USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program

USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program For more information or to contact your local Partners for Fish & Wildlife staff, please see: www.fws.gov/partners. For more information about USFWS, please see www.fws.gov

The USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program was established in 1987 with a core group of biologists and a small budget for on-the-ground wetland restoration projects on private lands. This successful, results-oriented program has garnered support through the years and has grown into a larger and more diversified habitat restoration program assisting more than 46,000 private landowners across

The USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program was established in 1987 with a core group of biologists and a small budget for on-the-ground wetland restoration projects on private lands. This successful, results-oriented program has garnered support through the years and has grown into a larger and more diversified habitat restoration program assisting more than 46,000 private landowners across

Operating as usual

2021 Kevin Conway Habitat Conservation Award: Clint Wirick As Utah Coordinator for the USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildl...
10/06/2021

2021 Kevin Conway Habitat Conservation Award: Clint Wirick

As Utah Coordinator for the USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, Clint Wirick has been instrumental in the state’s conservation. On August 25, 2021 his years of priceless work with landowners, NGO’s, state, and federal agencies to create landscape scale watershed and wildlife habitat restoration projects was recognized by the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. We’re proud to announce that Clint Wirick has received the 2021 Kevin Conway Habitat Conservation Award!

Clint works with private landowners on sagebrush steppe, wet meadow, riparian and stream habitats. The partnerships he manages have led to over 75,000 terrestrial acres, 7,000 riparian acres and 331 stream miles restored. An impressive field biologist and relationship builder, Clint has provided leadership among both the southern and southeastern region’s Utah Partners for Conservation Development steering committees as vice chairperson and chairperson. Clint has also served as the facilitator for Color Country Adaptive Resource Management Group, planning and facilitating quarterly meetings, annual tours and working with all stakeholders involved with the committee. He is an active participant with conservation groups, wildlife research, and writes for magazines and other publications sharing insight into Utah’s wild resources and their stewardship.

In the award letter from Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, it was expressed that the state truly could not accomplish watershed level restoration without Clint’s leadership.

Beyond his amazing professional achievements, Clint is an accomplished hunter with a true passion for hunting mule deer, elk, turkey and chukar and inviting new participants along with him to learn.

Thank you for being an inspirational leader in the conservation community and congratulations!

2021 Kevin Conway Habitat Conservation Award: Clint Wirick

As Utah Coordinator for the USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, Clint Wirick has been instrumental in the state’s conservation. On August 25, 2021 his years of priceless work with landowners, NGO’s, state, and federal agencies to create landscape scale watershed and wildlife habitat restoration projects was recognized by the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. We’re proud to announce that Clint Wirick has received the 2021 Kevin Conway Habitat Conservation Award!

Clint works with private landowners on sagebrush steppe, wet meadow, riparian and stream habitats. The partnerships he manages have led to over 75,000 terrestrial acres, 7,000 riparian acres and 331 stream miles restored. An impressive field biologist and relationship builder, Clint has provided leadership among both the southern and southeastern region’s Utah Partners for Conservation Development steering committees as vice chairperson and chairperson. Clint has also served as the facilitator for Color Country Adaptive Resource Management Group, planning and facilitating quarterly meetings, annual tours and working with all stakeholders involved with the committee. He is an active participant with conservation groups, wildlife research, and writes for magazines and other publications sharing insight into Utah’s wild resources and their stewardship.

In the award letter from Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, it was expressed that the state truly could not accomplish watershed level restoration without Clint’s leadership.

Beyond his amazing professional achievements, Clint is an accomplished hunter with a true passion for hunting mule deer, elk, turkey and chukar and inviting new participants along with him to learn.

Thank you for being an inspirational leader in the conservation community and congratulations!

Before & After: Hill Prairie restoration project in Illinois. Hill prairies formed on dry, southwest-facing hill tops ab...
10/05/2021

Before & After: Hill Prairie restoration project in Illinois.

Hill prairies formed on dry, southwest-facing hill tops above the floodplains of rivers, especially the Illinois and Mississippi rivers. Erosion in these areas carved steep hillsides. Hill prairie soils contain loess (fine-grained, wind-blown soil). Because they are hard to access, some Illinois hill prairies have been saved from agricultural development. The majority of Illinois hill prairies today are less than five acres in size and about half of these sites are smaller than one acre.

Photos by Mike Budd / USFWS.

Before & After: Hill Prairie restoration project in Illinois.

Hill prairies formed on dry, southwest-facing hill tops above the floodplains of rivers, especially the Illinois and Mississippi rivers. Erosion in these areas carved steep hillsides. Hill prairie soils contain loess (fine-grained, wind-blown soil). Because they are hard to access, some Illinois hill prairies have been saved from agricultural development. The majority of Illinois hill prairies today are less than five acres in size and about half of these sites are smaller than one acre.

Photos by Mike Budd / USFWS.

Utah PFW Program spent a morning with middle schoolers talking about native fish, indigenous people, beavers, rivers, fl...
09/28/2021

Utah PFW Program spent a morning with middle schoolers talking about native fish, indigenous people, beavers, rivers, flooding, habitat, what they want to be when they grow up and how to achieve it. Kids were able to sample fish, collect data, get wet and muddy, and chew on cottonwood bark like a beaver. Hopefully they went home and remembered one thing to tell their parents and siblings.

Thanks to our local U.S. Forest Service office fisheries biologist for helping out.

Congratulations to Tuda, Jack and the family at Ute Creek Cattle Company in New Mexico!
09/15/2021

Congratulations to Tuda, Jack and the family at Ute Creek Cattle Company in New Mexico!

Habitat restoration in action at Blue Ridge Discovery Center campus in Virginia.
09/08/2021

Habitat restoration in action at Blue Ridge Discovery Center campus in Virginia.

PFW is hiring! See the links below. This coordinated hire includes seven positions with duty stations in CA, CO, MT, TX,...
09/07/2021

PFW is hiring! See the links below. This coordinated hire includes seven positions with duty stations in CA, CO, MT, TX, SD, and two locations in WI. Open now through September 17th!

Public:
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/613113600

Merit Promotion:
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/613111400

PFW is hiring! See the links below. This coordinated hire includes seven positions with duty stations in CA, CO, MT, TX, SD, and two locations in WI. Open now through September 17th!

Public:
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/613113600

Merit Promotion:
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/613111400

Looking good, Illinois! Restored wetland outside Roberts pictured here. Photo by Mike Budd / USFWS. Interested in a proj...
08/10/2021

Looking good, Illinois! Restored wetland outside Roberts pictured here. Photo by Mike Budd / USFWS.

Interested in a project of your own? Learn more about our IL staff and the services they offer here: https://outdoor.wildlifeillinois.org/articles/biologists-focus-on-private-land-management

Looking good, Illinois! Restored wetland outside Roberts pictured here. Photo by Mike Budd / USFWS.

Interested in a project of your own? Learn more about our IL staff and the services they offer here: https://outdoor.wildlifeillinois.org/articles/biologists-focus-on-private-land-management

The Partners Program is working with landowners and partners to enhance and restore resilient ecosystems to a hotter and...
07/21/2021
Climate resilience in a hotter, drier West | Trout Unlimited

The Partners Program is working with landowners and partners to enhance and restore resilient ecosystems to a hotter and drier climate. Our awesome partner Trout Unlimited highlighted a project we are involved with in Utah addressing climate resilience. Thanks TU! Click the link below to find out more about the project and climate resilience.

The West is in the grips of another hot, dry summer, with more than

07/16/2021
Topeka Shiners, Blue Mounds State Park

Biologist Scott Ralston (Windom Wetland Management District) is heading up cooperative recovery of the endangered Topeka shiner, a small minnow inhabiting small to mid-size prairie streams in the Midwest and primarily found in the headwaters to the Missouri River. Check out the recent work at Blue Mounds State Park in Luverne, Minnesota.

It has often been said, "many hands make light work".  This is especially true in the Partner for Fish and Wildlife Prog...
07/15/2021

It has often been said, "many hands make light work". This is especially true in the Partner for Fish and Wildlife Program.

It was refreshing seeing so many partners and volunteers gather on this project in Utah with a goal to collect sediment, increase some floodplain connectivity, and create small wet spots in a dry landscape. This was accomplished using minimal tools, a lot of natural materials, and many hands. The weather couldn't of been better either with needed rain coming as we finished up. Utah's Watershed Restoration Initiative - WRI Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Trout Unlimited

This week is POLLINATOR WEEK.  Pollinator Week is an annual event celebrated internationally in support of pollinator he...
06/23/2021

This week is POLLINATOR WEEK. Pollinator Week is an annual event celebrated internationally in support of pollinator health. It's a time to celebrate pollinators and spread the word about what we can do to protect them.
If you didn't know, pollinators are critical to many aspects of our human lives. Pollinators are essential for the reproduction of many wildflowers and food crops. For one out of every three bites eaten by a human, a pollinator played a role. Pollinators are necessary part of healthy ecosystems as well. Ecosystems, habitat, and human food production rely on pollinator services!
The Partners Program is actively involved in pollinator science and conservation. Want to learn more or explore habitat projects, contact us at https://www.fws.gov/partners/

PC: Clint Wirick/USFWS

This week is POLLINATOR WEEK. Pollinator Week is an annual event celebrated internationally in support of pollinator health. It's a time to celebrate pollinators and spread the word about what we can do to protect them.
If you didn't know, pollinators are critical to many aspects of our human lives. Pollinators are essential for the reproduction of many wildflowers and food crops. For one out of every three bites eaten by a human, a pollinator played a role. Pollinators are necessary part of healthy ecosystems as well. Ecosystems, habitat, and human food production rely on pollinator services!
The Partners Program is actively involved in pollinator science and conservation. Want to learn more or explore habitat projects, contact us at https://www.fws.gov/partners/

PC: Clint Wirick/USFWS

Since 2015, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) has administered the Monarch Butterfly and Pollinators Cons...
06/16/2021

Since 2015, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) has administered the Monarch Butterfly and Pollinators Conservation Fund to conserve and increase habitat for monarchs and other pollinators. In 2016 the Kansas Grazing Lands Coalition, working in partnership with KS PFW, was fortunate enough to be awarded one of these grants.
This funding was used for on-the-ground habitat projects that addressed invasive species control in native prairie, benefited monarchs and other grassland obligate species and ranching sustainability. In total, this funding helped improve close to 16,000 acres of habitat for Monarchs and other pollinators on 15 projects in Kansas.
This past spring, Monarch Joint Venture staff contracted by NFWF, stopped through Kansas to collect data on blooming plants, milkweed, and monarch activity on a number of these KGLC/PFW habitat projects. This data collection is part of a larger multi-year- multi-state effort to gain a better understanding of the impact the NFWF funded projects are having on pollinator habitat and monarchs. The data will be used to estimate the amount of milkweed available to monarchs and explore relationships between monarch activity and the habitat.

Restoration job opportunities with a great conservation partner!
06/04/2021

Restoration job opportunities with a great conservation partner!

WE'RE HIRING! AGAIN! We're growing and hiring several positions across the quail range, so if you're a qualified candidate who wants to work for THE upland organization, throw your metaphorical hat in the ring.
* TX Coordinating Wildlife Biologist
Deadline 6/4
*KS Habitat Specialist-Cedar Bluff WMA
Deadline 6/4
*TN Farm Bill Wildlife Biologist
Deadline 6/7
*IL Farm Bill Wildlife Biologist-2 Positions
Deadline 6/19

But you better do it quickly, because several positions are closing today and in the next few days.
Job descriptions and application info here: https://bit.ly/2Rs1WGq

Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) Landscape-scale Restoration Initiative at Río Grande de Arecibo (Puerto...
05/25/2021

Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) Landscape-scale Restoration Initiative at Río Grande de Arecibo (Puerto Rico)

The Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program in the Caribbean has been collaborating since 2018 with NRCS and the USFS in the implementation of the Puerto Rico Joint Chiefs’ Landscape Restoration Partnership (JCLRP), a collaborative effort between several agencies and local partners (e.g., Para La Naturaleza, Protectores de Cuencas, Inc., and the Southwest Soil and Water Conservation District). The NRCS and USFS allocated $1,971,000 between 2018 and 2020, and $1,679,860 in 2021 to implement restoration and conservation actions within private lands of Puerto Rico. These initiatives aim to maintain the ecosystem functionality and resiliency by increasing the amount of private lands protected in the western and eastern regions of the Island, and promoting connectivity between private and public lands through transitional biological corridors to benefit trust species. Partners for Fish and Wildlife in the Caribbean has been providing technical assistance to the participants of these initiatives, implementing recovery actions for listed species and formalizing the collaboration with private landowners by signing 24 No-Cost Partners for Fish and Wildlife Landowner Agreements. The incentives to cover the implementation of the selected actions are provided by NRCS, and the plant material, monitoring actions, and the funds for the development of the Private Stewardship Management Plans are provided by the USFS.

This year, in an effort to strengthen our collaboration with NRCS in the Caribbean to recover listed species within private and public lands, and with the goal to contribute to the 30x30 Conservation Vision, the USFWS will collaborate with NRCS and the Lead Partner, Para la Naturaleza (PLN) in the recently awarded Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) that focuses on a landscape-level “reef to ridge” restoration approach within non-industrial private forestlands and agricultural lands in the Río Grande de Arecibo watershed in Puerto Rico to improve habitat for State and Federal trust species. The proposed restoration efforts, targeted to private forest and agricultural lands, and for which NRCS is allocating $2,541,985, will also help reduce sediment and pollutant runoff and promote the establishment of agroforestry systems in the watershed.

Partners for Fish and Wildlife, Endangered Species and Science Applications Programs in the Caribbean will be engaged in this initiative by providing technical assistance since the planning process and collaborating with PLN to ensure successful implementation of the objectives. In addition, the habitat restoration practices implemented under this initiative will directly benefit and reduce threats to the following identified focal species: Sirajo goby (Sycidium spp.), Coquí llanero (Eleutherodactylus juanariveroi), Puerto Rican crested toad (Peltophryne lemur), Palma manaca (Calyptronoma rivalis), Beautiful goetzea (Goetzea elegans), and Cóbana negra (Stahlia monosperma). Other listed plant species to be directly or indirectly benefited by the proposed conservations actions may include Ottoschulzia rhodoxylon, Peperomia wheelerii, Zanthoxylum thomasianum, Eugenia haematocarpa, Daphnopsis helleriana, and Myrcia paganii.

The RCPP will expand on-going restoration and conservation efforts for listed species within the northern region of Puerto Rico such as the PFW initiative in private lands within the Karst region to restore, enhance and establish new essential habitat for several listed plan species and the JCLRP. Moreover, No-Cost Partners for Fish and Wildlife Landowner Agreements will be also developed with interested participants to formalize the collaboration with private landowners and to ensure a retention period of the practices implemented within their property under the initiative.

Let’s hear it for all of those hardworking Moms out there! Flowers are a beautiful way to honor them on Mother’s Day. To...
05/09/2021

Let’s hear it for all of those hardworking Moms out there! Flowers are a beautiful way to honor them on Mother’s Day. To get those beauties, we need pollinators! Did you know that 85% of flowering plants are pollinated by native insects, mostly bees? Pollinators need our help and USFWS, through the Partners Program, is coordinating a Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Pollinator Task Force whose mission is to galvanize and fund native bee conservation. A main goal for the Task Force is to get diverse, quality pollinator habitat on the ground within the region. The Task Force agencies, including U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, U.G. Geological Survey and Natural Resources Conservation Service, are doing this by coordinating and funding actions that efficiently maximize native bee abundance, distribution, diversity and resilience with in the Great Lakes basin. They are busy as bees working with diverse partners throughout the Great Lakes Basin to fund and promote pollinator research, native bee surveys and habitat restoration. Stay tuned for future posts with details of their important work and tips on how you can help pollinators too! #GLRI, #Pollinators, #PFW

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5275 Leesburg Pike
Falls Church, VA
22041

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Thursday 9am - 5pm
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RE: North Atlantic Right Whales Just heard there's another death? The 13th one? I highly suspect two things: 1) Zika, West Nile, or St. Louis encephalitis (whales have been documented to suffer the latter two). All three viruses share the same phylogenetic clade; Zika with > 97 percent support. 2) About 1/3 of Calanus finmarchicus (Cal fin) has been unnaturally infected via Wolbachia-infected Aedes for ~ 5 years. North Atlantic right whales consume massive quantities of Cal fin as you know. And krill also comprises Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus (both are also Zika vectors). I spell out clearly which tests desperately need to be conducted on North Atlantic right whales (including a newer, safer, more reliable method for extracting eye fluids): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V136Y6ek7-Q&t And my reference-based article (with 14 citations): http://www.infobarrel.com/Test_North_Atlantic_Right_Whales_for_WNV_SLEV_ZIKA_and_Wolbachia
As you well know, vital services are lost when marshes disappear — from nourishing marine species to providing a physical barrier for coastal communities during storms such as the recent Hurricane I am trying to find scholarships to do this but time is really of the essence now. I may be in Vancouver attending grad school by the end of next semester.I have been trying to bring attention to the issues that I have observed over the past 10 years. I am trying alternate means. At the moment, I attend a small college on the Georgia coast, i have been conducting research in its under-explored and unppreciated yet stunningly beautiful marshes. I have changed my capstone project from writing a paper, on the plastic eating bacteria that I found in the marsh to documenting some of the Earths most ecologically important resources that are in danger. I would like the the reader tho know that my sckills and knowledge are credible and verifyable. I am a 3.4 non traditional biology student. My costs are minimal but more than this student can afford. I need to rent professional gear so that I can enter inti national and international events. I moved here 10 years ago, beat the odds and got sober. I started back to college 5 years ago. I have been studying biology mostly but went interdisciplinary, studying "film"/multimedia. I also attended film school in 98/99 at a college in Arizona. I know my way around equipment pretty well. I own a canon hsf 21, t3i and a d7100. The only camera my tiny college has is a 6d. What i am getting at is that i need much better, up to date equipment. in order to have this shown on an international level. The good news is, a $30,000 camera can be rented relatively cheap. https://www.youcaring.com/jeremyblackgeorgiacoast-862977 Jeremy
Today is Nature Photography Day! Share your favorite nature related images: https://contest.fbapp.io/nature-photography-day-photo-conte… www.naturephotographyday.com #naturephotoday #naturephotocontest