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Fort Belvoir Environmental Division

Fort Belvoir Environmental Division Welcome to the Official Fort Belvoir Environmental Division page. Views and opinions expres

Operating as usual

The importance of not littering impacts more than just your surrounding community, it helps protect and save wildlife, f...
04/29/2022

The importance of not littering impacts more than just your surrounding community, it helps protect and save wildlife, fish, and plants. This American Robin was caught in plastic netting just his past week, unable to fly or move as it was entangled. Luckily, one of our amazing tenants here on post found and released it safely back into the wild! By cleaning up after yourself and leaving no trace we protect our space. And if you see it and can clean it, why not do your part? Small actions can help protect our environment and the species that live on post live healthy.

This past weekend we celebrated Earth Day and we couldn't have asked for better weather. On Friday we opened up our Envi...
04/25/2022

This past weekend we celebrated Earth Day and we couldn't have asked for better weather. On Friday we opened up our Environmental Education Center and had our Environmental Experts talk about all things wetlands, wildlife, trees, stormwater and much more! A huge thank you for those who came out from the Public Health Activity Fort Belvoir Soldiers on Fort Belvoir for collecting the most waste off of our Base!

Then on Saturday we hosted Cub Scout Pack #118 for Earth Day celebrations with their help we cleaned up the rest of the Basin and collected 15 bags! Thank you Pack #118 for all of your help, enthusiasm, and being great environmental stewards to our lands and waters!

Timeline photos
04/22/2022

Timeline photos

#GoodToKnow

As we enter springtime, many animals (including foxes, groundhogs and raccoons) will come out during the day and, while they might look cute, they could be deadly.

Be on the lookout if they are showing abnormal behaviors, such as restlessness, wandering, paralysis, and attacks on other animals and people, as they might have rabies. Never approach a wild animal.

If you are involved in an animal bite incident, go to your nearest emergency room for evaluation and treatment.

Learn more about rabies here: https://go.usa.gov/xukyk

For additional information, you can also visit the U.S. Army Public Health Center website: https://go.usa.gov/xuky9

Fort Belvoir Community Hospital Fort Belvoir MWR Belvoir Spouses' Club BSC The Villages at Belvoir

Our Wildflower Garden is starting to Bloom!Come see our garden and other Environmental booths and displays this Friday (...
04/19/2022

Our Wildflower Garden is starting to Bloom!

Come see our garden and other Environmental booths and displays this Friday (April 22nd) from 10:00am -14:00 in Celebration of Earth Day!

We were featured in Alice Fergusons Potomac Watershed Cleanup! Thank you all once again for your help!
04/18/2022

We were featured in Alice Fergusons Potomac Watershed Cleanup! Thank you all once again for your help!

Species of the Week: Northern Long-eared Bat (Myotis septentrionalis)The Northern Long-eared bat is one of a few species...
04/13/2022

Species of the Week: Northern Long-eared Bat (Myotis septentrionalis)

The Northern Long-eared bat is one of a few species of bats that can be found in our area. Like similar species, the Northern long-eared bat comes out at dusk and is most active at night as it uses echolocation to find food and water. Sadly it is one of the most threatened, due to a fungal pathogen causing widespread disease across much of their range since 2006. So much so that in March of this year the USFWS has proposed a reclassification from threatened to endangered. However, research has shown that colonies may be adapting to this by virtue of staying in coastal environments and not migrating back into caves in the winter. Still though, it is important to continue efforts to protect and conserve their habitat throughout their range!

To Learn more visit: https://www.fws.gov/species/northern-long-eared-bat-myotis-septentrionalis

Thank you to everyone who came out and helped clean our basin on our Potomac Watershed Cleanup, we couldn't have done it...
04/12/2022

Thank you to everyone who came out and helped clean our basin on our Potomac Watershed Cleanup, we couldn't have done it without you! In total 45 amazing volunteers came out and picked up 54 bags of trash!

Hope to see you all at our next event!

Come Celebrate Earth Day With Us!
04/06/2022

Come Celebrate Earth Day With Us!

04/04/2022

April is Earth Month and here at Fort Belvoir we like to celebrate it by motivating you to take care of our lands and waters, learn about our beautiful natural systems and home, and enjoy the outdoors!

This year, we were fortunate enough to have a fellow Fort Belvoir tenant, who is pursuing a Graduate Degree in Fisheries and Wildlife Management, help educate us on all things environmental! Check out her fun, inspiring, and educational video featuring Baldy E. as they explore wildlife, wetlands, ecosystems, natural resources, biological threats, and climate change!

Thank you Malynda Jones for producing this great video and helping to educate all of us on the importance of Conservation!

Species of the Week: Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum)The Spotted Salamander is one of the most recognizable sala...
03/24/2022

Species of the Week: Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum)

The Spotted Salamander is one of the most recognizable salamander species here on Fort Belvoir. Their bright yellow and sometimes orange spots across their black bodies are visible from far away. As many salamander species, the spotted salamander lays their eggs underwater in small vernal pools free of any fish that could prey on them, where they hatch and eventually grow into juveniles and land dwelling adults! As the temperatures rise and with this rainy weather, keep your eyes peeled for migrating adults who are finding new pools to start the cycle again! Interesting facts: adult spotted salamanders live for about 20 years! Spotted salamander eggs sometimes contain green algae. The algae will consume the carbon dioxide that salamander embryos produce and turn it into oxygen that the embryos can use!

For more information: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/amphibians/facts/spotted-salamander

The Stormwater Pollution Prevention Quarterly Newsletter is here! In this quarters edition, you'll be able to read about...
03/21/2022

The Stormwater Pollution Prevention Quarterly Newsletter is here! In this quarters edition, you'll be able to read about the upcoming virtual events, tips on pollution prevention during spring and important dates for MS4 and ISW Facilities to keep track of! We want to ensure everyone is helping Fort Belvoir stay in compliance with all our stormwater permits. Thank you for your time! Let us know if you have any questions.

We made the Fort Belvoir Eagle!
03/16/2022
Save the spiders :: FORT BELVOIR

We made the Fort Belvoir Eagle!

The years 2020 and 2021 seemed to be the year of the “bugs,” with murder hornets; Brood X cicadas; puss caterpillars, and worms in headlines across the U.S., adding fears to our pandemic anxieties. Unfortunately, there is another “bug” in town, a palm sized spider with golden webs. But, befo...

Looking for a way to get involved?In partnership with the Alice Ferguson Foundation we are holding our Annual Potomac Ri...
03/16/2022

Looking for a way to get involved?

In partnership with the Alice Ferguson Foundation we are holding our Annual Potomac River Watershed Cleanup to help keep our shorelines, bays, and wildlife refuge healthy! The cleanup will be on April 9th from 9am-12pm and volunteers will meet at the Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge Environmental Education Center. Gloves and trash bags will be provided to all registered participants. Bring water and dress to get muddy, and remember to have the appropriate ID to get onto base!

Contact Tomás Nocera at [email protected] or 703-806-0048 to register.

Invasive Species of the Day: Northern Snakehead (Channa argus)The Northern snakeheads were first found in a pond in Mary...
03/04/2022

Invasive Species of the Day: Northern Snakehead (Channa argus)

The Northern snakeheads were first found in a pond in Maryland in 2002, and shortly after were established in the Potomac River and the Rappahannock rivers and associated tributaries, ponds, and lakes in 2004. It's unusual characteristics, that of being an obligate air breather, helps it spread so quickly and efficiently. Using a bladder that works as a primitive lung allows them to use their fins to walk on land from one place to another spreading quickly and efficiently. The northern snakehead is a top predator, consuming fish and other aquatic wildlife including amphibians. Their proliferation has disrupted natural aquatic systems competing against native fish and degrading the ecosystem through predation and disease transmission. Biologists are still trying to understand every aspect of its ecology, behavior, and the damage done by this species. If you catch one of them, make sure to report it to DWR and kill it, and maybe eat it as they are delicious, to save our wetlands!

Invasive Species of the week: Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis)The Emerald ash borer is an exotic beetle that was ...
03/03/2022

Invasive Species of the week: Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis)

The Emerald ash borer is an exotic beetle that was first discovered in 2002 and has since spread across North America in a prolific and devastating fashion, killing hundreds of millions of Ash trees. While adults feed on the leaves of ash trees causing little damage, the larvae feed on the inner bark of the ash tree disrupting the trees ability to take in water and nutrients, thus effectively killing it from the inside out. Ash trees, once widespread in the area, are fast growing hardwood trees with a wide tolerance to different environmental conditions. This characteristic made it a perfect habitat for many wildlife species. Since the emerald ash borer affects all 16 species of ash trees in the U.S., this major decline has resulted in severe habitat and ecosystem changes that open the door to more invasive species to expand. Further, the economic importance of ash trees, as valuable wood for furniture and ornamental planting is at risk of collapse. Spread of the emerald ash borer continues through transport of ash products and firewood; and as they have no defense against the beetle, the ash tree will die if infected. Luckily, there are ways to help stop the spread through active means of reducing transportation and good practices of planting.

Invasive species of the day: Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima)Though it sounds divine, Tree of Heaven is quite deadly...
03/02/2022

Invasive species of the day: Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima)

Though it sounds divine, Tree of Heaven is quite deadly to our native ecosystem. First introduced in the 1700s as an ornamental tree that was good for urban settings, the rapid growth and spread of Tree of Heaven has caused for it's expansion and damage to much of the US. As it grows and reproduces, Tree of Heaven secretes a toxin that inhibits other plants from growing nearby. This hinders native plants from growing and soon outcompetes other plants to dominate the canopy. Killing native plants offsets the balance in the ecosystem and can drive native animal and plant species to become functionally extinct in certain areas. Furthermore, it's aggressive root system can cause damage to pavements, sewers, and building foundations that affects peoples livelihood. As climate change impacts our world, Tree of Heaven is on the front lines waiting to expand, and with it another invasive species that uses Tree of Heaven as a host to lay their eggs, the spotted lanternfly whose ability to feed on and damage fruit-bearing trees concerns many people on the East Coast.

Invasive Species of the day: Pueraria montanaKudzu, nicknamed the vine that ate the South, was introduced in the late 18...
03/01/2022

Invasive Species of the day: Pueraria montana

Kudzu, nicknamed the vine that ate the South, was introduced in the late 1800s as an ornamental plant and for erosion control. The plant was widely promoted for use in the mid 1900s by the Soil Conservation Service who paid farmers to plant it, as it's vigorous growth was seen as a benefit. However, by 1950 its footprint had grown so much that it was officially recognized as a pest species, and subsequently listed as a federal noxious w**d by Congress in 1998. Today, Kudzu can be found from Connecticut to Florida and as far west as Texas, popping in other locations as well. As it is a climbing vine, their growth (1 foot growth per day) and large leaves smother and shade out native plants and kill trees through girdling or toppling due to excess weight. Prevention and biological control have faced hardships as Kudzu's extensive root system and crowns, if left untreated, can lead to recolonization of an area if not maintained on an yearly basis. To help, only plant native species of your area helping native pollinators, wildlife, and other plants!

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9430 Jackson Loop, Bldg. 1442
Fort Belvoir, VA
22060

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 6pm
Tuesday 8am - 6pm
Wednesday 8am - 6pm
Thursday 8am - 6pm
Friday 8am - 6pm

Telephone

+17038060048

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IMPORTANT INFORMATION from Fort Belvoir Environmental Division! In the last week you may have heard on the news and social media reports of sick or dying birds in the NOVA region. We are currently tracking this situation. It is unlikely that this poses any threat to human health, but to be on the safe side, DO NOT touch any dead or sick birds you may encounter. The Fort Belvoir Conservation Branch has not received any calls/reports of such issues on post, but would like to make everyone aware that this is happening in our region. If you find a dead or dying bird, contact the Fort Belvoir Conservation Branch at 703-805-3969. Headquarters Command Battalion, Fort Belvoir, VA Fort Belvoir MWR Fort Belvoir Community Hospital DAU Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) The Villages at Belvoir
IMPORTANT INFORMATION from Fort Belvoir Environmental Division! If you find a FAWN, LEAVE it ALONE! The Fort Belvoir Environmental Division wants to remind everyone that it is the time of year when white-tailed deer begin giving birth to fawns. Although our first instinct is to help out a fawn we find, the best way to help is to simply leave it alone. Fawns will typically appear “orphaned” but in most cases the mother (doe) is nearby and possibly within view. Females will leave the fawns alone so as not to bring attention to the fawns. Fawns will typically stay motionless and not run away when approached. The mother will return several times a day to feed the fawn and then leave it alone. If you spot a fawn and are concerned, call the Fort Belvoir Conservation Branch at 703-805-3969 or the Fort Belvoir Police at 703-806-4277. Headquarters Command Battalion, Fort Belvoir, VA Fort Belvoir MWR The Villages at Belvoir Soldier & Family Assistance Center (SFAC) - Fort Belvoir, VA Fort Belvoir Fire and Emergency Services Fort Belvoir Police Department
GREAT VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY! This Saturday join Fort Belvoir Environmental Division for their Spring Clean-up, "Clean the Bay Day." Advanced registration is required. Call 703-806-3406 or email [email protected] to register or for more information today! Headquarters Command Battalion, Fort Belvoir, VA Fort Belvoir MWR Fort Belvoir Community Hospital Fort Belvoir Fire and Emergency Services Fort Belvoir Police Department The Villages at Belvoir
#EarthDay2021! Today is Earth Day. Fort Belvoir Environmental Division went right to the source to find out how it all got started! Headquarters Command Battalion, Fort Belvoir, VA Fort Belvoir MWR Fort Belvoir Community Hospital Fort Belvoir Fire and Emergency Services Fort Belvoir Armed Forces Wellness Center
#checkitout Fort Belvoir Environmental Division is posting a series of YouTube videos on biodiversity and habitat that's perfect for kids to view, learn and have fun! Check out their post for more and be sure to check their page for new videos (there are two posted, so far!) Headquarters Command Battalion, Fort Belvoir, VA Fort Belvoir MWR Fort Belvoir ACS Fort Belvoir Community Hospital
Earth Day Every Day! Despite our ever increasing reliance on technology, many people are turning to parks and trails to get relief from the “new normal” of pandemic life. With a new appreciation for our parks, greenspaces, and wildlife, it’s important to realize that these valuable natural resources need to be protected in order to continue using them. Earth Day 2020 was somewhat overlooked due to the initial COVID-19 outbreak. But it’s been a year now and we shouldn’t let Earth Day 2021 go by without a passing glance. Read more at #BelvoirEagle online at http://www.belvoireagleonline.com/news/earth-day-every-day/article_d0726c1a-8cd0-11eb-9b5e-475cd2c91636.html Fort Belvoir Environmental Division Fort Belvoir MWR Headquarters Command Battalion, Fort Belvoir, VA Fort Belvoir Community Hospital
Responsible recreation on post: it’s up to you! People are spending more time outdoors and recreation will only increase as the weather gets warmer. We love that everyone is enjoying all that Fort Belvoir has to offer, but it is important that we do so responsibly. Make sure you are having fun in approved recreation areas and not in controlled environmentally sensitive areas. Simply walking off of trails or making your own trails through the woods can result in major impacts to natural and cultural resources. Learn more at #BelvoirEagle online at http://www.belvoireagleonline.com/news/responsible-recreation-on-post-it-s-up-to-you/article_df0d1c6c-8748-11eb-b61c-6377c07b2656.html Fort Belvoir Environmental Division Fort Belvoir MWR Headquarters Command Battalion, Fort Belvoir, VA Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Fort Belvoir, VA
We're eagerly awaiting the ospreys' return. Please let us know when you see them hanging around! I want to bring my grandchildren to see them. Thank you.
Surviving Winter It’s getting pretty cold out there. While you might be able to get cozy under blankets at home, wildlife have to be more creative to stay warm. To survive the cold and barren winter, animals use three main strategies. Learn more at #BelvoirEagle online here: http://www.belvoireagleonline.com/news/surviving-winter/article_2c9a1e28-55dd-11eb-b9ee-03aba0c87dff.html Headquarters Command Battalion, Fort Belvoir, VA Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Fort Belvoir, VA Fort Belvoir Environmental Division Fort Belvoir MWR
Mild winter, fewer birds during Christmas Bird Count A milder winter up north has resulted in fewer birds migrating to Northern Virginia, according to Kevin Walter, natural resource specialist with the Directorate of Public Works, who coordinated this year’s 121st Christmas Bird Count. Learn more at #BelvoirEagle online at http://www.belvoireagleonline.com/news/mild-winter-fewer-birds-during-christmas-bird-count/article_8ae93654-55dc-11eb-ac99-7ff1c2605c0a.html Headquarters Command Battalion, Fort Belvoir, VA Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Fort Belvoir, VA Fort Belvoir Environmental Division Fort Belvoir MWR
Taking to the skies: Bird migration in full swing! Have you been noticing a lot of birds flying around lately? Fall migration is in full swing right now! Most people don’t realize that fall migration is actually a really long process. Fall migration begins as early as the end of June for some species and extends into December, with peak migration occurring Aug. through Oct. Learn more at #BelvoirEagle online here: http://www.belvoireagleonline.com/news/taking-to-the-skies-bird-migration-in-full-swing/article_e90d7004-0e53-11eb-ab3d-1f0f00d791eb.html Headquarters Command Battalion, Fort Belvoir, VA Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Fort Belvoir, VA Fort Belvoir Environmental Division Fort Belvoir MWR
National Public Lands Day goes virtual! Since 1994, #NationalPublicLandsDay has been celebrated as the nation’s largest, single-day volunteer event for public lands. This year, the Fort Belvoir Environmental Division will host National Public Lands Day as a virtual event. A series of educational discussions and activities will be posted weekly to their page! Learn more in the #BelvoirEagle: http://www.belvoireagleonline.com/news/national-public-lands-day-virtual-this-year/article_36009d8a-f2d6-11ea-93e8-77a3fb5b6997.html