USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program

USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program For more information or to contact your local Partners for Fish & Wildlife staff, please see: www.fws.gov/partners. For more information about USFWS, please see www.fws.gov
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The USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program was established in 1987 with a core group of biologists and a small budget for on-the-ground wetland restoration projects on private lands. This successful, results-oriented program has garnered support through the years and has grown into a larger and more diversified habitat restoration program assisting more than 46,000 private landowners across the Nation. The Partners for Fish & Wildlife Program provides technical and financial assistance to private and Tribal landowners interested in restoring, enhancing and managing fish and wildlife habitats on their land. Through a landowner agreement, landowners agree to maintain the habitat improvement project for at least ten years, but otherwise retain ownership and full control of their land. Today, the Partners for Fish & Wildlife Program is equipped with more than 300 full-time staff, located in all fifty States and Territories. All of our habitat improvement projects are developed on individual basis and implemented at the field level. To get contact information for your local, please visit: http://www.fws.gov/partners/contactUs.html

Mission: "Working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats"

How many species do you see at this restored wetland? Just a few years ago it was an unproductive crop field. It's growi...
06/02/2020

How many species do you see at this restored wetland? Just a few years ago it was an unproductive crop field. It's growing a new crop now thanks to the private landowner. Check the comment section later today and we'll list the species.

Ryan Askren Photography

Teal and their destination: A wetland restored on private property. Thanks to Ryan Askren for his incredible photography...
05/28/2020

Teal and their destination: A wetland restored on private property.

Thanks to Ryan Askren for his incredible photography skills and time spent capturing the magic of wetlands.

An earthworm emerges after a rain to check the conditions. Earthworms are a source of food for birds, especially the Ame...
04/30/2020

An earthworm emerges after a rain to check the conditions. Earthworms are a source of food for birds, especially the American woodcock. They also create pores throughout the soil that creates a spongy texture, allowing water to infiltrate the soil, leading to less runoff. There are other benefits. Ever been fishing? There are several species though and maybe not all are beneficial. After the initial post, Mr. Steve Hill provided some great insight into the "jumping worm" in the comment section below.

Restore wetlands! You can do it, we can help!📷: Mallards rising into the air with the words "wetland restoration" writte...
04/29/2020

Restore wetlands! You can do it, we can help!

📷: Mallards rising into the air with the words "wetland restoration" written behind the ducks.

04/28/2020

Life today as told by white-tailed deer.

Video: One deer sneezes, the others run away.

04/27/2020

Diesel powered conservation! Habitat restoration requires some heavy duty equipment and skilled operators in order to provide quality wildlife habitat and quality recreational opportunities. We work with private contractors in order to get the job done. Enjoy these clips of habitat conservation in action. Thank you private contractors and private landowners.

Video: dozers, skid-steers, and excavators moving dirt or cutting trees. USFWS

Hats off to our friends at The Nature Conservancy who found a way to get trees in the ground at their Emiquon Preserve n...
04/23/2020

Hats off to our friends at The Nature Conservancy who found a way to get trees in the ground at their Emiquon Preserve near Havana, Illinois during these challenging times. They had a very detailed safety plan that kept everyone safe while they restored a hardwood forest. On average, they planted 435 tree seedlings per acre.

The Partners for Fish & Wildlife Program assisted with this project by purchasing the tree seedlings. This project is important to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service as it reduces forest fragmentation along a major migratory bird route (Illinois River) and it ties in with our National Wildlife Refuge system, with Emiquon National Wildlife Refuge only being 2.5 miles away.

Photos courtesy of Doug Blodgett of The Nature Conservancy.

Earth Day today!!!!!Did you know the first Earth Day was in April 22, 1970.  Happy 50th Anniversary Earth Day.Earth Day ...
04/22/2020

Earth Day today!!!!!

Did you know the first Earth Day was in April 22, 1970. Happy 50th Anniversary Earth Day.

Earth Day is widely recognized as the largest secular observance in the world, marked by more than a billion people every year as a day of action to change human behavior and create global, national and local policy changes.

Thank you to our landowners and other conservation partners.

photo: 2 people standing along a barbwire fence. Photo caption reads "Happy Earth Day" and a quote from Aldo Leopold that reads "Conservation will ultimately boil down to rewarding the private landowner who conserves the public interest".

Right now in 11 western states a battle to pass on ones genes 🧬 is happening.  Sage Grouse are as old as the sagebrush s...
04/21/2020

Right now in 11 western states a battle to pass on ones genes 🧬 is happening. Sage Grouse are as old as the sagebrush sea itself. Every spring these birds come back to the same spot in an ancient ritual of courtship and prowess. Unfortunately, sage grouse have been declining for many years.

Sage grouse conservation means conservation for 350+ other sagebrush ecosystem species. If we lose the bird, it might be to late for a lot of other wildlife.

These photos were taken in Southern Utah in an area where Partners Program biologist are actively engaged in habitat work and partnerships.

📸: Sage grouse lek photos by Clint Wirick/USFWS

Great article by Clint Wirick, Private Lands Biologist in Utah, about his strategic conservation efforts and partnership...
04/21/2020
A Habitat Highway in the Desert

Great article by Clint Wirick, Private Lands Biologist in Utah, about his strategic conservation efforts and partnerships. The conservation efforts are not only strategic, but they're also utilizing science to make sure they're doing the right thing in the right place and at the right time. Thank you Clint and partners! Beautiful landscape! https://editions.mydigitalpublication.com/publication/?i=656543&article_id=3647307&view=articleBrowser&ver=html5://www.facebook.com/PFWProgram/notifications/?section=activity_feed&subsection=mention&ref=notif&target_story=S%3A_I92853043210%3A10157976189893211

Wild turkeys have discovered refuge in southern Utah’s red rock desert landscape. Research to find out more is just beginning. Interest in turkey hunting h

Conserving the Oregon spotted frog, in Washington, with some incredible partnerships. We're fortunate to be a part of th...
04/20/2020
Partnering To Save The Endangered Oregon Spotted Frog

Conserving the Oregon spotted frog, in Washington, with some incredible partnerships. We're fortunate to be a part of this project along with the Samish Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The Samish DNR created this great story map to show you what they've been up to and what the partnership is achieving.

https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/f787d3248b0a4a7784e125a267fe643a

The collaborative effort between Samish Indian Nation and partners to restore Oregon Spotted Frog habitat in Washington State.

04/17/2020
Jon Wessman Career Recap

Jon Wessman was a Private Lands Biologist in Arkansas for 13 years and has had the great fortune of moving around the country and within the government. This video is a quick insight into his career and it provides some very important advice for all of us. Just when you think the job is about trees, birds and pollinators, you're slapped in the face with the sudden realization of what it is really about.

Video: A sit down interview with Jon Wessman. Some older photos of Jon are interspersed throughout the video.

04/16/2020
In a Tree

"HELLO IN THERE.......HELLO" - John Prine

video: Procyon lotor in a tree cavity. Would say the common name, but don't want to wreck the surprise.

The world lost a very special person recently. Sally Zodrow, a former USFWS employee and friend to many in the Partners ...
04/15/2020

The world lost a very special person recently. Sally Zodrow, a former USFWS employee and friend to many in the Partners for Fish & Wildlife Program, will be dearly missed. Lori Stevenson, Ohio State Coordinator for the PFW Program says "I miss her infectious laugh and her smile, I miss her straightforward way of providing me with advice on what to do and what not to do, and which adventurous trip we should go on next! I miss Sally for being Sally. She and her chocolate lab, Meg, will forever be in my heart."

As we work to conserve our natural resources, we all come to find that it is the people that make it special and what we remember most. Thank you Sally for the smiles you brought this world.

Photos of Sally enjoying the outdoors courtesy of Lori Stevenson.

Check out our swanky wood duck boxes! These unique boxes were designed by landowner Tom Cleveland who repurposed old wat...
04/13/2020

Check out our swanky wood duck boxes!

These unique boxes were designed by landowner Tom Cleveland who repurposed old water softener containers that would have otherwise been thrown away. Each box stands about three feet tall by 16" diameter and costs about $3 and less than an hour to make.

PFW has had great success installing duck boxes in partnership with landowners in Indiana, among other states. Last year, biologist Scott Fetters assisted landowners who had 19 successful boxes and helped to install another 5 this season. By building, installing and maintaining nest boxes, landowners can gain insight into the interesting aspects of wood duck nesting and reproduction, while helping to boost local populations.

To learn more about Wood Duck Boxes, see the Ducks Unlimited page here: https://bit.ly/2wEi79a

Big Blackfoot Chapter of Trout Unlimited
04/08/2020

Big Blackfoot Chapter of Trout Unlimited

Spring is here in the Blackfoot! We are all experiencing some tough changes...but not all change is bad. We are proud to share our first project of 2020...a spring creek transformation in the upper Blackfoot! Thanks to so many who made this possible, especially the private landowner, Montana Trout Unlimited, WestSlope Chapter Trout Unlimited Logjam Presents, MTFWP, KettleHouse Amphitheater, USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program and private donors! #blackfootriver #blackfootriverfund #troutwater

Fire is a natural process, a process which helps landscapes digest and cycle nutrients.  People are also a part of this ...
03/31/2020

Fire is a natural process, a process which helps landscapes digest and cycle nutrients. People are also a part of this process now and PFW has been working with some of the greatest conservation minded people in Utah to put this watershed back on a path of renewal and regeneration.

On this week’s edition of NWTF-Utah Habitat Management Monday we are highlighting the Miller Creek Watershed Restoration Project. This area was heavily damaged by the Seeley Fire that burned over 48,000 acres in Emery County in 2012. This wildfire resulted in damage to the riparian corridor throughout the watershed which has had a negative impact on wildlife habitat and has continued to cause water quality issues.

This multi-phase project is improving in-stream, riparian and upland habitat to benefit multiple wildlife species including wild turkey, elk, mule deer, grouse, native fish, and many others.

Partners include Trout Unlimited, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, NWTF, US Fish and Wildlife Service, BLM, NRCS, ConcoPhillips, Safari Club International, SFW, MDF, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Utah Wild Sheep Foundation, Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining, and multiple private landowners.

03/26/2020
Wetland Trail Camera

A gadwall doing somersaults! What!

Gadwall, wood ducks, a hooded merganser and a mink show up in front of the trail camera at the Webb project in Alexander Couny, IL. Our March 17 post will tell you more about this project.

Last year, Private Lands Biologist Chris Woodson in Missouri put a trail camera on  swamp milkweed to see which species ...
03/25/2020

Last year, Private Lands Biologist Chris Woodson in Missouri put a trail camera on swamp milkweed to see which species of butterflies would show up. These are just 2 of the images showing swallowtails and monarchs utilizing the same flower. Last year was an experimental setup, there will be more good stuff coming this summer.

Dedicated landowners help make Wisconsin's natural resources flourish. A husband and wife wade the Wedde Creek in centra...
03/24/2020

Dedicated landowners help make Wisconsin's natural resources flourish. A husband and wife wade the Wedde Creek in central WI (class I trout stream) removing invasive brush. These landowners are also planting 10 acres of native prairie along the stream to filter agriculture before it enters the stream, while also providing habitat for grassland birds and pollinators!

Photos: Brendan Woodall/USFWS

Just outside of Grand Rapids, Michigan our PFW Program had the opportunity to help restore this gem of a wetland. The pr...
03/23/2020

Just outside of Grand Rapids, Michigan our PFW Program had the opportunity to help restore this gem of a wetland. The project is on the newly acquired Highlands Park, a former private golf course now jointly owned and managed as a natural park by the Land Conservancy of West Michigan (LCWM) and Blanford Nature Center (BNC). Notice all the downed trees in the wetland. That will make great basking sites for turtles. You'll find ducks resting on these same trees.

Overall, 6 wetlands were restored and approximately 120 acres of surrounding habitat have been restored, or are in the process of being restored, to quality wildlife habitat.

Aerial photo by Justin Heslinga.

03/20/2020
How Deep for Ducks

A biologist walks through a shallow water wetland restored by the PFW Program as puddle ducks race into the site. This video illustrates the ideal depth for puddle ducks, which is about 12 to 18 inches deep.

Watch out for Brendan Woodall when he gets a hold of a chainsaw! Brendan, a Wisconsin Private Lands Biologist, put a hur...
03/18/2020

Watch out for Brendan Woodall when he gets a hold of a chainsaw! Brendan, a Wisconsin Private Lands Biologist, put a hurting on these black locust trees yesterday. Removing the locust here was important for the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly. Opening up this area will allow more wild lupine to grow, which the karner blue butterfly requires. Read more about the Karner blue here https://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/insects/kbb/kbb_fact.html

03/17/2020
Checking in on a Previously Restored Site

He practiced social distancing by grabbing his camera and checking in on a project that was restored 2 years ago. Some cool critters showed up. The Befofe/After photos are mesmerizing. Thanks Nick George for restoring this one! We hope you enjoy the results as much as we do. Thanks to Heartlands Conservancy, Ducks Unlimited, Illinois Department of Natural Resources, Arbor Day Foundation and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. It takes a team! Also, the water is only 8-10" deep that the biologist walks through.

Prescribed burn at a prairie project we were able to assist with. We did not assist with the burn, but we did help with ...
03/13/2020

Prescribed burn at a prairie project we were able to assist with. We did not assist with the burn, but we did help with brush removal and invasive species control prior to the burn. The fire was in-kind match. Thanks to the dedicated private landowners who define what it means to be a good steward of the land. Glad we could help out and glad our signs are fire tolerant. The monarchs, pollinators and migratory songbirds are sure to be happy this spring! Photo courtesy of Joann Fricke.

03/11/2020
Peeling back the layers

If it's too wet to farm, it's probably just right for the birds!

This video shows a before and after by peeling away the marginal crop ground and exposing the wetland we restored. A biologist walks through the wetland to give a depth perspective.

No audio.

These kids were able to participate in some turkey trapping and getting a GPS tracker on a hen. What we know is we reall...
03/09/2020

These kids were able to participate in some turkey trapping and getting a GPS tracker on a hen. What we know is we really don’t know a lot about turkey management in Utah from a published research and data perspective . Very little research exist in Utah, and practically none in these Southwest desert systems here. This project is providing a first glimpse into what turkeys are doing in this unique landscape. This research is happening in the Escalante Watershed of Southern Utah. The Partners Program is actively engaged in stream corridor habitat restoration efforts here and also a partner helping with this research effort. One question research would like to tease out is how these turkeys are using habitat restoration project areas.

Desert National Wildlife Refuge
03/07/2020

Desert National Wildlife Refuge

With #PeaceCorpsWeek drawing to a close, we would like to highlight the work of one of our own.

As an agro-forestry extension agent in Niger, West Africa, Christiana lived a and worked with a small rural village on the edge of the Sahara Desert to help increase the local food supply. Together they planted trees to stop desertification, reclaimed land to plant crops, and worked on dry season vegetable gardening. "It was a great experience being part of this community where people had to work together to survive, where entertainment consisted of talking, dancing and singing at the cooking fire every night, and where nothing was wasted," says Christiana.

This experience with the Peace Corps helped prepare Christiana, a wildlife biologist by training, for the Service's Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program. Today, she works with private landowners and other partners to implement voluntary habitat restoration projects on private lands. Most of her projects focus on collaborating with landowners to restore and enhance fish and wildlife habitat around springs, streams and wetlands. All projects benefit the landowner and the target species, such as Amargosa toad, Pahranagat roundtail chub (endangered), and southwestern willow flycatcher (endangered).

Thank you, Christiana!

#WelcomeToWild #WomenInSTEM #WomenInScience

Partners for Conservation
03/06/2020

Partners for Conservation

The South Dakota Agricultural Land Trust, founded in 2019, is looking for an Executive Director. The ED is a new full-time staff position that will be responsible for the professional leadership, management and growth of the SDALT. Working together with the SDALT Board of Directors, the Executive Director will advance the SDALT through the development and implementation of internal and external goals that reflect the organization’s mission and vision. The position provides overall leadership for fundraising, strategic planning, organizational development, completion and administration of conservation projects and financial oversight. Open until filled. To apply, email your resume, cover letter, salary requirements and potential start date to: [email protected] Subject: SDALT Executive Director or Apply online: http://ed.gr/b9yda #PartnersForConservation #PrivateLandsConservation #PublicPrivate

02/28/2020

Creating openings in the woods and conducting prescribed burns can have a big impact. Even zebra swallowtails, bumblebees and all sorts of other wildlife species will show up. This kicks off the food chain, providing ample food resources for bats and birds. Find a local forester or wildlife biologist to learn more.

Last week Dane County Parks staff and Partners for Fish and Wildlife staff planted 70 more acres of wet prairie habitat ...
02/27/2020

Last week Dane County Parks staff and Partners for Fish and Wildlife staff planted 70 more acres of wet prairie habitat at the Walking Iron Wildlife Area. Not only did this get quality habitat on the ground for the public and wildlife to enjoy, we were able to train Dane County seasonal employee Tom Klein in tractor and seeding operation. Pheasants Forever also partnered on this project and contributed some of the seed.

This seeding added to previous work the Partners Program has done with the County dating back to 2010. In that year, 104 acres of ditched crop fields were converted to wetlands and prairie. In 2012-13, an additional 150 acres were seeded to sand prairie, cool season grasses, and tall grass prairie.

The Dane County Conservation League provided a substantial donation for parking lots and boundary signage. The property can be accessed off a gravel parking lot at the intersection of CTH Y and Amenda Road and from two additional gravel parking lots on Amenda Road.

The 911-acre Walking Iron Wildlife Area is a public hunting area located north of Walking Iron County Park and the Village of Mazomanie and south of the Lower Wisconsin State Riverway and offers 898 acres of hunting opportunities for waterfowl, deer and turkey. Lands east of CTH Y are primarily grassland restoration and crop fields. Lands north of Amenda Road contain a small woodlot, crop fields and drainage ditches that can offer fantastic waterfowl hunting and observation. Lands south of Amenda Road are being restored to oak savanna and offer excellent deer and turkey hunting.

Address

5275 Leesburg Pike
Falls Church, VA
22041

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(703) 358-1879

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RE: North Atlantic Right Whales Just heard there's another death? The 13th one? I highly suspect two things: 1) Zika, West Nile, or St. Louis encephalitis (whales have been documented to suffer the latter two). All three viruses share the same phylogenetic clade; Zika with > 97 percent support. 2) About 1/3 of Calanus finmarchicus (Cal fin) has been unnaturally infected via Wolbachia-infected Aedes for ~ 5 years. North Atlantic right whales consume massive quantities of Cal fin as you know. And krill also comprises Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus (both are also Zika vectors). I spell out clearly which tests desperately need to be conducted on North Atlantic right whales (including a newer, safer, more reliable method for extracting eye fluids): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V136Y6ek7-Q&t And my reference-based article (with 14 citations): http://www.infobarrel.com/Test_North_Atlantic_Right_Whales_for_WNV_SLEV_ZIKA_and_Wolbachia
As you well know, vital services are lost when marshes disappear — from nourishing marine species to providing a physical barrier for coastal communities during storms such as the recent Hurricane I am trying to find scholarships to do this but time is really of the essence now. I may be in Vancouver attending grad school by the end of next semester.I have been trying to bring attention to the issues that I have observed over the past 10 years. I am trying alternate means. At the moment, I attend a small college on the Georgia coast, i have been conducting research in its under-explored and unppreciated yet stunningly beautiful marshes. I have changed my capstone project from writing a paper, on the plastic eating bacteria that I found in the marsh to documenting some of the Earths most ecologically important resources that are in danger. I would like the the reader tho know that my sckills and knowledge are credible and verifyable. I am a 3.4 non traditional biology student. My costs are minimal but more than this student can afford. I need to rent professional gear so that I can enter inti national and international events. I moved here 10 years ago, beat the odds and got sober. I started back to college 5 years ago. I have been studying biology mostly but went interdisciplinary, studying "film"/multimedia. I also attended film school in 98/99 at a college in Arizona. I know my way around equipment pretty well. I own a canon hsf 21, t3i and a d7100. The only camera my tiny college has is a 6d. What i am getting at is that i need much better, up to date equipment. in order to have this shown on an international level. The good news is, a $30,000 camera can be rented relatively cheap. https://www.youcaring.com/jeremyblackgeorgiacoast-862977 Jeremy
Today is Nature Photography Day! Share your favorite nature related images: https://contest.fbapp.io/nature-photography-day-photo-conte… www.naturephotographyday.com #naturephotoday #naturephotocontest