Dallas Police Dive Team

Dallas Police Dive Team The official page of the Dallas Police Department Underwater Recovery Team.THIS PAGE IS NOT MONITORED ON A 24 HR BASIS. IF YOU HAVE AN EMERGENCY CALL 911

Since its creation more than 120 years ago, the Dallas Police Department has created an atmosphere of ethical, caring behavior. The 3,640 sworn officers and 556 civilians, who make up the department, take special pride in helping to make Dallas a safe place to live, work and visit. As you explore this site, it is the department’s hope that you will become increasingly aware of the services and inf

Since its creation more than 120 years ago, the Dallas Police Department has created an atmosphere of ethical, caring behavior. The 3,640 sworn officers and 556 civilians, who make up the department, take special pride in helping to make Dallas a safe place to live, work and visit. As you explore this site, it is the department’s hope that you will become increasingly aware of the services and inf

Operating as usual

An Original on the team and a rock of an instructor.  Til Valhalla, Brother.
11/05/2021

An Original on the team and a rock of an instructor. Til Valhalla, Brother.

An Original on the team and a rock of an instructor. Til Valhalla, Brother.

09/02/2021

Sooo many mistakes! Sooooo hilarious!

05/12/2021

The City of Grand Prairie Public Safety Dive Team recovered the body of a 75-year-old male today at Joe Pool Lake. Divers initiated a search and rescue for the person until dark on Saturday, but the high winds challenged the recovery as well as an unknown last known location. Divers resumed operations on Sunday morning and, utilizing sonar technology, recovered the body at the Estes Peninsula cove location where he was pronounced deceased. The City of Grand Prairie sends its condolences to the victim’s family. Details: https://www.gptx.org/Home/Components/News/News/12918/26

Houston PD Dive Unit scored an impressive tool!
03/10/2021

Houston PD Dive Unit scored an impressive tool!

Working in the dark and cold water trying to save lives while working safely.
12/05/2020

Working in the dark and cold water trying to save lives while working safely.

7:48 PM - #IFD Tactical Dive Rescue Team 7 is called to assist @Lawrence_FD after witnesses report seeing a car drive into a retention pond at 9176 Basin St. The car traveling at a hight rate of speed, plowed through thick brush & was located inverted,15 ft from shore,10 ft deep. Upon arrival at Divers enter the retention pond at 8:16 PM & locate the first victim at 8:28 PM. The 2nd was located at 8:36 PM. Both were transported emergent to Methodist Hospital. Sadly neither of the occupants survived. Garners Towing was dispatched to assist with retrieval of the submerged vehicle after divers hook it. Additional searches of the car proved clear for possible occupants. Lawrence Police are investigating the cause of the accident.

Thank you cookies from grateful citizens!
07/29/2020

Thank you cookies from grateful citizens!

Firefighters from #IFD Station 7 got a truckload of thank you treats after Amy & Mike Gillum stopped by to meet with the divers & crew who recovered her titanium leg in Geist Reservoir on Saturday. The crew was presented w/ a gift card to #Kroger & amazing #FarmFreshProduce

Not a recovery you see everyday!  Thanks to IFD
07/26/2020

Not a recovery you see everyday! Thanks to IFD

After a 2 hour pre-planned top water, boat training exercise, on Geist Reservoir this afternoon, IFD Tactical Team 7 was back at the dock, putting their boats on the trailer, when officers from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) approached them and asked for assistance. A female boater (40's), was enjoying the day on her family's anchored, pontoon boat, when she accidentally lost her titanium/carbon fiber leg, valued at $20,000 in an area of Geist known as "Family Cove."

Without hesitation, the crew gathered their dive equipment from the Rescue truck and hopped into DNR's boat. With help from the owner of the leg, the crew was able to assess a general "last known location" and begin the search. The IFD dive team and tenders conducted a boat based dive and when subsurface, utilized a sweep pattern. Each of the 3 divers spent about 20 minutes, in zero visibility, attempting to locate the lost leg. They were successful in locating sunglasses, an anchor and multiple beer bottles, which in zero visibility felt like it could be the leg - to no avail. After an hour, the divers and DNR were about ready to call off the search. However, on the final pass for the 3rd diver, the leg was located 20 feet down, about 100 yards off shore.

All smiles for both the firefighters, DNR officers and the very grateful family, who despite the potential loss of a very valuable item, maintained a sense of humor and were extremely helpful by staying on scene and near the last known location.

07/03/2020
palmdale_dive_operation

One of the largest First Responder Dive Recovery Teams in the country.

This is "palmdale_dive_operation" by LA County Fire Training on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Well somebody wrote a nice grant proposal!
06/23/2020

Well somebody wrote a nice grant proposal!

Evolution Scuba just delivered our latest custom built Public Safety Dive Team Trailer to Fairfield, Ct Police Department Dive Team. This awesome trailer was specifically built for their team's equipment and diving protocols.

08/13/2019
LADbible

I’ll bet that little guy can show them some serious swimming maneuvers!

These Navy Seals got a good laugh when an actual seal decided to train with them 😂😂

One of our Dive Team members serving on or off duty and under or on top of the water!  Nicely done, Daniel!
08/02/2019

One of our Dive Team members serving on or off duty and under or on top of the water! Nicely done, Daniel!

A leader inspiring his troops!
08/01/2019

A leader inspiring his troops!

IFD Chief Ernest Malone stopped by to greet the 19 students and 11 instuctors at the Central Indiana Public Safety Dive School (PSDDR1) Class #19 during their open water dive evolutions at Somerset Lakes. As a former rescue diver himself, the Chief knows a thing or two about the rigors these students are in for. Dive students hail from IFD, Fishers Police, Fishers Fire, Noblesville FD and Danville FD. The students are in week 2 of 6 weeks of intense intraining led by IFD Dive Commander Jerry Richert. As many of the students discover, resuce diving is not for everyone and 7 students have tapped out thus far. The team effort to make this class happen requires each department to bring something to the table - either instructors or logistics. The Chief stopped by to offer some words of encouragement. #Teamwork

Something to think about!
07/12/2019

Something to think about!

Did you know there is more to decontaminating a drysuit than just taking care of the outside?

Public Safety teams spend time cleaning the outside of their drysuits because they were in dirty water, but few think about the inside. Whether teams share drysuits or not, inside the drysuit can get equally as contaminated as the outside.

Perspiration, and all other bodily functions, affects the inside of the drysuit during a mission. We also know not everyone shares the same personal hygiene.

After a mission, the drysuit is cleaned on the outside, dried, rolled up and stored. All that “funk” stays in the drysuit, waiting for the next unsuspecting diver uses it. Would you wear another person’s workout clothes if they haven’t washed them? This is the equivalent.

Aqua Lung’s Hazmat Drysuit can be turned inside out, decontaminated on the inside the same way as the outside. It can be dried with a towel, flipped back and handed to the next diver--clean and safe.

It is important to clean the whole drysuit, not just the outside.

For more information and Public Safety Pricing contact us at 1-800-248-3483

The Dive team is out searching the Trinity River for an individual that jumped from a bridge.
06/04/2019

The Dive team is out searching the Trinity River for an individual that jumped from a bridge.

https://fox2now.com/2019/05/24/bodies-found-in-submerged-portage-des-souix-car-identified-as-missing-adults/
05/25/2019
Bodies found in submerged Portage Des Souix car identified as missing adults

https://fox2now.com/2019/05/24/bodies-found-in-submerged-portage-des-souix-car-identified-as-missing-adults/

ST. CHARLES COUNTY, Mo. — Crews in Portage Des Sioux pulled a car from the Mississippi River near on Friday. The Metro West Dive Team removed the submerged car at Hideaway Harbor around 1:30 a.m. Two bodies were found inside. The bodies have been identified as John Reinhardt, 20, and Caitlin Frang...

Another day and as the flood waters recede enough for vehicles to be located and pulled from the “normal” depths, more h...
05/20/2019

Another day and as the flood waters recede enough for vehicles to be located and pulled from the “normal” depths, more high water vehicle casualties recovered.

05/20/2019

Truck recovered from Turtle Creek

The Dallas Police Dive Team recovers a truck from Turtle Creek after heavy rain storm.
05/20/2019

The Dallas Police Dive Team recovers a truck from Turtle Creek after heavy rain storm.

Flash flooding of Turtle Creek yesterday in Dallas swept away at least two vehicles.  The Dive Team was called out to re...
05/19/2019

Flash flooding of Turtle Creek yesterday in Dallas swept away at least two vehicles. The Dive Team was called out to recover the two vehicles seen by witnesses being washed into the deep creek. One driver was seen escaping. The second was never seen. Confirmation on that vehicle’s owner/driver’s safety pending. No bodies found.

Call out to Lake Ray Hubbard this evening to recover a car.
01/09/2019

Call out to Lake Ray Hubbard this evening to recover a car.

01/08/2019

HONOLULU (KHON2) - A13-year-old boy is dead after a tragic scuba diving accident in waters off Maunalua Bay in Hawaii Kai. The call came in at 11:12 a.m. and he was found, unconscious, underwater about 20 minutes later.

The boy and his family are visitors staying in Waikiki. The Island Divers Hawaii scuba diving tour they were on departed from Hawaii Kai Shopping Center just after 9a.m., according to witnesses. The boy ran into trouble roughly two hours later.

What was supposed to be a fun-filled day, exploring the ocean, ended in tragedy.

A 13-year-old boy's lifeless body was pulled from waters 60 feet deep, roughly one mile offshore of Maunalua Bay.

"The patient was recovered unconscious and not breathing, and we performed CPR as soon as we got him ashore...it was a scuba diving accident," said Honolulu Fire Department Battalion Chief Paul Kato.

The boy was rushed to Queens Hospital in critical condition where he was pronounced dead.

His parents were brought to shore by the tour boat then taken separately to the hospital.

Those on board were completely distraught

Gilian Bergerom, was one of more than 20 people who were part of the same diving tour.

"I think everyone is probably been in a little bit of shock and disbelief, and it feels like nightmare everyone's just waiting to wake up from," said Bergerom.

Another witness said she was a part of the same group as the young boy. She said he had a panic attack under water and got separated from their group. She said the current was very strong and the water was extremely murky.

Bergerom also said the water was very dirty.

"I was told you can usually see about 100 feet out. It was more like 10 or 15. Our dive instructor even said it was the worst he'd maybe ever seen it the 20 years he'd been diving here. So it was an unusually bad day out there," explained Bergerom.

HPD detectives were on scene and the diving gear the boy had used was taken in as evidence.

Witnesses said things could have been handled differently.

"It was just chaotic," explained a woman who was a member of the tour. "All the crew were back in the water, but it didn't seem like there was a plan... i just feel like there could have been a better plan to do the search and rescue and to call the Coast Guard immediately."

Those who were on the boat said the boy was missing for more than eight minutes before the crew called for help.

"It probably needed to happen a lot faster in my opinion," Bergerom said.

"I think all of us are just thinking about this family. That might be leaving Hawaii without their son."

KHON contacted Island Divers Hawaii. They declined to comment.

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

01/01/2019
Recent dive op!  We are available for private search and recovery regionally.
12/22/2018

Recent dive op! We are available for private search and recovery regionally.

Address

1400 S Lamar St
Dallas, TX
75215

General information

*****GENERAL INFORMATION***** The Dallas Underwater Recovery Team (D.U.R.T.) is a specialized unit of the Dallas Police Department which handles year round underwater search and recovery for bodies, evidence and vehicles. This Unit has provided assistance to other agencies when our expertise has been requested. Any requests other than immediate assistance for underwater recoveries or searches should be sent by e-mail to: [email protected] EVIDENCE RECOVERY- This unit is trained to locate and recover evidence that may have been used in a crime and employs special methods for collection and preservation. BODY RECOVERY- This unit is trained to locate and recover bodies that may be submerged due to accidental drowning, su***de, homicide, etc. VEHICLE RECOVERY- This unit is trained to locate and recover vehicles that are found in water. The members of this team are trained, professional individuals who perform the challenging task of looking for objects often times in zero visibility and in difficult environments where most recreational scuba divers would not venture. Today this Unit consists of 23 Police Officers that are assigned to various other divisions of the Department and come together when called upon for an operation. To be an operational diver on this team requires that they be fully certified Officer of the Dallas Police Department and be at least a certified Public Safety Diver through the International Association of Nitrox and Technical Divers (IANTD). To become a IANTD Public Safety Diver you must complete the Basic Open Water, Advanced Open Water and Rescue Diver courses through either PADI or NAUI or other recognized certifying body.. You must also be CPR certified. All dive team members are certified to use Dry suits, Full Face Masks and surface supplied air systems as well as Scuba, depending on the operational needs. The Dallas Police Dive Team NAUI instructors were instrumental in the creation of the Surface Supplied Air Certification lesson plan for NAUI and TCLEOSE (Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education). CERTIFICATIONS- Basic Open Water – Advanced Open water- Rescue Diver- Public Safety Diver- Full Face Mask- Dry Suit- Surface Supplied Air- Dive Masters- Instructors- Instructor Trainers- HISTORY- Police officer Michael Horton and Captain Jack R. Bragg Jr. who eventually formed The Dallas Underwater Recovery Team (D.U.R.T.) started diving on a case by case basis for the Dallas Police Department in the middle 1990’s. In 2008 Chief of Police David Kunkle assigned Captain Jack R. Bragg Jr. as the dive team commander and the unit received official recognition. Initially the unit was under the organization of the Crime Scene Response Section in the Investigations Bureau. In January of 2013 the Dallas Underwater Recovery Unit was moved to the Field Services Division of the Strategic Deployment Bureau and is funded from the SWAT org. Team members are regular police officers who volunteer for these additional duties. The volunteers come to the Dallas Underwater Recovery Team with their own basic dive equipment and must meet the standards of the International Association of Nitrox and Technical Divers requirements to be trained as a Public Safety Divers. That standard is a rescue level diver certified by PADI, NAUI or another equal certifying body, i.e. United States Navy. That means most applicants have minimally 60 plus open water dives prior to applying for the Dallas Underwater Recovery Team training. Black, cold water diving is not for everyone and it’s not unusual for applicants to withdraw from the training or leave the team after experiencing the grueling, hazardous conditions which are a far cry from recreational diving. In addition to the basics of diving, public safety divers require specialized training for hazards, risk assessment, dive planning, search procedures and techniques, diving in zero visibility, using underwater metal detectors, advanced sonar, full-face masks, communication systems, surface supplied air, dry suits, lift bags, decontamination and more. They are expected to recover and handle evidence in a manner where it can be presented in court and supported by their testimony. Our current roster consists of 16 Public Safety Divers, 2 Dive Masters and 5 Instructors. Divers must qualify quarterly to make sure they and their equipment is ready to dive. The qualification is a series of swim, tread and skills which will be performed in black out mask. Divers are required to provide documentation all of their personal equipment meets annual certifications and inspections. Funding is minimum and donations are welcomed to assist with specialized equipment and training. Anyone interested in donating may contact Sgt. Rod Dillon, #4535 (ret) at [email protected]

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Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 9am - 5pm

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thank you for your service ps.happy forth of july
A very rare diving rescue:Edd Sorenson rescued someone from an underwater cave in Florida in 2012. I couldn’t see the entrance, because it was so clouded with silt. After searching for about 10 minutes, I ran into her legs Edd Sorenson: ‘Cave diving is safe if you follow strict safety procedures.’ Photograph: Matthew Coughlin for the Guardian Fifteen years ago, I moved from Portland, Oregon to Florida to set up a cave-diving business on Merritt’s Mill Pond, a man-made lake in Marianna. I also became a member of International Underwater Cave Rescue and Recovery (IUCRR). There are hardly ever any cave rescues: by the time someone is reported missing and an IUCRR diver gets to the scene, the person is almost invariably dead. Until 2012, there had been only four successful cave rescues. In April 2012, I spent seven hours removing a young man’s body from a cave in Tallahassee, Florida. He had taken off his gear to get through a small hole and become stuck. I had to manipulate his arms and legs so I could push him back through the hole, because rigor mortis had set in. People ask me how I cope with something like that. I know it sounds cold, but I can switch off. I focus on the job. When an emergency call came a week later, saying there was a lost diver on the Mill Pond, I feared the worst. I was teaching a diving class at the far end of the lake; five minutes later and I would have been in the water and missed the call. A man had ventured with his teenage son and daughter into a system called Twin Caves. It descends in stages from 20ft to 100ft deep and goes 3,000ft underground, with multiple “jump tunnels” or arteries that run off a wider tunnel. The main route has a permanent line, a 4mm-wide nylon rope called the gold line. Cave diving requires strict safety procedures, with different equipment and training from open-water diving. In this case, the father was an experienced open-water diver, but open-water divers use a standard flutter kick, up and down. In heavily silted water, this disturbs the sediment, destroying visibility in seconds. The three of them were seen entering Twin Caves by a group of local cave divers already inside. The moment one of them saw the family doing flutter kicks, she signalled to her group to get out; but within seconds it was pitch black. They were able to find the gold line and make their way to the exit, only to be overtaken by two divers – the father and the son – ploughing past them in their panic to get out. On the surface, the father begged the group to go back for his daughter. But they were not trained in rescue techniques – and making such an attempt is a sure way to end up with more fatalities. A trapped diver will often thrash around in panic, tear off your mask and regulator and kill you both. I high-tailed it back to the shop, where my employee had our boat running. My gear is always ready and I carry two of everything: double tanks and a spare breather. By the time we got to the caves, it was at least 15 minutes since the call and I still had to gear up. Time was tight: air tanks last only 30 to 40 minutes at that depth. I couldn’t see the entrance, because it was so clouded with silt, but I knew from experience where it was, even though it is barely 3ft x 3ft. Inside, I began a zigzag search pattern; after about 10 minutes, I ran into her legs. She was treading water inside a dome with an air pocket created from divers’ bubbles. She had tried to get out a couple of times, but nearly got snagged on jagged rocks and turned back. She was lucky to have found the dome once, let alone twice. She was very cold, scared and crying. I told her: “I’m going to get you out. I won’t leave you, but I need you to stay calm.” She nodded. She held my arm and we dropped back down into the water, following the reel I had tied to the gold line. She shared air from my tank as I made my way back towards the entrance. Eventually, we found the entrance, squeezed through and hit the surface. Everyone was stunned to see two people alive. The girl was trying to thank me in the water, but I put her regulator back in and towed her back to the boat. The sheriff’s boat turned up at that moment and the father got chewed out pretty badly. He understood how close he had come to losing his daughter and tried to compensate me for my time. I refused, but he made a large donation to the Divers Alert Network (DAN). Later, I was honoured with the first ever DAN Hero award. The girl sent me a lovely letter, which I still have in my office. I was just happy everyone got to go home. That is rarely how it ends.