Bardstown-Nelson Co. Human Rights Commission

Bardstown-Nelson Co. Human Rights Commission The Commission meets at the Nelson County Library (201 Cathedral Manor, Bardstown, KY 40004) at noon
(1)

The Commission serves as an investigative, consultative, educational, and persuasive agency to promote equal treatment and opportunity for all people of Nelson County consistent with the Constitution and laws of the United States; of Kentucky; of Nelson County; and of the City of Bardstown.

09/14/2023

The Bardstown-Nelson County Human Rights Commission is sponsoring the annual writing contest for the youth of our community.
Students in grades from 6 to 12 may enter.

CHANGE vs PROGRESS

Hall of Fame basketball coach John Wooden once said “Although there is no progress without change, not all change is progress.” Think about this quote and the world around you. How would you respond to Coach Wooden? Do you agree with his statement that “not all change is progress”? Why or why not? Provide specific examples from today’s society to support your argument.

The Bardstown Human Rights Commission promotes mutual understanding and respect among all economic, social, racial, religious, s*x, age, and ethnic groups. We invite you to consider these groups in your (500 words or less) written response to the prompt above.


Rules: 500 words or less-typed. Include name, age, school, grade, parent/guardian’s name, and contact information (address, e-mail and phone).
Submit as PDF attachments to email address below.
Prizes: Prizes will be awarded for both 6-8 and 9-12
1st prize -$150
2nd prize - $100
3rd prize -$75
Honorable mentions -$50

Finalists will be notified and may be asked to read and record their submissions. Publication, airing and distribution will be handled thru the Commission.
Winners announced at Annual Recognition Event
Nov.14, 2023 Bardstown Civic Center 6 pm
All entries must be received by October 20, 2023.

Send all entries as PDFs to:
[email protected]

A wonderful celebration of local creators who champion worthy causes! Education opens our eyes!
08/11/2023

A wonderful celebration of local creators who champion worthy causes! Education opens our eyes!

This gallery hosted by SmugMug; your photos look better here.

We were honored to have a small part in this event. One of our main goals is education in the arena of human rights. We ...
08/11/2023

We were honored to have a small part in this event. One of our main goals is education in the arena of human rights. We learned a lot!

This gallery hosted by SmugMug; your photos look better here.

Although roughly presented, this allows you to see all our student art submissions. Enjoy!
02/02/2023

Although roughly presented, this allows you to see all our student art submissions. Enjoy!

More photos from the HRC’s art show opening. Thanks to all attending!
01/24/2023

More photos from the HRC’s art show opening. Thanks to all attending!

At the opening of the HRC student exhibit Technology and You at Bardstown for the Arts Gallery. Running until next Frida...
01/21/2023

At the opening of the HRC student exhibit Technology and You at Bardstown for the Arts Gallery. Running until next Friday.

Two of many thought-provoking pieces from tonight’s exhibit Technology and You.
01/21/2023

Two of many thought-provoking pieces from tonight’s exhibit Technology and You.

Please join us for this free opening THIS Friday…4-6 at the Gallery on court square. Meet the young artists, hear their ...
01/17/2023

Please join us for this free opening THIS Friday…4-6 at the Gallery on court square. Meet the young artists, hear their thoughts, see their work!
And share!

How about starting today?
01/16/2023

How about starting today?

12/11/2022

Sadly, former commissioner Mary Jane Johnson Greenwell passed away. Her many contributions to equality for all were recognized at our recent event. Full obituary on Barlow Funeral Home site. Rest easy, our friend.

Visited Thomas Nelson HS and Bethlehem HS today to deliver some art and writing awards. Kudos to students Kenton Gagne, ...
11/17/2022

Visited Thomas Nelson HS and Bethlehem HS today to deliver some art and writing awards. Kudos to students Kenton Gagne, Joseph Wallace, Chris Collett and Amanda Carrithers…artists and writers…plus Kyndal Magner (absent)!

Nelson County High School Art Department…Technology and You. Eden Solario and Callie Mattingly.
11/16/2022

Nelson County High School Art Department…Technology and You. Eden Solario and Callie Mattingly.

11/16/2022

Our 2022 middle school finalists, plus one! Avery Jennings , Josey Hite, Calvin Gabbert, (Ms Carrie Stivers), Akira Calvin, and Catherine Hils. Congratulations!

Honorees for 2022 were Mary Jane Greenwell, Carrie Stivers and Bethany Haven. All have contributed greatly to the advanc...
11/16/2022

Honorees for 2022 were Mary Jane Greenwell, Carrie Stivers and Bethany Haven. All have contributed greatly to the advancement and quality of human rights in our community. Thank you!

This feels “like deja vu all over again”. In 2017 Carlee Hite won the Middle School essay contest…2022 she wins the high...
11/16/2022

This feels “like deja vu all over again”. In 2017 Carlee Hite won the Middle School essay contest…2022 she wins the high School Division. congratulations!

Celebrating some of our student writers at tonight’s Annual Recognition Event!
11/15/2022

Celebrating some of our student writers at tonight’s Annual Recognition Event!

Congratulations!
11/10/2022

Congratulations!

These three ladies are finalists in the HRC 2022 writing challenge. Josey Hite, Avery Jennings, and Catherine Hils!!! Super proud of these ladies!!!

These ladies are invited with their family to attend the Annual Recognition Event on November 14, at the Nelson County Civic Center to receive their award and gift card. They will ask the top three to read aloud their submissions.

Technology and You! Artwork by Juno Wani.
11/07/2022

Technology and You! Artwork by Juno Wani.

Congratulations!
11/03/2022

Congratulations!

Finalists in the 2022 HRC writing challenge, Technology and You, are in! High school: Joseph William Wallace, Kate Howard, Chris Collette, Carlee Hite and Amanda Carrithers. Middle school: Calvin Gabbert, Catherine Hils, Akira Calvin, Josey Hite and Avery Jennings. Congratulations!!! (Artwork by Isabella Harris.)

Finalists in the 2022 HRC writing challenge, Technology and You, are in! High school: Joseph William Wallace, Kate Howar...
11/03/2022

Finalists in the 2022 HRC writing challenge, Technology and You, are in! High school: Joseph William Wallace, Kate Howard, Chris Collette, Carlee Hite and Amanda Carrithers. Middle school: Calvin Gabbert, Catherine Hils, Akira Calvin, Josey Hite and Avery Jennings. Congratulations!!! (Artwork by Isabella Harris.)

10/22/2022

THANK YOU to all the young writers who submitted essays for our Annual Recognition Event on the topic of how technology has shaped their lives. Finalists will be announced soon! The top three entries in each category will be read by the writer on November 14 at the Civic Center. Mark your calendar!

10/22/2022

We would like to welcome Bryan Rogers and Hortensia Mayer to the Bardstown Bardstown-Nelson Co. Human Rights Commission! Thank you for your willingness to serve our community.

Bardstown-Nelson County Human Rights Commission Youth Writing Contest 2022 The Bardstown-Nelson County Human Rights Comm...
08/12/2022

Bardstown-Nelson County Human Rights Commission Youth Writing Contest 2022

The Bardstown-Nelson County Human Rights Commission is sponsoring the annual writing contest for the youth of our community.
Students in grades from 6 to 12 may enter.

Technology and You

Technology, including social media, gaming platforms, and more, has changed our lives in powerful ways, both good and bad. We have access to more information than we have ever had before, but how do we know if the information we receive is true or not?

The information we consume helps us to make sense of the world. How does the information available through modern technology help you to understand the world around you? Think about how you get information and consider how that information influences how you understand the experiences of people who may be different from you. In some ways, modern technology has allowed us to learn more and think beyond ourselves to become more empathetic citizens of the world. In other ways, however, technology and the spread of disinformation has given rise to fear and mistrust, limiting our ability to show compassion to each other.

In your response, answer the following question: how has the information you have consumed through modern technology helped shape you into who you are? Consider both the good and bad influences that social media, gaming platforms, and other sources of information may have had on what you believe, know, and do.



Rules: 500 words or less-typed. Include name, age, school, grade, parent/guardian’s name, and contact information (address, e-mail and phone).
Submit as PDF attachments to email address below or PO Box 211, Bardstown, KY 40004

Prizes: Prizes will be awarded for both 6-8 and 9-12
1st prize -$150
2nd prize - $100
3rd prize -$75
Honorable mentions -$50

Finalists will be notified and asked to read and record their submissions. Publication, airing and distribution of these writings will be handled thru the Commission.
Winners announced at Annual Recognition Event
Nov.14, 2022 Bardstown Civic Center 6 pm
All entries must be received by October 21, 2022.

Send to: Bardstown-Nelson County Human Rights Commission
P.O. Box 211
Bardstown, KY 40004
OR
[email protected]

08/11/2022

COMING SOON!
Details about the Bardstown-Nelson Co. Human Rights Commission 2022 TOPIC Technology and YOU!

The Bardstown-Nelson Co. Human Rights Commission had an informational booth at Bardstown’s 1st Juneteenth celebration. W...
06/18/2022

The Bardstown-Nelson Co. Human Rights Commission had an informational booth at Bardstown’s 1st Juneteenth celebration. We are learning a lot today!

06/16/2022

Welcome to Brian Rogers, our newest appointee (by the Bardstown City Council) to the Bardstown Nelson County Human Rights Commussion. He joins Sarah Hardin Ballard, Sidney Shouse, Stephanie Harrison, Rob Graf, Sarah Bradford, Nick Cipparone, Janet Tonge and Mary Crum Spalding. Congratulations!

03/10/2022

Welcome, Sarah Hardin Ballard, as our newest member of the Bardstown-Nelson Co. Human Rights Commission! She joins Stephanie Harrison, Sidney Shouse, Rob Graf, Tim Boone, Brandon Nakasato, Janet Tonge, Nick Cipparone, Sarah Ann Bradford and Mary Crum Spalding.

01/17/2022
Congratulations to Martin Hils and Ty Johnson! Check out the Kentucky Standard, Wednesday, December 2.
12/01/2021

Congratulations to Martin Hils and Ty Johnson! Check out the Kentucky Standard, Wednesday, December 2.

The Kentucky Standard willbe publishing the toptwo  essays in this category from our 2021 writing event. Our topic was B...
11/26/2021

The Kentucky Standard will
be publishing the top
two essays in this category from our 2021 writing event. Our topic was Beyond 2020.
Finalists (left to right) Catherine Hils, Ty Johnson, Martin Hils, Henry Evans and Silas Dillard.

When creating this piece I wasn't focusing on one issue more addressing people as whole. Everyone is human and we all ha...
11/15/2021

When creating this piece I wasn't focusing on one issue more addressing people as whole. Everyone is human and we all have differences but we're still human. This is important to me because it feels like we as people get so caught up in ourselves that we forget about people as whole. We forget how interconnected we are as people. Being human is terrifying, overwhelming, and amazing. All of these feelings coincide and sometimes living outside of people seems easier than dealing with the issues that come along with being human. But we have these bonds that can be fragile, unbreakable, extremely messy, etc. You can't escape these bonds because even just being alive bonds you to others. So at the end of day we all united even if there are a lot of divisions with views. I represented these bonds with red string/spider webs because it symbolize these connections. Along with that I showed expressions of the people through their eyes and how they're feeling because people are going to feel many different things when thinking about their mortality and the role they play in the world. When I was actually creating this piece I used gouache paint to lay down the base shades of blue. Which I chose to make a monochromatic color scheme at first to set a tense mood while also showing a diverse skin tones with blue to represent people. Then I went in with watercolor pencils to add to different colors like green, purple, and other blues to the people to represent differences in people along with shading to make more interesting to look at. Finally I added the red spiderwebs/string to the piece with another watercolor pencil. Which I chose red so it stands out also red presents love, passion, anger, and blood which I felt added to the theme of the bonds that we have as humans
Isabel Harris
Bardstown High School

Alexis GribbinsNelson County High SchoolAs we all know, America has been flipped on its head in the past two years. Betw...
11/13/2021

Alexis Gribbins
Nelson County High School

As we all know, America has been flipped on its head in the past two
years. Between a worldwide pandemic political uproar, people are left
pretty broken and divided. America has seemed to be split by political
party on both of these issues, which both sides can be seen as more
than intense. I created this piece because no matter where we stand,
everyone has the pride and passion of an Eagle inside of them about
what they believe in.
The only way America can heal itself from these
dark days is to find away to put our differences aside, and ignite the
passion in all of us into to one unite of a country. Conservative or
Liberal, we all stride for the same goal of peace, love, and happiness,
and the only way out is through. So why not, go through together? I
believe we can heal ourselves, our country, and our world with the spirit
of the Eagle that lives in all of us.

“Unity”, defined by Merriam Webster as, “the quality or state of being made one”. With 2021 soon coming to a close and p...
11/12/2021

“Unity”, defined by Merriam Webster as, “the quality or state of being made one”. With 2021 soon coming to a close and political divide still in the air, it's important that we as a nation recognize the need for unity within our community. This isn't something we can do individually, we all have to come together and make a collective effort into bettering ourselves.
However, there are steps we can take to first inform and better ourselves before coming together as a group. Talking with the people around you who may have a different perspective on our current political climate is a big first step. While we may view our opposing side as “the enemy”, they can easily think the same about us. By talking with them It can give us more insight as to what they are thinking as well as help us come up with solutions to issues that plague our modern day. Despite what we may have been told to believe, nothing can be fixed with fighting one another.
Ultimately, nothing will change if we do nothing to change the issues within our society. We need to learn to stop viewing each other as “enemies” and instead see one another as “ friends”. With a new generation growing up in our midst, we need to better our world so that when they grow up and become adults they can be welcomed not in a society where hate and fear run rampant, but one where we are free of divide and hatred for each other. This is what I exemplified in my piece.
My piece depicts a woman in front of the American flag. On one side it is the woman in her soldier's uniform and on the other, she is in regular civilian clothing. This is meant to embody the feeling that despite her being an active member of the military, she is always a regular person like you or me. Which is exactly the mindset we need to embrace. We are not “civilians” or “soldiers” but instead we are all humans regardless of job title or belief.
Isabella Gomez
Nelson County High School

11/12/2021

My piece is meant to represent various issues that many people love to argue about. From abortion, to murder, to BLM, all of these issues are apparent in today's society. These issues aren't just problems in a large city, Bardstown is affected as much as any other place. Many of my friends are black, and many people in my school have had abortions, its all valid. My message that I am trying to convey is to just listen and hear what people are trying to say.
If people were to just stop and actually hear what others are saying, many may actually start to pay attention and recognize other's point of views. My piece is made up of paint markers on a black paper. I used different shapes to represent the different people and their arguments, its meant to look hectic and hard to read on the bottom. This chaos is meant to represent the loud arguing and overlap of people not listening. All we need to do is to hear others and try to understand what they're saying.

And to all the unsung women in our past personal histories, who are the giants' shoulders upon which we stand....
08/26/2020

And to all the unsung women in our past personal histories, who are the giants' shoulders upon which we stand....

Happy Women's Equality Day! On this date in 1920, the 19th Amendment recognizing the right of women to vote was added to the U.S. Constitution. The amendment's passage marked the culmination of a 72-year long struggle to achieve equal voting rights for women which had begun at the first women's right conference organized by Elizabeth Cady Stanton in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848. The 19th Amendment was the single largest extension of democratic voting rights in U.S. history, and it was achieved through decades of struggle and sacrifice by countless courageous women, many of whom endured years of ridicule, hardship, and even imprisonment, physical assault, and force feeding, all in pursuit of women's suffrage. In commemoration of this landmark event, in 1971, August 26 was declared Women's Equality Day.

The passage of the 19th Amendment was a tremendous victory for the Women's Suffrage Movement; it was a universal recognition of women's right to vote that decreed that no citizen could be denied the right to vote on account of s*x. This was a right that had been extended to all men in the country 50 years earlier, with the passage of the 15th Amendment in 1870. Even with its passage, however, the struggle for women's rights was far from over. The ability of women of color to exercise their right to vote varied dramatically across the country; while most African American women freely voted in the North and even ran for office after the passage of the 19th Amendment, for example, restrictive state laws effectively disenfranchised most African American women in the South until the passage of further civil rights laws later in the century.

Additionally, many of the suffragists who led the final push to pass the 19th Amendment quickly turned their attention to passing the Equal Rights Amendment, which would enshrine in the Constitution the principle that "women are people equal in stature before the law." The only right explicitly affirmed by the Constitution as equal for women and men is still the right to vote, as guaranteed by the 19th Amendment. While the ERA, which was originally drafted by suffragist Alice Paul in 1923, was nearly added to the Constitution 45 years ago, it narrowly failed ratification and its passage remains a goal of women's rights advocates today. Among them, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who when asked what amendment she would most like to see added to the Constitution, replied that she would choose "the Equal Rights Amendment," noting that when her granddaughters read the Constitution, she would like them to see "that that is a basic principle of our society."

Today, in honor of the 100th anniversary of women's right to vote, we're celebrating a few of the original Mighty Girls -- the suffragists! The suffragists were activists who worked tirelessly to secure that right for themselves, their daughters, and future generations of American women. Women are still grateful for the work of their suffragist sisters; since the 1980s, women have been turning out to vote in significantly higher numbers than men.

For books for all ages about the courageous women who fought for women's right to vote, visit our blog post, "How Women Won The Vote: Books for Kids & Adults About the U.S. Suffrage Movement,” at https://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=11827

For a fascinating book for adult readers about the final fight for the ratification of the 19th Amendment during the summer of 1920, we highly recommend "The Woman's Hour" (https://www.amightygirl.com/the-woman-s-hour) and the new Young Readers adaptation for ages 10 and up (https://www.amightygirl.com/the-woman-s-hour-young-readers)

For an excellent new children's book about the final intense stage of the Suffrage Movement, we highly recommend "Alice Paul, Lucy Burns, and Their Big Idea" for ages 7 to 12 at https://www.amightygirl.com/how-women-won-the-vote

For two excellent books about the heroic women of the U.S. Suffrage Movement, we also recommend "Roses and Radicals" for ages 10 and up (https://www.amightygirl.com/roses-and-radicals) and "Votes for Women!" for ages 13 and up (https://www.amightygirl.com/votes-for-women)

For adult readers, we recommend the new book "Suffrage: Women's Long Battle for the Vote" at https://www.amightygirl.com/suffrage-women-s-long-battle

And, for our favorite t-shirt honoring women throughout history who fought for their rights, check out the "Well behaved women seldom make history" t-shirt -- available in a variety of styles and colors for all ages -- at https://www.amightygirl.com/well-behaved-women-history-shirt

Sounds informative.
08/18/2020

Sounds informative.

The Lost Cause ideology that emerged after the Civil War and flourished in the early twentieth century in essence sought to recast a struggle to perpetuate slavery as a heroic defense of the South.As Adam Domby reveals here, this was not only an insidious

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Who currently sits on this commission?
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