Centreville Day

Centreville Day Centreville Day
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one-day, outdoor festival celebrating the diverse traditions that make up the Centreville of yesterday, today and tomorrow! costume parade, trick or treat trail, ghost tours, tons of local talent onstage, get your ticket from G&C booth for free kids' rides!!; great hands-on history fun such as making candles, churning , butter, double-dutch and stories, free admission & parking, buy something fun in the marketplace!!

Operating as usual

Not Centreville, DC, but such a cool photo of what the city looked like in the 1860s ....
08/30/2020

Not Centreville, DC, but such a cool photo of what the city looked like in the 1860s ....

View of the Washington Aqueduct, spanning the Potomac River into Washington D.C. at Georgetown. It was one of the three major crossings from Virginia into the capital city (Chain Bridge and Long Bridge). Federal infantry columns crossed the three bridges to occupy Northern Virginia on May 23, 1861.

On the Virginia side, six forts were erected as part of the Arlington Line to guard the approaches to Washington along the Aqueduct. According to Brigadier General John G. Barnard, Chief Engineer Defenses of Washington:

"To that portion of the defenses covering the Aqueduct and Long Bridges and the intermediate heights of Arlington, the above term was quite commonly applied, not only from its importance, but from the fact that, as elsewhere explained, the system had its beginning in some of these works, and that, under the pressure of danger after the battle of Bull Run, the first approach to a connected line was made by interpolating the lunettes with stockaded gorges, Forts Woodbury, Cass, Tillinghast, and Craig, between Forts Corcoran and Albany.
#FindYourFort

IMAGE:
"Washington, D.C. The Aqueduct bridge and Georgetown from the Virginia bank."
The Library of Congress

Fairfax County Wildlife: The Snapping Turtle
08/14/2020
Fairfax County Wildlife: The Snapping Turtle

Fairfax County Wildlife: The Snapping Turtle

Tough looking critter, huh? Wish we could say he has a heart of gold, but mostly he just wants to be left alone. This is our local buddy, the snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina). It’s Virginia’s …

We regret to announce that the planning committee has decided that we cannot meet in-person for Centreville Day 2020. Bu...
08/13/2020

We regret to announce that the planning committee has decided that we cannot meet in-person for Centreville Day 2020. But watch these pages for new ways of keeping up our Centreville Day traditions such as the Pet Pageant, the Safety Expo, and tours of historic sites virtually. Centreville Day was cancelled when the world faced a global influenza pandemic at the end of World War I, but today we have innovative ways of sharing and coming together to celebrate Centreville past, present & future!

Manassas National Battlefield Park
08/12/2020

Manassas National Battlefield Park

On July 27, 1862, Brig. Gen. John Buford was appointed by Gen. John Pope as the commander of a brigade of cavalry attached to the Second Corps of the Army of Virginia under Gen. Nathaniel Banks. At the time, Pope was interested in reorganizing his cavalry into larger units that were loosely tied to the 3 corps of his army (similar organization of cavalry was already successfully in practice in the western theater.)

Pope’s appointment of Buford was the only one he made in his tenure as commander of the Army of Virginia; and was arguably one of the best decisions he made during the Northern Virginia Campaign. At Second Manassas, Buford led the Union cavalry in a battle on the third day. While his men lost the fight and he was wounded by a spent bullet in the knee, he had shown initiative, considered unusual for Union cavalry at the time, and his star began to rise.

Following the battle, he would continue with Gen. McClellan as his chief of cavalry in the Maryland Campaign and would also serve in the same role under Gen. Burnside at Fredericksburg. In early 1863, under Gen. Hooker, he would be appointed as commander of the reserve brigade of the Cavalry Corps. Buford would also fight in the largest cavalry battle in North American history at Brandy Station on June 9, 1863. But perhaps he is most famous for his role in the Battle of Gettysburg, where his actions bought time for Gen. Reynolds First Corps to deploy, which also in turn helped the Union seize strong defensive positions. After the battle, he doggedly pursued the Confederates, notably earning the respect of President Lincoln.

He continued to serve in the war that fall through the Bristoe Campaign in October 1863, but contracted typhoid fever in November, dying on December 16th. In his last moments he was told that President Lincoln had promoted him to major general for his performance at Gettysburg. Questioning whether it was the truth, when he received confirmation he commented, “It is too late, now I wish I could live.”

#findyourpark #encuentratuparque #manassasbattlefield #secondmanassas158 #militarymonday

Image: Brig. Gen. John Buford in uniform, seated in 3/4 profile, and facing our left. (LOC)

Friends of Historic Centreville
08/12/2020
Friends of Historic Centreville

Friends of Historic Centreville

Centreville Day. A celebration of Centreville Virginia's History and Community. Entertainment, Kids Activities, Marketplace, Historic Activities.

Lee-Fendall House Museum & Garden
08/08/2020

Lee-Fendall House Museum & Garden

For this seventh post in our summer archaeology series, it would be remiss if we didn’t talk about the largest category in our archaeology collection - ceramics. Today, we are showcasing pearlware - by far the most common type of ceramics found in the 2010 archaeological excavation of the garden.

Pearlware has been around since the late 1700s. English potters were on a quest to create their own version of Chinese porcelain. Preceding pearlware was creamware, which was, as you’d imagine, cream-colored (1st photo, left, dated 1762-1820). Around 1775, potters started adding cobalt to the glaze, giving these "china glaze" ceramics a blue tint like Chinese porcelain. In 1779, English potter Josiah Wedgewood developed his version, called “pearl white”. These pearlware ceramics (1st photo, middle, dated 1775-1840) were popular from the late 18th to early 19th centuries but declined in production by 1820 with the rise of whiteware, whiter due to less cobalt in its glaze (1st photo, right, dated after 1820).

Our collection contains many different patterns of pearlware, produced in different ways. Some pieces were underglaze handpainted - the pattern was handpainted on before the ceramic was glazed (2nd photo, top left, dated 1795-1825). Other pieces have transfer-printed decoration - a piece of tissue paper, with an ink design on it transferred from an engraved plate, was pressed into the ceramic (2nd photo, top right, dated 1800-1840). This piece also has stippling - using small dots to make the design. A few of our pieces are dipped pearlware - the ceramic has bands of colored slip (water-diluted clay) added to it (2nd photo, bottom left, dated 1790-1890). Finally, one of our pieces has sponged decoration - a sponge was dipped into a colored glaze and then dabbed onto the ceramic (2nd photo, bottom right, dated 1820-1840).

The most common pattern we have is shell-edged. This type of decoration was most common on tableware, like plates. We have both blue and green shell-edged pearlware (3rd photo, both dated 1800-1840). Check out the last photo of a more intact pearlware plate with blue trim from the amazing collection at Jefferson Patterson Park & Museum.

Special thanks to research volunteer Jed Veilleux!

Friends of Colvin Run Mill
08/01/2020

Friends of Colvin Run Mill

The mill took delivery of a new, custom-built model that will allow hands-on demonstrations of the simple machines that automate the mill.

We are looking forward to letting you try out the model when we open more fully.

The model was commissioned by the Friends of Colvin Run Mill and paid for with donations from the public.

Manassas National Battlefield Park
07/30/2020

Manassas National Battlefield Park

While a number of local women from Manassas did their part in nursing the wounded soldiers from both battles, one story, that of Margaret Benson and her husband Amos, has become nearly legend. Margaret and her husband lived near Sudley church (shown in the photograph) which was used as a hospital after the First Battle of Manassas. Returning home from the church one day after the battle, Margaret and Amos discovered a seriously wounded Union soldier, John Rice of the 2d New Hampshire Infantry, laying under a fence. Despite their Confederate loyalties, the couple went to get a surgeon’s help.

The surgeon dismissed Rice as a hopeless case, but Margaret and Amos didn’t agree. Margaret fetched food from her house as her husband cleaned Rice up. They fed and cared for the soldier where he lay for 10 days until he was well enough to be transported to a prison in Richmond. Years later, Rice returned to Manassas to thank Margaret and Amos and even helped them raise money for the rebuilt Sudley Church. The story spread as a symbol of post-war reconciliation, but Margaret and Amos weren’t the only ones to cross lines to help the wounded. Stay tuned for future #WomensHistoryWednesdays about Fanny Ricketts and Lucinda Dogan.

#WomenatMANA #WomensHistoryWednesday #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque

(Image from the Library of Congress)

Ellanor C. Lawrence Park Friends
07/18/2020

Ellanor C. Lawrence Park Friends

On Sunday, July 19, Ellanor C.Lawrence Park is turning into a real life Parkemon game board! Play outside. It’s in your nature! #fairfaxparks #eclp #socialdistance #pokemoncommunityday

Manassas National Battlefield Park
07/16/2020

Manassas National Battlefield Park

“Let the generations know that women in uniform also guaranteed their freedom.” -- Mary Edwards Walker

When war came, Mary Edwards Walker petitioned the government and the Union Army for a surgeon’s commission, which they persistently refused. At the First Battle of Manassas, Mary served as an unpaid orderly, wound dresser and surgeon’s assistant. In 1863, Mary received her commission as a “Contract Acting Assistant Surgeon (civilian)” in Ohio, becoming the first female US Army surgeon.

Mary often crossed battle lines to treat civilians. In 1864, while assisting a Confederate doctor with a surgery, she was arrested by Confederate troops and accused of being a spy. During her four months as a prisoner of war, she continued to refuse to wear women’s clothing. After being released four months later, Mary served at Louisville Women’s Prison Hospital and at an orphan’s asylum.

#WomenatMANA #WomensHistoryWednesday #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque

(Photo from the Library of Congress)

Ellanor C. Lawrence Park Friends
07/15/2020

Ellanor C. Lawrence Park Friends

Look for this little friend on the trails at ECLP this week! #eclp #fcpa #besafe #itsuptous #keepourparksopen

Fairfax County Park Authority
07/13/2020

Fairfax County Park Authority

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has left Frying Pan Farm Park with limited staff, but this has not discouraged Farm Manager Paul Nicholson. He continues to give exemplary care, including returning to the park at all hours of the night to check on sick or pregnant animals or to ensure that bottle-fed babies get their nightly milk before bed.

We are selfless. We are passionate. We are essential. We Are Parks and Recreation. Join us and the National Recreation and Park Association to celebrate the good work of park and recreation professionals during Park and Recreation Month! #WeAreParksAndRec

Fairfax County Park Authority
07/12/2020

Fairfax County Park Authority

Carousels are once again spinning at parks in Fairfax County, and the Burke Lake Park train is choo-chooing along the rails. Take the kids for a ride on your next park outing! You can now purchase tickets in advance for all these amusements. http://ow.ly/noKa50Au6iO

Ellanor C. Lawrence Park Friends
07/12/2020

Ellanor C. Lawrence Park Friends

Support ECLP on Community Day because our park is vital to our community!! eclp #parkemon #fcpa #eclpfriends #preservesupportprotect

Fairfax Museum and Visitor Center
07/11/2020

Fairfax Museum and Visitor Center

We'll see you Tuesday July 14!

Manassas National Battlefield Park
07/10/2020

Manassas National Battlefield Park

One of the most impressive women in medicine at the time of the Civil War was Mary Edwards Walker. Mary would become the first and only woman to earn the Medal of Honor.

Born on a farm in rural New York in 1832 to abolitionists Alvah and Vesta Whitcomb Walker, Mary worked as a schoolteacher until she earned enough to attend Syracuse Medical College at the age of 20. After receiving her degree in medicine in 1855, Mary attempted to open a medical practice, but found few clients willing to trust a woman as their doctor.

She married Albert Miller, wearing a suit and tie to the wedding, but insisted there was nothing in the ceremony that said she had an obligation to obey her husband. In just a few months, she kicked Miller out for infidelity. She then shifted gears to begin a second career as a public speaker, discussing many topics including her dislike for women’s clothing. When war seemed imminent, Mary prepared to put her medical training to use.

#WomenatMANA #WomensHistoryWednesday #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque

(Photo from the Library of Congress)

Science Through Nature
07/05/2020

Science Through Nature

Firefly season is upon us! Did you know that each species has its own unique flashing pattern? Or that chemistry is behind their ability to light up? Use this infographic to learn more about these incredible insects! #sciencethroughnature

Manassas National Battlefield Park
06/29/2020

Manassas National Battlefield Park

Mysteries of Manassas History...

The image below is often attributed as the home of Wilmer McLean, perhaps the one man who could make the claim that the war had started in his front yard and ended in his front parlor. However, no images of McLean’s estate, “Yorkshire” exist; and today in fact, the house is no longer standing.

The home below, originally labeled “Beauregard’s Headquarters, Manassas” is actually Liberia plantation, which was owned by the Weir family at the time of the First Battle of Manassas in 1861. The Weirs had built the home in 1825 on land that had been patented in the 1730s by Harriet Bladen Weir’s ancestor, Robert “King” Carter. By the time of the Civil War, the plantation was the home of the Weir family and approximately 90 enslaved workers. In March of 1862, when Union troops arrived in Manassas, the Weirs headed South; and from that point on, several different people would own the house and property. Today, it is owned by the City of Manassas and managed by the Manassas Museum. Notably, it occasionally serves as a site for the museum’s historical programming.

One of the interesting distinctions of this home is that it was visited during the course of the Civil War by both the President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, and the President of the Confederate States, Jefferson Davis. Liberia served as General Beauregard’s headquarters in 1861, aside from a few hours around the time of the fighting at Blackburn’s Ford on July 18th when he was using the McLean home as a headquarters, which is likely the source of the confusion over this image. It was during this time that Jefferson Davis, after arriving at the tail end of the First Battle of Manassas, would make his visit to Liberia. The next spring, the home would serve as Union General Irvin McDowell’s headquarters, and President Lincoln would visit Liberia to confer with him.

To read more about Liberia Plantation visit:
http://www.manassascity.org/221/Liberia-House-and-Grounds

#findyourpark #encuentratuparque #militarymondays #manassasbattlefield #nationalparkservice

Images retrieved from the Library of Congress. The second image is the back of the photo of Liberia plantation clearly labeled as "Beauregard's Headquarters," which is likely why this might have been believed to be the McLean home "Yorkshire" which served very briefly as General Beauregard's headquarters.

Centreville Day
06/19/2020

Centreville Day

Today Fairfax County recognizes Juneteenth, a celebration of freedom from slavery. Historically there are many "Juneteeth" days in addition to the June 19, 1865 day that Federal troops enforced the Emancipation Proclamation in Galveston Texas. This painting, by Eastman Johnson, depicts one enslaved family's "Ride to Liberty" the artist witnessed here in Centreville around 1862. Long before Lincoln would consider the Emancipation Proclamation, enslaved people asserted their own claims to freedom.

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5714 Mount Gilead Rd
Centreville, VA
20120

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Saturday 09:00 - 17:00

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Comments

We are having an outdoor drive-in concert and movie night at Old Centreville Crossing - could share Centreville Day info to guests too -
Do you have any space available for vendors? If so how do I get the application?
If you need a ticket or two or three - call G&C Tire and Auto Service. G&C Tire And Auto Service
Anyone have something interesting / memory to share about Burt Reynolds?
I would like to sign up as a vendor but am wondering if I would be considered a crafter or business vendor. I am a merchandiser for a children's clothing company.
Your Vote is your Voice. My name is Johnny Anderson. I'm running for re-election as your Official Village Idiot. I thank you for your support.
If you don't have to work tomorrow, or can take a long lunch - come by G&C Tire and Auto Service. We still have some glasses to give away in the morning. We are also holding on to some for the 2017 Solar Eclipse viewing event we are hosting. Great time to meet some people from the commnuity and enjoy this "sharing" event. We will have glasses that can be passed around so everyone gets a chance to experience this solar eclipse.
Cheryl.. email me, left you private msg.. Karen Washburn
Much appreciation to Northern Virginia Electric Coop (NOVEC) for being one of our Sponsors for Centreville Day 2017! We invite other businesses, corporations, individuals, etc., to be a sponsor for the 25th anniversary of Centreville Day. Learn more at the Centreville Day website.
Save the date: Saturday, October 21, 2017 - the 25th anniversary of Centreville Day! 10 - 5:00, Historic Centreville Park (Mt. Gilead and Braddock Roads). Entertainment, food, games, vendors, activities for kids, parade, Pet Pageant - a full day for the whole family. And no entrance fee! What is your earliest memory of Centreville Day? The first one in 1992 beside Centreville HS? Fireworks? The Parade down Union Mill Road? Share pictures from those early Centreville Days!