Fostering Creativity: Ennis Center for Children

Fostering Creativity: Ennis Center for Children Fostering Creativity is a free therapeutic arts program for youth ages 5-21 affected by foster care in Genesee & Oakland Counties and youth who are involved, or at risk of being involved, in the juvenile justice system in Wayne County.

50 Board Books Featuring Faces of Color
07/14/2020
50 Board Books Featuring Faces of Color

50 Board Books Featuring Faces of Color

Just like for any other age group, it’s important that babies see people of color in their books. Use these 50 diverse titles to help build your board book collection.

More than $675 billion in federal funding for education, transportation, health care, and more depends upon a complete a...
07/13/2020

More than $675 billion in federal funding for education, transportation, health care, and more depends upon a complete and accurate #2020Census count. Help shape our community’s future – start here: 2020census.gov

07/08/2020
07/07/2020
07/06/2020
Grocery Giveaway!
06/30/2020

Grocery Giveaway!

Lets have a great week 🌸
06/29/2020

Lets have a great week 🌸

Lois Mailou Jones was an American painter & educator (born November 3, 1905, Boston Massachusetts, U.S.— died June 9, 19...
06/26/2020

Lois Mailou Jones was an American painter & educator (born November 3, 1905, Boston Massachusetts, U.S.— died June 9, 1998, Washington, D.C.).
Lois’s training was quite extensive. She attended Boston High School of Practical Arts, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and the Designers Art School of Boston. She took a year off from teaching to study painting in France where she found racial freedom and spent many summers there, painting and introducing her African tribal art to galleries in Paris. She also studied in New York, Italy and Africa (experienced two tours of Africa).
Lois left Boston to teach and establish an art department at the Palmer Memorial Institute in Sedalia, North Carolina. After that, she became a faculty member at Howard University, Washington D.C. 1930
Her versatile works range from traditional landscape of France, to the bold and bright colors of Haitian culture (the home of her husband), every day life as an African-American in New England, to African-themed abstraction (Her Les Fétiches, series of five African-style masks that depict five styles of African culture).
Lois was famously known and widely respected. She trained other African-American artists over the years such as Alma Thomas, Sylvia Snowden, David Driskell and Elizabeth Catlet. In 1970, Lois served as a cultural ambassador to Africa as part of the United Stated Information Agency. Her work toured around to some of the most famous of American museums in the 80’s and 90’s and still inspires and serves as an important role model to this day.

Les Fétiches, 1938. Hautes-Pyrenees, 1949, oil on canvase. Ode to Kinshasa, 1972, mixed media on canvase. Initiation, Liberia 1983, acrylic on canvase.Self Portrait, 1940.

Painted rock houses, a fun summer activity
06/25/2020

Painted rock houses, a fun summer activity

Happy Fine Arts Friday!!Bisa Butler was born in Orange, New Jersey. She is the youngest of four siblings. Butler graduat...
06/19/2020

Happy Fine Arts Friday!!

Bisa Butler was born in Orange, New Jersey. She is the youngest of four siblings. Butler graduated Cum Laude from Howard University with a Bachelor’s in Fine Art degree. Originally trained as a painter she shifted her focus to quilting during her educational studies for her Master’s degree in Arts Education. She has had her artwork displayed at the Smithsonian Museum of American History and at Walt Disney World’s Epcot Center. Butler’s quilted portrait of Wangari Maathai was selected to be a Time Magazine cover for their special double issue honoring 100 women of the year. She was a finalist for the Museum of Arts and Design’s Burke Prize in 2019. She currently resides in West Orange, NJ and is a Newark Public School art teacher.

Bisa Butler’s quilts communicate art, emotion, heritage, tradition, and beauty. Each quilt takes over 1,000 hours to assemble and stitch together. Her first quilted portrait was created in 2001, a homage to her grandmother. She has two dedicated rooms in her home as her art studio. One room is full of velvet, wool, silk, chiffon, and African wax-cast cotton prints. The other room is her production room where she assembles and stitches the pieces. She typically starts with a photograph and adapts it into a collage of layered fabrics. “I was the little girl who would sit next to my grandmother and ask her to go through her old family photo albums. I was the one who wanted to hear the story behind every picture. This inquisitiveness has stayed with me to this day. I often start my pieces with a black and white photo and allow myself to tell the story.” Butler brings African American past and present stories to the forefront in visually striking ways, focusing attention on both individual and collective historic narratives.

Pictured from left to right is the 2001 Time Magazine cover of Wangari Maathai, Asantewa 2020, The Safety Patrol 2018, The Storm, the Whirlwind, and the Earthquake 2020, and I Want to Smell the Flowers

The Charles Street Meeting House was built in 1807 by the Third Baptist Church. Like many churches in the Boston area, a...
06/18/2020

The Charles Street Meeting House was built in 1807 by the Third Baptist Church. Like many churches in the Boston area, abolitionists including Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, and Wendell Phillips used it as a place to speak from.

After the Civil War, the Third Baptist Church sold the building to the First African Methodist Episcopal Church who changed the name to the Charles Street A.M.E. Church and became the largest of Boston's five black churches. It was here that Josephine St Pierre Ruffin founded the National Association of Colored Women.

In the 1970s, the Gay Community News described the Meeting House as "best known to the gay community as a gay community center." Home to a gay crisis hotline, weekly dances for gay youth, and more, the Charles Street Meeting House provided a safe space for those seeking community.

Today, you can add this image to your Boston history coloring pages! You can find some more pages here:
https://www.nps.gov/bost/learn/kidsyouth/at-home-activities.htm

Image description: A line drawing of the Charles Street Meeting House. A three story building with a tower in the center that is topped with a cupola. In the upper left corner is a flag with evenly spaced horizontal stripes. Superimposed over the flag, in block writing, is: Pride.

Happy Fine Art Friday everyone! Greg Breda is our artist of the week 🎨 We hope you find his work as moving and inspirati...
06/12/2020

Happy Fine Art Friday everyone! Greg Breda is our artist of the week 🎨 We hope you find his work as moving and inspirational as we do.

"California native Greg Breda is a self-taught contemporary visual artist who lives and works in Los Angeles. Painting with acrylic paint on canvas, mylar and paper, his work explores the strength, resilience and beauty of the human spirit.
Sourcing media, memory, spiritual identity, and his imagination, Greg constructs a realistic central theme against minimal and abstracted backgrounds, persuading the viewer that the compelling conditions surrounding us could merely be challenging illusions. Often referencing ancient text, nature, and the language of flowers, the work then steps forward into reality (realism) in order to convey a level of clarity that is attainable through an illuminated spirit.
Through his work, Greg seeks to encourage the viewer to envision being elevated, illuminated, and expansive."
Bio taken from the Greg Breda official site http://www.gregbreda.com/bio/exhibitions

Pictured from left to right is "Untitled" (Salt, woman w/ big hat), 2013, acrylic on mylar. "Compassion", 2014, archival pigment digital print. "Resplendent Flame II" (First Love, Ish & Isha), 2015, acrylic on mylar. "Untitled" (Salt, man & shack), 2013, acrylic on mylar.

06/09/2020
06/08/2020
06/06/2020
Jean-Michel Basquiat (born Dec. 22nd 1960 Brooklyn, NY - died Aug. 12th 1988 New York, NY) was an American artist who to...
06/05/2020

Jean-Michel Basquiat (born Dec. 22nd 1960 Brooklyn, NY - died Aug. 12th 1988 New York, NY) was an American artist who took part in the Neo-Expressionist movement in the 1980's. He is best known for his street art and introduction of the African-American and Latino experience to the elite art community. Basquiat was self-taught and was encouraged by his mother to continue his love of art as he drew on sheets of paper that his dad brought home from his job as an account. In the 1970’s he was first noticed as a graffiti artist and went by the name of SAMO. Due to his troubled early childhood he quit high school at the age of 17 and sold sweatshirts and postcards featuring his work to make money. He became known at his first public formal exhibition at the Times Square Show in 1980 and from there became a celebrity. Basquiat was a public favorite and traveled around the world from Africa to Germany to showcase his work. He also dated Madonna for a few years before she became a famously known singer.

Basquiat had a wildly successful collaboration with Andy Warhol among many other accomplishments. He was known for his crown-motif which was his way of celebrating Africans as majestic royalty or deeming them as saints through imagery. Artist Francisco Clemente once said, “"Jean-Michel’s crown has three peaks, for his three royal lineages: the poet, the musician, the great boxing champion. Jean measured his skill against all he deemed strong, without prejudice as to their taste or age."

Jean-Michel Basquiat-“I am not a black artist, I am an artist”.

His works featured a fusion of words, symbols, stick figures and animals. From left to right are Untitled "Skull" 1981 , "Irony of A Negro Policeman" 1981, Street graffiti signed with his tag name of SAMO, Basquiat and Warhol are pictured together, Untitled "The Boxer" inspired by his boxing heros Joe Louis and Muhammad Ali, "Pez Dispenser" 1984.

Make your own musical instrument from cardboard or other household items. Here's an example of a classic or electric gui...
06/05/2020

Make your own musical instrument from cardboard or other household items. Here's an example of a classic or electric guitar. ROCK ON!

Our President and Founder, Bob Ennis, spoke with MID-Michigan NOW, offering advice on how to talk to children about Geor...
06/03/2020
Experts offer advice: How to talk to your kids about George Floyd, protests, and riots

Our President and Founder, Bob Ennis, spoke with MID-Michigan NOW, offering advice on how to talk to children about George Floyd, protests, and riots.

"Be you, a human being who is talking to another human being and share those experiences with compassion with each other. You can't mess with that, you can't mess with honesty."

There is so much going on in the world right now, it's hard to ignore. From coronavirus to protests and riots. And adults aren't the only ones very much aware of events. They say kids know more than we think and it's important to have conversations with them about what they are seeing and hearing. S...

06/03/2020
Center for Success

Center for Success

FREE MEALS today from 2-4pm at CFS Pontiac for kids 18 and under! Kids don't need to present.

Photos from Fostering Creativity: Ennis Center for Children's post
06/02/2020

Photos from Fostering Creativity: Ennis Center for Children's post

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129 E. Third St.
Flint, MI
48502

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Fostering Creativity

This therapeutic arts program addresses emotional issues/concerns experienced by children as a result of complex trauma, including circumstances which led to their removal from their birth parents or primary caregivers.

Fostering Creativity started at Ennis Center’s Flint location in 2014 and expanded to Ennis Center’s locations in Pontiac (2017) and Detroit (2019). The program is designed to support youth ages 5-21 in out-of-home placement/foster care (Flint and Pontiac) and youth who are involved, or are at risk of being involved, in the juvenile justice system (Detroit) through therapeutic arts programming and art therapy.

This grant-funded program would not be possible without the generous support of the following foundations: Ruth Mott Foundation, Hagerman Foundation, Flinn Foundation, Flint ReCAST, Community Foundation of Greater Flint, Child Welfare Society of Flint, and Ticket to Dream.

Ennis Center for Children has offered an array of services to meet the needs of foster children and their families since its beginning. To date, Ennis Center provides foster care, adoption, and related support services to more than 6,000 children and families annually.

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Beautiful job ladies ,I love the work you do for our kids!