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Dallas Police Dive Team

Dallas Police Dive Team The official page of the Dallas Police Department Underwater Recovery Team.THIS PAGE IS NOT MONITORE

Since its creation more than 120 years ago, the Dallas Police Department has created an atmosphere of ethical, caring behavior. The 3,640 sworn officers and 556 civilians, who make up the department, take special pride in helping to make Dallas a safe place to live, work and visit. As you explore this site, it is the department’s hope that you will become increasingly aware of the services and inf

Since its creation more than 120 years ago, the Dallas Police Department has created an atmosphere of ethical, caring behavior. The 3,640 sworn officers and 556 civilians, who make up the department, take special pride in helping to make Dallas a safe place to live, work and visit. As you explore this site, it is the department’s hope that you will become increasingly aware of the services and inf

Operating as usual

09/27/2022

Why do you want to be a PSD?
(Credit to Mark Phillips of PSD Divers Group)

As a member of a dive rescue and recovery team, it becomes important to decide why you are there. There is no glory in body recovery work and there is very little if any, attention paid to evidentiary search and recovery. Most all dive teams are made up of divers who volunteer for the duty. They work for a fire department or with law enforcement as a general rule and diving is added to their normal workload. There is usually very little budget provided for equipment or training. Some teams require their members to provide their equipment. Training is not always a priority for the agency so it can be put off easily. So, with a picture of PSDiving as bleak as this, why do you want to do it?

There is not enough work to create a commercial business and the type of work is not suited to ‘city to city travel’. In a body recovery, when you do your job to the best of your ability, you retrieve a dead body. In a majority of instances, you do this work in zero visibility water with a nasty, muddy bottom and you are feeling around for something you would most likely avoid on dry land. So why do you want to do it? Is it because you want to save lives? In reality, a dive rescue and recovery team very rarely has the opportunity to save the life of an individual who is submerged. The majority of work performed by a dive rescue and recovery team is recovery in nature.

There exists in all of us a desire to help those who are suffering. There are those individuals who perform the duties of a firefighter, paramedic, or law enforcement officer who are willing to go to the next step. They will do what others will not and they are rarely recognized for the work they do. There is no glory in recovering the dead body of a 13-year-old child. A quick mention on the nightly news, or maybe a three-sentence paragraph in the local paper will be all the recognition you can expect. If that is the kind of glory and recognition you want, you are picking a field of work that will very much disappoint you.

The parents of the 13-year-old child could care less about the newspaper or TV news. Their child is underwater. If you do not find their child, their only option is to hope that the child decomposes enough to float to the surface and is spotted before the body is lost. Put yourself in their place; if it were your son or daughter, what memory would you want? The mother’s teary “thank you,” and the father’s somber handshake, that is all the recognition you can hope for. Will you do it for that? The satisfaction of knowing you have helped another person put closure on a tragic event may be all you get.

But then there is the other side, a much darker side of drownings. How do you know the drowning was an accident? A mother cries about her lost child and gains the sympathy of the responders and is given the benefit of doubt when her story doesn’t quite fit the physical evidence. The discrepancies are attributed to her stress and anxiety. How do we know she is telling the truth? In 1999, at least four cars “accidentally” rolled into a body of water resulting in the deaths of children every time. No less than two were later proven to be homicides. The ability to at least consider the incident a potential homicide gives the responders an edge. Recognition and preservation of the area as a crime scene are vital.

CRIMINAL HOMICIDE. (a.) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter: The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another. Deaths caused by negligence attempts to kill assaults to kill, suicides, accidental deaths, and justifiable homicides are excluded. (b.) Manslaughter by Negligence: the killing of another person through gross

It will be the efforts and attention to detail of the public safety divers that tear apart the lies and deceptions of those who would attempt to hide the evidence of their crimes in water. You may be called to recover a body or evidence that was used in a crime. It may be that the only link to the killer is the evidence you recovered and preserved because you did your job the right way. As you progress through this book and beyond, your capabilities and effectiveness will expand. Your efforts may mean the difference between a criminal going to jail or walking free. Or, you may allow a grieving family the ability to give a loved one dignity in death.

Be Warned. You may never be able to voice a true reason for doing the work you will be undertaking. You may not last. Teams who perform a lot of body recovery work usually have a small core of long-time members and a continuous stream of transient team members.

Critical Incident Stress Syndrome can play a heavy part in all of the body recovery work you will do. If you are not willing or able to recognize signs of depression or anger that could stem from the work you are doing as a part of a Dive Rescue and Recovery team, you better hope someone else can. CISS, CISD, and PTSD are real things and do happen whether you know it, believe it or not.

If you are a gung-ho, go anywhere, or where, do anything, full speed ahead person, you may be dangerous as a rescue and recovery diver. The ability to work, as a team is critical to the safety of every individual involved in a mission. Every step of a dive mission must be planned and worked as a team effort; not an individual effort. A risk factor must be placed on every move the team makes. There should be no individuals working at a dive site only the team. Every mission is a team function and every member is dependent on everyone else. Individuals who exhibit little regard for teamwork or team training may forge ahead when problems crop up and challenge a situation with force. If they get into trouble, the mission is jeopardized and the lives of other team members can be put on the line.

If you decide to become or remain a Public Safety Diver, you will eventually develop a reason. Changes will occur within the team as well as your agency that will challenge your dedication. At the end of the day, when all the gear is clean and stowed away, you will always know that the job you perform is extraordinary. Your skills, training, dedication, and fortitude make you, the Public Safety Diver, unique.

08/05/2022

On Wednesday, August 3, 2022, the Lake Wales Police Department was dealt a terrible loss…the line of duty death of their beloved K-9 Max, partner to K-9 Officer Jared Joyner.

K-9 Max was shot and killed by a violent man with a criminal history.

To Officer Joyner, Chief Chris Velasquez, the men and women of the Lake Wales Police Department, and the residents of Lake Wales…the Polk County Sheriff’s Office shares your grief.

K-9 Max died doing what he was trained to do; he led the charge to apprehend a dangerous suspect who was an active threat to the community…and in doing so, he saved the lives of his partner and others.

This is an example of what’s down there with us in black water search and recovery in Texas. ”Mind Monsters” got nothing...
06/10/2022

This is an example of what’s down there with us in black water search and recovery in Texas. ”Mind Monsters” got nothing on these REAL monsters!

Our brethren in the north on an extreme recovery mission:https://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/en/gazette/rcmps-deepest-underwater-...
06/01/2022
RCMP’s deepest underwater mission returns deceased man to family | Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Our brethren in the north on an extreme recovery mission:

https://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/en/gazette/rcmps-deepest-underwater-mission-returns-deceased-man-family?tracking=fb&fbclid=IwAR0tH44SMU39a6D2v4DDx58FfyyGa1wTrYyuBk4YJS4Koxa9pTJYeWNGFcM&fs=e&s=cl

Latest stories — RCMP Gazette RCMP’s deepest underwater mission returns deceased man to family In February, three RCMP officers from the National Underwater Recovery Training Centre used a remotely operated vehicle to recover the body of a bulldozer operator who crashed through the ice. Credit: ...

New TX Specialty Plates!
05/26/2022

New TX Specialty Plates!

Photos from Dive Rescue International - Public Safety's post
12/10/2021

Photos from Dive Rescue International - Public Safety's post

Helping give a tiny super hero a great day!
11/13/2021

Helping give a tiny super hero a great day!

An Original on the team and a rock of an instructor.  Til Valhalla, Brother.
11/05/2021

An Original on the team and a rock of an instructor. Til Valhalla, Brother.

09/02/2021

Sooo many mistakes! Sooooo hilarious!

05/12/2021

The City of Grand Prairie Public Safety Dive Team recovered the body of a 75-year-old male today at Joe Pool Lake. Divers initiated a search and rescue for the person until dark on Saturday, but the high winds challenged the recovery as well as an unknown last known location. Divers resumed operations on Sunday morning and, utilizing sonar technology, recovered the body at the Estes Peninsula cove location where he was pronounced deceased. The City of Grand Prairie sends its condolences to the victim’s family. Details: https://www.gptx.org/Home/Components/News/News/12918/26

Houston PD Dive Unit scored an impressive tool!
03/10/2021

Houston PD Dive Unit scored an impressive tool!

Working in the dark and cold water trying to save lives while working safely.
12/05/2020

Working in the dark and cold water trying to save lives while working safely.

Thank you cookies from grateful citizens!
07/29/2020

Thank you cookies from grateful citizens!

Not a recovery you see everyday!  Thanks to IFD
07/26/2020

Not a recovery you see everyday! Thanks to IFD

One of the largest First Responder Dive Recovery Teams in the country.
07/03/2020
palmdale_dive_operation

One of the largest First Responder Dive Recovery Teams in the country.

This is "palmdale_dive_operation" by LA County Fire Training on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Well somebody wrote a nice grant proposal!
06/23/2020

Well somebody wrote a nice grant proposal!

One of our Dive Team members serving on or off duty and under or on top of the water!  Nicely done, Daniel!
08/02/2019

One of our Dive Team members serving on or off duty and under or on top of the water! Nicely done, Daniel!

A leader inspiring his troops!
08/01/2019

A leader inspiring his troops!

Something to think about!
07/12/2019

Something to think about!

Did you know there is more to decontaminating a drysuit than just taking care of the outside?

Public Safety teams spend time cleaning the outside of their drysuits because they were in dirty water, but few think about the inside. Whether teams share drysuits or not, inside the drysuit can get equally as contaminated as the outside.

Perspiration, and all other bodily functions, affects the inside of the drysuit during a mission. We also know not everyone shares the same personal hygiene.

After a mission, the drysuit is cleaned on the outside, dried, rolled up and stored. All that “funk” stays in the drysuit, waiting for the next unsuspecting diver uses it. Would you wear another person’s workout clothes if they haven’t washed them? This is the equivalent.

Aqua Lung’s Hazmat Drysuit can be turned inside out, decontaminated on the inside the same way as the outside. It can be dried with a towel, flipped back and handed to the next diver--clean and safe.

It is important to clean the whole drysuit, not just the outside.

For more information and Public Safety Pricing contact us at 1-800-248-3483

The Dive team is out searching the Trinity River for an individual that jumped from a bridge.
06/04/2019

The Dive team is out searching the Trinity River for an individual that jumped from a bridge.

https://fox2now.com/2019/05/24/bodies-found-in-submerged-portage-des-souix-car-identified-as-missing-adults/
05/25/2019
Bodies found in submerged Portage Des Souix car identified as missing adults

https://fox2now.com/2019/05/24/bodies-found-in-submerged-portage-des-souix-car-identified-as-missing-adults/

ST. CHARLES COUNTY, Mo. — Crews in Portage Des Sioux pulled a car from the Mississippi River near on Friday. The Metro West Dive Team removed the submerged car at Hideaway Harbor around 1:30 a.m. Two bodies were found inside. The bodies have been identified as John Reinhardt, 20, and Caitlin Frang...

Another day and as the flood waters recede enough for vehicles to be located and pulled from the “normal” depths, more h...
05/20/2019

Another day and as the flood waters recede enough for vehicles to be located and pulled from the “normal” depths, more high water vehicle casualties recovered.

05/20/2019

Truck recovered from Turtle Creek

The Dallas Police Dive Team recovers a truck from Turtle Creek after heavy rain storm.
05/20/2019

The Dallas Police Dive Team recovers a truck from Turtle Creek after heavy rain storm.

Flash flooding of Turtle Creek yesterday in Dallas swept away at least two vehicles.  The Dive Team was called out to re...
05/19/2019

Flash flooding of Turtle Creek yesterday in Dallas swept away at least two vehicles. The Dive Team was called out to recover the two vehicles seen by witnesses being washed into the deep creek. One driver was seen escaping. The second was never seen. Confirmation on that vehicle’s owner/driver’s safety pending. No bodies found.

Body found amidst plane wreckage
02/04/2019
Body found amidst plane wreckage

Body found amidst plane wreckage

A body has been found amidst the wreckage of the missing plane thought to be carrying footballer Emiliano Sala and his pilot David Ibbotson. An underwater search began on Sunday and the fuselage was found on the seabed. The Air Accident Investigation Branch say a body was discovered amongst broken u...

Call out to Lake Ray Hubbard this evening to recover a car.
01/09/2019

Call out to Lake Ray Hubbard this evening to recover a car.

Address

1400 S Lamar St
Dallas, TX
75215

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 9am - 5pm

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Comments

thank you for your service
ps.happy forth of july
A very rare diving rescue:Edd Sorenson rescued someone from an underwater cave in Florida in 2012.

I couldn’t see the entrance, because it was so clouded with silt. After searching for about 10 minutes, I ran into her legs

Edd Sorenson: ‘Cave diving is safe if you follow strict safety procedures.’ Photograph: Matthew Coughlin for the Guardian

Fifteen years ago, I moved from Portland, Oregon to Florida to set up a cave-diving business on Merritt’s Mill Pond, a man-made lake in Marianna. I also became a member of International Underwater Cave Rescue and Recovery (IUCRR).

There are hardly ever any cave rescues: by the time someone is reported missing and an IUCRR diver gets to the scene, the person is almost invariably dead. Until 2012, there had been only four successful cave rescues.

In April 2012, I spent seven hours removing a young man’s body from a cave in Tallahassee, Florida. He had taken off his gear to get through a small hole and become stuck. I had to manipulate his arms and legs so I could push him back through the hole, because rigor mortis had set in. People ask me how I cope with something like that. I know it sounds cold, but I can switch off. I focus on the job.

When an emergency call came a week later, saying there was a lost diver on the Mill Pond, I feared the worst. I was teaching a diving class at the far end of the lake; five minutes later and I would have been in the water and missed the call.

A man had ventured with his teenage son and daughter into a system called Twin Caves. It descends in stages from 20ft to 100ft deep and goes 3,000ft underground, with multiple “jump tunnels” or arteries that run off a wider tunnel. The main route has a permanent line, a 4mm-wide nylon rope called the gold line.

Cave diving requires strict safety procedures, with different equipment and training from open-water diving. In this case, the father was an experienced open-water diver, but open-water divers use a standard flutter kick, up and down. In heavily silted water, this disturbs the sediment, destroying visibility in seconds.

The three of them were seen entering Twin Caves by a group of local cave divers already inside. The moment one of them saw the family doing flutter kicks, she signalled to her group to get out; but within seconds it was pitch black. They were able to find the gold line and make their way to the exit, only to be overtaken by two divers – the father and the son – ploughing past them in their panic to get out.

On the surface, the father begged the group to go back for his daughter. But they were not trained in rescue techniques – and making such an attempt is a sure way to end up with more fatalities. A trapped diver will often thrash around in panic, tear off your mask and regulator and kill you both.

I high-tailed it back to the shop, where my employee had our boat running. My gear is always ready and I carry two of everything: double tanks and a spare breather. By the time we got to the caves, it was at least 15 minutes since the call and I still had to gear up. Time was tight: air tanks last only 30 to 40 minutes at that depth. I couldn’t see the entrance, because it was so clouded with silt, but I knew from experience where it was, even though it is barely 3ft x 3ft.

Inside, I began a zigzag search pattern; after about 10 minutes, I ran into her legs. She was treading water inside a dome with an air pocket created from divers’ bubbles. She had tried to get out a couple of times, but nearly got snagged on jagged rocks and turned back. She was lucky to have found the dome once, let alone twice. She was very cold, scared and crying.

I told her: “I’m going to get you out. I won’t leave you, but I need you to stay calm.” She nodded. She held my arm and we dropped back down into the water, following the reel I had tied to the gold line. She shared air from my tank as I made my way back towards the entrance.

Eventually, we found the entrance, squeezed through and hit the surface. Everyone was stunned to see two people alive. The girl was trying to thank me in the water, but I put her regulator back in and towed her back to the boat.

The sheriff’s boat turned up at that moment and the father got chewed out pretty badly. He understood how close he had come to losing his daughter and tried to compensate me for my time. I refused, but he made a large donation to the Divers Alert Network (DAN). Later, I was honoured with the first ever DAN Hero award. The girl sent me a lovely letter, which I still have in my office.

I was just happy everyone got to go home. That is rarely how it ends.
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