Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC

Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC The Hamilton Conservation Corps are City of Hamilton Volunteers working on wildlife preserves for the City of Hamilton with the Hamilton Parks Conservancy

Southeastern Avian Research
05/09/2020

Southeastern Avian Research

Please don't spray...

While you are out on your nature treks here are some fun things to do.....
05/04/2020

While you are out on your nature treks here are some fun things to do.....

Have you accepted our challenge yet? You can do it! It’s easier than you think. Get outside!!

Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC's cover photo
04/30/2020

Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC's cover photo

Love a bat today!!
04/30/2020
Bats save corn farmers $1 billion per year

Love a bat today!!

Despite their public image as spooky pests, bats provide vital pest control for humanity's food supply. A new study suggests they're worth $1 billion a year to corn farmers alone.

Almost all insects are important in some way. Here is some great information about the beloved firefly, or as we call th...
04/30/2020

Almost all insects are important in some way. Here is some great information about the beloved firefly, or as we call them here in south western Ohio, lightning bugs!!

We're proud to introduce our newest publication, the brochure Firefly Conservation: A Guide to Protecting the Jewels of the Night. The heart of this piece is the beautiful artwork by our partner Ink Dwell!

By carefully considering the needs of fireflies and how our actions could affect these beloved animals, we can take steps to ensure that their lights continue to shine for future generations.

Check it out: xerces.org/publications/brochures/firefly-conservation

04/26/2020
Your Wild Ohio Educator

What a great week!! Earth Day and Arbor Day in one week. It's important to keep the momentum going. Please keep supporting the environment!!

Learn how to continue your conservation efforts long after Earth Day as Meredith Gilbert gives us some suggestions on ways to make a difference in your area.

04/23/2020
The nature of hope | Thane Maynard | TEDxCincinnati

If you ever wondered if Conservation worked or how it works, please watch this great TEDx talk by our own Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard!!!

https://youtu.be/WfAaNZUguMU

Thane Maynard director of zoo talks about calendars the effort to save endangered animals from bunk of extinction and explores how that's possible cbc or and...

Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC's cover photo
04/22/2020

Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC's cover photo

Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC's cover photo
04/22/2020

Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC's cover photo

Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC's cover photo
04/22/2020

Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC's cover photo

04/22/2020
04/22/2020
One of the more obscure native plants of Ohio....
04/17/2020

One of the more obscure native plants of Ohio....

Perhaps the most unique of summer’s wildflowers is the ghost pipe (Monotropa uniflora). Many will instantly recognize its fleshy all-white appearance that appears throughout Ohio’s woods come June. They appear and mature to their full flowering forms within days, especially after wet weather following an extended period of dry conditions. Often occurring in tight clusters, each plant is a single stem with reduced, scale-like leaves and a solo terminal flower that droops. Once pollinated the flower begins to straighten to an erect state with its maturing capsule on top.

The first thing you notice about ghost pipes is their color. They’re entirely white or occasionally flushed with pink. No green means no chlorophyll and thus no ability to photosynthesize. Due to their lack of need for sunlight it’s not uncommon to find this species in the darkest forest understories where little other vegetation can grow. Ghost pipes occur throughout the state in a variety of mixed deciduous forest.

Since ghost pipes don’t photosynthesize, they need to get their nourishment by other means. This is solved by being a type of parasite called a myco-heterotroph. This means ghost pipes aren’t a direct parasite but instead use mycorrhizae fungi in the soil to steal nutrients and carbohydrates from nearby tree roots. A number of other Ohio plants utilize this method for nutrient allocation including our coralroot orchids from the genus Corallorhiza and Hexalectris.

Worth mentioning are a couple other closely related species to ghost pipe we have in Ohio. Commonly called pinesaps they are smaller plants with numerous flowers per stem instead of one and can be yellow, tan, or reddish-yellow but once again not green. The taxonomy of these fellow myco-heterotrophs is currently in flux but as of now it’s easiest to say Ohio has two species of pinesap. One is an early blooming (June and July) tan-light yellow colored species called Hypopitys monotropa; the other a later blooming (August and September) red-yellow species called Hypopitys lanuginosa. They grow in a variety of woodland habitats but usually in acidic situations associated with pines.

Check back Monday for another wildflower species profile! We’ll be covering more spring bloomers and even some summer and fall wildflowers throughout April as we continue to celebrate Ohio’s Native Plant Month!

Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative
04/10/2020

Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative

Pollinator Flower Plug Plot waking up in Western Ohio Farm. Photos taken April 4, 2020.
Note the White Dutch Clover in the middle photo.

Another installment to our Ohio Native Plant Month series.....   We hope you enjoy.
04/08/2020

Another installment to our Ohio Native Plant Month series..... We hope you enjoy.

Trilliums! Few wildflowers get as much love and attention as these and it’s really no surprise. They have that quintessential spring wildflower look and are cherished discoveries while out in the woods.

Here in Ohio, we have eight different species of trillium native to the state. Some are so common they occur in almost every county like the large-flowered trillium (T. grandiflorum), Ohio’s official state wildflower. Others are state-listed rarities such as the endangered painted trillium (T. undulatum). One species, the nodding trillium (T. cernuum) is presumed extirpated and hasn’t been seen in Ohio since 1879.

Trilliums come in many different flavors here in Ohio. All occur in woodlands although the specifics can vary widely. Some prefer more dry, upland and calcareous situations, while others like it wetter and more acidic. They bloom from late February on into May depending where you are in the state. It’s not uncommon to find several species all growing together in areas with the most impressive wildflower displays. In special situations one can find entire hillsides ensconced in dense displays of trillium, especially that of the large-flowered trillium species. Unfortunately, deer love trillium as much as humans albeit for more nefarious reasons. They can be quick to eat large populations into oblivion. However, there’s still many places to see nice colonies of trillium of species.

Some suggested spots throughout Ohio to see impressive displays of trillium of different species include the following: State nature preserves: Whipple, Davey Woods, Johnson Woods, Miller, Eagle Creek, Collier and Clifton Gorge. State parks: Alum Creek, Mt. Gilead, and Lake Hope. State forests: Shawnee, Zaleski, and Mohican.

Featured in this post are photos of each of Ohio’s eight species of trillium. Be sure to take a look at each photo for more specific information on each individual species such as their habitats and some identification characters. How many of Ohio’s species have you seen? It won’t be long before they are peaking throughout the state!

Check back tomorrow for another wildflower species profile! We’ll be covering more spring bloomers and even some summer and fall wildflowers throughout April as we continue to celebrate Ohio’s Native Plant Month!

Great info on more native plants!!
04/05/2020

Great info on more native plants!!

Flowering Winter Annual Plants support Ohio Native Bees and Honey Bees as they start creating their
Populations for the summer of 2020.
LEFT PHOTO: Mustard Grasses with honey bee.
TOP RIGHT: Dead Nettle with a native bee. Which one?
BOTTOM RIGHT: Chickweed and Dandelion with a native bee. Which one?
Photos were taken at WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORC BASE.
Winter Annual Plants are extremely critical for the health of the bees in our neighborhoods,
Including our farms.
When possible take walks/hikes in areas where you will see how Pollinators and plants
Work together to enable each to perpetuate their own species. How humans benefit from
Their mutualistic relationships.

Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC's cover photo
04/03/2020

Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC's cover photo

WooHoo!!! We've been waiting for this since sometime in January when we got the e-mail from the state announcing it. Be ...
04/02/2020

WooHoo!!! We've been waiting for this since sometime in January when we got the e-mail from the state announcing it. Be prepared to be bombarded with facts about native plants this month!! 🌸🌼💐💠💮

It's finally April! And April is the official Ohio Native Plant Month! This month we are going to focus on all the wonderful native pollinator plants, from oak trees to trumpet honeysuckle. What native plant is your favorite?

The nature trails at the Riverside Natural Area and Combs Park continue to be open during your stay at home order.  Plea...
03/27/2020

The nature trails at the Riverside Natural Area and Combs Park continue to be open during your stay at home order. Please remember to maintain the proper social distancing of at least 6 feet. This is not only to insure your safety from contamination but for your family's as well. You don't want to take anything home with you that you didn't bring. Sooooo..... Continue to use the Leave No Trace principles of leave only foot prints and take only pictures!! Happy hiking!!

For those of you who are eradicating  honeysuckle on your property or in your yards here is a great substitute!!  It is ...
03/19/2020

For those of you who are eradicating honeysuckle on your property or in your yards here is a great substitute!! It is native, supports wildlife and is the host plant for the spicebush swallowtail.

If you want to plant for pollinators but you have problems with deer eating your plants, or you don't have a lot of full-sun space, then spicebush could be a good option for you. This spring-blooming native shrub is fairly deer resistant, and doesn't need direct sun to thrive. As a bonus, spicebush is the host plant for the beautiful Spicebush Swallowtail butterfly!

While you are staying home it's a good time to build your birding skills!!  Have fun and remember to get some outside ti...
03/16/2020
Building Skills: The 4 Keys to Bird Identification

While you are staying home it's a good time to build your birding skills!! Have fun and remember to get some outside time!

With more than 800 species of birds in the U.S. and Canada, it’s easy for a beginning bird watcher to feel overwhelmed by possibilities. Field guides seem crammed with similar-looking birds arranged in seemingly haphazard order. We can help you figure out where to begin. First off: where not to s

03/14/2020
Your Wild Ohio - Explorer

Your Wild Ohio - Explorer

It's World Turtle Day! This day is set aside to help people celebrate and protect turtles and tortoises and their disappearing habitats around the world: https://www.worldturtleday.org/

In Ohio, we can’t stress enough that it’s peak nesting season for Ohio’s 11 turtle species, and you may encounter more turtles during this period. While it is okay to assist a turtle crossing a road, your own safety when doing this is a priority. Be sure to move the turtle in the direction it is travelling, otherwise it may turn back around and cross the road again.

It is also extremely important to remember that wild turtles are not pets! Wild turtles brought into captivity are at increased risk of being exposed to diseases and captivity might disrupt their natural cycles. If you release a captive wild turtle, be sure to release it in the same area it was taken from. Box Turtles are especially accustomed to a specific home range, and moving these turtles to habitat you think might be more suitable could result in population loss.

Get to know some of Ohio's turtles by downloading our Reptiles of Ohio Field Guide: http://ow.ly/TD1u30bYJhn

03/14/2020

While you are sitting at home being socially distant in this cold weather it's a good time to start planting your seeds, at least it will be pretty soon. Statistically we have our last frost in this area between May 11 and May 20th. If you need to plant your seeds 4-6 weeks before the last frost then you should plant them between March 30th and April 13th. You should still be careful about uncovering your tender perennials that are starting to peek thru no matter how tempted you are. Have a great weekend and happy spring dreaming!!

After a busy week of prescribed burns at the Riverside Natural Area we were able to burn approximately 33 acres. Attache...
02/25/2020
A Hamilton couple lit a prairie on fire to help wildflowers thrive

After a busy week of prescribed burns at the Riverside Natural Area we were able to burn approximately 33 acres. Attached is an article that explains the purpose of the burns.

Under clear blue skies last week, Kathy and Troy Schwable were setting a prairie on fire in the Rive...

Ornithologists, Birdwatchers Uncover Staggering Magnitude of Bird Population Decline
02/24/2020
Ornithologists, Birdwatchers Uncover Staggering Magnitude of Bird Population Decline

Ornithologists, Birdwatchers Uncover Staggering Magnitude of Bird Population Decline

Correction appended. Cornell Lab of Ornithology conservation scientist Dr. Ken Rosenberg led an international team of 12 scientists in an analysis of decades of data on bird population — and the conclusion is disturbing. In the last 50 years, one in four birds in North America has disappeared.

There are so many other things we could have been doing today.... 😞
02/22/2020

There are so many other things we could have been doing today.... 😞

Please remember that the Riverside Natural Area is taken care of entirely by volunteers. We removed a 33 gallon kitchen bag full of garbage today from the fishing area at the observation deck. That doesn't include the garbage we picked up on the trails. Please help us keep this area clean!! 😞

02/20/2020

We will be continuing our prairie burns this week. Please excuse our ash as we prepare our fields for another beautiful summer of bloom for all to enjoy! Our field 1 should be even more colorful than last year.

Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC's cover photo
02/20/2020

Hamilton Conservation Corps., LLC's cover photo

02/17/2020

Another fun day at the office....

Please think before you use chemicals for anything but especially a known poison.  This is a secondary exposure of roden...
01/24/2020

Please think before you use chemicals for anything but especially a known poison. This is a secondary exposure of rodent poison. Many birds of prey die every year due to this.

Another victim of secondary poisoning. Rodenticide kills more than it targets. This first year red shouldered hawk didn’t have a chance because whomever used rat/mouse poison did not look passed the rodent. For more information please visit www.raptorsarethesolution.org #rodenticide #raptorsarethesolution

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/health/how-immersing-yourself-in-nature-benefits-your-health?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium...
01/20/2020
How immersing yourself in nature benefits your health

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/health/how-immersing-yourself-in-nature-benefits-your-health?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=pbsofficial&utm_campaign=newshour&utm_content=1579446027&fbclid=IwAR19QVcBCWsP9o67bEgkrCRiwcdLbXHhOM1Mh_z8UvETHekxjrM0jAaQzyA

A growing body of research points to the beneficial effects that exposure to the natural world has on health, reducing stress and promoting healing. Now, policymakers, employers, and healthcare providers are increasingly considering the human need for nature in how they plan and operate.

Address

101 Joe Nuxhall Way
Hamilton, OH
45015

Opening Hours

Monday 06:00 - 21:00
Tuesday 06:00 - 21:00
Wednesday 06:00 - 21:00
Thursday 06:00 - 21:00
Friday 06:00 - 21:00
Saturday 06:00 - 21:00
Sunday 06:00 - 21:00

Telephone

(513) 887-2757

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One of our fantastic volunteers, Alicia Pater has organized a cleanup for Cliffveiw Park, Everyone get out there and give her a hand.