USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program

USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program For more information or to contact your local Partners for Fish & Wildlife staff, please see: www.fws.gov/partners. For more information about USFWS, please see www.fws.gov
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The USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program was established in 1987 with a core group of biologists and a small budget for on-the-ground wetland restoration projects on private lands. This successful, results-oriented program has garnered support through the years and has grown into a larger and more diversified habitat restoration program assisting more than 46,000 private landowners across the Nation. The Partners for Fish & Wildlife Program provides technical and financial assistance to private and Tribal landowners interested in restoring, enhancing and managing fish and wildlife habitats on their land. Through a landowner agreement, landowners agree to maintain the habitat improvement project for at least ten years, but otherwise retain ownership and full control of their land. Today, the Partners for Fish & Wildlife Program is equipped with more than 300 full-time staff, located in all fifty States and Territories. All of our habitat improvement projects are developed on individual basis and implemented at the field level. To get contact information for your local, please visit: http://www.fws.gov/partners/contactUs.html

Mission: "Working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats"

Operating as usual

The Nature Conservancy
10/15/2020

The Nature Conservancy

Ah, trees. The do so much for us. Did you know that forests cover 31% of the Earth's land? Yes, that may sound like a lot, but forests are actually disappearing at an alarming rate.

Irish Spring is supporting our reforestation efforts and helping educate its retail customers via in-store promotions. Learn more about how they want to help us keep it clean, here: https://nature.ly/318cYlC

The Partners Program is working with State wildlife agencies and other partners to improve and restore big game migratio...
10/09/2020

The Partners Program is working with State wildlife agencies and other partners to improve and restore big game migration and winter habitat as directed by Department of the Interior Secretarial Order 3362. These mule deer and elk in Utah have taken a liking to some of the collaborative habitat work being done in big game habitat. Restoration and enhancements in this particular area include seeding where wildfires burned, conifer control in sagebrush habitat, and water distribution projects. Partners include U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, Natural Resource Conservation Service, Conservation groups, Utah Watershed Restoration, State Trust Lands, Bureau of Land Management, and landowners.
📸: USFWS/Clint Wirick

10/01/2020
Migrating Monarchs

Check out this video recently captured by PFW biologist, Greg Kramos. Monarch butterflies were taking a pause from nectaring and a south wind in the Flint Hills tallgrass prairie of Kansas.

Something is afoot on the mixed grass prairie of Kansas!  A lot of recent work has taken place and progress made at the ...
09/21/2020

Something is afoot on the mixed grass prairie of Kansas! A lot of recent work has taken place and progress made at the historic Home on the Range site in northcentral Kansas………….and there’s about to be a lot more. The site that inspired a pioneer country doctor to put pen to paper in 1872 for what would eventually become one of the most famous songs in the world has seen a major restoration effort to the original cabin. The People’s Foundation in Smith county, owners and managers of the site, have most recently added a handicap accessible bridge and sidewalk connecting from the cabin as part of what will become an extensive interpretive trail system. Now, Kansas PFW has brought together multiple partners in order to assist with prairie restoration and reconstruction efforts. Stay tuned!

Partners for Fish and Wildlife in Colorado is working with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, private landowners, and other co...
09/08/2020

Partners for Fish and Wildlife in Colorado is working with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, private landowners, and other conservation partners to improve big game winter range and migration corridors in northwestern Colorado. This area supports 21% of all mule deer (approximately 80,000) on the western slope within Colorado and 25% of all elk (approximately 70,000) throughout the state. In addition to big game, this area provides important habitat for sagebrush obligate birds while supporting working landscapes and rural economies.

Large-scale fire suppression efforts have allowed pinyon-juniper woodlands to increase throughout Colorado and other western states. This expansion has partially resulted in the loss of sagebrush, native grasses and forbs, decreased forage quality and abundance, increased soil erosion, degradation of mesic habitats, and more. All of these are critical for landscapes supporting big game, sagebrush obligate birds, and working lands. Through collaboration with Colorado Parks and Wildlife and opportunities provided by Secretarial Order 3362, Partners for Fish and Wildlife in Colorado received funding for conifer removal efforts benefitting 1,500 acres of sagebrush habitat on private lands. These funds are being leveraged with internal and external contributions and complement ongoing conservation efforts involving private landowners, Colorado Parks and Wildlife, Bureau of Land Management, Natural Resources Conservation Service, county conservation districts, and others. This is another great example of how Partners for Fish and Wildlife maximizes leverage and restoration returns for DOI and Service priorities. Although ongoing, conifer removal efforts funded by S.O. 3362 have enhanced approximately 567 acres within the Bear’s Ears-White River Landscape.

08/26/2020
Collamer Dam Removal (Indiana)

Check out this time-lapse removal of the Collamer Dam along the Eel River in Indiana! Talk about a fast track project: the dam had failed in October 2019 and the partnership worked to have it removed by January 2020! PFW biologist Scott Fetters partnered with the FWS Fish Passage program and the landowner to provide project coordination with all permitting agencies. Removing the dam reconnects 380 miles of upstream habitat and 746 miles of downstream habitat for numerous fish species, as well as the federally listed rabbitsfoot and clubshell mussel. Removing the dam also improves public safety, fishing, kayaking and water quality.

Over the last several months we've truly seen how important partnerships are and how the work of many make the burden li...
08/18/2020

Over the last several months we've truly seen how important partnerships are and how the work of many make the burden light. Although it has taken some creativity, projects across the country have continued to be implemented for wildlife and people despite the unique circumstances. All this couldn't have been done without our partners. Thank you to the landowners, agency people, NGO's, contractors, and countless others in helping us collaboratively fulfill our conservation mission.

The project pictured is in Southern Utah. This stream had been damaged by fire in the upper watershed, mostly through high sediment transport and erosion. Several small structures (around 90) using mostly native material were built last fall on this section of river. The structures are designed to add in-stream habitat complexity, trap sediment, and bring the stream bed back up to the floodplain. This habitat complexity provides places for insects and fish to live, grow, and survive. The stream bed coming back up to the floodplain puts water back in the soil and provides green stream side vegetation important to - well - just about everything. Some of these structures are completely buried under the new stream bed now.

In the spring of 2020 we planned on planting nursery grown native plants like Nuttall's sunflower, milkweed, and several wetland grasses. COVID disrupted our plan - for a while. Through creativity, ingenuity, patience, understanding, and project partners having each others back it was accomplished! THANK YOU TO ALL OUR PARTNERS ON THIS ONE. The landowner, Utah Division of Wildlife, Trout Unlimited, National Turkey Federation, Utah Wild Project, ConocoPhillips, Utah Watershed Restoration Initiative, and volunteers.

Click on the photos for captions. Photo Credit: Jordan Nielson/Trout Unlimited

08/17/2020
Bison grazing a new seeding and managed grazing project

Cool video of bison grazing a new seeding and managed grazing project in South Dakota! Landowner Steve Hein and his family has worked with USFWS since 2004 to develop a grazing management strategy with his bison herd and preserving the native prairie and restoring wetlands.

07/16/2020
Kitchen Table Program

We're lucky and fortunate to be invited into the homes of private landowners, to sit down at their kitchen table and talk about how they are recovering America's wildlife.

What a treat it was for us to have a conversation with George and Ann Ihrke and discuss their backgrounds and conservation efforts. Their efforts are important to pollinators, water quality, migratory birds, and so much more. The results are stunning. Thanks to Ryan Askren for the incredible photography and videography. I hope you see his whooping crane video!

Conservation heroes can come from anywhere. Contractors are some of those heroes who don’t get enough love. Many times, ...
07/13/2020

Conservation heroes can come from anywhere. Contractors are some of those heroes who don’t get enough love. Many times, contractors are doing the work. They seed, fly planes, spray weeds, grow plants, cut trees, run equipment, collect native plant material, design, monitor, and in this case build fence.
Pictured here, a contractor is removing old failing fence so they can re-build a fence more wildlife, snow, and livestock friendly. This will facilitate wildlife migration, livestock management, and healthier forest and rangelands in Utah.
Species to benefit are numerous and include sagebrush and aspen community songbirds, beavers, elk, mule deer, pollinators, Greater sage-grouse, and Colorado River Cutthroat trout.

It's blazing hot throughout most of the country, so we thought we'd share this photo to cool you down. Shawn May, Partne...
07/09/2020

It's blazing hot throughout most of the country, so we thought we'd share this photo to cool you down.

Shawn May, Partners Biologist from Detroit Lakes Wetland Management District in Minnesota, captured this photo last winter while they were restoring a prairie. The project was completed in partnership with Pheasants Forever and adds to a large block of permanently protected habitat.

Photo by Shawn May/USFWS

06/25/2020

A squash bee is seen here pollinating a pumpkin flower! Well, one is cleaning itself up after eating and the other one is in the bottom still at work #PollinatorWeek #Pumpkins #Pollinators #Habitat #ItAintAllHoneybees

Job Opportunity! GS12-13 Fish & Wildlife Biologist with the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program Headquarters office. ...
06/24/2020
Fish and Wildlife Biologist

Job Opportunity! GS12-13 Fish & Wildlife Biologist with the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program Headquarters office.

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/571862800

Position open to current DOI employees. Closes 7/8/2020.

This position is part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Branch of Habitat Restoration. As a Fish and Wildlife Biologist within the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, you will review evolving land management issues and develop best management practices for operational success.

06/24/2020
#PollinatorWeek

Beautiful things show up when you remove a monoculture of red cedars. Here, a bumble bee feeds on a Hill's thistle.....and at a PFW Hill Prairie restoration site on private land. Thank you private landowners for conserving habitat! #PollinatorWeek #PrivateLandsConservation

In 2007, Kirtland’s warblers were discovered for the first time in Central Wisconsin; prior to that the warblers were on...
06/22/2020

In 2007, Kirtland’s warblers were discovered for the first time in Central Wisconsin; prior to that the warblers were only known to nest in northern Michigan. Foresters and wildlife biologists, including FWS Partners for Fish & Wildlife (PFW) and Ecological Services biologists, implemented Wisconsin’s first habitat project to benefit the warblers in 2013. Three hundred sixty acres were replanted to red and jack pines in different combinations. Herbaceous species native to pine barrens habitat were planted in almost 300 openings, half were 50’ and the other half were 100’ circumference, to attract insects which provide a necessary food resource for nesting females. Two years after the seeding, PFW biologist and FWS fire management staff cut down snags from a nearby seventy acre site. The pines in this area were not yet suitable for the warblers, but removing snags reduced the opportunity for brown-headed cowbirds to parasitize warbler nests.

Kirtland’s warblers were documented in the two project areas for the first time in June 2020. This is significant because the warblers nest only in large areas in which the pines are between five and twenty years old. Maintaining areas of young forest benefit Kirtland’s warblers.

Mark Pfost, Wisconsin Private Lands Biologist

Bear River valley wetlands in Wyoming. These private land meadows are irrigated by ranchers and used later in the season...
06/05/2020

Bear River valley wetlands in Wyoming. These private land meadows are irrigated by ranchers and used later in the season for livestock hay or grazing. The landowner, Seedskadee and Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Ducks Unlimited, and the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program teamed up last fall to repair the infrastructure that keeps these areas wet. The results this spring are incredible. Lots of water, wetland vegetation, and of course, ducks!

How many species do you see at this restored wetland? Just a few years ago it was an unproductive crop field. It's growi...
06/02/2020

How many species do you see at this restored wetland? Just a few years ago it was an unproductive crop field. It's growing a new crop now thanks to the private landowner. Check the comment section later today and we'll list the species.

Ryan Askren Photography

Teal and their destination: A wetland restored on private property. Thanks to Ryan Askren for his incredible photography...
05/28/2020

Teal and their destination: A wetland restored on private property.

Thanks to Ryan Askren for his incredible photography skills and time spent capturing the magic of wetlands.

An earthworm emerges after a rain to check the conditions. Earthworms are a source of food for birds, especially the Ame...
04/30/2020

An earthworm emerges after a rain to check the conditions. Earthworms are a source of food for birds, especially the American woodcock. They also create pores throughout the soil that creates a spongy texture, allowing water to infiltrate the soil, leading to less runoff. There are other benefits. Ever been fishing? There are several species though and maybe not all are beneficial. After the initial post, Mr. Steve Hill provided some great insight into the "jumping worm" in the comment section below.

Restore wetlands! You can do it, we can help!đź“·: Mallards rising into the air with the words "wetland restoration" writte...
04/29/2020

Restore wetlands! You can do it, we can help!

đź“·: Mallards rising into the air with the words "wetland restoration" written behind the ducks.

04/28/2020

Life today as told by white-tailed deer.

Video: One deer sneezes, the others run away.

04/27/2020

Diesel powered conservation! Habitat restoration requires some heavy duty equipment and skilled operators in order to provide quality wildlife habitat and quality recreational opportunities. We work with private contractors in order to get the job done. Enjoy these clips of habitat conservation in action. Thank you private contractors and private landowners.

Video: dozers, skid-steers, and excavators moving dirt or cutting trees. USFWS

Hats off to our friends at The Nature Conservancy who found a way to get trees in the ground at their Emiquon Preserve n...
04/23/2020

Hats off to our friends at The Nature Conservancy who found a way to get trees in the ground at their Emiquon Preserve near Havana, Illinois during these challenging times. They had a very detailed safety plan that kept everyone safe while they restored a hardwood forest. On average, they planted 435 tree seedlings per acre.

The Partners for Fish & Wildlife Program assisted with this project by purchasing the tree seedlings. This project is important to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service as it reduces forest fragmentation along a major migratory bird route (Illinois River) and it ties in with our National Wildlife Refuge system, with Emiquon National Wildlife Refuge only being 2.5 miles away.

Photos courtesy of Doug Blodgett of The Nature Conservancy.

Earth Day today!!!!!Did you know the first Earth Day was in April 22, 1970.  Happy 50th Anniversary Earth Day.Earth Day ...
04/22/2020

Earth Day today!!!!!

Did you know the first Earth Day was in April 22, 1970. Happy 50th Anniversary Earth Day.

Earth Day is widely recognized as the largest secular observance in the world, marked by more than a billion people every year as a day of action to change human behavior and create global, national and local policy changes.

Thank you to our landowners and other conservation partners.

photo: 2 people standing along a barbwire fence. Photo caption reads "Happy Earth Day" and a quote from Aldo Leopold that reads "Conservation will ultimately boil down to rewarding the private landowner who conserves the public interest".

Right now in 11 western states a battle to pass on ones genes 🧬 is happening.  Sage Grouse are as old as the sagebrush s...
04/21/2020

Right now in 11 western states a battle to pass on ones genes 🧬 is happening. Sage Grouse are as old as the sagebrush sea itself. Every spring these birds come back to the same spot in an ancient ritual of courtship and prowess. Unfortunately, sage grouse have been declining for many years.

Sage grouse conservation means conservation for 350+ other sagebrush ecosystem species. If we lose the bird, it might be to late for a lot of other wildlife.

These photos were taken in Southern Utah in an area where Partners Program biologist are actively engaged in habitat work and partnerships.

📸: Sage grouse lek photos by Clint Wirick/USFWS

Great article by Clint Wirick, Private Lands Biologist in Utah, about his strategic conservation efforts and partnership...
04/21/2020
A Habitat Highway in the Desert

Great article by Clint Wirick, Private Lands Biologist in Utah, about his strategic conservation efforts and partnerships. The conservation efforts are not only strategic, but they're also utilizing science to make sure they're doing the right thing in the right place and at the right time. Thank you Clint and partners! Beautiful landscape! https://editions.mydigitalpublication.com/publication/?i=656543&article_id=3647307&view=articleBrowser&ver=html5://www.facebook.com/PFWProgram/notifications/?section=activity_feed&subsection=mention&ref=notif&target_story=S%3A_I92853043210%3A10157976189893211

Wild turkeys have discovered refuge in southern Utah’s red rock desert landscape. Research to find out more is just beginning. Interest in turkey hunting h

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RE: North Atlantic Right Whales Just heard there's another death? The 13th one? I highly suspect two things: 1) Zika, West Nile, or St. Louis encephalitis (whales have been documented to suffer the latter two). All three viruses share the same phylogenetic clade; Zika with > 97 percent support. 2) About 1/3 of Calanus finmarchicus (Cal fin) has been unnaturally infected via Wolbachia-infected Aedes for ~ 5 years. North Atlantic right whales consume massive quantities of Cal fin as you know. And krill also comprises Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus (both are also Zika vectors). I spell out clearly which tests desperately need to be conducted on North Atlantic right whales (including a newer, safer, more reliable method for extracting eye fluids): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V136Y6ek7-Q&t And my reference-based article (with 14 citations): http://www.infobarrel.com/Test_North_Atlantic_Right_Whales_for_WNV_SLEV_ZIKA_and_Wolbachia
As you well know, vital services are lost when marshes disappear — from nourishing marine species to providing a physical barrier for coastal communities during storms such as the recent Hurricane I am trying to find scholarships to do this but time is really of the essence now. I may be in Vancouver attending grad school by the end of next semester.I have been trying to bring attention to the issues that I have observed over the past 10 years. I am trying alternate means. At the moment, I attend a small college on the Georgia coast, i have been conducting research in its under-explored and unppreciated yet stunningly beautiful marshes. I have changed my capstone project from writing a paper, on the plastic eating bacteria that I found in the marsh to documenting some of the Earths most ecologically important resources that are in danger. I would like the the reader tho know that my sckills and knowledge are credible and verifyable. I am a 3.4 non traditional biology student. My costs are minimal but more than this student can afford. I need to rent professional gear so that I can enter inti national and international events. I moved here 10 years ago, beat the odds and got sober. I started back to college 5 years ago. I have been studying biology mostly but went interdisciplinary, studying "film"/multimedia. I also attended film school in 98/99 at a college in Arizona. I know my way around equipment pretty well. I own a canon hsf 21, t3i and a d7100. The only camera my tiny college has is a 6d. What i am getting at is that i need much better, up to date equipment. in order to have this shown on an international level. The good news is, a $30,000 camera can be rented relatively cheap. https://www.youcaring.com/jeremyblackgeorgiacoast-862977 Jeremy
Today is Nature Photography Day! Share your favorite nature related images: https://contest.fbapp.io/nature-photography-day-photo-conte… www.naturephotographyday.com #naturephotoday #naturephotocontest