Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service-Johnson County

Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service-Johnson County The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service offers a diverse array of educational programs, activities, and resources.

Texas Range
06/25/2019

Texas Range

Too Hot to Spray?
Herbicide leaf applications on noxious brush and weeds are in full swing across the state. I often get asked when the cut-off time for spraying would be…which is of course going to vary from South to North Texas. However, it is a bit confusing when to stop leaf sprays when it is still warm enough for the plant to actively grow.

Hot conditions can impact the injury to plants by herbicides because plants develop a thicker wax layer on the leaf surface to reduce moisture loss. This barrier can keep herbicide from effectively entering the leaf. Also, the plant may slow down their rate of translocation and metabolism when it is really hot, decreasing the amount of chemical that is taken down to the roots to kill the plant.

So what is that cut-off date? Hard to say – but usually individual plant leaf treatments are more effective for longer into the summer than broadcast treatments. Once we get into the July heat down in South Texas, leaf applications are typically stopped, and more time is spent on stem and cut-stump applications.

Finally, keep in mind that ester formulations of herbicides can increase volatilizing when it’s really hot – so you may not want to use them near or under desirable trees when conditions are harsh.

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
06/20/2019

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

The largest number of human-caused wildfires is a result of careless debris burning. Burn household trash only in a burn barrel or other trash container equipped with a screen or metal grid to keep burning material contained. View more debris burning tips here: http://ow.ly/ifjh50unP2U

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
06/15/2019

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

Are you having trouble growing tomatoes? Check out the Tomato Problem Solver: http://ow.ly/nAtY50unNng

U.S. Department of Agriculture
06/12/2019

U.S. Department of Agriculture

In 2017, U.S. farms and ranches produced $388.5 billion in agricultural products, with the top 10 states accounting for 54% of sales!

Lookup your state 👉 http://ow.ly/EKrl50uBqRL

Events like these are sometimes few and far between. Agriculture pesticide waste collection event on June 13th from 8am ...
06/06/2019

Events like these are sometimes few and far between.

Agriculture pesticide waste collection event on June 13th from 8am to 12pm

Disposing of these products properly is worth the drive to Gatesville!

All information on the attached flyer!

05/30/2019
Controlling Algae in Farm Ponds

With Summer finally rolling around, many pond owners are now facing the issue of annoying algae growths in their ponds. This video will help you to identify what type or algae growths you are dealing with, as well as what your options are for managing or removing it.- Todd Sink

https://youtu.be/rj59ouOEgyE

With Summer finally rolling around, many pond owners are now facing the issue of annoying algae growths in their ponds. This video will help you to identify ...

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
05/27/2019

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

Texas Range
05/14/2019

Texas Range

Buttercup
Ranunculus spp.
Ranunculaceae
Description
There are 18 species of Ranunculus in Texas. These are perennial or annual herbs with a sharp, bitter taste.
The stem leaves are alternate, with palmlike veins, and are deeply lobed or dissected. The basal leaves usually have a distinctly different shape.
Flowers are arranged in fanshaped clusters. They usually have five glossy yellow petals and give rise to a small, dry fruit.
Habitat
There are two or more species of buttercup in every vegetational region of Texas. However, significant populations are usually found only in the eastern third of the state. Virtually all of the species require ample water and are found in seeps, mud flats, along ditches or in standing, shallow water.
Toxic Agent
All species are thought to contain a glycoside at various concentrations that is converted to protoanemonin, which acts as a blistering agent. The levels of glycoside increases greatly as the plants mature and reach the flowering stage.
Because protoanemonin is not stable, the plant is not a problem in hay. Although the toxin content varies widely within and among species of buttercup, a large amount of plant material is usually required to cause clinical signs with the species growing in Texas.
Signs of Livestock Ingestion
The signs of poisoning are those of severe gastrointestinal irritation and include: Red and/or ulcerated oral tissues; Salivation; Blood-tinged milk; Diarrhea; Abdominal pain; Depression or excitation; Convulsions; Death.
Most cases of buttercup poisoning in Texas are not life threatening. Horses consuming buttercup can die from colic.

Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service-Johnson County's cover photo
05/09/2019

Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service-Johnson County's cover photo

Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service-Johnson County
05/09/2019

Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service-Johnson County

05/08/2019
Tarrant County Master Gardener Association

With all the rain, keeping it for later is a great benefit!

Watch and learn how to make one at home!

How to Make a Rainbarrel with Phillip and Harold at the Tarrant County Resource Connection Demonstration Garden. It’s a great life learning and making a difference in Tarrant County!

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
05/05/2019

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

Monarch butterflies are making a comeback after years of decline. https://today.tamu.edu/2019/03/18/butterfly/ "Monarch caterpillars galore!" (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) by Vicki's Nature

Central Texas Beef Cattle Meeting! Producers from around the area reviving updates on heard health, beef market outlooks...
05/03/2019

Central Texas Beef Cattle Meeting!

Producers from around the area reviving updates on heard health, beef market outlooks, legislative updates from Farm Bureau, and marketing from Texas Beef Council.

Thank you @fallcreekranch for hosting us!

Thank you @txbeefteam and Somervell & Hood County @texasfarmbureau for sponsoring the meal!

It takes a team to pull these programs off and this is our Day in Texas Agriculture
Bosque Hood Somervel and Johnson @txextension

#agrilifeextension #mydayintexasag @mydayintexasag #beef #beefcattle #agriculturematters #education

05/03/2019
TAMU Quail Decline Initiative

TAMU Quail Decline Initiative

Texas wintergrass, AKA speargrass, can serve as nesting cover for quail. Its spear-like seeds are one way to identify it; here are some other characteristics to look for in this Plant of the Week!

Review your quail plants anytime with our YouTube playlist:
http://ed.gr/w7u8

Texas A&M Natural Resources Institute
05/01/2019

Texas A&M Natural Resources Institute

This week is Soil Stewardship Week - stay tuned each day as we share the five principles of soil health that are beneficial to remember as conservation stewards

Don’t forget about this Friday’s program! Call the office if you plan to attend to get a head count for meals! 817-5...
04/30/2019

Don’t forget about this Friday’s program! Call the office if you plan to attend to get a head count for meals! 817-556-6370

Remember one of the reasons a herbicide application does not work is “timing” this is a perfect read regarding that.
04/30/2019

Remember one of the reasons a herbicide application does not work is “timing” this is a perfect read regarding that.

Mesquite Leaf-Spray Timing Progress
It’s still too early for mesquite leaf-sprays in most areas of Texas. The photo above was taken in Wilson County on April 19, 2019. Soil temperature at a 12-inch depth was 70 degrees Fahrenheit and leaves were still light green. When soil temperatures reach 75 degrees Fahrenheit at 12-inches deep and leaves turn a uniform dark green, the leaf-spray window will be open

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
04/28/2019

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

Who can say this three times, real fast: "Good Garden Guest for Growth"? http://ow.ly/9Nj350rfeh2

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
04/27/2019

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

Attention all beef cattle producers! the 2019 Beef Cattle Short Course will take place on August 5-7 in College Station. Learn more here: http://ow.ly/P0JT50rfedu

Healthy Living in Johnson County
04/25/2019

Healthy Living in Johnson County

Come join us for a fun series, free of charge, that focuses on connecting lawn and garden care and living a healthy lifestyle! More details below. ⬇️

—The 20th Annual Central Texas Beef Cattle Meeting—Somervell, Bosque, Hood and Johnson County A&M AgriLife extension...
04/23/2019

—The 20th Annual Central Texas Beef Cattle Meeting—

Somervell, Bosque, Hood and Johnson County A&M AgriLife extension offices are partnering to hold the 20th annual
Central Texas Beef Cattle meeting. This educational program will feature Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Specialist in
entomology, beef cattle, and economics. The date for this event is May 3, 2019, with registration starting at 5:30
PM atFall Creek Ranch, 9301 Langdon Leake Court, Granbury, Texas.

The event is open for anybody to attend. It will provide relevant education in beef cattle operations.
Topics at this event will include hot industry topics and optimizing herd health with a production calendar conducted by Eric Kneese, DVM, Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences and Future beef market outlook and updates conducted by Jason Johnson, Agrilife Extension Agriculture Economist.

Dinner will be provided on site starting at 6:00PM with the program to follow at 6:30PM. Registration cost for the
program is $10 payable at the door. Please RSVP by April 28, 2019 if you plan to attend. To register for the program
you can contact Justin Hale at the Johnson County Extension Office at 817-556-6370 or by email:
[email protected]

04/23/2019

Master Gardener Interns from Hood, Somervell, and Johnson counties touring the gardens today!

#agrilifeextension #mydayintexasag #education #botanicalgardens #fortworthbotanicgardens #texasmastergardener #mastergardener

Spring! Everyone busy on nice afternoons and weekends! Planting everything you can get your hands on or perhaps your cle...
04/22/2019

Spring! Everyone busy on nice afternoons and weekends! Planting everything you can get your hands on or perhaps your cleaning up the landscape? Sometimes this involves mulching, don’t suffocate your gorgeous trees! Check out this guide to proper mulch placement around trees!

Share!

Just like you, trees need to breathe! Don’t suffocate your tree with a mulch volcano. Improper mulching keeps water trapped against the trunk and creates an environment ripe for fungi and bacteria, which can cause your tree to die. Learn more about proper mulch techniques at http://bit.ly/2IeWG2y 🌲🍃 #TreeCare

Ag 101
04/22/2019

Ag 101

Forage Establishment of Bermuda grass season here! Read up and throw it down! I hope this information is helpful and edu...
04/20/2019
Establishing Bermudagrass | Forage Fax

Forage Establishment of Bermuda grass season here! Read up and throw it down!

I hope this information is helpful and educational!

Share!

https://foragefax.tamu.edu/2019/04/19/establishing-bermudagrass/

Establishing Bermudagrass Posted on April 19, 2019 by vanessa.corriher As temperatures rise we often start getting an itch to plant. When it comes to establishing bermudagrass from sprigs there are several things to keep in mind before we start tilling the soil… Tifton 85 Sprigs loaded in a Bermud...

Texas Range
04/16/2019

Texas Range

Root Health and Grazing
How healthy are the roots on your grasses in the pasture? Livestock do not consider all grasses as equal. Naturally they will favor the more palatable grasses and graze them first. It’s important to maintain a close eye on these “ice cream plants” because overgrazing can cause roots to suffer. After rainfall events, these damaged roots will not be able to reach the stored sub-soil moisture and continue to grow. Leaving half of the full plant height as stubble will help maintain healthy roots. These roots are valuable for breaking up the soil surface, allowing rain to infiltrate. Remaining stubble will protect the soil from erosion, shade the ground from weed growth, and eventually return to the soil as organic matter. You may have noticed that grasses left in good condition at the end of the fall growing season “greened-up” faster than those overgrazed. Maintaining conservative stocking rates and rotating livestock to a new pasture when half of the desirable plants have been grazed will keep your pasture heathy for the long-term. A good rule-of-thumb for how grass should be ungrazed is to leave 12-14 inches on tall grasses, 6-8 inches on midgrasses, and 2-3 inches on short-grasses.

Neil Sperry
04/15/2019

Neil Sperry

Garden Tip: Folks, the most common question I've ever been asked is "What grass is best for the shade?" It's been asked here perhaps a dozen times in the past week or two. Before you spend a lot of money on sod to fill in the bare spots, you might want to read what follows. It might save you hundreds of dollars.

This is a lengthy discussion that I've left archived in my Notes on this page. I'm just going to copy and paste it in its entirety to cover the topic once and for all.

(Photo is from our TOTAL SHADE yard this afternoon 4.14.19 as the pecans begin to leaf out. It's a panorama of our rural backyard, so you may need to click on it to see it side to side. It has changed so much from three weeks ago.)

DEALING WITH SHADE:

If your trees grow the way you hope they will, sooner or later you're likely to run into issues with turfgrass that is thinning and flowers that aren't blooming.

My family lives in a pecan forest, and we've gone through those stages of "full-sun-transitioning-into-full-shade" landscaping. Plants that I chose to grow in full sun gradually found themselves, instead, in full shade. And, they weren't the least bit pleased with the changes. Here are some notes of how I've handled the situation at our house. Perhaps they'll be of help as you face the same issues.

My first step was to rethink our design. How much turf did I really need anyway. Our kids are grown, and play areas aren't as critical – until the grandkids come by for a visit. There are other places where we could set up a quick yard game if we needed to. That meant that those former turf areas that no longer could handle the shade could now be turned over to groundcovers.

St. Augustine, our most shade-tolerant turfgrass, needs at least five hours of direct sunlight daily to maintain itself (a couple hours less in South Texas). Zoysias need 6 or 7. Bermuda needs 8. In North and Northwest Texas where fescue can be grown, it needs 5 hours.

If you don't have those levels of sunlight, there are groundcovers that need no direct sunlight. I've used regular mondograss most plentifully. I like its soft, grass-like texture. It stays short, to 6 to 8 inches tall, and it forms a dense planting in a hurry. It's especially good at holding soil on slopes.

I've also used a lot of Asian jasmine and purple wintercreeper euonymus, two of our best full-sun groundcovers. They also do well in shade.

I use two other knee-high plants as tall groundcovers, or in lieu of shrubs. Wood fern serves mightily. It's a lovely fine-textured fern that grows to 18 to 24 inches tall. Other ferns are also available, but wood fern has been my "go-to" performer. I also have a lot of cast iron plant (aspidistra). It's among the coarsest-textured plants that we grow. It's especially pretty when I grow it alongside the aforementioned wood ferns. I do have to cover the aspidistra in winter cold spells, however. It's not too happy with North Texas extremes in our rural Collin County landscape.

Sometimes, however, you want to leave the turf right where it is, yet the shade is still causing you grief. What are the alternatives? Try removing any sick or undesirable trees. Usually there are a few plants that have outlived their usefulness. While you should never remove a contributing part of a garden, if a tree is misshapen or lethargic, get it out of the way and let the sun shine on through.

Other times, you may want to remove lower limbs from large shade trees. That's especially possible for tall, arching trees like pecans, red oaks and pistachios. It's much more difficult with spreading trees like mulberries, live oaks and hackberries where lower limbs are parallel to the ground. Where it does work, however, removing just one or two limbs can really make a difference in the quality of turfgrass below.

If you need shrubs that can hold up to the shade, choose first from the many, many types of hollies. With mature heights ranging from 2 to 20 or more feet, there is a holly for literally any type of landscaping need. Use several types, and cluster them in natural woodland groupings beneath your large trees. Your nurseryman can suggest the best types.

Other dependable shade performers include cleyera, fatsia and the several mahonias. Each of these plants brings a special charm to its surroundings. Whether you want the glossy, polished look of the cleyera foliage or the large and bold texture of the fatsias, you'll have show plants for your gardens. Mahonias are related to nandinas, and they share the same bold and upright, somewhat stemmy appearance. In fact, I have used nandinas and been very happy with their appearance. Where winter sun hits them after our trees lose their leaves I still get the rich colors, and I love their soft textures.

Oakleaf hydrangeas are sensational woody shrubs. Their dinner plate-sized leaves are dark green all summer, turning crimson in late fall. The floral bracts are large and lovely white. The plants thrive in the shade, and they grow to 5 or 6 feet tall and equally wide.

Color becomes a bit of a challenge in the shade garden. Impatiens will bloom well where they get morning sun and afternoon shade, but they'll "go all to leaves" if they're in heavy shade. Begonias aren't a lot different, although if you have "bright shade," Dragon Wing begonias can be very showy. Cutting-grown coleus varieties will also color best with half a day of sunlight.

If you have really heavy shade and you want warm-season color, you probably ought to stick with caladiums, long-time proven performers in southern shade gardens. Try the strap-leafed types as well. They stay perky for several weeks more than the old-fashioned "fancy-leafed" types.

I use textures as a substitute for color in our shade gardens. I use tropical plants with their wild and curious leaves, many attractively variegated. Ferns and philodendrons. Crotons and colocasias. You can create a fabulous landscape using nothing but foliage.

Shade need be no major worry as it evolves in your landscape. All it requires is a little foresight and planning. This might be the year you decide to make those necessary changes.

Address

1 N Main St, Ste 309
Cleburne, TX
76033

Opening Hours

Monday 13:00 - 17:00
Monday 08:00 - 12:00
Tuesday 13:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00
Wednesday 13:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 12:00
Thursday 13:00 - 17:00
Thursday 08:00 - 12:00
Friday 13:00 - 17:00
Friday 08:00 - 12:00

Telephone

(817) 556-6370

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