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OIG conducted a review of the disciplinary grievance procedure for Chicago Police Department (CPD) members and found tha...
05/20/2021

OIG conducted a review of the disciplinary grievance procedure for Chicago Police Department (CPD) members and found that it suffers from deficits of transparency and consistency, and that there are significant shortcomings in its practices and outcomes. The disciplinary grievance procedure is complex and involves several City agencies and private parties. The procedure is governed by the collective bargaining agreements negotiated between the City of Chicago and each of the unions representing sworn CPD members.

OIG found that between November 2014 and December 2017, arbitrations were assigned to only three arbitrators who exercise broad, unbounded discretion; settlements and arbitrations lack public transparency and consistency; and settlements don’t follow a consistent format or record all basic information.

OIG recommended CPD and the Department of Law (DOL), take measures such as: coordinating binding summary opinions and arbitration decisions annually, making grievance case information public, and expanding the pool of eligible arbitrators. CPD agreed with six of our eight recommendations. DOL agreed to partially implement one and thought one might need to be addressed by CPD unions. DOL provided various reasons why the remaining recommendations couldn’t or shouldn’t be implemented, including not having the data to do so or information being privileged.

“The availability of efficient, transparent, and consistent procedures is critical to the operation of the police disciplinary system,” said Deputy Inspector General for Public Safety Deborah Witzburg. “The need for clarity and transparency in police accountability systems has perhaps never been more urgent; while we appreciate CPD’s and DOL’s commitments to implement some of our recommendations, the City is missing other opportunities for transparency and accountability. We urge the City to implement each of our recommendations.”

See the report on our website:https://igchicago.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/OIG-Review-of-the-Disciplinary-Grievance-Procedure-for-Chicago-Police-Department-Members.pdf

#police #discipline #publicsafety

OIG conducted a review of the disciplinary grievance procedure for Chicago Police Department (CPD) members and found that it suffers from deficits of transparency and consistency, and that there are significant shortcomings in its practices and outcomes. The disciplinary grievance procedure is complex and involves several City agencies and private parties. The procedure is governed by the collective bargaining agreements negotiated between the City of Chicago and each of the unions representing sworn CPD members.

OIG found that between November 2014 and December 2017, arbitrations were assigned to only three arbitrators who exercise broad, unbounded discretion; settlements and arbitrations lack public transparency and consistency; and settlements don’t follow a consistent format or record all basic information.

OIG recommended CPD and the Department of Law (DOL), take measures such as: coordinating binding summary opinions and arbitration decisions annually, making grievance case information public, and expanding the pool of eligible arbitrators. CPD agreed with six of our eight recommendations. DOL agreed to partially implement one and thought one might need to be addressed by CPD unions. DOL provided various reasons why the remaining recommendations couldn’t or shouldn’t be implemented, including not having the data to do so or information being privileged.

“The availability of efficient, transparent, and consistent procedures is critical to the operation of the police disciplinary system,” said Deputy Inspector General for Public Safety Deborah Witzburg. “The need for clarity and transparency in police accountability systems has perhaps never been more urgent; while we appreciate CPD’s and DOL’s commitments to implement some of our recommendations, the City is missing other opportunities for transparency and accountability. We urge the City to implement each of our recommendations.”

See the report on our website:https://igchicago.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/OIG-Review-of-the-Disciplinary-Grievance-Procedure-for-Chicago-Police-Department-Members.pdf

#police #discipline #publicsafety

Last week, OIG's Public Safety section issued a series of flowcharts mapping investigative and disciplinary processes fo...
05/14/2021
Chicago Police Department Disciplinary Process Overview – Office of Inspector General

Last week, OIG's Public Safety section issued a series of flowcharts mapping investigative and disciplinary processes for Chicago Police Department (CPD) members. These flowcharts and accompanying documents offer a resource for the public, city officials, and Department members seeking to understand a complex and multivariate process: bit.ly/CPDDisciplinaryProcess.

“The investigative and disciplinary process for CPD members is complex to the point of threatening procedural fairness for those subject to it, and clouding the public’s view of its outcomes. This project aims to provide CPD members and members of the public with a clearer understanding of that process––a series of possibilities and outcomes, rooted in many layers of policies, rules, laws, and contracts––in an easier-to-digest visual form. This is a tangled and convoluted process that has historically puzzled stakeholders in all directions,” said Deputy Inspector General for Public Safety Deborah Witzburg. “Having this information centrally located, and regularly updated and evaluated by our office, will aid members of the public and members of the Department in navigating the disciplinary process, and better position the City to learn from its outcomes; these are critical steps in our ongoing efforts to bolster the transparency and legitimacy of the police accountability system.”

OIG is required by ordinance to examine sustained findings of misconduct committed by CPD members and accompanying disciplinary recommendations, in order to assess trends and determine whether discipline is consistently and fairly applied.

Chicago Police Department Disciplinary Process Overview Introduction The Office of Inspector General’s Public Safety section (OIG) is required by City ordinance to examine Sustained findings of misconduct committed by members of the Chicago Police Department (CPD) and accompanying disciplinary rec...

OIG’s Public Safety section has issued a second interim report on the Chicago Police Department’s (CPD) execution of sea...
05/06/2021

OIG’s Public Safety section has issued a second interim report on the Chicago Police Department’s (CPD) execution of search warrants, examining data from 2017 to 2020. OIG’s analysis found the following information, to inform efforts of the Department and other stakeholders to improve policies and practices:

• The system CPD uses to record information on search warrants does not capture certain critical data points, such as whether children were present or whether a search warrant was approved as a no-knock warrant.
• There are significant data quality concerns in CPD’s records, including incomplete addresses and missing target names.
• People of color were disproportionately targeted as subjects for search warrants.
• There has been some confusion in public conversation about the so-called “success rate” of CPD’s search warrants.

“This report is the second installment in the Public Safety section’s ongoing work on CPD’s search warrant practices and policies. Here, we look specifically at CPD’s data—what it tells us and what it doesn’t—regarding recent search warrants in order to better inform the ongoing policy debate and public conversation around the use of these warrants. CPD and members of the community are best served by a well-informed and productive reform process, and we hope to contribute to that process by providing accessible data as a platform for effective policy change,” said Deputy Inspector General for Public Safety Deborah Witzburg. “We are encouraged by CPD’s agreement with the recommendations we made in our first interim report earlier this year, and we will continue our work in this critical area.”

See the full report at: bit.ly/SearchWarrantData

OIG’s Public Safety section has issued a second interim report on the Chicago Police Department’s (CPD) execution of search warrants, examining data from 2017 to 2020. OIG’s analysis found the following information, to inform efforts of the Department and other stakeholders to improve policies and practices:

• The system CPD uses to record information on search warrants does not capture certain critical data points, such as whether children were present or whether a search warrant was approved as a no-knock warrant.
• There are significant data quality concerns in CPD’s records, including incomplete addresses and missing target names.
• People of color were disproportionately targeted as subjects for search warrants.
• There has been some confusion in public conversation about the so-called “success rate” of CPD’s search warrants.

“This report is the second installment in the Public Safety section’s ongoing work on CPD’s search warrant practices and policies. Here, we look specifically at CPD’s data—what it tells us and what it doesn’t—regarding recent search warrants in order to better inform the ongoing policy debate and public conversation around the use of these warrants. CPD and members of the community are best served by a well-informed and productive reform process, and we hope to contribute to that process by providing accessible data as a platform for effective policy change,” said Deputy Inspector General for Public Safety Deborah Witzburg. “We are encouraged by CPD’s agreement with the recommendations we made in our first interim report earlier this year, and we will continue our work in this critical area.”

See the full report at: bit.ly/SearchWarrantData

OIG audited the Chicago Department of Public Health’s (CDPH) COVID-19 contact tracing program to determine if CDPH manag...
04/29/2021

OIG audited the Chicago Department of Public Health’s (CDPH) COVID-19 contact tracing program to determine if CDPH managed privacy and cybersecurity risks associated with the collection, storage, and transmittal of data in accordance with City policies and CDC guidance. Although certain improvements to policies and procedures would encourage consistent and timely application of the security measures, OIG found that CDPH’s contact tracing program mitigates data privacy and cybersecurity risks.

OIG recommended a few operational changes to help improve the program and CDPH agreed with our recommendations.

“Contact tracing will continue to play an integral part in tackling the current pandemic by helping to address and manage cases, in an effort to minimize exposure and transmission throughout Chicago. Our audit finds that CDPH’s COVID-19 contact tracing program displays a commitment to security, privacy, and confidentiality standards––all a matter of high concern and import in protecting public privacy during a global health crisis,” said Inspector General Joe Ferguson. “As part of its overall and ongoing work to protecting communities from both cybersecurity and disease transmission risks, we encourage CDPH to continue to implement and update security needs as they develop.”

See more at: bit.ly/CDPHContactTracing

#covid19 #security #cybersecurity #privacy #PublicHealth #ContactTracing

OIG audited the Chicago Department of Public Health’s (CDPH) COVID-19 contact tracing program to determine if CDPH managed privacy and cybersecurity risks associated with the collection, storage, and transmittal of data in accordance with City policies and CDC guidance. Although certain improvements to policies and procedures would encourage consistent and timely application of the security measures, OIG found that CDPH’s contact tracing program mitigates data privacy and cybersecurity risks.

OIG recommended a few operational changes to help improve the program and CDPH agreed with our recommendations.

“Contact tracing will continue to play an integral part in tackling the current pandemic by helping to address and manage cases, in an effort to minimize exposure and transmission throughout Chicago. Our audit finds that CDPH’s COVID-19 contact tracing program displays a commitment to security, privacy, and confidentiality standards––all a matter of high concern and import in protecting public privacy during a global health crisis,” said Inspector General Joe Ferguson. “As part of its overall and ongoing work to protecting communities from both cybersecurity and disease transmission risks, we encourage CDPH to continue to implement and update security needs as they develop.”

See more at: bit.ly/CDPHContactTracing

#covid19 #security #cybersecurity #privacy #PublicHealth #ContactTracing

OIG released its 2021 First Quarter Report, which summarizes work from every section of the office, reflecting activity ...
04/16/2021

OIG released its 2021 First Quarter Report, which summarizes work from every section of the office, reflecting activity from Jan. 1 - Mar. 31. This quarter we received 701 complaints, concluded 456 matters, and published 6 reports.

Q1 investigations included: sexual assault and harassment, fraud and forgery, bribery, false statements, public indecency, and violations of the Ethics Ordinance—all of which are summarized to include OIG's recommendations and departments' disciplinary actions. Additional summaries include notifications about ambiguity within the Equal Employment Opportunity Policy concerning sexual harassment of members of the public by City employees, poor data quality in the Chicago Integrated Personnel and Payroll Systems; and reports on the Chicago Police Department's execution of search warrants, #GangDatabase, and response to George Floyd protests.

See the full report at: bit.ly/OIG2021Q1

OIG released its 2021 First Quarter Report, which summarizes work from every section of the office, reflecting activity from Jan. 1 - Mar. 31. This quarter we received 701 complaints, concluded 456 matters, and published 6 reports.

Q1 investigations included: sexual assault and harassment, fraud and forgery, bribery, false statements, public indecency, and violations of the Ethics Ordinance—all of which are summarized to include OIG's recommendations and departments' disciplinary actions. Additional summaries include notifications about ambiguity within the Equal Employment Opportunity Policy concerning sexual harassment of members of the public by City employees, poor data quality in the Chicago Integrated Personnel and Payroll Systems; and reports on the Chicago Police Department's execution of search warrants, #GangDatabase, and response to George Floyd protests.

See the full report at: bit.ly/OIG2021Q1

“CFD’s historical struggles with allegations of on-the-job discrimination and sexual harassment, alongside OIG’s audit f...
04/14/2021

“CFD’s historical struggles with allegations of on-the-job discrimination and sexual harassment, alongside OIG’s audit findings, demonstrate that more robust policies and enforcement are needed to protect CFD members,” said Inspector General Joe Ferguson. “Firefighters and paramedics live together while on duty, spend 24-hour shifts with each other, and work in a high-risk, high-stress environment where their lives and the lives of others depend on members’ cooperation and mutual trust. These conditions require a thoughtful and tailored approach that goes beyond adoption of the blanket policy that covers all City employees. While CFD has stated that it will wait until a new commissioner is appointed before developing a strategic approach to the issues raised in this audit, we recommend that the Department address these challenges sooner rather than later, and make a firm commitment to improving workplace conditions and culture for all of its dedicated members.”

See OIG's Audit of Policies and Practices Related to Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Within the Chicago Fire Department on OIG’s website: https://igchicago.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Audit-of-Policies-and-Practices-Related-to-CFD-Discrimination-and-Sexual-Harassment.pdf.

“CFD’s historical struggles with allegations of on-the-job discrimination and sexual harassment, alongside OIG’s audit findings, demonstrate that more robust policies and enforcement are needed to protect CFD members,” said Inspector General Joe Ferguson. “Firefighters and paramedics live together while on duty, spend 24-hour shifts with each other, and work in a high-risk, high-stress environment where their lives and the lives of others depend on members’ cooperation and mutual trust. These conditions require a thoughtful and tailored approach that goes beyond adoption of the blanket policy that covers all City employees. While CFD has stated that it will wait until a new commissioner is appointed before developing a strategic approach to the issues raised in this audit, we recommend that the Department address these challenges sooner rather than later, and make a firm commitment to improving workplace conditions and culture for all of its dedicated members.”

See OIG's Audit of Policies and Practices Related to Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Within the Chicago Fire Department on OIG’s website: https://igchicago.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Audit-of-Policies-and-Practices-Related-to-CFD-Discrimination-and-Sexual-Harassment.pdf.

OIG’s latest audit finds that the Chicago Fire Department’s (CFD) policies and practices related to discrimination and s...
04/14/2021

OIG’s latest audit finds that the Chicago Fire Department’s (CFD) policies and practices related to discrimination and sexual harassment are insufficient to meet the environmental challenges posed by the workplace.

We found that while CFD’s policies comply with baseline laws, the policies themselves--and the complaint process and training used to enforce and promote them--are insufficient. Also, the process for scheduling interviews for members who made formal complaints placed them at risk of retaliation and potentially discouraged them from reporting misconduct.

OIG's recommendations include: implementing training tailored specifically to CFD's environment; written guidance and training on handling complaints; appointing a diversity, equity, and inclusion officer; and developing a strategy with more safeguards to protect from retaliation. CFD agreed with most of these, but stated that it will not develop a strategic approach to address issues highlighted in OIG's audit until after a new commissioner is appointed.

See the audit at: bit.ly/CFDAudit

#firedepartment #harassment #discrimination #diversityequityinclusion #audit

OIG’s latest audit finds that the Chicago Fire Department’s (CFD) policies and practices related to discrimination and sexual harassment are insufficient to meet the environmental challenges posed by the workplace.

We found that while CFD’s policies comply with baseline laws, the policies themselves--and the complaint process and training used to enforce and promote them--are insufficient. Also, the process for scheduling interviews for members who made formal complaints placed them at risk of retaliation and potentially discouraged them from reporting misconduct.

OIG's recommendations include: implementing training tailored specifically to CFD's environment; written guidance and training on handling complaints; appointing a diversity, equity, and inclusion officer; and developing a strategy with more safeguards to protect from retaliation. CFD agreed with most of these, but stated that it will not develop a strategic approach to address issues highlighted in OIG's audit until after a new commissioner is appointed.

See the audit at: bit.ly/CFDAudit

#firedepartment #harassment #discrimination #diversityequityinclusion #audit

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The mission of the independent and non-partisan City of Chicago Office of Inspector General (OIG) is to promote economy, effectiveness, efficiency, and integrity by identifying corruption, waste, and mismanagement in City government. OIG is a watchdog for the taxpayers of the City and has jurisdiction to conduct investigations and audits into most aspects of City government.

If you see corruption, fraud, or waste of any kind, we need to hear from you. For more information, visit our website at: www.igchicago.org.

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