Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service-Johnson County

Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service-Johnson County The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service offers a diverse array of educational programs, activities, and resources.
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Those seeking information on pond weeds and management can participate in this course. A TDA CEU hour will be given thro...
06/05/2020

Those seeking information on pond weeds and management can participate in this course. A TDA CEU hour will be given through this course as well.

Aquatic weed growth is a serious management problem for Texas pond owners. On June 9 from noon to 1 p.m., the Texas A&M Extension Service will cover various aspects of how to identify and manage different types of aquatic vegetation.

The program offers one Texas Department of Agriculture continuing education unit in integrated pest management for those seeking CEU credits.

🔗https://ext.ag/301kI9B

"An announcement from the Texas Animal Health Commission, TAHC, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Cattle Fever Ti...
05/29/2020
Cattle fever tick numbers on the rise - Animal Science

"An announcement from the Texas Animal Health Commission, TAHC, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program, USDA-CFTEP, that cattle fever tick infestations have spread outside the permanent quarantine zone prompted concern from AgriLife experts, who last dealt with a large outbreak in 2017."

https://animalscience.tamu.edu/2020/05/28/cattle-fever-tick-numbers-on-the-rise/

AgriLife experts warn of ticks’ potential negative economic impact Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are working to help thwart the spread of cattle fever. An announcement from the Texas Animal Health Commission, TAHC, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.....

RHDV2 was found in Lampasas and Hamilton Counties recently.  This is a highly contagious, deadly virus, affecting domest...
05/14/2020

RHDV2 was found in Lampasas and Hamilton Counties recently. This is a highly contagious, deadly virus, affecting domestic and wild rabbits.

At this time, the ARBA is asking breeders close to outbreaks to enact strict bio-security measures to reduce the opportunity of their herds contracting this deadly virus. Rabbit breeders are encouraged to not utilize cross country transport service during this time in an effort to contain the outbreak and protect rabbit populations across the continent.

Don't forget about tomorrows webinars hosted by McLennan County Extension Office. "Reagan Noland, Extension Agronomist f...
05/13/2020

Don't forget about tomorrows webinars hosted by McLennan County Extension Office.

"Reagan Noland, Extension Agronomist from Angelo will be talking about “Storing Grain” and Mark Welch, Extension Economist will speaking on “Ag Commodity Market Update.” Reagan and I have talked about planting certified seed, and how long you can plant collected seed before it loses its genetically improved advantage, wild heads in wheat fields, stands that are not uniform, etc."

Please preregister by clicking on the link. Once you have registered you can attend on your smart phone, computer, ipad, etc. When you register you can mark that you need a CEU (IPM).

Register for this Program: https://tinyurl.com/y9nutuw7

The Johnson County Extension Office will soon be moving into a new office. With this new space we have made the decision...
05/08/2020

The Johnson County Extension Office will soon be moving into a new office. With this new space we have made the decision to feature different aspects of Johnson County Extension Life. We will be holding this photo contest to select works of photography to be placed on canvas and featured in our new conference room.

The attached flyer has further instructions and information on this great opportunity to be recognized in a meeting place of knowledge, leadership and youth development for our county community. We are encouraging all the folks that are involved in production agriculture, youth education, and extension programming to submit photos that represent our community and culture.
Please also share with anyone you think would enjoy this opportunity to share their talents!

Links:
Entries: http://joco4h.square.site
Photo uploads: http://tinyurl.com/JoCoExtContest

State testing is coming back to Johnson County this next Monday, May 4th.No doctors order is required and the test is fr...
04/30/2020

State testing is coming back to Johnson County this next Monday, May 4th.

No doctors order is required and the test is free of charge. You do, however, need an appointment.

Please share this so we can get as many people aware of it as possible!

State testing is coming back to Johnson County this next Monday, May 4th.

No doctors order is required and the test is free of charge. You do, however, need an appointment.

Please share this so we can get as many people aware of it as possible!

Jamie

Johnson County Master Gardeners - Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
04/29/2020

Johnson County Master Gardeners - Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

Growing Tomatoes in Johnson County

Tasty and prolific tomatoes are the ultimate goal of most vegetable gardeners in Johnson County and all over the world. Before you get started, here is a review of the basics of tomato production.
PLANT SELECTION. Small and medium size tomatoes will be most successful in our area because of the intense heat in the middle of summer. Tomatoes will continue to bloom, but will not set fruit reliably, once night time temperatures reach the mid-seventies. The cherry type tomatoes are exceptions and will produce throughout the summer. Because of the heat you will have very little success with very large tomatoes like beefsteak and with most heirloom tomatoes. If you have lots of space, try a few, but don’t depend upon them for your real crop. These are some tried and true varieties frequently grown in this part of Texas. They should be available at local nurseries and at the Johnson County Master Gardener Plant Sale on April 4 in Cleburne.
• Large
o Big Beef-Has old time flavor and is highly disease resistant. Sets fruit early compared to other large tomatoes. Has been grown commercially near Cleburne.
o Phoenix 403-Vigorous and compact with excellent disease resistance.
o Tycoon-This Texas Superstar is a very prolific producer and has superior disease resistance.
• Medium
o Celebrity-Reliable and probably the most widely planted tomato in home gardens. Very productive, strong plants produce round red tomatoes.
o Early Girl-A very tasty old favorite and early producer. Ideal for canning.
o Tasmanian Chocolate-A dwarf plant ideal for pots and small gardens, it grows to 3.5 feet tall, produces full size tomatoes and will need staking.
• Paste
o Roman Warrior-An improved Roma type that produces huge sets of large paste tomatoes for canning.
• Small
o Juliet-Produces from early summer through frost.
PLANTING. Choose a site that gets at least 6 hours of sun each day. Good drainage is a must. Prepare the area several weeks in advance by working the top 8” of soil and digging in about 3” of organic material. Do not plant until all danger of frost has passed and be ready to cover the plants if needed. Tomatoes cannot survive freeze or even frost. At planting time work in ¼ to ½ cup of slow release fertilizer where each plant will be set. In order to get a head start on the hot weather, purchase healthy 6”-8” transplants. It is essential to allow 4 feet between plants in all directions so that air can circulate. Though that looks like far too much space when you first plant, it will help with disease control and allow access for care and harvesting. Place the transplant deeper in the hole than in the pot. If plants are lanky, they can even be placed at an angle with part of the stem buried. Immediately place a cage, sides wrapped with fiber row cover or even plastic wrap, over each plant. This greatly reduces loss from transplant shock. Later the fabric can be removed, but the cages will stay in place to support the grown plants.
CARE. Tomatoes need even watering. Water thoroughly, but not too often. Twice a week may suffice depending on your soil. Tomatoes don’t like wet feet, but will be less productive if allowed to wilt. There is no way to set a rule for how often to water. Drip irrigation is preferred. Keep weeds out of area by shallow cultivation or the use of mulch. Once the first fruit has set, begin to fertilize every 3 to 4 weeks.
INSECTS AND DISEASE. Early blight can be a major problem. It is a fungus that begins on the lower leaves and progresses upward. This can be prevented by removing the growth on the lower 8” to 10” of the plant after it is 18” high. Fungicides will help, but need to be used early as they are a preventative, not a cure. Be sure to spray the underside of the leaves. Watch for spider mites when temperatures get warm. High pressure water sprays applied to the bottom of leaves several times a week will help to prevent a buildup. Stink bugs are a problem that can usually be prevented by hand picking as can hornworms. Insecticides are available, but be very careful to read and follow all directions for food crops.
Joan Leach, Johnson County Master Gardener

Neil Sperry
04/27/2020

Neil Sperry

Garden Tip: BAGWORM SIGHTING! This PHOTO ON LEFT was posted here today by Holly Riggs Mueller of McKinney. She has circled several ULTRA-TINY bagworms already feeding actively on junipers in her neighborhood. This is April 26, and that's a month earlier than I've ever seen them in North Central Texas.

THIS IS THE TIME TO CONTROL THEM! Almost any general-purpose insecticide will kill bagworms at this point. Bacillus thuringiensis (B.t.), Sevin, Spinosad, Malathion, Permethrin – the problem is not in finding a labeled insecticide. It's in applying it early, before they do serious damage to junipers, arborvitae, cypress and other conifers.

Thanks, Holly, for this great heads-up! Her photo is on the left. What bagworms, if left unchecked, will become by June on the right.

Office of the Governor Greg Abbott
04/24/2020

Office of the Governor Greg Abbott

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service is providing free online training to help local officials understand, acquire & administer federal assistance available through the CARES Act.

The first session providing an overview for local governments is available now ↓

https://agrilifelearn.tamu.edu/product?catalog=TAEX-001

Additional sessions will dive into specifics of individual programs based on the needs of state and local officials.

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

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AUSTIN - Governor Greg Abbott today announced that Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service will provide a series of free online trainings to help local officials understand, acquire, and administer federal assistance available to the state of Texas and municipalities through the Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act and recently passed Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. Beginning today, AgriLife Extension will offer these trainings online to help local leaders navigate the federal funding process, and in turn, respond and recover from the COVID-19 pandemic as quickly and effectively as possible.

In conjunction with the announcement, the Governor joined Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp and Texas Division of Emergency Management Chief Nim Kidd for a series of calls with Mayors and County Judges, members of the Texas Legislature, and the Texas congressional delegation today to provide details on the training, walk leaders through the process, and answer questions about federal funding.

"Our local officials have done a tremendous job leading their communities throughout the COVID-19 response, and the state of Texas will continue to work alongside them and provide these leaders with the resources and support they need during this challenging time," said Governor Abbott. "These online trainings will assist local leaders in efficiently navigating the federal funding process and ensure that our communities receive the financial support that they need in a timely manner."

"One thing we learned during our response to Hurricane Harvey was that federal funding is invaluable in the recovery process," said John Sharp, Chancellor of The Texas A&M University System. "However, it comes with all sorts of strings and requirements that can be confusing to those who don’t know the rules. AgriLife Extension agents are well-positioned to guide county judges, mayors and other local officials through the federal funding maze."

The first online training, Federal Relief: An overview for local governments, is available now. Additional trainings will dive into the specifics of individual programs based on the needs of state and local officials. Extension agents will be available to assist local leaders with questions throughout the training and subsequent federal funding application process.

The CARES Act authorizes approximately $2 trillion in federal stimulus funds to combat the crisis and stabilize the economy, including $150 billion available directly to states, territories and tribal governments. This includes a number of programs to address the issues that states and local governments are facing as they work to protect their communities during this challenging time.

The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service is a unique education agency that provides programs, tools, and resources on a local and statewide level that teach people improved agriculture and food production, advanced health practices, environmental protection, economic, and youth programs.

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Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
04/17/2020

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

There is a flood of information surrounding #COVID19 and it can be confusing to sift through what is fact or myth. AgriLife Extension experts separate fact from fiction and help clear up confusion surrounding the novel coronavirus.

Read here: ext.ag/COVIDmyths

04/14/2020
AggieTurf: Texas A&M Turfgrass Program

AggieTurf: Texas A&M Turfgrass Program

Happy Turfie Tuesday! Here is the second video in our series - nearly 70 minutes on general turfgrass management! It is lengthy, but you'll find a lot of information. Be sure to join Dr. Grubbs-Bowling next Monday at 6pm for a live Q&A on all things general management!

AggieTurf: Texas A&M Turfgrass Program
04/13/2020

AggieTurf: Texas A&M Turfgrass Program

Don't forget to join Dr. Segars TONIGHT as she goes live at 6pm to answer your questions on turfgrass selection and other timely turf topics!

Grandma knows best!
04/11/2020
AgriLife Today

Grandma knows best!

Have you found yourself "getting back to basics" when it comes to food and self-sufficiency during #COVID-19? Maybe googling some things you wish you'd remembered from your grandma? Well, you're not alone! Texas A&M University Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service tamu.ag/3e9W4Il

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
04/10/2020

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

Take your garden to the next level! Gardening 101 is a free online course from #AgriLifeExtension that covers:

🔹plant growth and development
🔹soil, water and plant nutrition
🔹landscaping and lawn care
🔹and more!

Enroll today: http://ow.ly/BOrL50zb1ei

For more resources you can use while #socialdistancing go to http://ow.ly/QnOa50zb1ej

04/10/2020
Texas Range Extension

Mesquite Spraying Basics!

Learn the basics of mesquite treatments and timing for herbicide applications in this short video!

04/09/2020
Texas Range Extension

These can be seen throughout Johnson County. It’s crucial to understand the stages of this plant.

Do you know the Texas Thistle? (2nd in Dr. Rector's Thistle Series)

Texas thistle is the most common thistle throughout the southern half of Texas in the spring. It can be found growing in all vegetation areas of the State except for the High Plains and the Piney Woods. It is a native, cool season annual, biennial or perennial that flowers beginning in late February to July and August.

Texas thistle, also commonly named Southern thistle (Cirsium texanum Buckl.), is a member of the Sunflower Family. Having no ray flowers, the central disk flowers are pink and the flowering head is globe-shaped and underlined with phyllaries (leaf like parts right below the flower) that are narrow and sharply spine tipped. The leaves are more narrow at the base, leaves on both sides of the stem with spine-tipped margins.

ID Tip: The underneath side of the leaf is covered with dense woolly hairs so thick that you cannot see the underlying green of the leaf.

Address

1 N Main St, Ste 309
Cleburne, TX
76033

Opening Hours

Monday 13:00 - 17:00
Monday 08:00 - 12:00
Tuesday 13:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00
Wednesday 13:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 12:00
Thursday 13:00 - 17:00
Thursday 08:00 - 12:00
Friday 13:00 - 17:00
Friday 08:00 - 12:00

Telephone

(817) 556-6370

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