Headquarters, U.S. Army Trial Defense Service

Headquarters, U.S. Army Trial Defense Service Welcome to the official Headquarters, U.S. Army Trial Defense Service page. The mission of TDS is to provide a full-range of defense legal services to Soldiers worldwide, at no cost to the Soldier.

Operating as usual

Timeline Photos
08/17/2021

Timeline Photos

To Soldiers past and present, we recognize and honor your service and sacrifice. I am proud to serve with all of you.

Photos from The Judge Advocate General's Legal Center and School's post
07/30/2021

Photos from The Judge Advocate General's Legal Center and School's post

Thank you for your service LTC(R) Bateman!
07/28/2021

Thank you for your service LTC(R) Bateman!

Photos from The Judge Advocate General's Legal Center and School's post
05/08/2021

Photos from The Judge Advocate General's Legal Center and School's post

Some major changes to to AR 670-1 effective 26 February 2021. Here’s a summary of some of the changes.
01/28/2021

Some major changes to to AR 670-1 effective 26 February 2021. Here’s a summary of some of the changes.

Some major changes to to AR 670-1 effective 26 February 2021. Here’s a summary of some of the changes.

01/26/2021
11/17/2020

Ladies and Gentlemen,

The DEU vacancy announcement for the Term, GS-13, Legal Administrative Specialist positions at U.S. Army Trial Defense Service is now posted on USAJOBS.

These are same positions previously announced but they are now open to all. The positions are located at Fort Shafter, Hi; Fort Belvoir, VA; Ft. Leavenworth, KS; Ft. Campbell, KY; Ft. Bragg, NC; Ft. Hood, TX; and JBLM, WA. Announcement closes on 25 November 2020.

The announcement for the position at Kaiserslautern, Germany, will follow soon. Stay tuned.

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/584730300- CONUS
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/584730800- Hawaii

11/06/2020
TJAG's TDS 40th Anniversary Message

Tomorrow marks the 40th anniversary of the Trial Defense Service and TJAG has issued a statement to commemorate the occassion! Please have a listen, keep up the incredible work, and happy birthday!

One of our very own, CPT Jeri D’Aurelio, debuts in the 2020 qualifiers for NBC’s American Ninja Warrior on Monday, Septe...
09/22/2020

One of our very own, CPT Jeri D’Aurelio, debuts in the 2020 qualifiers for NBC’s American Ninja Warrior on Monday, September 28th at 7pm.

Are you #TEAMJERI ?

Update: CPT D’Aurelio will make her debut next Monday. Not tonight.

Tune in ***edit*** Monday, Sep 28th at 7pm for NBC's American Ninja Warrior as USARAK's own #ArcticTough CPT Jeri D'Aurelio debuts in the 2020 qualifiers! Follow along as the strongest Trial Defense Attorney in the Army competes to continue on and earn the title of America's Ninja Warrior! Arctic Warriors! Arctic Tough! #TEAMJERI

U.S. Army JAG Corps
09/11/2020

U.S. Army JAG Corps

On this day, 19 years ago, tragedy struck the United States in New York, New York, Arlington, Virginia, and Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

Many of you answered the call to service post-911. Today, we thank you for your courageous service and your sacrifices—and we thank and remember those whose lives were lost, either innocently, or while bravely serving in support of our Country, on that day.

Where were you? #shareyourstory

#PatriotDay
#NeverForget
#September11

Congratulations to the recipients of this year’s award.
08/27/2020

Congratulations to the recipients of this year’s award.

On August 10, 2020, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 Army National Guard (ARNG) Trial Defense Services (TDS) Excellence Awards ceremony was held.

The ARNG TDS Excellence Awards recognize three individuals annually for their exceptional contributions to the ARNG TDS. The Colonel (COL) Patrick A. Barnett ARNG TDS Leadership Award recognizes a judge advocate or paralegal who embodies the leadership traits of the ARNG TDS organization’s founder, COL Patrick A. Barnett. The Outstanding Counsel award recognizes a judge advocate who best exemplified the highest ideals of professionalism, commitment, and passion in the pursuit of justice. The Outstanding Paralegal award recognizes one defense paralegal who best exemplified the highest ideals of professionalism, commitment, and passion in support of clients and defense counsel.

The winners of this year's awards are:

Major Jonathan Quan - recipient of the COL Patrick A. Barnett Leadership Award (not pictured)

Major Richard Holtmeyer - this year’s Outstanding Counsel award recipient

Sergeant James Baxter - this year’s Outstanding Paralegal award recipient (not pictured)

Nominations for the FY 2020 ARNG TDS Excellence Awards are due on 4 October 2020. See the latest published JAG Connector (2020_08) for more details!
#StewardoftheProfession
#USArmyJAGCorps
#USArmy

We are looking for those that want to help “Defend Those That Defend America.” Apply now and ask about opportunities to ...
08/19/2020

We are looking for those that want to help “Defend Those That Defend America.” Apply now and ask about opportunities to serve and about Trial Defense Service.

Apply now for an adventure like no other! Whether you're interested in a summer internship, part-time service, or full-time service, the Army JAG Corps offers unparalleled practice opportunities alongside incredible people. Be sure to complete your application and interview by October 1st!

www.jagcnet.army.mil/apply

Stay safe and stay sharp!
08/03/2020

Stay safe and stay sharp!

Mental fitness is just as important as physical fitness and reading gives your brain a great workout.

Did you know that reading strengthens your brain, improves your memory, empowers you to empathize with other people, helps you sleep better, reduces stress, lowers blood pressure, fights symptoms of depression, prevents cognitive decline as you age, and contributes to a longer life?

So, what are you currently reading (or listening to)?

#CurrentlyReading
#MentalFitness

Happy Birthday to the Judge Advocate General Corps!
07/29/2020

Happy Birthday to the Judge Advocate General Corps!

Today, we celebrate the 245th birthday of The Judge Advocate General’s Corps.

Our lineage traces back to July 29, 1775, when the Second Continental Congress elected John Adams’ law pupil, William Tudor, to be the Judge Advocate of the Army. He held the rank of lieutenant colonel and was paid $20.00 a month. The following year, Congress changed the title of Tudor’s office to ‘Judge Advocate General,’ making him the first in a long line of Army Judge Advocates General. Since that time, thousands of men and women have served in our Corps as judge advocates, legal administrators, and paralegal specialists.

As we celebrate the 245th birthday of the Corps, it is important to remember the contributions of trailblazers like Walt Tsukamoto, Phyllis Propp-Fowle, and John Henry Nolan. They are what the Army Values are all about and embody the four constants of our Corps: Mastery of the Law, Principled Counsel, Stewardship of the Profession, and Servant Leadership —and why all of us should be proud to be a part of our Army and our JAG Corps.

Pictured below:

Walt Tsukamoto - Walter T. Tsukamoto was a civilian lawyer and judge advocate captain in the Army Reserve when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. A loyal American who was outraged by the bombing of Hawaii, Tsukamoto requested that the War Department order him to active duty and although denied at least four times, the Army relented. Tsukamoto subsequently served with distinction and honor in the United States and in Japan during World War II. Walt Tsukamoto was the first lawyer of Asian-American ancestry to serve in our Corps, the first Asian-American to reach the rank of colonel in our Corps, and is the only judge advocate in history to be awarded the Congressional Gold Medal.

Phyllis Propp-Fowle - The only woman in her law school class at the University of Iowa when she graduated in 1933, Phyllis Propp-Fowle joined the Army after the outbreak of war in 1941 and served in the Women’s Army Corps until joining the JAG Corps in 1944. She was the first female judge advocate and the first female post judge advocate in history. After she deployed to France in late 1944, then Captain Propp-Fowle became the first female judge advocate to serve in a combat theater and be authorized to wear right shoulder sleeve “combat patch” insignia.

John Henry Nolan - John Nolan enlisted in the Army in 1953 and completed Infantry Officer Candidate School in 1967. He deployed to Vietnam the following year, as a lieutenant, where he served as a platoon leader, executive officer, and company commander in combat—and was wounded in action. In 1973, as the post-Vietnam Army rapidly downsized, then Captain Nolan, voluntarily reverted to the rank of master sergeant in order to remain on active duty. In his new role as a legal clerk (today’s paralegal specialist), he demonstrated such excellence that after being promoted to sergeant major, he was selected in 1980 to be the first JAG Corps Regimental Sergeant Major.

#USArmyJAGCorps
#USArmy

The Judge Advocate General's Legal Center and School
U.S Army Legal Services Agency
United States Army Reserve Legal Command

Today marks the 72nd anniversary of the official end to racial segregation in the U.S. Armed Forces. The Army is more di...
07/27/2020

Today marks the 72nd anniversary of the official end to racial segregation in the U.S. Armed Forces. The Army is more diverse now then ever before, but the past few months have reminded us that we still have a long way to go on our never-ending journey to be a more perfect organization. Let's celebrate how far we've come as we continue to move forward together. #armystrong

Today marks the 72nd anniversary of the official end to racial segregation in the U.S. Armed Forces. The Army is more diverse now then ever before, but the past few months have reminded us that we still have a long way to go on our never-ending journey to be a more perfect organization. Let's celebrate how far we've come as we continue to move forward together. #armystrong

You can be whoever you want to be, as evidenced by Jeri D’Aurelio below. Find those healthy outlets when you are out of ...
07/23/2020

You can be whoever you want to be, as evidenced by Jeri D’Aurelio below. Find those healthy outlets when you are out of uniform to keep you happy and healthy. Drop comments below about what you are doing to remain healthy and happy during this challenging period.

That feeling when you've discovered a career worth training for, as demonstrated by Soldier, lawyer, gymnast, and American Ninja Warrior participant Jeri D'Aurelio. Jeri is in the JAG Corps which means she works for the best law firm in the world: ours. Learn more: https://go.usa.gov/xf24H 📷 : Scott Harrison

06/22/2020

TDS is committed to keeping everyone safe during this COVID-19 season and changed many of our business practices around the world. As we navigate this PCS season, make sure you have contact information for the TDS office of your losing installation in the event you run into trouble before you sign-in to your new unit. Remember your rights and consult a defense attorney if you are in doubt.

Happy Law Day!
05/01/2020

Happy Law Day!

Happy #LawDay, JAG Corps!

Since its inception in 1958, Law Day is held on May 1st every year to celebrate the role of law in our society and to cultivate a deeper understanding of the legal profession.

This year's theme, from the American Bar Association (ABA), celebrates the centennial of our 19th Amendment—100 years of women's right to vote in America! You can learn more about this theme, and past themes, at the ABA's website here --> https://www.americanbar.org/groups/public_education/law-day/

As we celebrate our democracy, we also take a moment to celebrate you—and others who serve our great Nation, particularly in times of crisis and peril. Thank you all for what you do, every single day. We are honored to serve alongside you. Happy Law Day!

#GoArmyJAG
#ArmyCOVID19Fight

U.S. Army
U.S. Army Reserve
The National Guard
United States Army Reserve Legal Command

Are you leaving active duty?  Ready to serve in a different capacity?  Ever wanted to work in TDS or have TDS experience...
04/23/2020

Are you leaving active duty? Ready to serve in a different capacity? Ever wanted to work in TDS or have TDS experience and enjoyed it? Consider joining the 154th LOD! Please feel free to me contact the Chief Paralegal NCO, SFC Stefanou at [email protected]

03/20/2020
U.S. Army JAG Corps

Take care of yourselves and increase your knowledge of good health and hygiene practices and implement them into your daily routine.

It is crucial to not panic during this time, and one way to resist that urge is to verify the information you are receiving with credible resources. The saying “trust but verify” applies here.

Know that we are here to assist you. Have a great weekend!

A message from The Judge Advocate General, LTG Charles N. Pede, and the JAG Corps Leadership Team:

Teammates,

Our JAG Corps serves the greatest clients in the world and it's our Soldiers, Civilians, Families, and Ambassadors for Life that make what we do every single day possible.

As we focus on the challenge of COVID-19, we encourage each of you to remember that your health and readiness are vital to our great Nation. Our leaders, across the globe, are finding ways to deliver premier legal services to our clients while protecting our greatest asset--our people.

Heed the directions and guidance of our National and State leaders--especially our medical professionals--as we all, together, get through this challenging time.

Ensure your personal, professional and family health safety practices are rigorously enforced - social distancing, hand washing, cleaning of surfaces and other proven protocols. Establish protocols to check on each other - especially our single Soldiers and Teammates.

Challenges provide opportunity - and we know that we will emerge from this a more resilient and agile Corps, Army, and Nation.

Stay Healthy and Be Ready!

01/17/2020

Long post in the series but worth reading to the end.

In prior posts, we have talked about a soldier's right to remain silent and right to legal counsel. We discussed the advantages of one telling law enforcement that he wants to remain silent or talk to a lawyer. Before interrogating a soldier, law enforcement officers must notify him of his rights, and if a soldier invokes the right to remain silent or right to counsel, the interview must end. We have discussed how unfair law enforcement interrogations are.

They are not a search for the truth; they are a quest to create a confession. If an individual is being interrogated, law enforcement has already decided he is guilty. The tactics law enforcement officers use are designed to increase psychological pressure on the subject, and their goal is to induce a feeling of hopelessness that is so bad that confessing to a crime seems like the best choice. These tactics produce a lot of confessions, most are true, but a few are false. Whether guilty or innocent, one does not want to go through this interrogation process.

In our last post, we talked about isolation. When one arrives at the place of the interrogation, one's phone is taken away. One is put in a room by one's self with nothing to do but think. Law enforcement wants you to think how much trouble you are in and how much you just want this to end. The subject is left in isolation until he begins to show symptoms of hopelessness. The subject thinks he is alone, but he's being watched through a one-way mirror by law enforcement.

When the subject begins to show signs of distress, the interrogator will enter the room. Before the interrogator can begin the interrogation, she must read the subject his rights. If the subject invokes the right to remain silent or right to counsel, the interrogation must end, so, before reading the suspect his rights, the interrogator sets the conditions for the subject to waive his rights, that is, agree to talk to her without a lawyer. This stage of the process is called rapport building.

The goal of rapport building is to convince the subject that the interrogator is a kind, sensible, and fair individual who is only interested in finding the truth. The interrogator will try to convince the subject that she will do everything she can to help the subject discover the best path out of his current predicament. The problem is: the opposite is true. The interrogator may be kind and sensible in other settings, but what she is about to do is not fair and is not about finding the truth. Before she decided to interrogate the subject, she decided the subject was guilty, and her goal is to get a confession.

The interrogator will enter the room with a copy of the form law enforcement uses to advise subjects of their rights and memorialize their decisions. The interrogator will set the form aside and say, "we'll get to that later." Indeed. She'll get to it later, but not before she's convinced the subject trusts her and will talk to her without a lawyer. First, the interrogator will fake interest in the subject's well-being by asking, "how are you doing?" Then she'll make small talk about things in the news, happenings on post, and Army life.

The interrogator will ask questions to discover the subject's hometown, assignment history, MOS, marital status, and other information so she can find non-threatening things to talk about. The goal of talking is to build rapport. The goal of rapport-building is gain the subject's trust. The goal of gaining the subject's trust is cause him to waive his rights by convincing him the interrogator is an honest broker who will help the subject through the process and look out for his interests. In short, the goal is to trick the subject into waiving his rights.

Everyone in law enforcement knows the interrogator has already determined the subject is guilty, is not an honest broker, and will not look out for his interests. The interrogator hopes the subject will talk to her without a lawyer so she can employ other tactics that will almost certainly lead to a confession. The interrogator knows that if the subject tells her he does not want to talk to her or he wants a lawyer, she cannot use these other tactics. She knows if the subject talks to a defense lawyer, the defense lawyer will tell him not to talk to law enforcement or anyone else.

So, they talk and talk until the interrogator senses the time is right. Then she will notify the subject of his right to counsel and right to remain silent. She will ask him if he wants a lawyer. She will ask him if he's willing to talk to her about the alleged offenses. If the subject asks for a lawyer or says he does not want to talk, the interrogation is over, and he will not suffer the unfair practices that will follow if he waives his rights. If the subject waives his rights, the interrogator has him right where she wants him.

Address

9275 Gunston Road
Fort Belvoir, VA
22060

General information

While this is an open forum, it is also intended to be a family friendly one. We look forward to hearing from you, but please keep your comments and wall posts appropriate or they will be removed. Posts will be removed if they violate any of the guidelines listed below: - Do not post graphic, obscene, explicit or racial comments. We also do not allow comments that are abusive, hateful, vindictive or intended to defame anyone or any organization. - Do not post any solicitations (i.e.: asking users to "like" your page, visit your website, sign a petition, contribute to a fundraiser). - Do not post advertisements, prize contests or giveaways. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Similarly, we do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. - Do not post details about an ongoing investigation or legal or administrative proceeding that could prejudice the processes or could interfere with an individual's rights will be deleted from this page. - Apparent spamming or trolling will be removed and may cause the author(s) to be blocked from the page without notice. - Do not post copyrighted or trademarked images or graphics. Imagery posted on the Facebook wall should be owned by the user. - Do not post political propaganda. - Do no post documents of any kind. - All information posted to social media sites will be unclassified. No FOUO (for official use only), classified, pre-decisional, proprietary or business-sensitive information should ever be posted or discussed on this page. Don't post personnel lists, rosters, organization charts or directories. This is a violation of privacy. The appearance of external links or use of third-party applications on this site does not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the U.S. Army or Department of Defense. For more information, visit the DoD Social Media user agreement at: http://www.defense.gov/socialmedia/user-agreement.aspx You are encouraged to quote, republish or share any content on this site on your own blog, web site or other communication/publication. If you do so, please credit the Army unit or the person who authored the content as a courtesy.

Telephone

(703) 693-0296

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U.S. Army JAG Corps page
Ambassador for Life: https://www.facebook.com/USArmyJAGCAmbassadorsforLife/
Website: www.jagcnet.army.mil
Legal Services: https//www.jagcnet.army.mil/Legal
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Education: https://www.facebook.com/TJAGLCS

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History of U.S. Army Trial Defense Service

The U.S. Army Trial Defense Service (TDS) originally began as an experiment. Previously, defense attorneys worked for the Staff Judge Advocate (SJA), a person whom advised the Commanding General often directing the very actions that brought about the need for legal representation. To ensure due process for Soldiers, a new system introduced the concept of a separate chain of command within the Judge Advocate General’s Corps. This distinct organization ultimately became TDS.

After testing the program from 1978 to 1980, the Chief of Staff approved the permanent TDS organization. Since then, TDS has functioned as a world-wide organization with its headquarters in Fort Belvoir, Virginia. It is a division of the United Stated Army Legal Services Agency (USALSA), which provides logistical support to TDS. Attorneys in TDS typically serve two-year tours, and all TDS attorneys are rated within the TDS organization.

TDS has nearly 600 Soldiers, about 160 of whom are Active Component (AC) and over 275 of whom are Reserve Component (RC). Reserve Component members belong to one of three Legal Operations Detachments (LODs), the 16th LOD, the 22d LOD and the 154th LOD. The mission of these three organizations is to provide legal services support to commanders and Soldiers who help sustain military operations. The Army National Guard also has developed a very thriving TDS organization with over 125 defense counsel.


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