National Archives at Fort Worth

National Archives at Fort Worth Welcome to the official page for the National Archives at Ft. Worth! If you're looking for the official source of information about the US National Archives, please visit our homepage at http://www.archives.gov.
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As a center for historical and genealogical research, we have both an Archival and Microfilm Research Room for researchers. Our historical records date from the 1800s to the late 1900s, and include letters, photographs, maps, architectural drawings, and other documents received from over 100 Federal agencies and courts in Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas. We are open 8:00 am - 4:00 pm Monday through Friday. For textual research, please call 817-551-2051 to set up an appointment.

Operating as usual

September is National Preparedness Month and FEMA posted this graphic on Facebook in 2016 to make sure people are neighb...
09/02/2020

September is National Preparedness Month and FEMA posted this graphic on Facebook in 2016 to make sure people are neighborly and check in on their neighbors (NAID 75580343). It states, “Don’t forget to do a neighbor check! Always check with each other in case of emergency.” This is a great reminder as we are living in the time of a pandemic.

For more information on preparing for a disaster visit: www.ready.gov/September .

On May 19th, 1919, a joint resolution to the Constitution was presented proposing an amendment to the Constitution exten...
08/26/2020

On May 19th, 1919, a joint resolution to the Constitution was presented proposing an amendment to the Constitution extending the right of suffrage to women (NAID 596314). The amendment reads:

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on the account of sex.

On August 26th, 1920, Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby certified the ratification of the 19th Amendment changing the American electorate forever.

August 18th marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Although the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, this landmark event was not the beginning or the end of the story for women and the struggle for the right to vote. This month the National Archives at Fort Worth will highlight some of these stories from the vast holdings of the National Archives.

To learn more about what the National Archives is doing to mark the 100th anniversary of women in the U.S. attaining the right to vote, see https://www.archives.gov/women .

#Archives19thAt100

08/21/2020

In March of 1776, while staying in Braintree, Massachusetts, Abigail Adams wrote to her husband John Adams while he was in Philadelphia.

Abigail hoped to hear that independence would be declared, but she knew that a new government-created by white men with laws that benefited them—would not most likely bring much in the way of change for women.

Her concerns were well founded. Women of the time had no legal identity apart from their husbands. They could not vote, they could not own property, or gain custody of their children if divorced.

While Abigail’s own marriage was a happy one, she was aware of the situation of women overall, she urged her husband to think carefully about the needs of women in forming the new government. In her letter, she stated:
If perticuliar care and attention is not paid to the Laidies we are determined to foment a Rebelion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any Laws in which we have no voice, or Representation.

Abigail would have been pleased to see the passage of the 19th Amendment enfranchising women. However, it can be assumed that she would have hoped to have seen it sooner than the 144 years it took from the time she wrote those words to her husband.

To learn more about the letter Abigail Adams wrote to John Adams read the 19th Amendment at 100: Abigail Adams blog.

August 18th marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Although the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, this landmark event was not the beginning or the end of the story for women and the struggle for the right to vote. This month the National Archives at Fort Worth will highlight some of these stories from the vast holdings of the National Archives.

To learn more about what the National Archives is doing to mark the 100th anniversary of women in the U.S. attaining the right to vote, see https://www.archives.gov/women .

#Archives19thAt100

One hundred years ago today, Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment fulfilling the necessary requi...
08/18/2020

One hundred years ago today, Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment fulfilling the necessary requirement of three-fourths of states to ratify in order for the US Constitution to be amended. Tennessee Governor A.H. Roberts submitted Tennessee’s Ratification of the 19th Amendment to Washington, DC on August 24th (NAID 1501900).

However, Tennessee may not have actually ratified the amendment had it not been for a young representative, Harry T. Burn from East Tennessee receiving a letter from his mother. Originally planning to vote against ratification, Burn changed his vote when his mother wrote:

Dear Son, …Hurray and vote for Suffrage and don’t keep them in doubt.

A dutiful son, Burn changed his vote to “aye.”

To learn more about Burn and his mother’s letter read the Putting the “Rat” in Ratification: Tennessee’s role in the 19th amendment blog.

August 18th marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Although the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, this landmark event was not the beginning or the end of the story for women and the struggle for the right to vote. This month the National Archives at Fort Worth will highlight some of these stories from the vast holdings of the National Archives.

To learn more about what the National Archives is doing to mark the 100th anniversary of women in the U.S. attaining the right to vote, see https://www.archives.gov/women .

#Archives19thAt100

The cover to the official 1913 program of the Woman Suffrage Procession shows a woman on horseback, confidently riding t...
08/14/2020

The cover to the official 1913 program of the Woman Suffrage Procession shows a woman on horseback, confidently riding towards the Capitol as a herald of a new era.

In reality, the march was a very different experience.
During the 1910s, suffragists staged large and dramatic parades to draw attention to their cause. On March 3, 1913—the day before Woodrow Wilson’s first Presidential inauguration—more than 5,000 suffragists gathered in Washington, DC, to march down Pennsylvania Avenue. The women were accompanied by nine bands and twenty-four floats, but the suffragists were met with crowds of unruly men blocking their paths and shouting derogatory remarks.
Ambulances struggled to reach those in need as the crowds sometimes deliberately blocked them, and over 100 women were taken to the hospital. By the end of the day, the cavalry had to be called in from Fort Myer to bring the crowd of spectators under control as the police did little to help controlling the crowd.

The poor treatment of the marchers sparked immediate outrage.

To learn more about 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession read the 19th Amendment at 100: Woman Suffrage Comes to Washington blog.

August 18th marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Although the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, this landmark event was not the beginning or the end of the story for women and the struggle for the right to vote. This month the National Archives at Fort Worth will highlight some of these stories from the vast holdings of the National Archives.

To learn more about what the National Archives is doing to mark the 100th anniversary of women in the U.S. attaining the right to vote, see https://www.archives.gov/women .

#Archives19thAt100

More than any other woman of her time, Susan B. Anthony recognized that many of the legal disabilities women faced were ...
08/11/2020

More than any other woman of her time, Susan B. Anthony recognized that many of the legal disabilities women faced were the result of their inability to vote.

Anthony worked tirelessly her whole adult life fighting for the right to vote, and she was instrumental in bringing the issue to the forefront of American consciousness.

In 1872, Anthony was arrested for voting for a candidate for Congress in the city of Rochester, New York. She was indicted for voting “wrongfully and unlawfully” (NAID 278295). She was later convicted by the State of New York and fined $100 (NAID 278304).

To learn more about Anthony and her work read the Susan B. Anthony: Women’s Right to Vote blog.

August 18th marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Although the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, this landmark event was not the beginning or the end of the story for women and the struggle for the right to vote. This month the National Archives at Fort Worth will highlight some of these stories from the vast holdings of the National Archives.

To learn more about what the National Archives is doing to mark the 100th anniversary of women in the U.S. attaining the right to vote, see https://www.archives.gov/women .

#Archives19thAt100

Born in Canton (now Guangzhou), China, in 1896, Mabel Ping-Hua Lee moved to New York City with her missionary father and...
08/07/2020

Born in Canton (now Guangzhou), China, in 1896, Mabel Ping-Hua Lee moved to New York City with her missionary father and their family during the era of Chinese Exclusion. Because of the restrictions of the Chinese Exclusion Acts, Chinese immigrants were prohibited from becoming U.S. citizens, rendering them unable to vote.

This did not stop Mable Ping-Hua Lee from fighting for suffrage, however. A member of the New York Women’s Political Equality League and an outspoken feminist, Lee began writing and speaking publicly about woman suffrage while a teenager. Notably, in May of 1912 she joined other suffragists to lead a parade (on horseback!) down the streets of New York City in support of votes for women in front of thousands of supporters. She later led a contingent of Chinese and Chinese American women in a New York City suffrage parade in 1917.

Lee marched for women’s enfranchisement even though she was barred from becoming a U.S. citizen because of her race. As a result, she remained unable to vote when New York adopted woman suffrage in 1917 and after the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920.

To learn more about Lee read the 19th Amendment at 100: Mabel Ping-Hua Lee blog.

August 18th marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Although the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, this landmark event was not the beginning or the end of the story for women and the struggle for the right to vote. This month the National Archives at Fort Worth will highlight some of these stories from the vast holdings of the National Archives.

To learn more about what the National Archives is doing to mark the 100th anniversary of women in the U.S. attaining the right to vote, see https://www.archives.gov/women .

#Archives19thAt100

“Seeking no favors because of our color nor patronage because of our needs, we knock at the bar of justice and ask for a...
08/04/2020

“Seeking no favors because of our color nor patronage because of our needs, we knock at the bar of justice and ask for an equal chance.” –Mary Church Terrell

Although activist Mary Church Terrell was perhaps most well known for her fight against racial segregation, she was also an outspoken advocate for woman suffrage.

Terrell argued that the vote was even more essential to African American women because they were disadvantaged by both their race and their sex, and the vote would be key to achieving civil rights.

As with American society as a whole, the woman suffrage movement was segregated, and black women were not always welcomed at white women suffrage events. After befriending Susan B. Anthony, Terrell spoke at National American Woman Suffrage Association meetings, offering her perspective as a black woman
.
To learn more about Terrell and African American women’s fight for suffrage read the 19th Amendment at 100: Mary Church Terrell blog.

August 18th marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Although the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, this landmark event was not the beginning or the end of the story for women and the struggle for the right to vote. This month the National Archives at Fort Worth will highlight some of these stories from the vast holdings of the National Archives.

To learn more about what the National Archives is doing to mark the 100th anniversary of women in the U.S. attaining the right to vote, see https://www.archives.gov/women .

#Archives19thAt100

August 18th marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment.  Although the 19th Amendment was rati...
08/01/2020

August 18th marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Although the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, this landmark event was not the beginning or the end of the story for women and the struggle for the right to vote. This month the National Archives at Fort Worth will highlight some of these stories from the vast holdings of the National Archives.

Women were the first organized group to protest at the gates of the President’s house. Beginning on January 10, 1917, women seeking voting rights stationed themselves outside the White House.

These pickets were organized by the National Woman’s Party (NWP), which employed militant tactics to agitate for the vote. The NWP had been created by Alice Paul, who was frustrated with the suffrage movement’s slow progress.

The women stood without speaking in front of the White House, holding banners. They became known as the “Silent Sentinels” as they stood at their posts for almost three years, six days a week. They had hoped to embarrass President Woodrow Wilson into supporting a Federal woman suffrage amendment.

In this photograph, “Silent Sentinel” Alison Turnbull Hopkins stands outside the White House, January 30, 1917 (NAID 594266).

To learn more about the “Silent Sentinels” read the 19th Amendment at 100: Women Are First to Protest White blog.

To learn more about what the National Archives is doing to mark the 100th anniversary of women in the U.S. attaining the right to vote, see https://www.archives.gov/women .

#Archives19thAt100

Need a little dose of cuteness?  These seals basking in the sunshine off of St. Paul Island, Alaska certainly foot the b...
07/29/2020

Need a little dose of cuteness? These seals basking in the sunshine off of St. Paul Island, Alaska certainly foot the bill (NAID-131107148)!

Photographer Jacqueline Babcock captured the animals in their natural habitat in October 2003. St. Paul Island is part of the Pribilof Islands which are four volcanic islands located in the Bering Sea off of the coast of Alaska. According to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, “Each summer, nearly a million northern fur seals gather on these remote Bering Sea islands to give birth to their pups.”

The photograph is part of a series of records titled: Central Photographic Files Relating to Environmental Problems and Remediation Activities, Social and Economic Life on the Pribilof Islands, Alaska which is from the Records of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

On this day in 1897 in Atchison, Kansas aviatrix Amelia Earhart was born.  An aviation pioneer, she was the first female...
07/24/2020

On this day in 1897 in Atchison, Kansas aviatrix Amelia Earhart was born. An aviation pioneer, she was the first female to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She continued to set aviation records throughout her life. After a first failed attempt, Earhart set out on a round-the-world flight with crew member Fred Noonan from Miami, Florida on June 1, 1937. After almost a month of flying with stops in South America, Africa and the Indian subcontinent they landed in Lae, New Guinea. Earhart and Noonan took off on what would be their last flight from Lae Airfield on July 2nd and were never to be seen again. The mystery surrounding the disappearance of Earhart has been of great public interest over the years.
This photograph of Earhart was taken nearly a year before her disappearance and is part of the Records of the Army Air Forces (NAID 6708609).

In the Records of the Patent and Trademark Office there are thousands of products labels including this one for Uncle Sa...
07/19/2020

In the Records of the Patent and Trademark Office there are thousands of products labels including this one for Uncle Sam’s Ice Cream Cones (NAID 5716617). In honor of National Ice Cream Day today, you can just imagine enjoying a sweet cold treat with this patriotic label wrapped around a crunchy ice cream cone.

Hopefully you are able to enjoy some fun in the sun like these ladies this summer!  Taken by photographer Flip Schulke t...
07/14/2020

Hopefully you are able to enjoy some fun in the sun like these ladies this summer!

Taken by photographer Flip Schulke the original caption of this photograph reads: Residents take part in organized daily exercises in one of the public pools at Century Village Retirement Community in West Palm Beach, Florida (NAID 548550).

This photograph was taken as part of the DOCUMERICA program which was the Environmental Protection Agency’s Program to photographically document subjects of environmental concern between the years of 1972-1977.

Mid-July brings about hot weather as captured in Clifford Berryman’s cartoon Summer Swelters which was originally publis...
07/08/2020

Mid-July brings about hot weather as captured in Clifford Berryman’s cartoon Summer Swelters which was originally published in the Washington Evening Star in July 1921 (NAID 6011671). Berryman’s Uncle Sam stands with a fan and towel in hand, sweating as he looks at the thermometer. Many of us probably share his sentiment of “The Spirit of ’76 was fine, but I’m tired of this 96 stuff!”

The Center for Legislative Archives holds approximately 2,400 original pen-and-ink drawings by cartoonist Clifford K. Berryman in the U.S. Senate Collection. Berryman was one of Washington’s best-known political cartoonists in the first half of the 20th century. Berryman drew for the Washington Post from 1890 until 1907, and then for the Washington Evening Star from 1907 until his death in 1949. All of Berryman’s cartoons are available for online viewing through the National Archives Catalog by searching the keywords: Clifford Berryman.

Happy Independence Day!  John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail on July 3, 1776 that American Independence “ought to be so...
07/04/2020

Happy Independence Day! John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail on July 3, 1776 that American Independence “ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.” The Washington Monument is silhouetted in fireworks in this photograph and is definitely the “illuminations” Adams referred to (NAID 6413316).
Staff Sargent Lono Kollars was the Scene Camera Operator who captured this image of the 4th of July festivities in 1986 and is part of the Records of the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

There is nothing as refreshing as the taste of a ripe juicy watermelon when it is hot outside!  Sixteen- year old Lila S...
06/30/2020

There is nothing as refreshing as the taste of a ripe juicy watermelon when it is hot outside!

Sixteen- year old Lila Swihart grew some of the largest watermelons in Mississippi County, Arkansas in 1929. She grew watermelons because she was a member of her school’s 4-H Club. Swihart was able to sell them and earned a net profit of $151.67 which is almost $2,300 in today’s dollars!

The National Archives at Fort Worth houses the Records of the Extension Service for the state of Arkansas. These records are arranged by county and provide a glimpse into what rural life was like during the 1920s and 1930s. (NAID 251659)

Stay cool out there and enjoy a slice of watermelon!

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If you don't use it, be prepared to lose it. Due to lack of patrons in the afternoons, Fort Worth NARA genealogy research room plans on closing at 1:00 pm daily starting in the coming months. #Ancestryforfree, #maximizeyourtaxdollaruse
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