Spotsylvania Battlefields

Spotsylvania Battlefields Spotsylvania Battlefields grew from local preservation efforts and continues to support work to save

Four major Civil War battles and campaigns happened in Virginia’s Spotsylvania County: Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Wilderness, and Spotsylvania Court House. Spotsylvania Battlefields grew from local preservation efforts and continues to support work to save and spotlight the battlefields in this county. We are passionate about our local Civil War history and love to share interesting facts about the current preservation and historical facts.

In early June 1863, while some of the Army of Northern Virginia prepared to push north for an invasion of Pennsylvania, ...
12/07/2023

In early June 1863, while some of the Army of Northern Virginia prepared to push north for an invasion of Pennsylvania, others fought another Rappahannock River crossing just south of Fredericksburg by elements of the Sixth Corps. Labeled by Col. Lewis A. Grant of the Vermont Brigade as “an exciting and brilliant affair,” some of the rank and file asked to do the fighting were not so thrilled.

Writing to the Syracuse, New York, Journal newspaper, a soldier in the 122nd New York noted about June 6: “The [pontoon] bridges had been laid with a sharp resistance in which Capt. Cross of the Engineers, and Captain of a New Jersey regiment and several men were killed, and eighteen wounded, in all a loss of about twenty five.” The writer explained that “Johnny Butternut is not very good natured this time either,” and that “they are as waspish as a nest of bumble-bees after we have mowed over their nests in the old meadow at home.”

After about a week of occupying the south bank, the Federals fell back to the Stafford County side of the river and eventually ended up at Gettysburg with the rest of the army.

Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Pvt. Thomas A. Boyd, 90th Pennsylvania Infantry, was one of the thousands of United States soldiers counted as a casualt...
12/06/2023

Pvt. Thomas A. Boyd, 90th Pennsylvania Infantry, was one of the thousands of United States soldiers counted as a casualty at the Battle of Fredericksburg. But, as is often the case, Boyd, a Philadelphian, was more than just a soldier. He was a husband to Hannah and father to Robert (13), Sarah (10), Hannah (8), Thomas (6), and Susannah (6 months).

Wounded while fighting on the Slaughter Pen Farm portion of the battlefield while his regiment’s colonel, Peter Lyle, led their brigade, Pvt. Boyd eventually received care at Lincoln Hospital in Washington D.C., where he died of his wound on January 6, 1863.

Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.

CVBT released its December 2023 "history email" yesterday, which looks at aspects of Civil War artillery. If you missed ...
12/05/2023

CVBT released its December 2023 "history email" yesterday, which looks at aspects of Civil War artillery. If you missed it, it is available on the CVBT website at: https://bit.ly/485bSY5

If you don’t want to miss future CVBT email newsletters, you can sign up for them at: https://bit.ly/3IElLAr

As the Battle of Fredericksburg raged on what became known as the Slaughter Pen Farm portion of the battlefield, Brig. G...
12/04/2023

As the Battle of Fredericksburg raged on what became known as the Slaughter Pen Farm portion of the battlefield, Brig. Gen. Evander Law’s mixed Alabama and North Carolina brigade entered the fray. In doing so, Law’s two North Carolina regiments attacked elements of the Sixth Corps fighting along the Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac Railroad.

One of the soldiers, Pvt. John Marcus Hefner of the 57th North Carolina, wrote to his wife Keziah describing the fight and his company’s casualties: “we Charged on them they was in the Railrode dich and we Run them near A half A mile and they Reenforst and we Retreated back to the railroad dich and I can inform you that they Shot at us Some three ours I can inform you that we had six wounded and one kild Miles Drum was Shot in his head above his tempel and lodged against the skin on tother side and I hope to bery him.” The 57th North Carolina lost over 30 men killed and almost 200 wounded in the fight.

Looking for a Christmas gift for your special history enthusiast? CVBT has you covered! Volumes 2-16 of the Fredericksbu...
12/01/2023

Looking for a Christmas gift for your special history enthusiast? CVBT has you covered! Volumes 2-16 of the Fredericksburg History and Biography journal are available for an incredibly low price of $3.00 each. Order your copies today: https://bit.ly/49XmABr
All proceeds go toward forwarding CVBT’s mission.

In a December 5, 1863, letter to his sweetheart, Maj. Walter Taylor, who served as Robert E. Lee’s assistant adjutant ge...
11/30/2023

In a December 5, 1863, letter to his sweetheart, Maj. Walter Taylor, who served as Robert E. Lee’s assistant adjutant general, wrote about events he observed during the Mine Run Campaign. Commenting about November 30, Taylor penned: “On Monday, we confidently looked for an attack—it passed without one. The enemy was in our immediate front and they too had entrenched themselves. This looked rather q***r to see two large armies face to face busily constructing works for defence.”

Both armies digging in within eyesight was a scene that would become familiar soon enough during the Overland and Petersburg Campaigns, but in the winter of 1863-64, it was still rather novel.

Thank you for supporting   and helping CVBT with our goal of creating public access and interpretive opportunities at mo...
11/29/2023

Thank you for supporting and helping CVBT with our goal of creating public access and interpretive opportunities at more of our battlefield properties. Your donations make a difference as we all partner to save and learn from the places where history happened. https://bit.ly/3FPNC02


There’s still time to help us with our   project goal. Help us reach $10,000 to open more CVBT land to the public and pr...
11/29/2023

There’s still time to help us with our project goal. Help us reach $10,000 to open more CVBT land to the public and provide historical interpretation opportunities. https://bit.ly/3FPNC02

While CVBT’s Harris Farm and Pelham’s Corner properties currently have public access and interpretation, we want to crea...
11/28/2023

While CVBT’s Harris Farm and Pelham’s Corner properties currently have public access and interpretation, we want to create more opportunities for learning about what happened on central Virginia’s Civil War hallowed grounds. Will you help us raise $10,000 this to do so? Donate now, at: https://bit.ly/3FPNC02

You’ve helped preserve what is important! Now, help us make the history that happened on central Virginia’s battlefields...
11/28/2023

You’ve helped preserve what is important! Now, help us make the history that happened on central Virginia’s battlefields more accessible. It’s within reach! Give at: https://bit.ly/3FPNC02

Several CVBT properties where significant historical events occurred are prime for public access and educational interpr...
11/28/2023

Several CVBT properties where significant historical events occurred are prime for public access and educational interpretation. Your donation will help make this long-time goal achievable. To give, visit: https://bit.ly/3FPNC02

Get a head start! This year CVBT is trying to raise $10,000 to help create more public access and interpretation opportu...
11/27/2023

Get a head start! This year CVBT is trying to raise $10,000 to help create more public access and interpretation opportunities on previously preserved lands. You can help with this year’s project and fundraising effort at: https://bit.ly/3FPNC02

Can we raise $10,000 on   to create public access and interpretative opportunities on more of the battlefield land that ...
11/25/2023

Can we raise $10,000 on to create public access and interpretative opportunities on more of the battlefield land that you’ve helped CVBT preserve? Your donation ensures our ability to turn even more hallowed ground into history learning spaces. Give early here: https://bit.ly/3FPNC02


Take a break from Black Friday this year and start a new tradition, Battlefielding Friday! Get outdoors on a battlefield...
11/24/2023

Take a break from Black Friday this year and start a new tradition, Battlefielding Friday! Get outdoors on a battlefield, breathe in some fresh air, see some wildlife, read a wayside sign or two or ten, and take a few minutes to appreciate all that battlefield preservation offers our communities. Happy battlefielding!

Wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving Day! We are grateful for all the ways you help make a difference by saving places where...
11/23/2023

Wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving Day! We are grateful for all the ways you help make a difference by saving places where history happened in Central Virginia.


Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.

The day after the Battle of Fredericksburg, Pvt. Joseph Baker, 15th New Jersey Inf., wrote to a friend detailing the cas...
11/22/2023

The day after the Battle of Fredericksburg, Pvt. Joseph Baker, 15th New Jersey Inf., wrote to a friend detailing the casualties in his company. Fighting on the south end of the battlefield, Baker and his Sixth Corps regiment engaged first as skirmishers but then ended up in a stand-up fight that he estimated lasted two hours.

Baker’s list included: “Ord. Sergeant. Geo. Martin shot in the head, Simon S. VanNess in the knee, Dick Bulgin shot in the hip, Len Cooper in the leg near the hip, John Thompson shot in left arm, Zachariah Seals shot in the jaw, Jim Timmins in the hand, John P. Brink in the hand, Jim Egbert wounded in leg, Abraham King in leg, Wm. Broadwell in the left shoulder. Missing Ed Albertson, Henry Cole, David L. Hayes, and one [other] man I believe.” Although not wounded himself, Baker stated, “I had a bullet shot right through my blanket, which was strapped on my back. It was pretty close I tell you.”

Pvt. Baker’s good luck on the battlefield unfortunately ended at Salem Church on May 3, 1863, where he received a mortal wound.

Just one week left until  . Central Virginia Battlefields Trust is pleased to participate in this Global Day of Giving. ...
11/21/2023

Just one week left until . Central Virginia Battlefields Trust is pleased to participate in this Global Day of Giving. As we work to preserve Civil War battlefields, we are also giving historic greenspace back to our local community and creating outdoor classrooms where every generation can learn stories of courage and leadership.


At the Battle of Fredericksburg, 1st Sgt. William R. Montgomery and the Phillips Legion served along the famous Sunken R...
11/20/2023

At the Battle of Fredericksburg, 1st Sgt. William R. Montgomery and the Phillips Legion served along the famous Sunken Road and Stone Wall. Four days after the battle, Montgomery wrote to his aunt giving some descriptions of the waves of Federal attacks:

“We waited until they got within about 200 yards of us & rose to our feet & poured volley after volley into their ranks which told a most deadening effect. They soon began to waver & at last broke from the rear, but the shouts of our brave soldiers had scarcely died away when we saw coming another column more powerful & seemingly determined than the first (if possible) but only a few rounds from our brave & well trained men was necessary to tell them that they had undertaken a work a little too hard. But before they had entirely left the field another column & another & still another came to their support. But our well aimed shots were more than they could stand so about night they were compelled to give up the field covered with their dead.”


Montgomery image courtesy of Find a Grave.

  is less than two weeks away. Central Virginia Battlefields Trust is happy to once again participate in this special da...
11/17/2023

is less than two weeks away. Central Virginia Battlefields Trust is happy to once again participate in this special day. Be on the lookout for more information on this year’s preservation project and how you can help.

CVBT released its November 2023 e-newsletter on Tuesday. If you missed it, it is available on the CVBT website at: https...
11/16/2023

CVBT released its November 2023 e-newsletter on Tuesday. If you missed it, it is available on the CVBT website at: https://bit.ly/40H41gH

If you don’t want to miss future CVBT email newsletters, you can sign up for them at: https://bit.ly/3IElLAr

Photo credit: Jennifer Michael

Today is National Drummer Day. Whether sounding the long roll for battle, beating out a parade step, giving drumbeat com...
11/15/2023

Today is National Drummer Day. Whether sounding the long roll for battle, beating out a parade step, giving drumbeat commands, or serving in non-musical positions like stretcher bearers, drummers—many of whom were mere boys—played important roles in Civil War army life.


Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.

This past Saturday, a number of area high school students and adult volunteers helped the Central Virginia Battlefields ...
11/14/2023

This past Saturday, a number of area high school students and adult volunteers helped the Central Virginia Battlefields Trust board members and staff plant and trim trees and pick up litter at CVBT’s Pelham’s Corner property. Afterward, the students learned about this historic piece of ground and how artillery functioned with a demonstration from Stribling’s Battery at nearby Slaughter Pen Farm.

In late November 1862, as the Army of the Potomac waited for pontoons to arrive to cross the Rappahannock River into Fre...
11/13/2023

In late November 1862, as the Army of the Potomac waited for pontoons to arrive to cross the Rappahannock River into Fredericksburg, Maj. William Watson, a surgeon in the 105th Pennsylvania, took an opportunity to write home. “On my way to Falmouth I rode down to the river to take an other look at Fredericksburg,” Watson penned. “Looking over, not a Woman or child is to be seen—but plenty of Graybacks come within range of one’s observation. It looks strange to see squads of hostile men not fifty yards apart lounging carelessly about idly contemplating one an other,” Watson noted.


Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.

11/11/2023
Today is National Louisiana Day. Among the general officers killed or mortally wounded during the fighting at the Battle...
11/10/2023

Today is National Louisiana Day. Among the general officers killed or mortally wounded during the fighting at the Battle of the Wilderness one of the least recognized by name, even among Civil War enthusiasts, is Leroy Augustus Stafford, who commanded a brigade of Louisiana regiments in Maj. Gen. Edward Johnson’s Division of Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell’s Corps.

A Louisiana native, Stafford first served as lieutenant colonel, and then colonel of the 9th Louisiana Infantry. During the Chancellorsville Campaign, Stafford was captured but quickly exchanged. He received a promotion to brigadier general in October 1863 and led troops in three assaults at Payne’s Farm during the Mine Run Campaign. During the Wilderness fighting on May 5, 1864, that raged north of Saunder’s Field, Stafford received a bullet wound that severed his spinal cord. Removed from the battlefield and taken to Richmond’s Spotswood Hotel, Stafford died on May 8, 1864.

Maj. Luther Bruen of the 12th U.S. Infantry wrote to his wife Augusta from Spotsylvania on the morning of May 13, 1864, ...
11/09/2023

Maj. Luther Bruen of the 12th U.S. Infantry wrote to his wife Augusta from Spotsylvania on the morning of May 13, 1864, telling her, “I have escaped untouched so far, altho eight officers out of seventeen have been killed or wounded and one half of my men are killed, wounded or missing.” Maj. Bruen wrote again a couple of hours later, but this time the news was not so good.

Bruen explained, “the rebs began throwing shells at troops moving in our rear and also some in a piece of woods in our front. The fire was very hot and while I was hurrying up the men who were throwing up entrenchments a shell exploded near me and a piece struck me just under the cap of the left knee, making a wound about an inch deep and one and a half or two long.” Bruen tried to not worry Augusta by closing: “Now, Dear, don't fret about me—I am not much hurt and in good spirits, thinking I have got very cheaply compared with some others.”

Sent to Washington D.C.’s Douglas Hospital, Bruen’s leg was later amputated and he died on June 21, 1864.


Image courtesy of Dayton Metro Library.

Despite being only 16 years old when he enlisted in the summer of 1861, Henry Matrau of the 6th Wisconsin Infantry made ...
11/08/2023

Despite being only 16 years old when he enlisted in the summer of 1861, Henry Matrau of the 6th Wisconsin Infantry made a fine soldier and advanced from private to captain before he mustered out in July 1865. In a letter to this mother following the Mine Run Campaign, he filled her in on some of the things he experienced.

Crossing the Rapidan River and marching “on by-roads through a dense forrest of scrubby pines denominated the Wilderness,” the 6th Wisconsin fell in behind “the 5th Corps wagon train.” A band of Confederate cavalry attacked the wagons and Matrau and his comrades “deployed as skirmishers through the wood” toward the wagons. “There the Rebs were drinking whiskey, rummaging wagons, cutting mules loose, whipping the teamsters, & raising the devil generally,” Matrau penned. Despite letting loose a volley “that emptied a dozen or twenty saddles and set them running for dear life,” the cavalry had set fire to some of the wagons “loaded with shells that commenced a series of explosions.”

After continuing the march to Robinson’s Tavern, the Confederates fell back across Mine Run “on a range of Heights well fortified.” Matrau was convinced that “To have charged those Heigts with the number of men we had would have been sheer murder & Gen. Meade knew it.” Like many other soldiers, Matrau seemed pleased that “we fell back to our old position.”

Having comrades wounded or killed by a soldier’s side was a fairly common occurrence during the Civil War. During the fi...
11/07/2023

Having comrades wounded or killed by a soldier’s side was a fairly common occurrence during the Civil War. During the fight at the Battle of Second Fredericksburg, Lt. Herbert Wells of the 122nd New York Infantry had it happen to him. He wrote home about it in a letter: “Just before we started forward and while we yet were on the edge of the city my Captain (who was standing right beside me, and we were talking . . .) was struck by a minie and badly wounded. We were watching the effect of the charge,” he explained.

Lt. Wells removed his captain to a safe place, but “The next moment we were ordered forward and I had to take command of the company.”

Wells received a wound on June 3, 1864, at Cold Harbor, but mustered out with his regiment in June 1865.

All quiet along the Potomac “they say,”“Except now and then a stray Picket”Is shot as he walks on his beat, to and fro,B...
11/06/2023

All quiet along the Potomac “they say,”
“Except now and then a stray Picket”
Is shot as he walks on his beat, to and fro,
By a rifleman hid in a thicket.
Tis nothing—a private or two, now and then,
Will not count in the news of the battle;
Not an officer lost, only one of the men,
Moaning out all alone the death rattle.


Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.

“CHARGE! and in an instant every man was on his feet, and with tremendous cheers, which were answered by wild yells of t...
11/03/2023

“CHARGE! and in an instant every man was on his feet, and with tremendous cheers, which were answered by wild yells of the rebels, the column rushed from under the cover of the woods. Quick as lightening a sheet of flame burst from the rebel line, and the leaden hail swept the ground over with the column was advancing,—while the canister of the artillery came crashing through our ranks at every step, and scores and hundreds of our brave fellows fell, literally covering the ground.”
Describing Col. Emory Upton’s attack on May 10, 1864; from History of the 5th Regiment Maine Volunteers, 1871.

CVBT released its November 2023 "history email" on Wednesday, which is the second part of a focused look at the experien...
11/02/2023

CVBT released its November 2023 "history email" on Wednesday, which is the second part of a focused look at the experiences of early visitors to Central Virginia’s battlefields. If you missed it, it is available on the CVBT website at: https://bit.ly/40mnHGr

If you don’t want to miss future CVBT email newsletters, you can sign up for them at: https://bit.ly/3IElLAr

Barely two weeks into the Overland Campaign, the wear and tear on the soldiers was clearly evident in their letters. Sgt...
11/01/2023

Barely two weeks into the Overland Campaign, the wear and tear on the soldiers was clearly evident in their letters. Sgt. Isaac Lefevers, 46th North Carolina wrote home to his wife Catharine on May 19th from “Spotselvania Coart House,” explaining that “this is 7 Days that the most Desporate Battle has bin going on and Stil no Sine to sease.” Levfevers noted that he missed the first two day while attending to the wounded. However, “Since that time I have bin with the Regt wat few is left.”

In the fight of the previous evening, Lefevers “Received a slite wond in my left Shoulder al tho I am Stil with the co” and trusting Providence that would escape unharmed. “I tel you their neaver has bin such a Sloughter in men Since the war commenced we have lost a menny a good man,” he wrote. Apparently on the skirmish line at the time, Sgt. Lefevers closed that he “would like to Rite more but cant at this time we air loocken for the yankes Every minute they air Stil in site I wil Rite a gain in a few Days If I am permited to.”

Sgt. Lefevers died at a Richmond Hospital about a month after receiving a wound in a nearby skirmish on June 15, 1864.


Map image courtesy of the Library of Congress.

The descriptive nature of Civil War soldiers’ letters detailing the locations where they fought, and thus giving present...
10/31/2023

The descriptive nature of Civil War soldiers’ letters detailing the locations where they fought, and thus giving present-day visitors the ability to see them, is sometimes simply amazing. In a letter by Pvt. Samuel North (126th Pennsylvania), dated December 18, 1862, and written to his brother, North described the Battle of Fredericksburg.

He opened: “I wrote a letter to mother in Fredericksburg on Sunday [Dec. 14], it was just a scribble . . . to let her know that I was safe then. but I knew [the battle] was not all over for the shells were flying about pretty thick at the time.” Apparently sheltering himself, Pvt. North noted that “we were sitting behind a stone wall at a grave yard in charles st.”

The 126th Pennsylvania, a nine-month regiment, served in Brig. Gen. Andrew Humphreys’ Division and participated in the attacks on the Confederate position along the famous Sunken Road on the afternoon of December 13. Undoubtedly the stonewalled graveyard that North mentioned was the Masonic Cemetery on Charles St., which was founded in 1784 and is still there today.


Image courtesy of the Fredericksburg Masonic Cemetery page.

Ensuring that your legacy gifts end up benefitting those you want to help is the purpose of planned giving. CVBT’s inclu...
10/30/2023

Ensuring that your legacy gifts end up benefitting those you want to help is the purpose of planned giving. CVBT’s inclusion in your planned giving is a way for you to continue making a difference in battlefield preservation. CVBT’s Legacy Society website page provides a number of helpful tips when considering making a legacy gift. To learn more, visit: https://www.cvbt.org/legacysociety

At times, serving as a part of the army’s rear guard could be as harrowing as a full-blown battle. During the Army of th...
10/27/2023

At times, serving as a part of the army’s rear guard could be as harrowing as a full-blown battle. During the Army of the Potomac’s move from the Wilderness to Spotsylvania, the 4th New Jersey of the Sixth Corps helped in that unenviable role as the army moved south and some of the enemy followed.

Sgt. Benjamin Linton wrote in his diary on May 7, 1864, that after stopping for “a little coffee and fried pork” they had “to leave to take our position in line” and blunt the pursuit. Receiving some help from their artillery, which had been of little use in the Wilderness, the enemy received “every grape in this case after which they were a little slow to come so close.” Quickly constructing “a line of breastworks,” Sgt. Linton wrote, “That night the enemy made another attack on us but received a galling fire and fall back.”

Unfortunately, only a week of life was left for Sgt. Linton. He was mortally wounded in the Spotsylvania fighting on May 12, 1864, and died two days later.

Sgt. Linton’s diary account comes courtesy of Spared and Shared 23.

On May 9, 1863, 20-year-old Sgt. Thomas Smiley (5th Virginia Infantry) wrote to his sister Mary about the Battle of Chan...
10/26/2023

On May 9, 1863, 20-year-old Sgt. Thomas Smiley (5th Virginia Infantry) wrote to his sister Mary about the Battle of Chancellorsville. In the letter he mentioned a close call he encountered: “You have no doubt heard of the battle of Chancellorsville before this and you may feel uneasy about me I will now try to quiet that uneasiness by writing a few lines to you for the purpose of letting you know that I am safe with no broken bones. but I made a very narrow escape indeed. There was a shell exploded a few yards from me one of the pieces of which struck in the ground by my side throwing the dirt and gravels over me my eyes were blackened and bruised up and my right hand was struck bruising and swelling it so that I could not do duty for a couple of days but I am thankful that I was permitted to escape from any worse wound. I am now in the company but my hand is still right sore.”

Sgt. Smiley survived the war, dying at age 78 in 1920.

Post-war image of Smiley courtesy of Find a Grave.

Don't forget that you can support Central Virginia Battlefields Trust's mission of battlefield preservation through your...
10/25/2023

Don't forget that you can support Central Virginia Battlefields Trust's mission of battlefield preservation through your IRA. For more information, visit the CVBT website:
https://www.cvbt.org/iragiving

Although not always sent, Civil War condolence letters written to the families of fallen comrades often provided a measu...
10/24/2023

Although not always sent, Civil War condolence letters written to the families of fallen comrades often provided a measure of comfort and closure during their time of loss.

On January 10, 1863, Lt. John Foley, 88th New York Infantry (Irish Brigade), wrote in reply to Joseph Cahill about the death of 22-year-old Pvt. Thomas Healey, who was killed at Fredericksburg. Foley called Healey “A brave and fearless soldier,” and “a sterling and honest man.” Explaining that Healey’s death was “deeply regretted by his few surviving comrades,” Foley added that Healey’s passing was lamented “by none more so than by” Foley himself. As a postscript, he added, “The poor fellow was heroism on the battle field.”

During the Second Battle of Fredericksburg, Lt. Elisha Hunt Rhodes (2nd Rhode Island Inf.) witnessed a couple of amazing...
10/23/2023

During the Second Battle of Fredericksburg, Lt. Elisha Hunt Rhodes (2nd Rhode Island Inf.) witnessed a couple of amazing artillery shots. The Confederates struck first. Posted on the high ground west of Fredericksburg, they fired a shot at the 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery’s Battery G, which was in the process of relocating. “As they were crossing a small bridge over a stream, a [Confederate] shot hit one of the caissons and knocked it off the bridge,” Rhodes wrote.

Not long after though, turnabout proved fair play. As the Federal infantry rushed the Confederate position, “Battery ‘B’ fired over the heads of our men, Rhodes noted. As the defenders limbered “up their guns and leave with horses on the run,” Capt. Thomas Frederick Brown of Battery B “sighted a cannon at a Rebel gun, just leaving the redoubt and hit the ammunition chest on the limber taking the men off as if with a stroke of lightning.”


Image of Capt. Brown courtesy of Find a Grave

CVBT released its October 2023 e-newsletter yesterday. If you missed it, it is available on the CVBT website at: https:/...
10/20/2023

CVBT released its October 2023 e-newsletter yesterday. If you missed it, it is available on the CVBT website at: https://bit.ly/3s2EPnW

If you don’t want to miss future CVBT email newsletters, you can sign up for them at: https://bit.ly/3IElLAr
Photo credit: Jennifer Michael

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