Dallas County Veteran Services

Dallas County Veteran Services The Dallas County Veterans Service Office is an advocate agency established to assist veterans and/o

Operating as usual

10/29/2021

LGBTQ+ Women Veterans Listening Session [November 2, 2021]

Virtual – HAVE YOU SERVED? Are you a le***an, gay, bisexual, transgender, q***r (LGBTQ+) Woman? You are cordially invited to join Center for Women Veterans, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, LGBTQ+ Health Program, and Minority Veterans of America for an LGBTQ+ Women Veterans Listening Session on November 2, 2021, at 12 pm ET. Event number: 2764 589 2053 Join by phone: 14043971596 USA Toll Number Access code: 276 458 92053. We invite you to share your thoughts, questions and concerns about your VA experiences. #BringWomenVeteransHome2VA #VAWomenVets

09/15/2021
files.constantcontact.com

GET A FREE DISCHARGE UPGRADE

Click on the link below for more information:

https://files.constantcontact.com/3c407922601/42f4369e-5720-4726-8213-5f6887f68c43.pdf

New VHA Coronavirus Vaccination Requirements:Read more:https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/202...
07/28/2021
Executive Order on Protecting the Federal Workforce and Requiring Mask-Wearing | The White House

New VHA Coronavirus Vaccination Requirements:

Read more:
https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2021/01/20/executive-order-protecting-the-federal-workforce-and-requiring-mask-wearing/

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including section 7902(c) of title 5, United States Code, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Happy 246th Birthday to the U.S. Army!!!To all the Active Duty service members and US Army Veterans, thank you for servi...
06/14/2021

Happy 246th Birthday to the U.S. Army!!!

To all the Active Duty service members and US Army Veterans, thank you for serving our country with grace and dignity.

Special thanks to our staff, James Henderson and Lavette Domineck, for your service in the U.S. Army.

Happy 246th Birthday to the U.S. Army!!!

To all the Active Duty service members and US Army Veterans, thank you for serving our country with grace and dignity.

Special thanks to our staff, James Henderson and Lavette Domineck, for your service in the U.S. Army.

“Free Entrance to National Parks for Veterans and Gold Star Families The National Park Service in partnership with Opera...
06/02/2021
Free Entrance to National Parks for Veterans and Gold Star Families (U.S. National Park Service)

“Free Entrance to National Parks for Veterans and Gold Star Families

The National Park Service in partnership with Operation Live Well would like to thank military personnel and their families for their service and invite them to enjoy their national parks. Since Veterans Day 2020, Gold Star Families and US military veterans are eligible to receive free access to more than 2,000 federal recreation areas, including national parks, wildlife refuges, and forests. The free access program is a way to thank America’s veterans and Gold Star Families for their support of our country and to encourage them to explore recreational opportunities on their public lands and waters.”

Click on the link below for more info:

https://www.nps.gov/planyourvisit/veterans-and-gold-star-families-free-access.htm

The National Park Service in partnership with Operation Live Well would like to thank military personnel and their families for their service and invite them to enjoy their national parks.

WOMEN VETERANS DAY:  June 12, 2021
04/30/2021

WOMEN VETERANS DAY: June 12, 2021

WOMEN VETERANS DAY: June 12, 2021

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  VA Benefits Login AccessApril 29, 2021 VA.gov site becomes central login for accessing benefits ...
04/29/2021
VA.gov Home | Veterans Affairs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: VA Benefits Login Access

April 29, 2021



VA.gov site becomes central login for accessing benefits



WASHINGTON — Veterans and their families may begin accessing their Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) benefits and services on the new and user-friendly VA.gov website starting April 30.



Users will be able to access information about VA benefits and services through a single site rather than through multiple locations.



All benefits-related features previously located in the eBenefits web portal will be available on VA.gov. Veterans are encouraged to start logging into the site using their current Digital Service (DS) Logon or creating a new account using ID.me.



“VA.gov offers Veterans an enhanced site in terms of usability and security with the implementation of two-factor authentication,” said Acting VA Under Secretary for Benefits Thomas Murphy. “The most frequently used features are now readily accessible on one website to include the ability to file a disability claim, check the status of a claim or change direct deposit and payment history.”



The eBenefits site will remain functional through March 31, 2022, to give Veterans an opportunity to complete claims started on the platform. Thereafter, VA.gov becomes the single source solution to access VA benefit and service information online.



U.S. Digital Service worked with thousands of Veterans to test the new and improved VA.gov. The department wanted to ensure Veterans deemed the site functional before migrating Veterans’ data.



Learn more about VA.gov.



###



For questions related to this news release, please contact the following individuals:

Susan Carter - [email protected]

Randy Noller - [email protected]

Tatjana Christian - [email protected]



Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

810 Vermont Ave. NW

Washington, D.C. 20420
https://www.va.gov/

VA on Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Flickr. Blog

Apply for and manage the VA benefits and services you’ve earned as a Veteran, Servicemember, or family member—like health care, disability, education, and more.

Women's History Month:US Army 6888th Central Postal Directory BattalionStory posted at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/688...
03/29/2021

Women's History Month:

US Army 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion

Story posted at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6888th_Central_Postal_Directory_Battalion

Members of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion take part in a May 1945 parade
ceremony in honor of Joan d'Arc at the marketplace where she was [martyred]. – photo posted
at www.wikipedia.org


"Somewhere in England, Maj. Charity E. Adams,...and Capt. Abbie N. Campbell,...inspect the first contingent of Negro members of the Women's Army Corps assigned to overseas service.", 2/15/1945 – photo posted at https://www.history.com/news/black-woman-army-unit-mail-world-war-ii

The 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion, nicknamed the "Six Triple Eight", was an all-black battalion of the Women's Army Corps (WAC). The 6888th had 855 black women, both enlisted and officers, and was led by Major Charity Adams. It was the only all-black, all-female battalion overseas during World War II. The group motto was "No mail, low morale".

The battalion was organized into five companies, Headquarters, Company A, Company B, Company C, and Company D. Most of the 6888th worked as postal clerks, but others were cooks, mechanics and held other support positions, so that the 6888th was a self-sufficient unit.

During World War II, there was a significant shortage of soldiers who were able to manage the postal service for the U.S. Army overseas. In 1944, Mary McLeod Bethune worked to get the support of first lady, Eleanor Roosevelt, for "a role for black women in the war overseas." Black newspapers, too, challenged the U.S. Army to "use black women in meaningful Army jobs."

The women who signed up went to basic training in Georgia. Women who were already in the WAC, like Alyce Dixon, served at different locations, including the Pentagon, before they joined the 6888th.

The 6888th left the United States on February 3, 1945, sailing on Île de France and arriving in Glasgow on February 12. Île de France encountered several German U-boats on the trip, forcing the ship to take evasive maneuvers. The same day the battalion was transported by train to Birmingham., on 15 February, the battalion was inspected and marched in review before Lt. Gen. John C. H. Lee, Commanding General, Communications Zone, European Theater of Operations (ETO), and Maj Gen. Robert McGowan Littlejohn, Chief Quartermaster, ETO, part of whose command was mail.

When the 6888th settled in at Birmingham, "they saw letters stacked to the ceiling of the temporary post office." The temporary post office was located in converted hangars. Some letters had been in the makeshift offices for as long as two years.

Army officials believed that undelivered mail was "hurting morale." Many letters and packages were difficult to source, as they were addressed with only the first name of the soldier, had a commonly used name or used nicknames.

Early in the operation, a white general attempted to send a white officer to "tell them how to do it right," but Major Adams responded, "Sir, over my dead body, sir!" The battalion finished what was supposed to be a six-month task in three months in May 1945.

The 6888th devised their own system to handle the backlog of mail. The women of the 6888th worked in three different shifts, seven days a week, processing and delivering mail – a morale booster – to fighting troops in Europe. Each shift handled an estimated 65,000 pieces of mail. It was cold when they arrived, and women wore long underwear and coats in the unheated buildings.

The 6888th was a segregated unit, sleeping and eating in different locations from the white, male soldiers. They were housed in a former school building, with officers quartered in houses nearby. Some women felt that European "locals" treated them better than people did in the United States.

A chaplain working at Birmingham caused problems for Adams, ordering her soldiers not to report to work, but to report to his office, causing them to be AWOL. Adams had to "'counsel' him to let the women alone," reminding him that she was in charge of the women's assignments.

Once the backlog in Birmingham had been dealt with, the 6888th were shipped across the Channel to Le Havre in May 1945 and then were entrained to Rouen. The 6888th dealt with another backlog of mail in Rouen, some of the letters three years old. The military police in the WAC unit were not allowed to have weapons, so they used jujitsu to keep out "unwanted visitors." They also participated in a parade ceremony at the place where Joan of Arc died.

By October 1945, the mail in Rouen had been cleared and the 6888th was sent to Paris. They marched through Paris and were housed in a luxurious hotel, where they received first-class treatment. During this time, because the war was over, the battalion was reduced by 300 women, with 200 due to be discharged in January 1946.

In February 1946, the unit returned to the United States where it was disbanded at Fort Dix, New Jersey. There was no public recognition for their service at the time.

Members of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion were awarded the European African Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, the Good Conduct Medal, and the World War II Victory Medal during their service.

On February 25, 2009, the battalion was honored at the Women in Military Service for America Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery. The event was attended by three former unit members of the 6888th including Alyce Dixon, Mary Ragland, and Gladys Shuster Carter. Dixon and Ragland were also honored by President Barack Obama and first lady, Michelle Obama in 2009.

On March 15, 2016, the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion was inducted into the U.S. Army Women's Foundation Hall of Fame. Battalion veteran Elsie Garris attended the Induction Ceremony.

On November 30, 2018, Fort Leavenworth dedicated a monument to the women of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion. Five women from the battalion - Maybeel Campbell, Elizabeth Johnson, Lena King, Anna Robertson, and Deloris Ruddock - were present at the dedication.

Women's History Month:

US Army 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion

Story posted at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6888th_Central_Postal_Directory_Battalion

Members of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion take part in a May 1945 parade
ceremony in honor of Joan d'Arc at the marketplace where she was [martyred]. – photo posted
at www.wikipedia.org


"Somewhere in England, Maj. Charity E. Adams,...and Capt. Abbie N. Campbell,...inspect the first contingent of Negro members of the Women's Army Corps assigned to overseas service.", 2/15/1945 – photo posted at https://www.history.com/news/black-woman-army-unit-mail-world-war-ii

The 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion, nicknamed the "Six Triple Eight", was an all-black battalion of the Women's Army Corps (WAC). The 6888th had 855 black women, both enlisted and officers, and was led by Major Charity Adams. It was the only all-black, all-female battalion overseas during World War II. The group motto was "No mail, low morale".

The battalion was organized into five companies, Headquarters, Company A, Company B, Company C, and Company D. Most of the 6888th worked as postal clerks, but others were cooks, mechanics and held other support positions, so that the 6888th was a self-sufficient unit.

During World War II, there was a significant shortage of soldiers who were able to manage the postal service for the U.S. Army overseas. In 1944, Mary McLeod Bethune worked to get the support of first lady, Eleanor Roosevelt, for "a role for black women in the war overseas." Black newspapers, too, challenged the U.S. Army to "use black women in meaningful Army jobs."

The women who signed up went to basic training in Georgia. Women who were already in the WAC, like Alyce Dixon, served at different locations, including the Pentagon, before they joined the 6888th.

The 6888th left the United States on February 3, 1945, sailing on Île de France and arriving in Glasgow on February 12. Île de France encountered several German U-boats on the trip, forcing the ship to take evasive maneuvers. The same day the battalion was transported by train to Birmingham., on 15 February, the battalion was inspected and marched in review before Lt. Gen. John C. H. Lee, Commanding General, Communications Zone, European Theater of Operations (ETO), and Maj Gen. Robert McGowan Littlejohn, Chief Quartermaster, ETO, part of whose command was mail.

When the 6888th settled in at Birmingham, "they saw letters stacked to the ceiling of the temporary post office." The temporary post office was located in converted hangars. Some letters had been in the makeshift offices for as long as two years.

Army officials believed that undelivered mail was "hurting morale." Many letters and packages were difficult to source, as they were addressed with only the first name of the soldier, had a commonly used name or used nicknames.

Early in the operation, a white general attempted to send a white officer to "tell them how to do it right," but Major Adams responded, "Sir, over my dead body, sir!" The battalion finished what was supposed to be a six-month task in three months in May 1945.

The 6888th devised their own system to handle the backlog of mail. The women of the 6888th worked in three different shifts, seven days a week, processing and delivering mail – a morale booster – to fighting troops in Europe. Each shift handled an estimated 65,000 pieces of mail. It was cold when they arrived, and women wore long underwear and coats in the unheated buildings.

The 6888th was a segregated unit, sleeping and eating in different locations from the white, male soldiers. They were housed in a former school building, with officers quartered in houses nearby. Some women felt that European "locals" treated them better than people did in the United States.

A chaplain working at Birmingham caused problems for Adams, ordering her soldiers not to report to work, but to report to his office, causing them to be AWOL. Adams had to "'counsel' him to let the women alone," reminding him that she was in charge of the women's assignments.

Once the backlog in Birmingham had been dealt with, the 6888th were shipped across the Channel to Le Havre in May 1945 and then were entrained to Rouen. The 6888th dealt with another backlog of mail in Rouen, some of the letters three years old. The military police in the WAC unit were not allowed to have weapons, so they used jujitsu to keep out "unwanted visitors." They also participated in a parade ceremony at the place where Joan of Arc died.

By October 1945, the mail in Rouen had been cleared and the 6888th was sent to Paris. They marched through Paris and were housed in a luxurious hotel, where they received first-class treatment. During this time, because the war was over, the battalion was reduced by 300 women, with 200 due to be discharged in January 1946.

In February 1946, the unit returned to the United States where it was disbanded at Fort Dix, New Jersey. There was no public recognition for their service at the time.

Members of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion were awarded the European African Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, the Good Conduct Medal, and the World War II Victory Medal during their service.

On February 25, 2009, the battalion was honored at the Women in Military Service for America Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery. The event was attended by three former unit members of the 6888th including Alyce Dixon, Mary Ragland, and Gladys Shuster Carter. Dixon and Ragland were also honored by President Barack Obama and first lady, Michelle Obama in 2009.

On March 15, 2016, the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion was inducted into the U.S. Army Women's Foundation Hall of Fame. Battalion veteran Elsie Garris attended the Induction Ceremony.

On November 30, 2018, Fort Leavenworth dedicated a monument to the women of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion. Five women from the battalion - Maybeel Campbell, Elizabeth Johnson, Lena King, Anna Robertson, and Deloris Ruddock - were present at the dedication.

Address

2377 N Stemmons Fwy, Ste 631
Dallas, TX
75207

Opening Hours

Monday 8:30am - 5pm
Tuesday 8:30am - 5pm
Wednesday 8:30am - 5pm
Thursday 8:30am - 5pm
Friday 8:30am - 5pm

Telephone

+12148196521

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Dallas County Veteran Services posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Dallas County Veteran Services:

Nearby government services


Other Government Organizations in Dallas

Show All