National Black Police Association

National Black Police Association www.blackpolice.org National Black Police Association was founded in 1972 in St. Louis, MO. The National Chairman is Malik Aziz.

and is a vanguard and voice for minority law enforcement officers in the United States. Mission Statement: To increases the awareness of the community, to be the conscience of the Criminal Justice System, and to enhance the quality of life in the African American Community.

It is with Great Sadness that we announce the passing of NBPA Region II President Melvin Vester.  Visitation and Serv...
05/16/2018

It is with Great Sadness that we announce the passing of NBPA Region II President Melvin Vester. Visitation and Services will be as follows:

Viewing Thursday
May 17, 2018 between 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
St. John Missionary Baptist Church
2501 South Main Street
Little Rock, Arkansas 72204

Funeral Service will be held Friday May 18, 2018 at 11:00 am
St John Missionary Baptist Church
2501 S Main Street
Little Rock, Arkansas 72204

Superior Funeral Home
5017 East Broadway
North Little Rock, Arkansas 72117
(501) 945-9922

Hotel Lodging
4 Points.Sheraton
(501) 664-5020
CODE: VE15AA $79

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of longtime NBPA Member, George Bedford.Services for Mr. Bedford a...
09/15/2017

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of longtime NBPA Member, George Bedford.

Services for Mr. Bedford are as follows:

Wake:
Friday, September 15, 2017
Southern Crest Full Gospel Baptist Church
2325 Locust Ave.
Dallas, Texas 75216
6:30 PM - 8:30PM

Funeral:
Friday, September 15, 2017
Southern Crest Full Gospel Baptist Church
2325 Locust Ave.
Dallas, Texas 75216
12:30 PM

Join us for the2017 45th Annual National Education and Training Conferencein Dallas, TexasJuly 30, 2017 - August 6, 2017...
06/22/2017

Join us for the
2017 45th Annual National Education and Training Conference
in Dallas, Texas
July 30, 2017 - August 6, 2017
THEME:"WE ARE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER!"

Go to:
http://files.constantcontact.com/507fd920101/d36786f5-ce26-4f4c-b9a2-4c84ed0b748e.pdf
to download the brochure

Where:
Renaissance Dallas Hotel
2222 N Stemmons Frwy.
Dallas, TX 75207

Hotel Information:
Call: 800.468.3571
Code: NPBA or National Black Police Association
Cost: $139 Per Night
Cut off for price is July 10, 2017

03/17/2017

2017 CALL FOR WORKSHOPS
The Workshop Schedule Planning for the 2017 NBPA 45th Annual National Education and Training Conference, July 30 - Aug. 6, 2017, has begun. The Renaissance Hotel in Dallas, Texas, will be our host hotel. The workshop dates available will be Pre-Conference July 30th and 31st and August 2-4.

If you wish to teach a workshop please go to
http://blackpolice.org/forms/2017/2017callforworkshops.pdf

Email forms to
[email protected]

If you have any questions, please contact the office.

Thank You

01/26/2017

National Black Police Association

“Dedicated to promoting justice, fairness, and effectiveness in law enforcement.”

The National Black Police Association Stands for Continued Action Forward on the Civil Rights Agenda and in Criminal Justice Reform from the Trump Administration

DALLAS, TX – January 23, 2017 – The National Black Police Association (NBPA) was established in 1972, with a mission to increase the awareness of the community, to be the conscience of the criminal justice system, and to enhance the quality of life in the African-American community. We serve as the guardians of truth and equity in the process of criminal justice, and stand for integrity and respect in policing for all.

As an organization that represents officers of color in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Bermuda, and the Caribbean, we are extremely concerned about a document entitled, “The Trump Administration: The First 100 Days,” that the National Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) forwarded to the new presidential administration, asking President Trump to consider potential actions on a number of matters that we feel are key to the relationship between police and the communities we serve.

It is not our intent to work counter to our sisters and brothers of the FOP. Many NBPA members are also members of the FOP, and we have mutual concerns which we agree need to be addressed, even if we differ on how to achieve end results. However, we feel it is our duty to bring to your attention those issues that the NBPA feels run counter to supporting civil rights in America, and in establishing needed criminal justice reform.

* Rescindment of President Obama’s January 2015 Executive Order 13688, which governs state and local law enforcement agencies’ acquisition of surplus military equipment through the Department of Defense’s Excess Property Program, also known as the 1033 Program. Police militarization is historically a huge barrier to community relations in this country. The type of equipment that is used, and when it is used, can be key to building bridges, or to straining community relations further. Most of the acquisitions are designed for use on a battlefield, not in neighborhoods, some of which are already disadvantaged by crime, poverty, poor education and joblessness. They need various forms of focused assistance, not police occupation. We do understand, however, that there are instances, though rare, in which a police agency would need to use an armored truck or riot gear, such as safely retrieving an injured officer or hostage from a deadly incident, or responding to an out-of-control riot situation. However, day-to-day use of equipment such as .50-caliber guns and explosives is not generally part of the responsibility of your standard law enforcer. We would like to see continued monitoring of the program, as well as a limit to the amount and type of equipment that is being issued. Imagery and symbolism are as important today as it was when police officers used dogs and water hoses to control civil rights protestors in the 1960’s. If an officer presents as an occupying force, he will be seen as the occupying force instead of a traditional law enforcer with the safety and protection of all citizens as a priority.

* Deprioritizing recommendations made by President Obama’s May 2015 Task Force on 21st Century Policing. Ronald L. Davis, former Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) stated, when the final report was delivered in 2015, “…the report represented a defining moment in American policing and a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to redefine policing in a democratic society.” Continued use of policing tactics of yesteryear has
resulted in increased and ever-widening rifts between law enforcement agencies and communities of color in America. That is why the NBPA was asked to contribute to the effort, along with dozens of other law enforcement and community partners and elected officials, to develop best practices for criminal justice today, which would honor both law enforcement and the communities we serve. Those recommendations came in the form of Six Pillars that support community policing efforts:

1. Building Trust through accountability, transparency and procedural justice, and acknowledging barriers, both past and present. This creates and sustains legitimacy.
2. Developing Policies that are not only effective, but that also provide necessary oversight.
3. Providing Technology that supports crime reduction and is also responsibly utilized.
4. Crime Reduction through positive community relations and partnerships.
5. Providing the best Training and education to affect contemporary policing strategies.
6. Making Officer Wellness and Safety—both mentally and physically—a priority.

Since its establishment in 1994, the COPS office has been invaluable to the law enforcement community, providing information and resources to policing agencies all over the country. The Six Pillars that they helped to deliver are a solid standard for community policing. Defunding the COPS office at this crucial time would have a devastating effect on policing in America. The NBPA stands behind the collaborative effort of all of the stakeholders, to develop the recommendations put forth by the Task Force on 21st Century Policing. We recognize the importance of these recommendations in moving law enforcement ahead, not backwards, in a contemporary America.

* Reversing the Federal government’s position on private prisons. Starting in 2016, the Obama administration began to phase out and scale back the use of private prisons. Reasons for the actions are 1) private prisons have been deemed less safe and secure for both inmates and correctional workers; 2) private prisons hold only 12% of the federal prison population, and that number is declining—they are no longer an effective or practical means of addressing overcrowding from other prisons; 3) private prisons have long been a cash cow, allowing private companies to make millions of dollars through mass incarceration—but delivering poor service in return. Mass incarceration disproportionately effects communities of color, and prison profits are driven by the number of inmates that can be delivered, which cyclically sustains the unequal levels of incarceration—it is easy to incarcerate people of color, who have, since Reconstruction, been the face of crime in this country, however unwarranted that label is. We would like to see a continued scaling back and phasing out of the use of private prisons, for the fiscal benefit of all communities, but particularly for communities of color, which are disproportionately affected by mass incarceration.

* Reversing the ban on racial profiling. For several years, the Department of Justice has issued guidance on the use of race, and other characteristics, in the performance of law enforcement duties. In October 2016, the President of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), Terrance Cunningham, apologized for the historical mistreatment of minorities by police in this country, as he and the IACP understand the impact that that traditional relationship has had on the ability to effectively fight crime in a way that honors both police and the community. America has a long history of attributing crime to the actions of mainly people of color. Statistics about who, by race, commit crime, are primarily drawn from incarceration numbers. However, we contend that basing this information on the prison population is grossly inaccurate, as statistics support that Black and Latino men and women are incarcerated at a much higher rate than other races/ethnicities, even when committing the same crimes. We agree that a suspect in a crime is most easily identified by race, but we do not support the contention that racial profiling is a substitute for an accurate lookout—which would include other identifying details—and good police work. Stopping or detaining people of color based on any perceived bias underminds trust in the community, and is frankly not an effective crime-fighting tool. The criminal enterprise can use this knowledge to its advantage, and suspects who are not people of color will merely slide under the radar, uncaught more often than not, while officers’ attention is trained on who they feel is the more ‘obvious’ perpetrator. In addition, racial profiling by law enforcement can lead to civil rights violations, expensive litigation, and consent decrees, which
consume human resources and take time to address. It can take years for a police agency to overcome the hit to its reputation.

Policing is a noble profession. We support the excellent work of men and women in blue, but we would ask this present administration to have continued focus on addressing those causes of the distrust that has developed between police and communities of color. In particular, an emphasis should be placed on training, especially in the areas of implicit bias, use of force, de-escalation, conflict resolution, reasonable alternatives, diversity and sensitivity, and fair and impartial policing. In addition, we ask you to commit to examining the often false narratives that are created surrounding communities of color that lead to bias, and thus to a stronger possibility of harm to citizens and to officers, and to keep in place those mechanisms that are useful in working towards positive resolutions, including a robust civil rights agenda. Keeping the Civil Rights Divison of the Department of Justice operating with sufficient funding and support will be important to the furtherance of fair and equitable criminal justice. Our actions must reflect the highest of policing standards, and our communities should demand and expect such.

With respect to the National Fraternal Order of Police, we will continue to work side-by-side with other police organizations, even those with which we do not agree on all matters. There were other issues in the FOP’s document which we did not agree with, such as how immigration concerns and sanctuary cities should be treated. However, in the spirit of fostering a good working relationship with your administration, we respectfully brought to your attention those things that are of most importance to our members. The National Black Police Association will continue to monitor these and other concerns in criminal justice and criminal justice reform, and will join in solidarity with those partners and change agents that demand that justice be served at all times. We trust that your administration will do what is necessary and right in addressing these important issues, and offer any assistance you need as you navigate the discussions and actions. As in the past, we know how important it is to have a diverse group of law enforcement officials at the table, and we bring knowledge and a perspective that most traditional policing organizations do not.

We are asking for a meeting with President Trump and the administrative staff at your earliest convenience.

Thank you for your time and attention. We wish you well in all of your Presidential endeavors.

National Black Police Association
320 South R.L. Thornton Freeway Suite 230
Dallas, TX 75203-1820
855-TRY-NBPA – Phone/(214) 879-6272 – Fax www.blackpolice.org

Happy Thanksgiving from the National Black Police Association. Please be safe this holiday season,
11/23/2016

Happy Thanksgiving from the National Black Police Association. Please be safe this holiday season,

It is with Great Sadness that we announce the passing of former NBPA Fiscal Officer Donna Ross sister, Ms. Pamela Gail R...
11/17/2016

It is with Great Sadness that we announce the passing of former NBPA Fiscal Officer Donna Ross sister, Ms. Pamela Gail Ross (12.6.1959 – 11.14.2016).

Visitation and Funeral Services will be as follows:
Visitation:

Friday, November 18, 2016 from 5:00PM to 7:00PM
Heavenly Gate Funeral Services Chapel
702 Gatewood Road
Garland, Texas 75043

Homegoing Celebration
Saturday, November 19, 2016 at 11:00AM
Mesquite Friendship Baptist Church
680 E. US Hwy 80
Mesquite, Texas

It is with great sadness we announce the passing of Mr. Herbert LeRoy Davis, Step-Father of NBPA Former Fiscal Officer D...
10/24/2016

It is with great sadness we announce the passing of Mr. Herbert LeRoy Davis,
Step-Father of NBPA Former Fiscal Officer Donna Ross.

Funeral Arrangements are as follows:

Funeral:
Monday, October 24, 2016
McCalls Bronxwood Funeral Home
4035 Bronxwood Ave
Bronx, NY 10466

Graveside:
Calverton National Cemetery

210 Princeton Blvd
Calverton, NY 11933

Cards may be sent to:

Donna Ross
1904 Signal Ridge Place
Rockwall, Texas 75032

It is with great sadness we announce the passing of Mr. Paul Mims, Father NBPA Secretary Jakisha Jones. Funeral Arrangem...
10/22/2016

It is with great sadness we announce the passing of Mr. Paul Mims, Father NBPA Secretary Jakisha Jones. Funeral Arrangements are as follows:

Celebration of Life for Mr. Paul Mims
Viewing:
Greater Mt. Tabor Christian Center (GMTCC)
Saturday, Oct. 22
10a to 11:50

Funeral:
Greater Mt. Tabor Christian Center (GMTCC)
2513 S. Edgewood Terrace
Fort Worth, TX 76105
12noon

Graveside:
Cedar Hill Memorial Cemetary
8301 US-287 BUS
Kennedale, TX 76001

Repast at the church.

Cards may be sent to:

Jakisha Jones
708 Daughter Drive
Burleson, TX 76028

It is with great sadness we announce the passing of Helen McDonald, mother NBPA Board Member Nina Justice. Funeral Arran...
09/29/2016

It is with great sadness we announce the passing of Helen McDonald, mother NBPA Board Member Nina Justice. Funeral Arrangements are as follows:

Viewing
Mt. Bethel Baptist Church
901 NW 11 Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311

Date: Friday, September 30th, 2016
Time: 6:00PM to 9:00PM

Funeral Service
Mt. Bethel Baptist Church
901 NW 11 Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311

Date: Saturday, October 1, 2016
Time: 11:00AM

Mizell & Kurtz Funeral Home is conducting the service.
1305 NW 6 Street
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311

09/22/2016

National Black Police Association

“Dedicated to promoting justice, fairness, and effectiveness in law enforcement.”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

National Black Police Association Statement
on the Officer-Involved Shooting Death of Terence Crutcher

DALLAS, TX – September 22, 2016 – This week, we have all been captivated by the death of Terence Crutcher as a result of an officer-involved shooting in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Preliminary information indicates that Mr. Crutcher’s disabled vehicle was the initial reason that officers came into contact with him. He was not the target of any known investigation, nor was he a suspect in a crime. His death is heartbreaking for Terence Crutcher’s family, and the Tulsa community. We grieve with Mr. Crutcher’s loved ones, and offer our condolences and prayers.

The mission of the National Black Police Association is to increase the awareness of the community, to be the conscience of the criminal justice system, and to enhance the quality of life in the African-American community. We serve as the guardians of truth and equity in the process of criminal justice, and stand for integrity and respect in policing. As an organization that represents officers of color in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Bermuda, and the Caribbean, we are extremely concerned about the continuing deaths of citizens of color in what should be benign encounters with police officers.

Policing is a noble profession. While we support the work of men and women in blue when that work is done in excellence, we would ask police departments across the country to have renewed and continued focus on the causes of the deaths of citizens while in police custody and during police encounters. In particular, an emphasis should be placed on training, especially in the areas of implicit bias, use of force, conflict resolution, reasonable alternatives, diversity and sensitivity, and fair and impartial policing. In addition, we call on law enforcement to commit to examining the often false narratives that are created surrounding communities of color that lead to bias, and thus to a stronger possibility of harm to citizens and to officers. Our actions must reflect the highest of policing standards, and our communities should demand and expect such.

The National Black Police Association will continue to monitor this incident, and join in solidarity with those partners and change agents that demand that justice be served at all times. We trust that Chief Chuck Jordan will do what is necessary, right and timely in the handling of the investigation into the shooting. We support the Tulsa, Oklahoma community, and would have its citizens know that they are in our thoughts as we navigate this difficult policing terrain.

320 South R.L. Thornton Freeway
Suite 230
Dallas, TX 75203-1820
855-TRY-NBPA – Phone/(214) 879-6272 – Fax
www.blackpolice.org

09/13/2016

Greetings Fellow Officers,

I pray that this letter greets both you and your family in wonderful spirits! As your national chair, I consider this opportunity as an honor and privilege to serve this most prestigious organization.

With your assistance and involvement, this transition will be one of creative and innovative ideas and positive resolve.

I have been a member of the National Black Police Association for over 20 years, and have served as both the local and regional presidents in addition to other roles and positions. This service time has allowed me to witness major transitions within the organization and through it all, the NBPA is still standing strong due to dedicated members such as yourself. With all of the racial injustices, lack of diversity for promotions and minority recruitment issues, the services of the NBPA is still very much in need, more so NOW than ever before!

It is vital for us to work as a team, because every challenge will make us stronger experts to serve and assist one another. We have an advantage because of the commitments and effective working relationships with the past national chair and Fiscal Officer. They have agreed to be available as consultants and advisors on matters dealing with the NBPA. Malik Aziz will serve as the Executive Director and will be assisting with addressing issues on the national and international levels.

As we all know, a successful and productive organization is comprised of great people with great ideas, therefore I encourage everyone to submit their ideas, problems with solutions to the regional office, so that they can advise the national office of all matters.

Within the next 30 days, after consulting with each board member, you will hear more about the vision of the administration.

Service to Mankind,

Reggie Miller
National Chair

PLEASE REVIEW UPDATED INFORMATION:
09/06/2016

PLEASE REVIEW UPDATED INFORMATION:

With Our Deepest Sympathy, it has come to our attention that the father of Former National Chairman Malik Aziz, Mr. Will...
09/02/2016

With Our Deepest Sympathy, it has come to our attention that the father of Former National Chairman Malik Aziz, Mr. William “Lil Red” Gadberry, Jr. has been called home. Please keep Chairman Aziz and his family lifted up in prayer at this time.

Please adhere to the following:

If you wish to send cards, please send to the following address: P.O. Box 541596
Grand Prairie, Texas 75054

For Plants and Flowers:
Evergreen Funeral Home
6449 University Hills Blvd.
Dallas, Texas 75241
214.376.1500

Wake and Funeral to be held at Evergreen Funeral Home Service Times:
Wake:
Tuesday, September 6, 2016
Time: 7:00pm to 7:45pm

Funeral Service:
Wednesday, September 7, 2016
Time: 12:00 Noon

May the Love of God and all the fond memories of your Father, keep you at joy and peace. Asalaam Aleikum

With Humble Gratitude National Chairman Reggie Miller & the National Board of Directors

IMPORTANT CONFERENCE INFORMATIONMonday - August 1, 2016 Scholarship Dance This years theme is "Denim and Diamonds" Don't...
07/25/2016

IMPORTANT CONFERENCE INFORMATION

Monday - August 1, 2016
Scholarship Dance
This years theme is "Denim and Diamonds"
Don't forget to pack your best Denim and Bling.
Prizes for the BEST Dressed!

Tuesday - August 2, 2016
Prayer Breakfast
This year there WILL NOT be a Memorial March.
Please wear your uniform to the Prayer Breakfast.
(NO GUNS PLEASE)

For all coming to the conference, you should have received a call or email about your shirt size. If you have not given this information, please send your shirt size to [email protected].

THANK YOU AND SEE YOU AT THE CONFERENCE!

Please read thoughts from our National Chairman from the New York Times Article.
07/11/2016

Please read thoughts from our National Chairman from the New York Times Article.

Don’t forget that the protesters were peaceful. Don’t forget that the police were protecting them.

JOIN US FOR THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE!
06/20/2016

JOIN US FOR THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE!

CONFERENCE BROCHURE : 44th Annual National Black Police Assn Education & Training Conference
06/10/2016

CONFERENCE BROCHURE : 44th Annual National Black Police Assn Education & Training Conference

03/25/2016
With unfailing courtesy and diplomatic tact, Sergeant Horatio Julius Homer, the first African American appointed to the ...
02/29/2016

With unfailing courtesy and diplomatic tact, Sergeant Horatio Julius Homer, the first African American appointed to the Boston Police Department, served 40 faithful years as police commission guard. The son of Sarah Fields and Charles Homer, he was born May 24, 1848 in Farmington, Connecticut. There, he attended public schools until the age of 12.

At 14, Homer left for Waterbury, Connecticut, where he found work at a hotel as a bellhop. He soon became a waiter and trusted employee of that hotel. In his youthful days, he also worked as a steward on a steamboat, plying from Boston to Bangor, and as a porter on a Pullman parlor car, running from Philadelphia to Pittsburg. Pullman cars were very crude at that time, said Homer, and it was no easy job to spend most of your life on one of those jogging cars.

At the age of 17, he married Sophia A. Williams, a native of Haddam, Connecticut. Around 1873, they made their way to Boston and, before long, found a home at 271 Tremont Street. She kept house, and he started his life in the Hub as a waiter at the old Commonwealth Hotel on Washington Street. Homer later landed another job as a waiter at the Hotel Brunswick - a first-class establishment on the corner of Boylston and Clarendon streets. Amos Barnes and John W. Dunklee, owners of that hotel, touted it as "a pleasant permanent home and desirable stopping place for the business or pleasure seeker." President Rutherford B. Hayes was among the hotel's many distinguished guests.

Promotions

In 1878, Homer was offered a job as janitor of the Globe Theatre, at 598 Washington Street, by its proprietor, John Stetson. While employed there, he met several influential men who suggested that he become a police officer, taking up a post at the front door of the Office of the Police Commission, at Pemberton Square. Since the thought of becoming a policeman had never crossed Homer's mind, he hadn't ever sought such a position. But when one was offered, he accepted it.

Appointed by Police Commissioner Henry Sturgis Russell, Homer left the Globe Theatre and joined the Boston Police Department as a patrolman on December 24, 1878, becoming the first black officer in the city. The police force then consisted of only 746 men. As a patrolman, Homer was connected to Station 4, but he reported there on Sundays and holidays only. Most of his time was spent in front of the commission's office.

By the time he became an officer, Homer had moved with his wife, Sophia, to 46 Buckingham Street in the North End. Boston was a pretty rough city in those days, he said, particularly down around Fleet and Richmond streets, which were lined with sailors' boarding houses. There were riots and trouble all the time.

Oddly enough, though, Homer told a reporter that his time as a policeman was a very peaceful experience. In all his 40 years of service he had to use violence just once, on an unwelcome caller who refused to leave the commission's office. He took the man by the neck and threw him out on the street. A consummate diplomat, Homer avoided resorting to force if at all possible, preferring instead to use tact when dealing with people. He was a courteous man, noted one observer, "always extremely polite" and "exceedingly well versed in police duties."

After passing his civil service exam, on September 23, 1895 Homer was promoted to the rank of sergeant by Police Commissioner Gen Martin. His home was then 35 Newton Street, Brighton. That promotion brought him an increase of $200 in his annual salary and made him the first African American in the Boston Police Department to wear the stripes of a sergeant. He retained his post at headquarters, however, and remained there until his retirement. No one could pass into the inner office of the board of police until undergoing his scrutiny. During Sergeant Homer's many years of service, he saw the Hub's police force grow to 1,700 men, met every president from Hayes to Wilson, and also served as an es**rt for noted foreign ambassadors.

He once made an insightful observation about an individual who has been placed under arrest. He remarked, "People should be more careful how they sympathize with a man or woman whom an officer has put under arrest. One word of sympathy expended upon the arrested party and it makes him rebellious. Of course, the public do not realize this, but I wish they would!"

Not only was the sergeant great at his job, but he was a gifted musician. He played as many as eleven different instruments proficiently, among them, the violin, viola, cello, double bass, flute, clarinet, trombone, guitar and mandolin. In fact, he gave guitar and mandolin lessons. In addition to musical ability, Sergeant Homer possessed artistic talent. He built marvelous creations in household furniture and ornaments out of pasteboard and cancelled postage stamps. He was a coin collector and a history buff as well, who had a remarkably sharp memory.

The sergeant was active in civic affairs as a member of the Fraternal Association, a local benevolent organization consisting of prominent black businessmen, politicians and community leaders. The association was formed in 1870 by George H. White and others to aid the poor and the needy.

Homer's wife, Sophia, died childless on March 5, 1902 at the age of fifty-four. Highly esteemed, she served as the chaplain of Corps 79 - a women's relief organization in Brighton.

On November 3, 1903, the sergeant wed 27-year-old Lydia Spriggs, a woman half his age from Deer Creek, Maryland. The couple moved into a second floor apartment at 686 Massachusetts Avenue in the South End. Their first child of the marriage, Horatio Julius Homer Jr., was born there in 1912. And at the age of sixty-seven, Homer became the proud father of a second son, David Lawrence Homer, born March 26, 1916.

"Sergeant Horatio J. Homer, hale and hearty, with gray waving locks and a strongly lined face, but with all the strength of young manhood with him in his [70th] year," wrote a reporter in 1918, "still sits as he has for forty years, in front of the door of the commissioner of Boston's police."

Sergeant Homer petitioned Mayor Andrew Peters for voluntary retirement on January 27, 1919. Two days later, after dedicating four decades of his life in service to the city, he retired on half salary - $875 a year - at the age of 70. In the general order retiring the sergeant, Police Commissioner Edwin Curtis said of him, "During his long service, Sergeant Homer has performed his duties with uniform courtesy and strict attention to all the requirements of his exacting position. He will be missed by many citizens of Boston having business with the department and all connected with headquarters."

After the sergeant retired from the force, he and his family moved to 82 Humboldt Ave., Roxbury, where he died on January 9, 1923. He is laid to rest at Evergreen Cemetery in Brighton.

In*******al marriage in the United Sates was banned in 1664 and not overturned until 1967.During the seventeenth and ear...
02/26/2016

In*******al marriage in the United Sates was banned in 1664
and not overturned until 1967.

During the seventeenth and early eighteenth century, the growing number of in*******al marriages (also known as miscegenation) between Blacks and whites led to the passage of this new law. The first anti-miscegenation law enacted was in the colony of Maryland in 1664 and additional colonies quickly followed suit. These marriages were prohibited and penalties included the enslavement, exile or imprisonment of the white perpetrators. These laws grew and evolved over the years and attempts were even made to modify the Constitution to ban in*******al marriage in all states.

It would take three hundred years for this law to be overturned. In 1967, Richard Loving, a white man, and Mildred Jeter, a Black woman, were married in the District of Columbia. When they returned home to Virginia, they were arrested and convicted of violating the state's anti-miscegenation law. They each faced a year in jail and their case went to the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court found in favor of the Lovings in the famous trial Loving v. Virginia. They ruled that prohibiting in*******al marriage on state and local levels was unconstitutional; this meant that marriages between the races were legal in the country for the first time since 1664.

In 2000, Alabama became the last state to officially legalize in*******al marriage by removing the unenforceable ban that was still contained in their state constitution. Read more famous cases about in*******al relationships that changed history.

Address

Dallas, TX
75203

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when National Black Police Association posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to National Black Police Association:

Share