Erie County Commission on the Status of Women

Erie County Commission on the Status of Women Connecting women with the resources they need to reach their full potential.
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Operating as usual

The Sexualization Of Women In Sports Extends Even To What They Wear
07/26/2021
The Sexualization Of Women In Sports Extends Even To What They Wear

The Sexualization Of Women In Sports Extends Even To What They Wear

One women's team is in a dispute over having to wear bikini bottoms for their uniforms. An athlete was told her briefs were too short. A lot needs to change to even the playing field, experts say.

The long roots of women’s exodus from the labor force
07/26/2021
The long roots of women’s exodus from the labor force

The long roots of women’s exodus from the labor force

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For a special Throwback Thursday, we wish a happy 165th birthday to Buffalo's Louise Blanchard Bethune, recognized as th...
07/21/2021

For a special Throwback Thursday, we wish a happy 165th birthday to Buffalo's Louise Blanchard Bethune, recognized as the first woman professional architect in the United States.

#tbt #TBThursday #EC200 EC200 - Erie County Bicentennial

07/20/2021

On this date (July 19) in 1848, the Seneca Falls Convention began. Demanding equal civil, social, and moral rights for women, the event was organized by Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton at the Wesleyan Chapel near Stanton’s home in Seneca Falls, NY. Despite meager publicity and only five days’ notice, over 300 attended—mostly women and some notable men, including Frederick Douglass, famed African American abolitionist.

The gathering opened with Stanton’s “Declaration of Sentiments and Grievances,” a treatise modeled on the Declaration of Independence, which began, “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights…” The convention also passed 12 resolutions which called for specific equal rights for women, including the right to vote.

After the convention, news quickly spread nationwide, and the event is generally considered the birth of the women’s suffrage movement in the U.S. However, securing the right to vote was only one of many goals of the Seneca Falls activists—and not even the main one—with the majority of the other goals and resolutions focusing on economic oppression, sexual violence, and racism.

Women's Rights
07/19/2021
Women's Rights

Women's Rights

New Yorkers have long led the struggle for women's rights. Seneca Falls, home to the first Women's Rights Convention in 1848, is considered the birthplace of the women's rights movement. Some of its greatest leaders from Susan B. Anthony to Matilda Joslyn Gage and Elizabeth Cady Stanton did their pi...

On this date (July 19) in 1848, the Seneca Falls Convention began. Demanding equal civil, social, and moral rights for w...
07/19/2021

On this date (July 19) in 1848, the Seneca Falls Convention began. Demanding equal civil, social, and moral rights for women, the event was organized by Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton at the Wesleyan Chapel near Stanton’s home in Seneca Falls, NY. Despite meager publicity and only five days’ notice, over 300 attended—mostly women and some notable men, including Frederick Douglass, famed African American abolitionist.

The gathering opened with Stanton’s “Declaration of Sentiments and Grievances,” a treatise modeled on the Declaration of Independence, which began, “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights…” The convention also passed 12 resolutions which called for specific equal rights for women, including the right to vote.

After the convention, news quickly spread nationwide, and the event is generally considered the birth of the women’s suffrage movement in the U.S. However, securing the right to vote was only one of many goals of the Seneca Falls activists—and not even the main one—with the majority of the other goals and resolutions focusing on economic oppression, sexual violence, and racism.

On this date (July 19) in 1848, the Seneca Falls Convention began. Demanding equal civil, social, and moral rights for women, the event was organized by Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton at the Wesleyan Chapel near Stanton’s home in Seneca Falls, NY. Despite meager publicity and only five days’ notice, over 300 attended—mostly women and some notable men, including Frederick Douglass, famed African American abolitionist.

The gathering opened with Stanton’s “Declaration of Sentiments and Grievances,” a treatise modeled on the Declaration of Independence, which began, “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights…” The convention also passed 12 resolutions which called for specific equal rights for women, including the right to vote.

After the convention, news quickly spread nationwide, and the event is generally considered the birth of the women’s suffrage movement in the U.S. However, securing the right to vote was only one of many goals of the Seneca Falls activists—and not even the main one—with the majority of the other goals and resolutions focusing on economic oppression, sexual violence, and racism.

Join us on July 29, 2021
07/15/2021
Welcome! You are invited to join a webinar: Black Women's Equal Pay: Waiting Another Century is Not an Option. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email about joining the webinar.

Join us on July 29, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic and related recession has both highlighted the persistent racial and gendered economic inequalities that Black women face in the labor market and exacerbated them. Black women were over-represented in many low-paying jobs recognized as "essential" during the pandemic, but dismi...

Fifty years since the 26th Amendment lowered the voting age to 18 in 1971!
07/15/2021
It's Been 5 Decades Since States Ratified The 26th Amendment

Fifty years since the 26th Amendment lowered the voting age to 18 in 1971!

It was 50 years ago this month that the 26th Amendment was signed, giving 18-year-olds the right to vote. Now, a movement to lower the voting age to 16 is gaining momentum.

Nikole Hannah-Jones Issues Statement on Decision to Decline Tenure Offer at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and...
07/08/2021
Nikole Hannah-Jones Issues Statement on Decision to Decline Tenure Offer at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and to Accept Knight Chair Appointment at Howard University

Nikole Hannah-Jones Issues Statement on Decision to Decline Tenure Offer at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and to Accept Knight Chair Appointment at Howard University

Today, award-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones announced that she has declined an offer of tenure from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). In her first extensive comments since the UNC Board of Trustees voted on her tenure, Ms. Hannah-Jones released the following statement: ....

How can you best align your business' brand with values of inclusivity and justice? Registration is now open for the Aug...
07/02/2021

How can you best align your business' brand with values of inclusivity and justice? Registration is now open for the August 4th symposium, "Brand Integrity & Social Justice."

Details & registration at: positivestepsny.com

How can you best align your business' brand with values of inclusivity and justice? Registration is now open for the August 4th symposium, "Brand Integrity & Social Justice."

Details & registration at: positivestepsny.com

Please watch and share this powerful discussion hosted by PowHer NY!
06/24/2021
Dismantling Sexual Harassment in Albany

Please watch and share this powerful discussion hosted by PowHer NY!

Sexual harassment has been endemic to New York State politics for too long. This year brought renewed attention to this issue in Albany and an urgency to ens...

There's still time to register! Learn what can be done about sexual harassment in New York State politics. Join PowHer N...
06/22/2021

There's still time to register! Learn what can be done about sexual harassment in New York State politics. Join PowHer NY TOMORROW (Wednesday, June 23) at 1 PM to help identify what's needed to change Albany. Moderated by our own Dr. Karen King, Executive Director of Erie County Commission on the Status of Women.

Register: bit.ly/PH_Albany

In partnership with the Sexual Harrassment Working Group & TImesupnow.

There's still time to register! Learn what can be done about sexual harassment in New York State politics. Join PowHer NY TOMORROW (Wednesday, June 23) at 1 PM to help identify what's needed to change Albany. Moderated by our own Dr. Karen King, Executive Director of Erie County Commission on the Status of Women.

Register: bit.ly/PH_Albany

In partnership with the Sexual Harrassment Working Group & TImesupnow.

The urgency of intersectionality
06/22/2021
The urgency of intersectionality

The urgency of intersectionality

Now more than ever, it's important to look boldly at the reality of race and gender bias -- and understand how the two can combine to create even more harm. Kimberlé Crenshaw uses the term "intersectionality" to describe this phenomenon; as she says, if you're standing in the path of multiple forms...

What can be done about sexual harassment in New York State politics? Join PowHer NY this Wednesday, June 23 at 1 PM to h...
06/21/2021
Dismantling Sexual Harassment in Albany

What can be done about sexual harassment in New York State politics? Join PowHer NY this Wednesday, June 23 at 1 PM to help identify what's needed to change Albany. Moderated by our own Dr. Karen King, Executive Director of Erie County Commission on the Status of Women.

Register: bit.ly/PH_Albany

In partnership with the Sexual Harrassment Working Group + TImesupnow.

Join to help identify the policy, cultural, systemic changes needed to change the toxic workplace and address sexual harassment in Albany.

Timeline Photos
06/15/2021

Timeline Photos

TONIGHT at 6:30 PM: the third of four FREE virtual discussion groups: "Women's Suffrage Revisited: An Analysis of Race, Class, & Gender." Featuring presentations by authors that shed light on the history of the movement.

Register at: eventbrite.com/e/womens-suffrage-revisited-an-intersectional-reading-group-tickets-150779795427#

Presented by the UB Gender Institute, Buffalo & Erie County Public Library - Central Library, & Erie County Commission on the Status of Women.

TOMORROW, June 10 (11:30 AM – 12:30 PM): The second of four sessions of the Woman of Color Summit. Engage in discussions...
06/09/2021

TOMORROW, June 10 (11:30 AM – 12:30 PM): The second of four sessions of the Woman of Color Summit. Engage in discussions addressing systemic barriers, inequities, & disparities for women of color. Our own Dr. Karen King of the Erie County Commission on the Status of Women will be hosting tomorrow's roundtable discussion.

To register and for more details, go to: eleversity.org/summit

Learn more about us at: erie.gov/csw

TOMORROW, June 10 (11:30 AM – 12:30 PM): The second of four sessions of the Woman of Color Summit. Engage in discussions addressing systemic barriers, inequities, & disparities for women of color. Our own Dr. Karen King of the Erie County Commission on the Status of Women will be hosting tomorrow's roundtable discussion.

To register and for more details, go to: eleversity.org/summit

Learn more about us at: erie.gov/csw

06/07/2021
nwlc.org

Women Gained 314,000 Jobs in May, But Still
Need 13 Straight Months of Growth to Recover
Pandemic Losses

Address

Rath Building, 95 Franklin St
Buffalo, NY
14202

General information

The Commission was established by a unanimous vote of the Erie County Legislature in 1987 to remove gender based inequities for women. In 1988, the Commission became a department of Erie County government. The Commission conducts policy studies; analyzes current legislation, programs and trends affecting women; develops collaborative programs with local and regional organizations and public officials; provides educational awareness; and recommends measures to coordinate, consolidate or expand the resources and services available to women in Erie County. Please visit our website at www.erie.gov/csw for a listing of resources available for women at a national level, as well as here in Erie County!

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 5pm
Tuesday 8am - 5pm
Wednesday 8am - 5pm
Thursday 8am - 5pm
Friday 8am - 5pm
Saturday 9am - 5pm
Sunday 11am - 5pm

Telephone

(716) 858-8307

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A very special thank you to Dr. Karen King, Executive Director, Erie County Commissioner on the Status of Women, for honoring this writer during Women's History Month, 2018.
Tamara McMillan speaking to #nacw girls summit!