Food For All

Food For All Hunger Program The Goals of Food for All:

-To educate the community to the reality of hunger and poverty.
-To research the causes of hunger and act as advocates/agents of change.
-To maximize the availability of nutritionally adequate food.
-To assist needy people in securing available nutritional resources.
(2)

Hunger Facts:

-1 out of 4 children in New York State lives in poverty.
-14% of Erie County’s population lives below the poverty line.
-22% of the County’s children live in poverty. (2000 Census data)
-53,000 children in Erie County are hungry or at risk of hunger. (Nutrition Consortium of New York State)
-More than 90,000 Western New York residents turn to food pantries and soup kitchens for assistance; more than half are children. (Food Bank of Western New York)
-Households with children receive 82% of Food Stamps. Hunger Has Many Faces:

-Hunger is a child waiting with her mother at a food pantry for a bag of food because her mother’s paycheck doesn’t stretch far enough to put food on the table
-Hunger is a single, childless adult who lost his/her food stamps because of 1996 welfare changes.
-Hunger is a family of four struggling to live on two low paying jobs that offer no health insurance.
-Hunger is the face of a senior citizen whose fixed income is barely above the federal poverty level and yet does not qualify for food stamps. Food for All Responds:

*Nutrition Outreach and Education Program:

Food for All conducts outreach activities designed to increase participation in three federal nutrition programs: Food Stamp Program, the Summer Food Service Program for Children, and the School Breakfast Program. We provide:

-Free confidential Food Stamp prescreening
-Food Stamp application assistance
-Technical training to agency staff
-Promotional items for the School Breakfast Program
-Technical assistance for the Summer Food Program for Children


*Advocacy and Public Policy Activities:

Food for All believes that the problem of hunger will only be solved through a long term effort and commitment to systemic policy and program changes that meet the food needs of poor and hungry people. Our advocacy activities include:

-Organizing local community support around state legislation i.e., Hunger Prevention and Nutrition Assistance Program.
-Organizing community support around federal legislation i.e., reauthorization of Food Stamps.
-Organize and sponsor workshops and forums to educate religious groups how to advocate for action against hunger and poverty i.e., Mobilizing Faith Communities to End Hunger.
-Educate the general public to the reality of hunger and poverty through our newsletter and other organizations’ newsletters, the Media and presentations at various community groups.
-Continue to represent hunger concerns on local coalitions who share a common task.


*Emergency Food Providers Directory:

Food for All publishes and distributes the Emergency Food Providers Directory. The directory lists the more than 140 food pantries and dining sites in Erie County by ZIP code and details information about each provider and how to make a referral to a food pantry.

Operating as usual

ONE DAY, FIVE COVID-19 VACCINATION EVENTS: ERIE COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH OFFERS PFIZER AND J&J VACCINE Highmark Blue ...
05/21/2021

ONE DAY, FIVE COVID-19 VACCINATION EVENTS: ERIE COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH OFFERS PFIZER AND J&J VACCINE



Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield of Western New York partners with ECDOH
for vaccine clinic at Kleinhans Music Hall Parking Lot





ERIE COUNTY, NY – This Saturday, May 22, the Erie County Department of Health (ECDOH) has a schedule that can only be described as intense, with five separate COVID-19 vaccination clinics scheduled to cover ages 12 and older.



In partnership with Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield of Western New York, ECDOH will have a clinic set up in the Kleinhans Music Hall parking lot at 3 Symphony Circle, Buffalo, 14201 from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. This clinic will offer the one-dose Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, for ages 18 and older. The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra is providing free ticket vouchers for its 2021-2022 season Sunday performances to individuals who are vaccinated at this clinic. A selection of giveaway items will also be available, courtesy of Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield.



The ECDOH-Highmark event at Kleinhans Music Hall is part of an active calendar of clinics planned throughout summer 2021 on weekends and in conjunction with activities at Canalside Buffalo and larger community events.



“Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield of Western New York is proud to partner with the ECDOH to reduce barriers and increase the accessibility of the vaccine, which we know to be a safe and effective way to keep our community healthy,” said Michael Edbauer, D.O., President, Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield of Western New York. “We look forward to bringing convenient pop-up vaccine clinics to neighborhoods and residents across our region to increase vaccinations in the community.”



For youth ages 12 and older, ECDOH has four COVID-19 vaccine sites planned with Pfizer vaccine.

SUNY ECC South Campus: 4041 Southwestern Boulevard (Gymnasium - Building 6), Orchard Park, NY 14127
McKinley High School: 1500 Elmwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14207
MST Preparatory School: 646 E Delavan Ave, Buffalo, NY 14215
SUNY ECC North Campus: 6205 Main Street (Bell Center), Williamsville, NY 14221


Appointments are suggested at all clinics; walk-ins are welcome, but may not be accommodated in the final hour of any ECDOH clinic.



These vaccination options are in addition to the Vax Visit program, first announced by ECDOH last week. Schedule a vaccine-at-home by calling (716) 858-2929.



#



Erie County Department of Health (ECDOH), COVID-19 vaccine info and clinic schedule: http://www.erie.gov/vax
Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield of Western New York: https://www.bcbswny.com
ECDOH, COVID-19 Information Line: (716) 858-2929 – foreign language interpretation available


###

ONE DAY, FIVE COVID-19 VACCINATION EVENTS: ERIE COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH OFFERS PFIZER AND J&J VACCINE



Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield of Western New York partners with ECDOH
for vaccine clinic at Kleinhans Music Hall Parking Lot





ERIE COUNTY, NY – This Saturday, May 22, the Erie County Department of Health (ECDOH) has a schedule that can only be described as intense, with five separate COVID-19 vaccination clinics scheduled to cover ages 12 and older.



In partnership with Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield of Western New York, ECDOH will have a clinic set up in the Kleinhans Music Hall parking lot at 3 Symphony Circle, Buffalo, 14201 from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. This clinic will offer the one-dose Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, for ages 18 and older. The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra is providing free ticket vouchers for its 2021-2022 season Sunday performances to individuals who are vaccinated at this clinic. A selection of giveaway items will also be available, courtesy of Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield.



The ECDOH-Highmark event at Kleinhans Music Hall is part of an active calendar of clinics planned throughout summer 2021 on weekends and in conjunction with activities at Canalside Buffalo and larger community events.



“Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield of Western New York is proud to partner with the ECDOH to reduce barriers and increase the accessibility of the vaccine, which we know to be a safe and effective way to keep our community healthy,” said Michael Edbauer, D.O., President, Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield of Western New York. “We look forward to bringing convenient pop-up vaccine clinics to neighborhoods and residents across our region to increase vaccinations in the community.”



For youth ages 12 and older, ECDOH has four COVID-19 vaccine sites planned with Pfizer vaccine.

SUNY ECC South Campus: 4041 Southwestern Boulevard (Gymnasium - Building 6), Orchard Park, NY 14127
McKinley High School: 1500 Elmwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14207
MST Preparatory School: 646 E Delavan Ave, Buffalo, NY 14215
SUNY ECC North Campus: 6205 Main Street (Bell Center), Williamsville, NY 14221


Appointments are suggested at all clinics; walk-ins are welcome, but may not be accommodated in the final hour of any ECDOH clinic.



These vaccination options are in addition to the Vax Visit program, first announced by ECDOH last week. Schedule a vaccine-at-home by calling (716) 858-2929.



#



Erie County Department of Health (ECDOH), COVID-19 vaccine info and clinic schedule: http://www.erie.gov/vax
Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield of Western New York: https://www.bcbswny.com
ECDOH, COVID-19 Information Line: (716) 858-2929 – foreign language interpretation available


###

Preparing for P-EBT 2.0: SNAP Outreach to FamiliesAs we await details on the next round of Pandemic-EBT (P-EBT) in New Y...
05/17/2021

Preparing for P-EBT 2.0: SNAP Outreach to Families
As we await details on the next round of Pandemic-EBT (P-EBT) in New York, it is an especially important time for SNAP outreach to families with children. Sharing information about SNAP can help ensure P-EBT reaches as many eligible children as possible; it is especially critical for reaching young children, as Congress extended P-EBT to eligible children under age six who are part of a household enrolled in SNAP. Call Food For All if you would like help filling out a SNAP application -716-262-6864- Erie county
585-815-5721 - Gensesee County, 585-456-4224

Preparing for P-EBT 2.0: SNAP Outreach to Families
As we await details on the next round of Pandemic-EBT (P-EBT) in New York, it is an especially important time for SNAP outreach to families with children. Sharing information about SNAP can help ensure P-EBT reaches as many eligible children as possible; it is especially critical for reaching young children, as Congress extended P-EBT to eligible children under age six who are part of a household enrolled in SNAP. Call Food For All if you would like help filling out a SNAP application -716-262-6864- Erie county
585-815-5721 - Gensesee County, 585-456-4224

More Great News! WIC Will Soon Triple Benefits for Fruits & VegetablesNYS WIC is granting a temporary boost to the cash ...
05/17/2021

More Great News! WIC Will Soon Triple Benefits for Fruits & Vegetables

NYS WIC is granting a temporary boost to the cash value benefit for fruit and vegetable purchases; for four months, program participants' eWIC cards will be loaded with more than three times the current amount allotted for fruits and vegetables.

While the standard monthly value is $9 per child and $11 for pregnant, postpartum, and breastfeeding women, the monthly amount will increase to $35 per child and adult because of a provision in the American Rescue Plan passed earlier this year. The act gives the U.S. Department of Agriculture authority to temporarily increase the value for up to four months; NYS WIC program will provide the increase from June through September.

More Great News! WIC Will Soon Triple Benefits for Fruits & Vegetables

NYS WIC is granting a temporary boost to the cash value benefit for fruit and vegetable purchases; for four months, program participants' eWIC cards will be loaded with more than three times the current amount allotted for fruits and vegetables.

While the standard monthly value is $9 per child and $11 for pregnant, postpartum, and breastfeeding women, the monthly amount will increase to $35 per child and adult because of a provision in the American Rescue Plan passed earlier this year. The act gives the U.S. Department of Agriculture authority to temporarily increase the value for up to four months; NYS WIC program will provide the increase from June through September.

05/13/2021
04/16/2021
04/16/2021

HEAP has been extended to 8/31/21 and a third emergency HEAP benefit is available effective immediately.

Food Gnomes are looking for volunteers this weekend !
04/09/2021

Food Gnomes are looking for volunteers this weekend !

Food Gnomes are looking for volunteers this weekend !

Direct sowing is one way to get a head start in the garden. The cold, wet weather of spring can hasten germination for s...
04/03/2021

Direct sowing is one way to get a head start in the garden. The cold, wet weather of spring can hasten germination for some seeds, and many early crops might otherwise become bitter in summer heat. Direct sowing alongside a crop that's already growing (aka "succession sowing") also means more harvests! With several weeks to go before our last frost, we want to sow as much as we can now to maximize the growing season.
In the Northeast, Radishes and Peas can be direct sown while the cool weather holds–in addition to Raab, Spinach, and Arugula. By mid-April, we're adding rows of Chard, Beets, Lettuce, Carrots, and Parsnips.
Borage, Bachelor's Button, Calendula, Spider Flower, Marigold, Morning Glory, Sweet Pea, and Johnny Jump-Ups are all flowers to sow now through May; the moisture and temperature fluctuations of spring will benefit germination.
Source - Hudson Valley Seed Company

Direct sowing is one way to get a head start in the garden. The cold, wet weather of spring can hasten germination for some seeds, and many early crops might otherwise become bitter in summer heat. Direct sowing alongside a crop that's already growing (aka "succession sowing") also means more harvests! With several weeks to go before our last frost, we want to sow as much as we can now to maximize the growing season.
In the Northeast, Radishes and Peas can be direct sown while the cool weather holds–in addition to Raab, Spinach, and Arugula. By mid-April, we're adding rows of Chard, Beets, Lettuce, Carrots, and Parsnips.
Borage, Bachelor's Button, Calendula, Spider Flower, Marigold, Morning Glory, Sweet Pea, and Johnny Jump-Ups are all flowers to sow now through May; the moisture and temperature fluctuations of spring will benefit germination.
Source - Hudson Valley Seed Company

Double Up Food Bucks Request For Applications 2021Double Up Food Bucks Request for Applications (RFA) FARMERS MARKETSFie...
04/02/2021

Double Up Food Bucks Request For Applications 2021
Double Up Food Bucks Request for Applications (RFA) FARMERS MARKETS
Field & Fork Network (F&FN) is seeking applications from New York farmers markets and mobile markets who would like to participate in the 2021 Double Up Food Bucks (DUFB) season (July 1, 2021 – October 31, 2021). All applications will be reviewed and considered based on their eligibility requirements (see below) with some preference given to markets that fall within specific geographic areas. The link is in the comments .

Double Up Food Bucks Request For Applications 2021
Double Up Food Bucks Request for Applications (RFA) FARMERS MARKETS
Field & Fork Network (F&FN) is seeking applications from New York farmers markets and mobile markets who would like to participate in the 2021 Double Up Food Bucks (DUFB) season (July 1, 2021 – October 31, 2021). All applications will be reviewed and considered based on their eligibility requirements (see below) with some preference given to markets that fall within specific geographic areas. The link is in the comments .

Job training
04/02/2021

Job training

Job training

DHS Public Charge Rule UpdateThe Trump administration’s 2019 Department of Homeland Security (DHS) public charge rule ha...
04/02/2021

DHS Public Charge Rule Update

The Trump administration’s 2019 Department of Homeland Security (DHS) public charge rule has been removed. DHS issued a final rule that removed the 2019 public charge rule from the Federal Register and reinstated the 1999 DHS Field Guidance.

SNAP and other nutrition programs can NOT be considered in a public charge test under the 1999 Field Guidance.

As we celebrate this victory, we know that much work remains to connect immigrant families to federal nutrition programs, and that we must continue to fight fear with facts.

DHS Public Charge Rule Update

The Trump administration’s 2019 Department of Homeland Security (DHS) public charge rule has been removed. DHS issued a final rule that removed the 2019 public charge rule from the Federal Register and reinstated the 1999 DHS Field Guidance.

SNAP and other nutrition programs can NOT be considered in a public charge test under the 1999 Field Guidance.

As we celebrate this victory, we know that much work remains to connect immigrant families to federal nutrition programs, and that we must continue to fight fear with facts.

Fun Fact :The Free Breakfast for Children Program was one among more than 60 community social programs created by the Bl...
03/11/2021

Fun Fact :
The Free Breakfast for Children Program was one among more than 60 community social programs created by the Black Panther Party. They were renamed Survival Programs in 1971.

Many studies have shown the health benefits of eating breakfast. It improves your energy levels and ability to concentra...
03/11/2021

Many studies have shown the health benefits of eating breakfast. It improves your energy levels and ability to concentrate in the short term, and can help with better weight management, reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease in the long term.

Many studies have shown the health benefits of eating breakfast. It improves your energy levels and ability to concentrate in the short term, and can help with better weight management, reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease in the long term.

03/11/2021
03/11/2021
03/11/2021
Tips for growing root vegetables from Hudson Valley SeedBed and Soil Preparation: This is often the root of root-vegetab...
03/08/2021

Tips for growing root vegetables from Hudson Valley Seed

Bed and Soil Preparation: This is often the root of root-vegetable growing problems. Root crops like a deep, loose, and well-drained soil to develop to full size. If your soil is suitable, till it well, then smooth the surface before sowing (to alleviate compaction after winter). If, however, your soil is very compacted and rocky (like so many places around here!), you will have much better success growing roots in a raised bed. Just make sure your raised bed or container is at least 10 square inches. Either way, add aged manure or compost to your beds or rows to provide additional nutrients to your plants. Most root crops do fine in partial sun, but full exposure is great.

Planting, Thinning, Watering, and Planting Again: Root crops grow best if sown directly to prevent root disturbance. All vegetables in this category prefer cooler weather and can be planted in spring for a summer harvest and in late summer for a fall (and winter storage) crop. For a steady supply of carrots, sow successively two or three times, in three-week intervals. Radishes are the fastest growing root and are great for successive sowing too. Spring and summer are also fast and small enough to inter-crop with any slower maturing plants, root or not, to save space in a small garden. Rutabagas and parsnips both require a long-growing season and should be sown as soon as danger of frost has passed.

Thinning is a step that cannot be skipped when it comes to root crops. Roots need space to stretch out and grow under ground, and crowding will result in a spindly-looking and unsatisfying harvest. The good news is that thinnings are delicious! Add these "baby greens" to salads and stir fries. Beets, carrots, parsnips, radishes, and turnips can be thinned (as soon as they are large enough for snacking) to two-inch intervals and the bulky rutabaga prefers eight inches of space. Carrots are notoriously slow to germinate; be patient–they'll come up!

Proper watering may mean the difference between a successful harvest or nothing at all, when it comes to root crops. About one inch of water per week is ideal. Whether it comes from rain or irrigation, it’s important to soak the soil with water, so that moisture seeps deep down. Surface watering can cause the roots to grow close to the surface and be small, misshapen, or dried out.

Weeding: Most root crops grow slowly at the beginning of their life and are unable to outcompete weeds, which is why weeding is crucial in the first few weeks of development. It’s best to prevent weeds from maturing by frequently hand-weeding or using a cultivator (to cut the weeds just below the surface). Carrots are especially sensitive to weed crowding.

Harvesting: Carrots, beets, radishes, and turnips can be harvested whenever they reach a usable size; but left to overgrow, they will lose flavor and become woody–so monitor their development. Rutabagas and parsnips, on the other hand, can stay in the ground until late fall (and they're even sweeter after the first frost!). Most roots will come out of the ground easily when pulled, but the longer ones, like carrots or winter radishes, can be stubborn. For those, reach below the surface alongside the root and wiggle it back and forth a bit or twist gently before pulling. If removing an entire crop at once, a garden fork is helpful to loosen the soil right next to the plants. All the root crops mentioned here have edible tops as well: experiment with carrot top pesto or a turnip greens sauté. Take a look here for details on how to know when different types of vegetables are ready to be harvested.

Storing: By keeping (most) root veggies cold (between 32 and 40 degrees) and humid (between 80 and 95%), their shelf life can be extended for weeks and often months. Although not too many of us are lucky enough to live in a home with a real underground cellar, the same result can be achieved in a basement, or even a buried cooler. For cellaring inspiration, take a look at this stream of ideas. And, for a brief overview of how to store fruits and vegetables, see this helpful guide from from Cornell.

Tips for growing root vegetables from Hudson Valley Seed

Bed and Soil Preparation: This is often the root of root-vegetable growing problems. Root crops like a deep, loose, and well-drained soil to develop to full size. If your soil is suitable, till it well, then smooth the surface before sowing (to alleviate compaction after winter). If, however, your soil is very compacted and rocky (like so many places around here!), you will have much better success growing roots in a raised bed. Just make sure your raised bed or container is at least 10 square inches. Either way, add aged manure or compost to your beds or rows to provide additional nutrients to your plants. Most root crops do fine in partial sun, but full exposure is great.

Planting, Thinning, Watering, and Planting Again: Root crops grow best if sown directly to prevent root disturbance. All vegetables in this category prefer cooler weather and can be planted in spring for a summer harvest and in late summer for a fall (and winter storage) crop. For a steady supply of carrots, sow successively two or three times, in three-week intervals. Radishes are the fastest growing root and are great for successive sowing too. Spring and summer are also fast and small enough to inter-crop with any slower maturing plants, root or not, to save space in a small garden. Rutabagas and parsnips both require a long-growing season and should be sown as soon as danger of frost has passed.

Thinning is a step that cannot be skipped when it comes to root crops. Roots need space to stretch out and grow under ground, and crowding will result in a spindly-looking and unsatisfying harvest. The good news is that thinnings are delicious! Add these "baby greens" to salads and stir fries. Beets, carrots, parsnips, radishes, and turnips can be thinned (as soon as they are large enough for snacking) to two-inch intervals and the bulky rutabaga prefers eight inches of space. Carrots are notoriously slow to germinate; be patient–they'll come up!

Proper watering may mean the difference between a successful harvest or nothing at all, when it comes to root crops. About one inch of water per week is ideal. Whether it comes from rain or irrigation, it’s important to soak the soil with water, so that moisture seeps deep down. Surface watering can cause the roots to grow close to the surface and be small, misshapen, or dried out.

Weeding: Most root crops grow slowly at the beginning of their life and are unable to outcompete weeds, which is why weeding is crucial in the first few weeks of development. It’s best to prevent weeds from maturing by frequently hand-weeding or using a cultivator (to cut the weeds just below the surface). Carrots are especially sensitive to weed crowding.

Harvesting: Carrots, beets, radishes, and turnips can be harvested whenever they reach a usable size; but left to overgrow, they will lose flavor and become woody–so monitor their development. Rutabagas and parsnips, on the other hand, can stay in the ground until late fall (and they're even sweeter after the first frost!). Most roots will come out of the ground easily when pulled, but the longer ones, like carrots or winter radishes, can be stubborn. For those, reach below the surface alongside the root and wiggle it back and forth a bit or twist gently before pulling. If removing an entire crop at once, a garden fork is helpful to loosen the soil right next to the plants. All the root crops mentioned here have edible tops as well: experiment with carrot top pesto or a turnip greens sauté. Take a look here for details on how to know when different types of vegetables are ready to be harvested.

Storing: By keeping (most) root veggies cold (between 32 and 40 degrees) and humid (between 80 and 95%), their shelf life can be extended for weeks and often months. Although not too many of us are lucky enough to live in a home with a real underground cellar, the same result can be achieved in a basement, or even a buried cooler. For cellaring inspiration, take a look at this stream of ideas. And, for a brief overview of how to store fruits and vegetables, see this helpful guide from from Cornell.

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1272 Delaware Ave
Buffalo, NY
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