4,962 deaths. Yet, a test-positivity rate of 42% suggests the actual spread, case numbers, and deaths are far higher. Afghan public-health officials estimated that the Delta variant is responsible for approximately 60% of new infections.

Continue reading here: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr.pdf#page=155

For daily updates, follow SIGAR on Twitter
🚨 Today, SIGAR released its 52nd Quarterly Report to Congress, examining security conditions in , rise in COVID-19 infection rates, increase in opium-poppy cultivation, and much more.

Read the full report here:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr.pdf

Status of Funds Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-funding.pdf

Security Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-security.pdf

Economic and Social Development Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-economic.pdf

Governance Section:https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-governance.pdf

Counternarcotics: https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2021-07-30qr-section2-governance.pdf#page=13

Check out on Twitter for more Quarterly Report highlights.
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