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Tualatin Soil and Water Conservation District

Tualatin Soil and Water Conservation District Conservation is for everyone! We help Washington County residents care for the land and water. Providing local solutions to local problems. www.tualatinswcd.org

Operating as usual

Come visit us at PlanetCon today at PCC Rock Creek!♻️ Recycle those hard to recycle plastics and hazardous materials.🛠 F...
01/14/2023

Come visit us at PlanetCon today at PCC Rock Creek!
♻️ Recycle those hard to recycle plastics and hazardous materials.
🛠 Fix your household items at the repair fair.
🎁 Visit our table for some freebies 😁

Only a few weeks until on January 14th at Portland Community College Rock Creek!

View the attached checklist to step you through preparing your items you will be bringing! The full details are on the web page: https://www.planetcon.org/

Wednesdays are for wildflowers 🌸These cold January days have us dreaming of our favorite summer blooms. What native wild...
01/11/2023

Wednesdays are for wildflowers 🌸

These cold January days have us dreaming of our favorite summer blooms. What native wildflower are you looking forward to seeing this summer?

Photo 1: Douglas spirea (Spiraea douglasii)
Photo 2: Meadow checkermallow (Sidalcea campestris)
Photo 3: Common camas (Camassia quamash)
Photo 4: Oregon iris (Iris tenax)
Photo 5: Western yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

Tualatin Soil and Water Conservation District is sponsoring a free pesticide collection event on February 4th! Take adva...
01/10/2023

Tualatin Soil and Water Conservation District is sponsoring a free pesticide collection event on February 4th! Take advantage of this opportunity to safely and anonymously dispose of old and unwanted pesticides.

Pre-registration is required by January 23rd, 2023. Space is limited so register early to secure your spot!

This event is intended for people living and/or working in Washington County, Oregon. If you are from outside Washington County, our ability to accept your waste will be dependent on availability and budget. Please contact Tualatin SWCD for prior approval to participate: (503) 277-3709.

Visit our website for event details and registration information: https://tualatinswcd.org/event/pesticide-collection-event-2023/

*W**D ALERT!* Italian arum (arum italicum) is a showstopper in the winter. It’s marbled, arrow-shaped leaves rise above ...
01/06/2023

*W**D ALERT!* Italian arum (arum italicum) is a showstopper in the winter. It’s marbled, arrow-shaped leaves rise above the leaf litter and give a splash of color on a dreary day. But some of the most beautiful plants are most harmful to our ecosystems.

It is an unusual plant in that its leaves emerge in the winter and last through early summer. Once its foliage dies back a vibrant column of orange-red berries appear. Unfortunately, not all is ideal when it comes to Italian arum. All parts of this plant are toxic, and it should be kept away from kids and pets who may accidentally eat its berries. It is also extremely difficult to control because of its ability to spread by seeds and root fragments.

👉 Head over to our W**d & Pest Directory to learn more about this month’s W**d of the Month: https://tualatinswcd.org/species/italian-arum/

After a weeks of festivities, taking down the Christmas tree can be a bit of a bummer. One way to feel better about wrap...
01/02/2023

After a weeks of festivities, taking down the Christmas tree can be a bit of a bummer. One way to feel better about wrapping up the holiday season is by putting our trees to good use. When broken down in a landfill or when burned, these trees become climate-warming gasses. There are many alternative ways to be rid of these trees that don't contribute to climate change and actually enhance our environment.

Follow the link below to learn about upcoming Christmas tree collection events, recycling organizations, and DIY solutions.

https://tualatinswcd.org/how-to-recycle-your-christmas-tree/

Many mammals survive the winter by some type of hibernation, but this mule deer looks awfully awake to us! Although deer...
12/28/2022

Many mammals survive the winter by some type of hibernation, but this mule deer looks awfully awake to us! Although deer can hunker down for days at a time to avoid harsh weather, they tend to remain active throughout winter.

They can do this by swapping out their summer coat for thicker, longer, darker fur that repels water, absorbs sunlight, and maintains heat. They will also relocate to lower elevation areas or places with dense stands of conifers that provide more shelter from the elements. And because these tall animals are general browsers, they're content eating woody stems, leaves, and mushrooms when herbaceous plants aren't accessible. This avoids the need to spend autumn stocking up their pantries, although they do eat more during the fall to get fat and happy - sort of like we do during the holidays!

Photo by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

The forecast calls for even more rain this week. Oof! Rain is a powerful force in our Tualatin river watershed. It carve...
12/28/2022

The forecast calls for even more rain this week. Oof!

Rain is a powerful force in our Tualatin river watershed. It carves away soil causing erosion along streambanks and can flood our roads and buildings. The trick is that flooding is natural: it's all about location, location, location.

Tualatin SWCD prioritizes investments throughout the watershed so that in days like these more and more of our streams have healthy opportunities to flood (what we call "floodplain reconnection") in natural areas that reduce downstream flooding of roads and buildings.

Pictured here is the Tualatin river in the spring of 2022 spilling over its banks and finding a natural outlet to release energy and water to a location planted just for these conditions. We manage over 980 acres of streamside projects in spots like these, in cooperation with private landowners throughout the county each year.

Want to find out more about what we do for streamsides throughout Washington County? Visit https://tualatinswcd.org/programs/habitat-conservation/streamside-planting-programs/

Brrrrr!!! We hope everyone is staying warm out there! Learn about how our winged friends make it through the coldest of ...
12/22/2022

Brrrrr!!! We hope everyone is staying warm out there! Learn about how our winged friends make it through the coldest of days.

⚠️ Washington county! We are in a temporary quarantine of ash, olive, and white fringe tree materials. Slow the spread o...
12/22/2022

⚠️ Washington county! We are in a temporary quarantine of ash, olive, and white fringe tree materials. Slow the spread of the Emerald Ash Borer and don’t move these materials outside of the county.

Happy winter solstice everyone! Let's explore a few of the plants that provide a precious splash of color and wildlife f...
12/21/2022

Happy winter solstice everyone! Let's explore a few of the plants that provide a precious splash of color and wildlife food during these darkest days of the year.

1. Snowberry is known for its bold white snowy berries and are enjoyed by many birds (Photo by Jim Choate).
2. Blue elderberry can have a distinct frosty blue berry, medicinal and great for wildlife (Photo by Tualatin SWCD).
3. Rosehips of wild roses showing off a range of colors here at a wetland and are a meaty treat for humans, birds, and many other mammals (Photo by Tualatin SWCD).

Our staff has been joining local students while they hunt for macroinvertebrates! Did you know that our local waterways ...
12/14/2022

Our staff has been joining local students while they hunt for macroinvertebrates! Did you know that our local waterways are filled with macroinvertebrates? Indeed they are! 🔍💦

Macros come in all shapes and sizes and are a great tool to tell whether water is healthy or not. Different species have different tolerant levels for pollution:

1) Sensitive or Intolerant Species: Organisms easily killed, impaired, or driven off by bad water quality; includes many types of stonefly, dobsonfly, and mayfly nymphs and caddisfly larvae.

2) Somewhat Tolerant Species: Organisms with the ability to live under varying conditions may be found in good or poor quality water; includes amphipods, scuds, beetle and cranefly larvae, crayfish, and dragonfly nymphs.

3) Tolerant Species: Organisms capable of withstanding poor water quality; includes most leeches, aquatic worms, midge larvae, and sow bugs.

Can you spot any macros in the 2nd and 3rd pictures? Hint: there may be a damselfly larva, which is somewhat tolerant to pollution.

Have you ever wondered where all Oregon’s rain goes? 🌧When it rains, water flows across our sidewalks, streets, and lawn...
12/13/2022

Have you ever wondered where all Oregon’s rain goes? 🌧

When it rains, water flows across our sidewalks, streets, and lawns to the nearest storm drain. These drains are connected through a series of underground pipes that carry it directly to our wetlands, rivers, and creeks. Along its journey, the rainwater picks up harmful pollutants like trash, pet waste, pesticides, and fertilizers and carries them with it. This pollution ends up in the nearest waterway and contaminates our drinking water, our swimming holes, and wildlife habitat.

Just remember where rainwater flows, everything goes!

💧 Head over to the Watershed Navigator to learn more 💧
https://watershednavigator.org/understand-rain-storms/rain-and-storm-drains

That's right, our tool loan program has expanded once again! We have shovels and plant bags available for free rental to...
12/12/2022

That's right, our tool loan program has expanded once again! We have shovels and plant bags available for free rental to Washington County residents to assist with planting projects.

🌲 Follow the link for more information 🌲
https://tualatinswcd.org/tool-loan-program/-tools

Winter can be a difficult time for everybody. Cold days and long nights make you want to curl into a chrysalis sometimes...
12/07/2022

Winter can be a difficult time for everybody. Cold days and long nights make you want to curl into a chrysalis sometimes. 🐛

Butterflies, like this swallowtail, survive winter by forming a cozy case called a chrysalis. When the temperatures rise, and the days get brighter they will reemerge as fully formed butterflies. Here’s a few tips on how you can help butterflies and other pollinators survive the winter:

🐝 Provide winter cover. Winter cover offers food and shelter for pollinators. Just remember to leave the leaves!
🦋 Plan your pollinator landscape. Winter is a great time to start planning your garden for next year!
🐦 Put out bird feeders in late fall, winter, and early spring to provide resident and migrating birds food during a time when resources are scarce.

📸 Megan McCarty, Wikimedia Commons

It's ! To celebrate, let's talk about Soil and Water Conservation Districts and how we protect our soil ecosystems here ...
12/05/2022

It's ! To celebrate, let's talk about Soil and Water Conservation Districts and how we protect our soil ecosystems here in Oregon.

Why do we have Soil and Water Conservation Districts?
In response to the Dust Bowl disaster of the 1930s, the federal government established the Soil Conservation Service (now known as the Natural Resources Conservation Service) to help landowners preserve the health of soil and other natural resources. In 1955, Tualatin SWCD was founded to focus on soil and water conservation on agricultural lands within Washington County. Today, there are conservation districts that exist in almost every US county.

Why is soil conservation important?
Each scoop of soil contains millions of microbes that keep the tiny ecosystem functioning, which is essential for growing food and creating living landscapes. Non-healthy soil has a lack of biodiversity in plants and animals, which increases erosion, flooding, and pollution. In just five years, between 2012 and 2017, Washington County experienced a nearly 30% decrease in total agricultural land area. Once farmland is developed, it will likely never return to farming or open space.

What soil types do we have in Oregon?
Sand, silt, and clay are the three particles that make up soil and give it texture. Washington County, Oregon has mostly clay particles. In Oregon, Jory is the official state soil that can be recognized by its red color and seen on the foothills of the east and west sides of the Willamette Valley. Read more about Jory soil here: https://bit.ly/OregonStateSoil.

How can you promote healthy soil?
1) Keep soil covered.
2) Reduce soil disturbance.
3) Increase plant diversity and keep roots alive in the soil year-round.
4) Test your soil regularly.
Click here to learn about our FREE Soil Testing Program: https://bit.ly/soiltestingprogram

It's ivy pulling season! 💪Ivy (Hedera species) are evergreen climbing vines. They grow in thick mats, blocking sunlight ...
12/02/2022

It's ivy pulling season! 💪

Ivy (Hedera species) are evergreen climbing vines. They grow in thick mats, blocking sunlight and preventing other plants from getting established. This creates what is known as an “ivy desert,” where ivy is the only plant that is able to grow.

Luckily, winter is a great time of year to get ivy under control! Plants are easier to pull from the ground when soil is damp from rain. While removing ivy can be hard work, it can be fulfilling on a cold winter’s day!

Learn more about this month’s W**d of the Month: https://tualatinswcd.org/species/ivy/

Just trying to get all these ducks in a row...Wood ducks are common year-round in our region. They nest in tree cavities...
12/01/2022

Just trying to get all these ducks in a row...

Wood ducks are common year-round in our region. They nest in tree cavities near lakes, ponds, and streams. A century ago, wood ducks were threatened with extinction from over-hunting and habitat loss. Fortunately, their numbers have rebounded, partly due to communities and individuals installing nesting boxes in parks and on private properties.

📷: J. Comery

Every winter, the Pacific Northwest earns its tongue-in-cheek nickname, the Pacific North-wet. 🌧️From October to April, ...
11/29/2022

Every winter, the Pacific Northwest earns its tongue-in-cheek nickname, the Pacific North-wet. 🌧️

From October to April, we have more water than we know what to do with so most of us let it wash down the drain, literally! Come summer when our skies clear and the rain stops, we buy it back to water our thirsty gardens. How silly is that? By collecting and storing rainwater, we can use it to water gardens, wash cars, and even flush toilets!

Read how we worked with one resident in Aloha to install a cistern on his property to harvest rainwater: https://tualatinswcd.org/projects/saving-it-for-later-rainwater-harvesting/

Oo la la can it be true? We've got grant funding waiting for you! Not sure how to put a conservation education grant to ...
11/28/2022

Oo la la can it be true? We've got grant funding waiting for you!

Not sure how to put a conservation education grant to use? You've got till February 15 to come up with an idea. Need some inspiration? Follow the link for examples of projects we've funded in the past. Go on, get to it!

https://bit.ly/3tQxipE

Ah genus Neogale (previously Mustela) - the corgis of the wild. With long furry bodies attached to four wittle wegs we t...
11/23/2022

Ah genus Neogale (previously Mustela) - the corgis of the wild. With long furry bodies attached to four wittle wegs we think they're QT pies! But don't be fooled, these blood thirsty darlings are exceptionally ferocious predators. Those itty bitty teefs are used to crush the skulls of their enemies and all who dare to oppose them. Both minks and weasels are sneaky little buggers, but minks are larger, darker, water-patrollers while weasels impose chaos upon meadow and woodland communities.

1 (Jacob McGinnis) Just a little weasel guy doing weasel guy things
2 (Nicole Beaulac) Mr.Mink post splishy splash

Did you miss the Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom Virtual Field Trip last week? No worries! You can re-watch the fiel...
11/22/2022

Did you miss the Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom Virtual Field Trip last week? No worries! You can re-watch the field trip about Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and vegetable production at Stoneboat Farm here: https://bit.ly/StoneboatFarm 🥦🫑🌽🥕

📸 Credit: Stoneboat Farm

We achieve so much more when we work together! With support from a Tualatin SWCD grant, our friends at Tualatin Riverkee...
11/21/2022

We achieve so much more when we work together! With support from a Tualatin SWCD grant, our friends at Tualatin Riverkeepers forged new partnerships helping them scale-up their stewardship efforts.

They hosted over a dozen habitat improvement projects where volunteers planted thousands of native plants, removed invasive weeds, and completed trail maintenance. They also grew their Pint-Sized Science program, bringing several environmental education talks to local breweries.

Big thanks to the Tualatin Riverkeepers and all of our grantees who use our grant programs to create a healthier, more resilient Washington County.

There's more funding waiting to be put to use! Visit our website to read about the different grants we offer and to find inspiration for your next conservation project.

Just a reminder 👀 Standing dead trees are hugely important for nesting, resting and food for some of our rarest birds. W...
11/16/2022

Just a reminder 👀 Standing dead trees are hugely important for nesting, resting and food for some of our rarest birds. We spotted this marvelous snag on a property outside of North Plains. You can see by all the holes that someone has gone to work finding grubs and insects under the tree bark. You have to wonder how many birds benefit from this one tree that was left in place!

Some fun facts about lichen!
11/16/2022

Some fun facts about lichen!

Hey Washington County neighbors! Another chance to snag conservation funding is here. Applications for this round of TWI...
11/14/2022

Hey Washington County neighbors! Another chance to snag conservation funding is here. Applications for this round of TWIG awards are due January 15. Mosey over to our website for program details and application instructions.

https://tualatinswcd.org/programs/grants-funding/twig/

Join us next Tuesday, November 15th from 10-10:30 for a virtual field trip at Stoneboat Farm! Read below to sign up🍅🌽🥕
11/10/2022

Join us next Tuesday, November 15th from 10-10:30 for a virtual field trip at Stoneboat Farm! Read below to sign up🍅🌽🥕

Only ONE week until our next Virtual Field Trip!

We invite students to join us virtually to learn about Community Support Agriculture and vegetable production at Stoneboat Farm in Hillsboro, Oregon!

Follow this link to apply for a spot:

https://oregonaitc.org/programs/virtual-farm-field-trips/stoneboat-farm-november/

Did you know that everyone lives in a watershed?💦 If you live, work, and play in Washington County, you are part of the ...
11/09/2022

Did you know that everyone lives in a watershed?💦 If you live, work, and play in Washington County, you are part of the Tualatin River watershed! We share this watershed with an amazing array of wildlife species, including some reel-y cool fish. Fish require cool, clean water, so their presence (or absence) can tell us a lot about water quality and habitat conditions. 🌿

🐟Learn more about these fin-tastic fish in our new blog post: https://tualatinswcd.org/fin-tastic-fish-in-the-tualatin-river-watershed/

🖌Illustration Credit: Nora Sherwood

The landscapes all around us were shaped by history - both recent and ancient. University of Oregon student and talented...
11/08/2022
Natural History of Willamette Valley Wetland Prairies

The landscapes all around us were shaped by history - both recent and ancient. University of Oregon student and talented illustrator Emily-Bell tells the story of Willamette Valley wetland prairies through vibrant illustrations. Follow the link to take a visual journey through time to learn how these rare ecosystems came to be.

14,000 years ago, episodic geological, climatological, and hydrological events shaped the Pacific Northwest, carving rock, shifting soils, and laying the foundation for plant life defining the regi…

Oregon ash may not be the prettiest tree in the forest, but its contributions to water quality, soil health, and wildlif...
11/07/2022
When Oregon Ash Goes Missing: What the Arrival of EAB Means for the Tualatin River Watershed - Tualatin Soil and Water Conservation District

Oregon ash may not be the prettiest tree in the forest, but its contributions to water quality, soil health, and wildlife habitat are immense. Our latest blog post explores how the loss of this under-loved species will affect the Tualatin River watershed and how restoration ecologists are bracing for more changes to come.

🌿 https://bit.ly/3Tc5CpG 🌿

Oregon ash may not be the prettiest tree in the forest but its contributions to water quality, soil health, and wildlife habitat are immense

Announcing our first ever Oregon white oak seedling giveaway! 🎉🌳 Help us protect this unique and imperiled ecosystem by ...
11/04/2022

Announcing our first ever Oregon white oak seedling giveaway! 🎉🌳 Help us protect this unique and imperiled ecosystem by planting an oak tree. Reserve your Oregon white oak tree seedling today! Pick-up will take place on November 17th at Fernhill Wetlands. Visit our website to sign-up for yours! https://tualatinswcd.org/event/oak2022/

Chances are you’ve seen common broom (Cytisus scorparius) - its bright yellow flowers stand out along roads and highways...
11/03/2022

Chances are you’ve seen common broom (Cytisus scorparius) - its bright yellow flowers stand out along roads and highways. While its flowers bring a splash of color to the landscape, it can quickly take over large swaths of land outcompeting native conifer seedlings, like Douglas fir, and displacing essential native grasses and wildflowers. It also has the tendency to into dense, dry thickets which create a wildfire hazard.

👉 Head over to our W**d & Pest Directory to learn more about common broom and other broom species: https://tualatinswcd.org/species/common-broom/

When you hear the word “pollinator,” do you think of a bee or a butterfly? Many people do! But the truth is that pollina...
11/02/2022

When you hear the word “pollinator,” do you think of a bee or a butterfly? Many people do! But the truth is that pollinators are a much larger group of animals and insects including beetles, birds, and bats. 🦇🐞🐦

Our friends over at the Backyard Habitat Certification Program put together a great video that highlights why pollinators are so important! https://youtu.be/TcY4czVaqHI

📸: Beetle on lupine | Courtney Celley, USFWS

Address

7175 NE Evergreen Pkwy #400
Hillsboro, OR
97124

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Monday 8am - 4:30pm
Tuesday 8am - 4:30pm
Wednesday 8am - 4:30pm
Thursday 8am - 4:30pm
Friday 8am - 4:30pm

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+15033342288

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Where is the facebook live video for Bee's now
•Gardenfest Plant Sale: Saturday April 27, 8 am - 2 pm. Join Washington County Master Gardeners for a fun-filled day shopping from a selection of 1000’s of plants expertly selected for the PNW, generating inspiring ideas from our new Education Garden, asking questions of our experts, or taking classes. Offering perennials, shrubs, vegetables, herbs and more for flower-filled gardens and bountiful harvests. Children’s activities, plant combination ideas, & gardener gifts too. Our Master Gardeners are delighted to welcome you, inspire you, and help you succeed in your garden by providing practical knowledge on plants, garden care, and diagnosing problems. At PCC Rock Creek Campus - 17705 NW Springville Road, Portland. washingtoncountymastergardeners.org The TSWCD will be providing information about invasive plants and a short class that is free to everyone.
There are 2 people on the ballot for the Director position Zone 4. Only one of them is listed in the voter's pamphlet. Where is the information about Loren Behrman? Why isn't it in the voter's pamphlet?
The final installment of the Tualatin River Watershed Series is this Wed., March 28 (class) and March 31 (field trip). This one focuses on agriculture in the watershed. I've met with local farmers John McDonald and Dave Vanasche. Dave has arranged for the field trip to visit a hazelnut orchard, grass seed farm, berry farm and flower farm. John provided great info and both may join us Wednesday evening. This is a great opportunity to learn more about the 35% of land base in the county that is devoted to agriculture - some 200 different crops.
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