Harris County Flood Control District

Harris County Flood Control District A special purpose district created by the Texas Legislature in 1937 in response to devastating floods that struck the region in 1929 and 1935.
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The Harris County Flood Control District (the District) is a special purpose district created by the Texas Legislature in 1937 in response to devastating floods that struck the region in 1929 and 1935. The District's jurisdictional boundaries are set to coincide with Harris County, a community of more than 3.7 million people that includes the City of Houston. The other boundaries in which we operate - those provided by nature - are of the 22 primary watersheds within Harris County's 1,756 square miles. Each has its own independent flooding problems. Each presents unique challenges.

Mission: Since its creation, the Harris County Flood Control District's role has become increasingly complex. Whereas, its original role was to serve as the local partner for major projects with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, many other facets of reducing flood risks in Harris County have come into play. Accordingly, the mission of the Harris County Flood Control District is to: Provide flood damage reduction projects that work, with appropriate regard for community and natural values. The District accomplishes its mission by: Devising flood damage reduction plans; Implementing the plans; and Maintaining the infrastructure.

Operating as usual

MAAPnext
11/20/2020

MAAPnext

Cities, suburbs, and rural areas can be susceptible to two types of flooding – Riverine and Community. Learn more about each at http://www.maapnext.org/

Work continues on channel improvements on Berry bayou, a tributary of Sims Bayou.  This project phase is scheduled to fi...
11/20/2020

Work continues on channel improvements on Berry bayou, a tributary of Sims Bayou. This project phase is scheduled to finish by the end of the year and will remove the 1-percent (100-year) floodplain from hundreds of homes and businesses in the area. For more information:
https://bit.ly/36UdIgb Harris County Precinct 2

In an effort to keep you informed about the Harris County Flood Control District’s continuing maintenance in the Cypress...
11/19/2020

In an effort to keep you informed about the Harris County Flood Control District’s continuing maintenance in the Cypress Creek watershed, we want to notify you about an upcoming repair project. In Winter 2020, the Flood Control District will restart construction in your area on various drainage issues along K145-00-00, a tributary in the Cypress Creek watershed commonly known as Dry Creek. The proposed repairs are necessary to help stabilize the channel and prevent further negative impacts. K145-00-00-X017 consists of making repairs to K145-00-00 post Tropical Storm Beta and adding backslope swales and interceptor structures along the east side of the channel.

At the conclusion of the construction, a revegetation of the area will take place and will include community input. The image below is a concept to give a perspective of what can be done with the tree planting efforts following the completion of the project. The plan will also be coordinated with MUD 365 who will also be part of the tree planting effort. There will be heavy machinery used for this project and for public safety reasons, please avoid the area until work is complete.

This Friday (November 20, 2020), Flood Control District staff will be available to meet with residents at the project site to answer questions and respond to comments (while allowing for COVID-19 safety and social distancing practices). Residents with questions or interested in a site visit, should contact Rob Lazaro at (346) 286-4027 or [email protected].

Contract Amount: $135,000.00
Construction Start – Winter 2020
Construction Duration – 30 calendar days
The Flood Control District appreciates your patience through the duration of this project. More information may be available on the Flood Control District’s website, https://www.hcfcd.org/X285. Should you have any questions or comments, please visit www.hcfcd.org/contact-us

Progress on the T.C. Jester Stormwater Detention Basin
11/17/2020
Progress on the T.C. Jester Stormwater Detention Basin

Progress on the T.C. Jester Stormwater Detention Basin

Progress on the T.C. Jester Stormwater Detention Basin Construction Zone to be Closed to the Public Until Further Notice Harris County Flood Control District 9900 Northwest Freeway, Houston, Texas 77092hcfcd.org As part of the Harris County Flood Control District’s focus on reducing flood risks in...

11/17/2020

The work continues on the Lawndale Bridge and Channel Improvements Project over Brays Bayou east of I-45 next to Forest Park Lawndale Funeral Home. This effort is part of Project Brays which aims to reduce the flood risk for more than 15,000 homes along Brays Bayou. This bridge is one of the final of 32 slated for replacement in Brays Bayou. https://bit.ly/36IUoCO

Harris County Flood Control District contractors working on a construction project in the Cypress Creek Watershed. Photo...
11/16/2020

Harris County Flood Control District contractors working on a construction project in the Cypress Creek Watershed. Photo featured here is from K163-00-00-E002. Learn more about work in the Cypress Creek Watershed here: https://bit.ly/3lCKc55

11/12/2020
Construction Advisory: Armand Bayou Channel Conveyance Improvements - Project ID: B100-00-00-E002In an effort to keep yo...
11/02/2020

Construction Advisory: Armand Bayou Channel Conveyance Improvements - Project ID: B100-00-00-E002

In an effort to keep you informed about the Harris County Flood Control District’s continuing improvements in the Armand Bayou watershed, we want to notify you of an upcoming project. In November 2020, the Flood Control District will begin construction on a project to widen and deepen Armand Bayou, HCFCD Unit B100-00-00, from Spencer Highway to the Sam Houston Tollway.

This project is a partnership between the Flood Control District and the Harris County Toll Road Authority (HCTRA). Channel improvements along this 2,300-foot section of Armand Bayou will mitigate for increased stormwater flows as a result of a HCTRA project to expand the toll road. HCTRA is funding the channel project, which is being managed by the Flood Control District.

The project involves widening and deepening the current V-shaped channel, which has an average depth of about 6 feet, and a bank-to-bank channel width that varies from 20 feet to 30 feet. The new channel will have a flat bottom approximately 61 feet wide. The average depth will be 8 feet. From bank to bank, the channel itself will be as much as 122 feet wide. Property along the channel was acquired to widen the current 30-foot drainage easement to a maximum of 182 feet, including maintenance berms that will allow for future routine maintenance access.

Natural stable channel design features of the new channel will improve its environmental value, while also working to stabilize the slopes. These environmentally friendly features include using natural root balls to armor the “toe” of the creek, and using a series of pools and rock riffles to slow the water and reduce erosion. This new reach of Armand Bayou will have room to meander more naturally within the channel corridor. An existing stormwater detention basin will ensure no downstream impacts from the project.

The work will include three bridge replacements over Armand Bayou in this area, sequenced to minimize community and mobility disruption. The sequence of bridge replacements will generally move upstream (east to west) from Spencer Highway, starting with the bridge crossing at Sinclair Street and continuing with the bridges at DuPont Street and Oleander Drive.
Construction equipment will access the work area via public easements. The contractor will use heavy construction equipment such as dump trucks, excavators and bulldozers to remove trees, vegetation and excavated soil. Motorists are urged to be alert to truck traffic when passing near construction access points and along truck routes.

Contractor – SER Construction Partners
Contract Amount – $4,985,763 to be funded by HCTRA
Construction Start – November 2020
Construction Duration – 361 calendar days

The Flood Control District appreciates your patience through the duration of this project. More information is available on the Flood Control District website, www.hcfcd.org. Questions? Please submit them on the project webpage at https://www.hcfcd.org/Find-Your-Watershed/Armand-Bayou/Conveyance-Improvements-on-Armand-Bayou.

As part of the ongoing Ardmore Bridge construction which resumed today, please be aware that crews will be working weeke...
10/30/2020

As part of the ongoing Ardmore Bridge construction which resumed today, please be aware that crews will be working weekends (Saturday and Sundays) through mid-November in an effort to expediate the completion of the project. The Flood Control District appreciates the community’s continued patience as we work to finish this project. To view the detour map, please visit the Construction Updates & Detours section of the bridge on projectbrays.org.

10/29/2020
What is H&H Modeling?

H&H, or Hydrologic and Hydraulic, modeling is a term that you have likely encountered as a resident of Harris County and our region in general. This video explains H&H modeling, and how the Harris County Flood Control District uses it to develop effective flood hazard management and mitigation strategies throughout our region. https://youtu.be/anwzJiDFMho

H&H, or Hydrologic and Hydraulic, modeling is a term that you have likely encountered as a resident of Harris County and our region in general. This video ex...

Check out our interactive mowing schedule tool! The Flood Control District's regular maintenance program includes mowing...
10/29/2020

Check out our interactive mowing schedule tool! The Flood Control District's regular maintenance program includes mowing, selective clearing, hazardous tree removal, herbicide application, tree pruning, and removing sediment and foreign materials that build up in our channels, potentially affecting their ability to efficiently convey stormwater. https://bit.ly/3msxuWm

The opening of the Ardmore Bridge which connects North and South MacGregor Way and is east of Highway 288, has been dela...
10/26/2020

The opening of the Ardmore Bridge which connects North and South MacGregor Way and is east of Highway 288, has been delayed due to construction quality issues. Unfortunately, the work performed on the bridge did not meet Harris County Flood Control District specifications during a routine inspection. Work to remedy the construction issues is expected to take 45 days contingent on the absence of weather delays. The work could begin as soon as Monday, Oct. 26 and continue through December. The Flood Control District apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause and appreciates the community’s patience as our contractor works to resolve quality issues that resulted in a delayed opening. We encourage Harris County residents to use the existing detours that are in place diverting traffic to Hwy 288. To view the detour map, please visit the Construction Updates & Detours section of segment 2 on projectbrays.org.

The Flood Control District will begin construction this week on a channel repair project along K139-00-00, a tributary i...
10/22/2020

The Flood Control District will begin construction this week on a channel repair project along K139-00-00, a tributary in the Cypress Creek watershed. These repairs are necessary to help stabilize the channel and prevent further impact to the stream. The project consists of about 1 miles of repairs upstream of Cypresswood Drive to its confluence with Cypress Creek (K100-00-00). For more information visit www.hcfcd.org/X285.

We are honored to receive the 2019 Environmental Impact Award from the North Houston Association for our work in the Cyp...
10/22/2020

We are honored to receive the 2019 Environmental Impact Award from the North Houston Association for our work in the Cypress Creek watershed. The award is presented to an organization that has showcased “insurmountable efforts in preserving and protecting the area’s environment.” We were given the award due to our preservation and protection of the environment in north Houston while also contributing to the health and safety of Harris and Montgomery Counties for more than 80 years.

This award is a testament to our team’s commitment to preserving Cypress Creek’s natural state while also providing critical flood reduction infrastructure with robust community engagement. For more information of the ongoing work in the Cypress Creek watershed, please visit: https://www.hcfcd.org/Cypress-Creek

Harris County Flood Control District  and FEMA co-created a story map to highlight efforts to have a flood-resilient com...
10/19/2020

Harris County Flood Control District and FEMA co-created a story map to highlight efforts to have a flood-resilient community such as developing flood risk communication products, interactive mapping tools, promoting floodplain management, mitigation actions, flood education and flood hazard mapping in Harris County. Take a look here: https://arcg.is/0zWOTf

Major Hurricane Harvey repair projects continue along Buffalo Bayou.  Crews are repairing erosion and bank failure issue...
10/14/2020

Major Hurricane Harvey repair projects continue along Buffalo Bayou. Crews are repairing erosion and bank failure issues between Shepherd Drive to Sabine Street. The repairs, totaling approximately $9.7million, are necessary to stabilize and prevent further damage to the channel. The grant funds for this effort were provided by USDA-NRCS.

Read more here: https://bit.ly/2H661KC

Take a look at projects the Harris County Flood Control District has been working on since Harvey to reduce the risk of ...
10/06/2020

Take a look at projects the Harris County Flood Control District has been working on since Harvey to reduce the risk of flooding for homes and businesses. https://bit.ly/30DZ8XW

Harris County Commissioners awarded $36 million for flood reduction projects in Hunting and White Oak Bayous. Both proje...
09/30/2020

Harris County Commissioners awarded $36 million for flood reduction projects in Hunting and White Oak Bayous. Both projects are part of a partnership effort between the Harris County Flood Control District and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Read more here: https://bit.ly/2HAqWFZ

This $6.4 million project to improve Berry Bayou from I-45 to Edgebrook Drive is one of more than $180 million of upcomi...
09/25/2020

This $6.4 million project to improve Berry Bayou from I-45 to Edgebrook Drive is one of more than $180 million of upcoming improvements planned for the Sims Bayou Watershed. Learn more here: https://bit.ly/2S0WkQ8

09/22/2020

Harris County Flood Control District team deploying a discharge measurement boat at Buffalo Bayou and Milam to measure flow volume for forecast efforts #hcfcdnews #houwx

Flash flooding is ongoing in southeast Texas and travel should be avoided. #hcfcdnews #houwx
09/22/2020
Flash Flooding in Progress

Flash flooding is ongoing in southeast Texas and travel should be avoided. #hcfcdnews #houwx

Flash flooding is ongoing in southeast Texas and travel should be avoided.

Sign up at fwsalerts.org
09/22/2020

Sign up at fwsalerts.org

Significant street flooding is occurring in southern and southwest Harris County and travel should be avoided in the fla...
09/22/2020

Significant street flooding is occurring in southern and southwest Harris County and travel should be avoided in the flash flood warning area. Low lying roadways near the coast are experiencing flooding this morning from high tides in the Clear Lake, Shoreacres and Rio Villa areas. Rainfall amounts of 5-10 inches is possible today which could lead to additional roadway flooding and rises in creeks and bayous. Read more: https://bit.ly/3kGLtXY #HCFCDNEWS #HoustonWX

Heavy rain at Keegans Bayou @ Roark Rd near Stafford. Street flooding possible.: At least 1.0 inch of rain in the last 1...
09/22/2020
Harris County Flood Warning System

Heavy rain at Keegans Bayou @ Roark Rd near Stafford. Street flooding possible.: At least 1.0 inch of rain in the last 15 minutes.

09/22/2020

A flash flood warning has been issued for southern Harris County ‪until 830pm‬. Turn around, don't drown when encountering flooded roads. HCFCD.ORG/stormcenter

While we are monitoring TS Beta, we also wanted to take time to get you up to speed on the history behind the Harris Cou...
09/21/2020
Flood Control District History

While we are monitoring TS Beta, we also wanted to take time to get you up to speed on the history behind the Harris County Flood Control District.

History of the Harris County Flood Control District

The Harris County Flood Control District is actively monitoring Tropical Storm Beta and its threat of potential impacts ...
09/21/2020

The Harris County Flood Control District is actively monitoring Tropical Storm Beta and its threat of potential impacts to our area. The slow-moving tropical storm is expected to make landfall later today around Matagorda Bay. Low lying roadways near the coast are experiencing flooding this morning from high tides in the Clear Lake, Shoreacres and Rio Villa areas. Rainfall amounts are currently expected to be between 4-8 inches south of I-10 with lower amounts north of I-10. Rises in area creeks and bayous will be possible, but widespread flooding is currently not expected. Read more: https://bit.ly/3kz3Pde

FWSalerts.org
09/21/2020

FWSalerts.org

09/18/2020

A quick look at how we get information used to estimate flooding impacts in Harris County. https://bit.ly/306mnKf

Progress continues on the first phase of the Lauder Road Stormwater Detention Basin along Greens Bayou between Lauder Ro...
09/17/2020

Progress continues on the first phase of the Lauder Road Stormwater Detention Basin along Greens Bayou between Lauder Road and JFK Boulevard. Join us for a community meeting for Phase 2 tonight (9/17) at 6:30pm -7:30pm at: https://publicinput.com/lauderphase2

Flood Control District contractors working to desilt channels within the San Jacinto watershed. Learn more about how we ...
09/16/2020

Flood Control District contractors working to desilt channels within the San Jacinto watershed. Learn more about how we maintain our infrastructure at https://www.hcfcd.org/Recovery

Address

9900 Northwest Fwy
Houston, TX
77092

Opening Hours

Monday 07:30 - 16:30
Tuesday 07:30 - 16:30
Wednesday 07:30 - 16:30
Thursday 07:30 - 16:30
Friday 07:30 - 16:30

Telephone

(346) 286-4000

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The Harris County Flood Control District (the District) is a special purpose district created by the Texas Legislature in 1937 and governed by Harris County Commissioners Court. The District was created in response to devastating floods that struck the region in 1929 and 1935. The District's jurisdictional boundaries are set to coincide with Harris County, a community of more than 4.5 million people (2015) that includes the City of Houston. The other boundaries in which we operate - those provided by nature - are of the 22 primary watersheds within Harris County's 1,777 square miles. Each watershed has its own independent flooding problems. Each watershed presents unique challenges.

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Comments

I have a question for Gary Zika and the Project Brays team. With the renovation work on Buffalo Speedway to occur, the additional water flows into Poor Farm Ditch and into Brays is or is not offset by detention capacity added? After reading about the Buffalo Speedway rebuilding project and the new 8 foot square stormwater lines, which dump into Poor Farm Ditch. Where is the offsets for increased flow into Brays?
HCFCD, Can you explain how this was allowed to happen. https://www.golfchannel.com/news/future-bright-houston-open-memorial-park-move?fbclid=IwAR1CdcDUCsdLB0mxm5PpT2FcWNbTQH2WrBL0DhkazstSvd8sKQD1TKndEzQ From the article: "What Doak did with this previously flat, flood-prone land was remarkable. He effectively added elevation and improved drainage into the Buffalo Bayou, which runs through the park. (How effective? Tropical Storm Imelda dropped nine inches on Memorial Park last month; the next day, the greens and fairways were being mowed.)" Why on earth does it make sense to take water that fell in a place where it can slowly soak into the ground and quickly funnel it to Buffalo Bayou where it will contribute to flooding others--either downstream or taking up capacity in an already overloaded bayou? It's ridiculous.
I wanted to do a big thanks to HCFCD; Gary Zika, Melissa and Rusty as well as the others on Project Brays. The rainfall we received last month from the storm on September 21/22 was handled by the storm water systems especially along Braesheather and the cul de sacs of Cranleigh, Endicott et al. I have been told that through the rains the water never went over the curb on Cranleigh! This is great news as it appears that the new detention dug out and connections to the Meyerland Section 7 worked well to get the water into the Brays Bayou system! Looking forward to the finish line as we get the bridges rebuilt over the next year and a half. It is my belief that we finally have adequate flows from the Rebuild Houston work from 2015! Thanks for your continued efforts to get us out of danger!
You guys are doing a great service!
https://tx-bellaire6.civicplus.com/DocumentCenter/View/26079/Drainage-Master-Plan-PPT---FMTF---V5 How would increasing storm water flow from Bellaire to Brays Bayou, not affect the bayou? It seems curious to me that with substantial improvements in storm water flow from Bellaire as they are proposing, the claim is no impact on Brays capacity. Please review this and let me know if this is truly the case or not.
This is the long overgrown Harris County Flood Control drainage ditch in La Porte. When are y'all gonna maintain the existing drainage system?
We sure need someone to come out to the 15000 block of Crosswinds Drive and clean out the flood drains on the street. Last time we had a hard rain the street flooded
#DYK that #2020Census data determines the amount of funding that schools receive for school books, school lunch programs and school supplies? Apply now at 2020census.gov/jobs to help get the funding needed for schools in your community. To Whom It May Concern Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUjcmzScMvE&feature=youtu.be
I attended the Sims Bayou Community Engagement meeting on Thursday, February 13, at the Hiram Clarke Multi-Service Center. The presentation was poor in quality. The attendees could not read the information on the PowerPoint presentation because it was blurred, out of focus, or the print was too small and the presenter seemed to have an "attitude."
I have contacted the Harris County Flood Control months ago asking them to assist with an evasive plant that is killing all of the trees and wildlife on property they control behind my house. At first I sent the pictures and requests to the City of Houston-they came out the next day. They agreed that the problem was critical and needed immediate attention. However, they said their hands were tied bc this is HC Flood Control land. Large trees are dying while they continue to ignore my request for assistance. I suppose my only recourse is to take this to the media. I will also be contacting Texas A&M to ask them to do a study on the damage this is causing.
I just put up my new video about your wunnerful Houston Mayor called "Sly The Mayor Turner" Elections have MAJOR consequences don't they says Tony Buzzbee. Check it out and let me know what you think. “Sly The Mayor Turner” https://youtu.be/RqmZntxqu8w Turning Houston into a 3rd world city Turner hey Mayor what a downright pity. They keep moving in turning this city blue, nothing gets fixed, nothing built new.
SOLVED: Southeast Texas and Houston flooding problem??? My SOLUTION: build three story structures. We live on the third floor and park on the second. Care to guess, as to who we place on the first floor??? Yep, our idiot builders, developers, permit people, and politicians... You may send my Nobel prize, forthwith... AFTERTHOUGHT: You'll notice??? That zero American Indian villages have been found in this coastal plain.... WHY? They've known, for generations and CENTURIES, which creeks, rivers, bayous, and streams.... were IMPASSABLE, every time it rained. Where's their village? Way up in the woods, at Woodville....a hundred miles away! They're still laughing at the idiot white men- building in a flood plain... (duhhh darned fools.... they could've ASKED... The Alabama-Coushattas were a friendly tribe...)