ROADwomen

ROADwomen Interested in making Texas blue? Get involved with the River Oaks Area Democratic Women. We fight hard to put pro-choice democratic women in office.
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The River Oaks Association for Democratic Women (ROADWomen) is an all volunteer effort that works only because ROADwomen has so many wonderful volunteers. Please lend your expertise to a good cause!

Operating as usual

We're here, where are you?!
05/28/2021

We're here, where are you?!

05/28/2021
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ROADwomen Final Fridays - Special Guest Mike Collier

Kat has started the meeting - hop on!
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/3784473744

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History is being made before our very eyes! For the first time in American history, two women will be seated behind the ...
04/29/2021

History is being made before our very eyes! For the first time in American history, two women will be seated behind the President. Next stop...the presidency. Women can do anything!

History is being made before our very eyes! For the first time in American history, two women will be seated behind the President. Next stop...the presidency. Women can do anything!

Amazing morning in Houston. We were honored to represent ROADWomen on a mural bike tour. So many vaccinated friends. The...
04/25/2021

Amazing morning in Houston. We were honored to represent ROADWomen on a mural bike tour. So many vaccinated friends. The weather is perfect to be outside! Letitia Plummer for Houston City Council At-Large Position 4 Nata Lia Rodney Ellis Tarsha Jackson For Houston City Council District B Judge Genesis Draper #HoustonBikeTrails #Murals #GeorgeFloyd #blacklivesmatter #roadwomendoitinthevotingbooth #HarrisCountyDems

In loving memory of Muffie Moroney 1943-2021When the story of fierce Texas women is written, there will be the stars, th...
04/22/2021

In loving memory of Muffie Moroney
1943-2021
When the story of fierce Texas women is written, there will be the stars, the leading ladies whose names everyone knows, the Ann Richards, the Barbara Jordans, the Sissy Farentholds, and the Senfronia Thompsons. But make no mistake, the supporting players, those who chose not to seek public office themselves but to work to elect others, will be there as well.

There will be an entire chapter on Linda L.S. Moroney, known to all as Muffie, who died unexpectedly this week. It will include the facts of her life, of course...that she was born in Washington, D.C. during World War II, grew up in Houston, spent her summers in (then rural) Fort Bend County. She was a proud graduate of St. John’s School, Randolph-Macon Woman's College, and the University of Houston Law School. She worked for the NSA, clerked for the 14th Court of Appeals in Houston, and eventually built her own successful law firm.

But just the facts could never tell the story of Muffie’s life. There was no halfway for Muffie Moroney. She was a loving and supportive mother and grandmother, a loyal friend, and an active member of Christ Church Cathedral, where she, as you might have guessed, focused on social justice issues.

Her greatest passion was always politics...Texas Democratic politics. She knew everyone and mentored most. She organized. She raised money. She was personally generous with her time and money as long as the ultimate goal was to elect more Democrats, fight for equality, and most importantly, strengthen women’s rights.

Muffie loved ROADwomen. As one of the organization’s founders, she was a bit of a mama bear...guiding, mentoring, and always working as hard as anyone. Though her passion for ROADwomen never wavered, for the past few years most of Muffie’s activism has been directed to the Sisters United Alliance, an offspring of ROADwomen designed on Muffie’s dining room table by Muffie, Sherrie Matula, and the late Diane Mosier. Singularly focused on getting non-voting Democratic-leaning women out to the polls, especially in non-urban (read "red") Texas, SUA has grown from Harris County in 2016 to nine counties in 2018 to 26 counties in 2020 and is expanding even further in 2022.

When...not if...those reluctant voters evict the Republican cabal from Austin next year, Muffie’s spirit will surely be there, smiling and reminding us all that, while her journey is done, ours is not.

Rest easy, Muffie. We love you and we will miss you.

River Oaks Area Democratic Women (ROADwomen)

In loving memory of Muffie Moroney
1943-2021
When the story of fierce Texas women is written, there will be the stars, the leading ladies whose names everyone knows, the Ann Richards, the Barbara Jordans, the Sissy Farentholds, and the Senfronia Thompsons. But make no mistake, the supporting players, those who chose not to seek public office themselves but to work to elect others, will be there as well.

There will be an entire chapter on Linda L.S. Moroney, known to all as Muffie, who died unexpectedly this week. It will include the facts of her life, of course...that she was born in Washington, D.C. during World War II, grew up in Houston, spent her summers in (then rural) Fort Bend County. She was a proud graduate of St. John’s School, Randolph-Macon Woman's College, and the University of Houston Law School. She worked for the NSA, clerked for the 14th Court of Appeals in Houston, and eventually built her own successful law firm.

But just the facts could never tell the story of Muffie’s life. There was no halfway for Muffie Moroney. She was a loving and supportive mother and grandmother, a loyal friend, and an active member of Christ Church Cathedral, where she, as you might have guessed, focused on social justice issues.

Her greatest passion was always politics...Texas Democratic politics. She knew everyone and mentored most. She organized. She raised money. She was personally generous with her time and money as long as the ultimate goal was to elect more Democrats, fight for equality, and most importantly, strengthen women’s rights.

Muffie loved ROADwomen. As one of the organization’s founders, she was a bit of a mama bear...guiding, mentoring, and always working as hard as anyone. Though her passion for ROADwomen never wavered, for the past few years most of Muffie’s activism has been directed to the Sisters United Alliance, an offspring of ROADwomen designed on Muffie’s dining room table by Muffie, Sherrie Matula, and the late Diane Mosier. Singularly focused on getting non-voting Democratic-leaning women out to the polls, especially in non-urban (read "red") Texas, SUA has grown from Harris County in 2016 to nine counties in 2018 to 26 counties in 2020 and is expanding even further in 2022.

When...not if...those reluctant voters evict the Republican cabal from Austin next year, Muffie’s spirit will surely be there, smiling and reminding us all that, while her journey is done, ours is not.

Rest easy, Muffie. We love you and we will miss you.

River Oaks Area Democratic Women (ROADwomen)

It is with heavy hearts that we acknowledge the passing of ROADwoman Muffie Moroney. She was a true example of strength ...
04/21/2021

It is with heavy hearts that we acknowledge the passing of ROADwoman Muffie Moroney. She was a true example of strength and tenacity. A leader amongst leaders. We'll be sending out a more thorough tribute in the coming days but couldn't let today end without extending our gratitude for her mentorship and our condolences to her family and all who love her. We are all better for having known her. Rest in power, Muffie.

It is with heavy hearts that we acknowledge the passing of ROADwoman Muffie Moroney. She was a true example of strength and tenacity. A leader amongst leaders. We'll be sending out a more thorough tribute in the coming days but couldn't let today end without extending our gratitude for her mentorship and our condolences to her family and all who love her. We are all better for having known her. Rest in power, Muffie.

Derek Chauvin Found Guilty Of George Floyd's Murder
04/20/2021
Derek Chauvin Found Guilty Of George Floyd's Murder

Derek Chauvin Found Guilty Of George Floyd's Murder

George Floyd's death sparked sustained protests in Minneapolis, across the United States and around the world. It also set off a national reckoning on police violence and systemic racism.

A fantastic time was had by all tonight! Thank you to everyone who contributed to the success of tonight's event. It is ...
04/17/2021

A fantastic time was had by all tonight! Thank you to everyone who contributed to the success of tonight's event. It is just the beginning.

A fantastic time was had by all tonight! Thank you to everyone who contributed to the success of tonight's event. It is just the beginning.

Photos from Houston Black American Democrats's post
04/01/2021

Photos from Houston Black American Democrats's post

If Stacey Abrams taught us anything, it's not to wait until "election season" to get things started. We are going to do ...
03/27/2021
We Run The World Fundraiser

If Stacey Abrams taught us anything, it's not to wait until "election season" to get things started. We are going to do our part in 2022. As you know it takes money to organize effectively.
ROADwomen is partnering with Harris County Democratic Party (HCDP) and H-BAD to put together an event to raise funds to help in our focus of registering WOMEN & First-Time voters- "We Run the World"

We would love you to participate! The event is virtual. We are asking voters throughout Texas for pre-recorded messages and Texas artists to donate a performance for our show.

What we are looking for:

1. For performances, please send us a 2 to 4 minute video that will compel, inspire, and/ or energize our efforts.

2. A 1 to 2 minute video from you or your community members about the importance of women in leadership or perhaps highlighting a woman that inspired you to become involved.

3. A quick clip, filmed on your phone or tablet (horizontally) saying "We Run the World." Can you do it in a different language? Do that too!

4. A quick clip of young women of Harris County and beyond giving them words of encouragement. A sort of, "You got this. Keep going. You can do anything" vibe. If that seems hard, talk about that moment you realized, " Hey! I can run and win, I can do anything!"

Please email your video to [email protected]. Super easy, right! I'm attaching our flier to view.

There are sponsorships available. Would you be interested?

(view levels at: https://www.harrisdemocrats.org/ticketed-event-2. There are really fun perks for sponsors. )

Harris County Democratic Party Houston Black American Democrats

The Harris County Democratic Party is dedicated to the ideal that everyone deserves an equal shot at life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, regardless of where they come from.

03/26/2021

Text Pathway to 877877 to send communications to your Senator encouraging them to pass the Dream and Promise Act today.

Thank you to the amazing Diane Trautman for your sponsorship! We love you and appreciate all you do for Harris County! Y...
03/25/2021

Thank you to the amazing Diane Trautman for your sponsorship! We love you and appreciate all you do for Harris County! You can get your $10 tickets or sign up as a Sponsor for We Run the World! at https://www.harrisdemocrats.org/ticketed-event-2

Thank you to the amazing Diane Trautman for your sponsorship! We love you and appreciate all you do for Harris County! You can get your $10 tickets or sign up as a Sponsor for We Run the World! at https://www.harrisdemocrats.org/ticketed-event-2

⚠️ACTION ALERT⚠️Register HB6 opposition NOW!👉bit.ly/3lYxwqdEnter personal info. Under org add "Self," Volunteer Deputy V...
03/25/2021
Texas legislature

⚠️ACTION ALERT⚠️
Register HB6 opposition NOW!👉bit.ly/3lYxwqd

Enter personal info. Under org add "Self," Volunteer Deputy Voter Registrar or concerned voter. Add comment opposing HB6. Help at blueactiondems.com/txlege (go to Voter Suppression) TY Texas Blue Action Democrats and Flip The Texas House! #txlege

Blue Action Democrats are tracking bills and opportunities for activism in the 2019 session.

03/25/2021

Congressman Sheila Jackson Lee asked us to share with y'all. Please stand up for this important legislation, if you can.

As the author of the federal Violence Against Women Act, it is my pleasure to invite you to an announcement and presentation of the House passage of the Violence Against Women Act; and the challenge for its final passage and signing by the President of the United States. As you well know, over the time of your leadership, you've seen the impact of violence on women and children. We hope that you will attend, and if asked to speak as to the importance of the Violence Against Women Act in your area of expertise that you will accept this invitation. This presentation/press conference will be held on Thursday, March 25, 2021, at 1:30 PM at the Mickey Leland Federal Building, 1919 Smith St. Houston, Texas 77002, first-floor lobby. Please RSVP to [email protected] and [email protected] ASAP. Thank you.

Sincerely yours,

Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee
Chair of Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security

Please share

Thank you to Judges Kyle and Eric Carter, and Harris County Clerk Teneshia Hudspeth for their support of the upcoming We...
03/19/2021

Thank you to Judges Kyle and Eric Carter, and Harris County Clerk Teneshia Hudspeth for their support of the upcoming We Run the World! event! ROADwomen, Houston Black American Democrats, Harris County Democratic Party thank you!

Sponsorships are still available at:
https://www.harrisdemocrats.org/ticketed-event-2

Thank you to Judges Kyle and Eric Carter, and Harris County Clerk Teneshia Hudspeth for their support of the upcoming We Run the World! event! ROADwomen, Houston Black American Democrats, Harris County Democratic Party thank you!

Sponsorships are still available at:
https://www.harrisdemocrats.org/ticketed-event-2

03/16/2021
Celebrating the Women of Congress

Celebrate the amazing women of Congress with HCDP, ROADwomen, and H-BAD! A wonderful discussion with Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee. Congresswoman Sylvia Garcia, and Congresswoman Lizzie Pannill Fletcher, moderated by Dayna Steele.

Thanks to Harris County DA Kim K Ogg and Judge Jason Cox-Probate Court 3 for signing on to support ROADwomen, Houston Bl...
03/15/2021

Thanks to Harris County DA Kim K Ogg and Judge Jason Cox-Probate Court 3 for signing on to support ROADwomen, Houston Black American Democrats, and Harris County Democratic Party's event We Run the World!

Sponsorships and tickets are available at:
https://www.harrisdemocrats.org/ticketed-event-2

Thanks to Harris County DA Kim K Ogg and Judge Jason Cox-Probate Court 3 for signing on to support ROADwomen, Houston Black American Democrats, and Harris County Democratic Party's event We Run the World!

Sponsorships and tickets are available at:
https://www.harrisdemocrats.org/ticketed-event-2

On this day in Women's History Month we honor Ruth Bader Ginsburg on what would have been her 88th birthday. Ruth Bader ...
03/15/2021

On this day in Women's History Month we honor Ruth Bader Ginsburg on what would have been her 88th birthday.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was born into a family committed to education. She married the love of her life, Martin, and started their family. Ginsburg graduated from Cornell with a bachelor’s degree in 1954, earning high honors in Government and distinction in all subjects. She was also the College of Arts and Sciences Class Marshal. After graduating from Cornell, she attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Ginsburg was one of only 9 women in a class of 500 students. She often faced gender discrimination and was asked to explain how she felt about taking a spot in the program instead of a man. Ginsburg and her female colleagues were called on in class for “comic relief” and they were even excluded from using certain sections of the library. Ginsburg transferred to Columbia Law School in 1958 for her final year. During her studies, she made both the Harvard and Columbia Law Review.

Ginsburg graduated with her law degree from Columbia in 1959 at the top of her class. However, even with all of her academic accomplishments, it was hard for her to find employment after graduation. She explained, “In the fifties, the traditional law firms were just beginning to turn around on hiring Jews. … But to be a woman, a Jew, and a mother to boot, that combination was a bit much.” Ginsburg was able to land a position as a law clerk for the Honorable Edmund L. Palmieri in 1959 and served in that office until 1961.

Following her clerkship, Ginsburg began working as a research associate for the Columbia Law School Project on International Procedure. After a year, she became the associate director. In 1963, she began as a Professor of Law at Rutgers University School of Law and taught until 1972. She also became involved with the ACLU and she was central to the founding of their Women’s Rights Project in 1971. Ginsburg returned to Columbia Law School in 1972, where she became the first woman hired to receive tenure.

Appointed to the Court of Appeals by President Carter, Ginsburg would serve on that bench for thirteen years until President Clinton appointed to be the first Jewish woman on the Supreme Court.

There are so many remarkable things Ruth Bader Ginsburg did during her lifetime, especially in regards to gender equality. Affectionately called “R.B.G.”, she inspired generations of Americans to break gender barriers.

Thank you, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, for being an example of strength and smarts. You are a beacon of light that will shine for generations to come. We thank and honor you every day. Happy birthday, R.B.G.!

Today in our Women of Note series throughout #WomensHistoryMonth we pay homage to Ida B. Wells.Born in Mississippi in 18...
03/13/2021

Today in our Women of Note series throughout #WomensHistoryMonth we pay homage to Ida B. Wells.

Born in Mississippi in 1862, Ida B. Wells became an activist and suffragist. Her father was a political and community leader, despite the dangerous implications of being socially active as a newly freed slave. After losing her parents and infant brother during the yellow fever epidemic of 1878, Wells carried on the family legacy of activism while caring for her remaining siblings, managing to secure a well-paying job as a teacher while taking classes at Fisk University.

In 1884, after living in Tennessee for two years, Wells demonstrated her determination for justice in an moment that would launch her journalism career. On May 4, Wells took her seat in the “ladies” coach section of a train to Nashville. When the conductor ordered she move to the African-American section, Wells refused, put up a fight, and was ejected from the train. Though she initially won court cases against the train company for its unjust treatment, the decisions were later reversed. Frustrated with the ineffectiveness of the courts, Wells turned to journalism to fight for racial and gender justice. After having numerous articles in local and national publications, Wells became an owner of Memphis Free Speech and Headlight in 1892.

She became widely known for her relentless work on behalf of the anti-lynching movement which began in 1892 after three Black men, having recently opened a grocery store in competition with a white-owned store, were lynched by a white mob. Wells began investigating and shared her findings in the Memphis Free Speech and Headlight. Her editorials caused such outrage among the white community that her life was in immediate jeopardy and she was forced to flee to Chicago.

There Wells shifted her focus to the women’s suffrage movement, continuing her devotion to justice and democracy. Wells embraced the interest of women in politics, establishing the Alpha Suffrage Club in January 1913. Through her work with the Alpha Club she saw the Black women had not been given the tools to participate in the political process. This inspired her to build coalitions with clubs for Black women at the local, state, and national levels to encourage more women of color to become involved.

In March 1913, Ida B. Wells traveled to the first suffrage parade in Washington D.C., an event organized by the National American Woman Suffrage Association. On the day of the parade, she and sixty other black women arrived to march with the Illinois delegation, but were immediately advised, as women of color, to march in the back, so as to not upset the Southern delegates. Wells refused, arguing: “Either I go with you or not at all. I am not taking this stand because I personally wish for recognition. I am doing it for the future benefit of my whole race.” She initially left the scene, therefore convincing the crowd that she was complying with the request. However, she quickly returned and marched alongside her own Illinois delegation, supported by her white co-suffragists Belle Squires and Virginia Brooks. This event received massive newspaper coverage and shed light on the reality of participation in politics for the Black community.

The movement Wells created helped the women’s suffrage movement reach its success. Her work helped pass the Presidential and Municipal Bill in Illinois in June 1913, giving women over age 21 partial suffrage (the right to vote in presidential and municipal, but not state, elections). She helped register women voters and encouraged women who remained doubtful of their place in the electoral process to find strength in their voice.

Thank you, Ida B. Wells, for embodying the strength of a woman. You opened minds and hearts with a tireless commitment to civil rights, justice, and the fundamental American idea that everyone can and should vote. We are grateful and honor you today and every day.

Today in our Women of Note series throughout #WomensHistoryMonth we pay homage to Ida B. Wells.

Born in Mississippi in 1862, Ida B. Wells became an activist and suffragist. Her father was a political and community leader, despite the dangerous implications of being socially active as a newly freed slave. After losing her parents and infant brother during the yellow fever epidemic of 1878, Wells carried on the family legacy of activism while caring for her remaining siblings, managing to secure a well-paying job as a teacher while taking classes at Fisk University.

In 1884, after living in Tennessee for two years, Wells demonstrated her determination for justice in an moment that would launch her journalism career. On May 4, Wells took her seat in the “ladies” coach section of a train to Nashville. When the conductor ordered she move to the African-American section, Wells refused, put up a fight, and was ejected from the train. Though she initially won court cases against the train company for its unjust treatment, the decisions were later reversed. Frustrated with the ineffectiveness of the courts, Wells turned to journalism to fight for racial and gender justice. After having numerous articles in local and national publications, Wells became an owner of Memphis Free Speech and Headlight in 1892.

She became widely known for her relentless work on behalf of the anti-lynching movement which began in 1892 after three Black men, having recently opened a grocery store in competition with a white-owned store, were lynched by a white mob. Wells began investigating and shared her findings in the Memphis Free Speech and Headlight. Her editorials caused such outrage among the white community that her life was in immediate jeopardy and she was forced to flee to Chicago.

There Wells shifted her focus to the women’s suffrage movement, continuing her devotion to justice and democracy. Wells embraced the interest of women in politics, establishing the Alpha Suffrage Club in January 1913. Through her work with the Alpha Club she saw the Black women had not been given the tools to participate in the political process. This inspired her to build coalitions with clubs for Black women at the local, state, and national levels to encourage more women of color to become involved.

In March 1913, Ida B. Wells traveled to the first suffrage parade in Washington D.C., an event organized by the National American Woman Suffrage Association. On the day of the parade, she and sixty other black women arrived to march with the Illinois delegation, but were immediately advised, as women of color, to march in the back, so as to not upset the Southern delegates. Wells refused, arguing: “Either I go with you or not at all. I am not taking this stand because I personally wish for recognition. I am doing it for the future benefit of my whole race.” She initially left the scene, therefore convincing the crowd that she was complying with the request. However, she quickly returned and marched alongside her own Illinois delegation, supported by her white co-suffragists Belle Squires and Virginia Brooks. This event received massive newspaper coverage and shed light on the reality of participation in politics for the Black community.

The movement Wells created helped the women’s suffrage movement reach its success. Her work helped pass the Presidential and Municipal Bill in Illinois in June 1913, giving women over age 21 partial suffrage (the right to vote in presidential and municipal, but not state, elections). She helped register women voters and encouraged women who remained doubtful of their place in the electoral process to find strength in their voice.

Thank you, Ida B. Wells, for embodying the strength of a woman. You opened minds and hearts with a tireless commitment to civil rights, justice, and the fundamental American idea that everyone can and should vote. We are grateful and honor you today and every day.

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  • To elect Democrats to office, with a special emphasis on electing pro-choice Democratic women.

  • To influence the Democratic Party to continue its historic role as a party that promotes social justice and equal rights for all people.
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    Today at 1 PM! Join us for a Legislative Update at our new District Office. We look forward to seeing you and catching up after an eventful Legislative Session. https://fb.me/e/2l6hg0apI
    Just fyi - All are welcome to this free event. "Ever wondered what it’s really like to run for office? Maybe you are uninterested, cynical, or skeptical regarding politics, but for most who choose to run, the exercise manifests a call to service. If you’ve ever wondered what candidacy is like, and why candidates run, this event is for you. On June 6 at 3pm Central, YaleWomen Houston welcomes Harris County Clerk Teneshia Hudspeth for a non-partisan virtual conversation on her journey. Clerk Hudspeth is a graduate of The Women’s Campaign School at Yale, recently renamed The Campaign School at Yale (TCSY). A non-partisan and issue-neutral organization, sponsored by the Yale Law School, TCSY empowers individuals to lead through politics. Led by Patti Russo, the organization has supported the political careers of over 4,000 women over the past two and a half decades. Please register below. Guests welcome." To register or for more info: https://bit.ly/3bA6IZf
    Hey fellow ROADwomen, can you help me with this? https://www.facebook.com/events/606567516936888/
    Sharing from Moms Demand action: ARTWORK REQUEST We needd to keep the pressure up on Sen. Lucio, and to thank Sen. Hinojosa. So we’re calling on the KIDS to help us out. The ask: gather as many homemade thank you cards, created by children, as possible by Sunday. We’ll overnight them (I’m working to see about reimbursement) to Becca DeFelice, who will hand deliver them with homemade cookies. Lucio is a big family man, and we need him to remember why he needs to keep doing the right thing. So, here’s what the cards need to say. Dear Senator, Thank you for voting to keep me safe. Child, Age City (Some can say specifically Senator Lucio, but we also want to pass a few along to Hinojosa). We’re hoping to get 50-100 cards. A parent can write the text, but please have a kiddo decorate and sign it wherever possible if anyone has kids who want to participate let me know and I can arrange pickup
    Public Health Committee Hearing Tomorrow On Wednesday, April 7th at 8:00 AM, the Texas House Public Health Committee will hold a hearing for six anti-abortion bills. These appalling bills are extremist legislators’ attempt to push abortion access out of reach: HB 1515 This is an extreme and dangerous bill that would outright ban abortion in the state before many Texans even know they are pregnant. It would create harassing lawsuits against doctors and anyone who helps patients access care by creating a cause of action that would allow anyone to sue a doctor who performs an abortion and anyone who “aids or abets” an abortion. This bill is unconstitutional and has been struck down in every state where it was passed. It will open our state up to expensive and time-consuming legal challenges. HB 1280 This is another extreme bill that would ban abortion with essentially no exceptions, including the case of a lethal fetal diagnosis—a heartbreaking situation for any family. Forcing someone to carry a pregnancy to term compounds economic hardships and increases the odds of the patient and her family living in poverty. HB 2337/SB 394 This bill places extensive restrictions on how and when a provider can provide medication abortion. Medication abortion is extremely safe and effective and gives patients the option to end their pregnancy at home or in another comfortable setting. Mifepristone, the medication used, is subject to FDA restrictions and has a proven safety record. HB 2313/SB 802 This bill violates the privacy of Texans seeking an abortion by forcing them to reveal their medical decision to a third party. It requires a patient to receive counseling from state contractors, often Crisis Pregnancy Centers, before an abortion. HB 3218/SB 1173 This bill unconstitutionally bans abortion based on private decision making, forcing people to carry nonviable pregnancies against their will. HB 3760/SB 1647 This omnibus-style bill adds additional unconstitutional restrictions and hurdles for patients and medical professionals. It would require abortion providers to document that they have received information on giving birth and caring for a pregnancy in the case of a fetal anomaly. It would criminalize providers if they do not comply with the state’s proposed recordkeeping. To submit written public comment from anywhere in Texas, please use the link below. A sample comment should include the following: My name is ###X, and I oppose House Bill ###X. Add 1-2 lines about why you personally oppose this bill. Incorporate one or two of the primary talking points (see above). Share why you care about abortion access. Remind them why you oppose the bill and urge them to reject this legislation. Thank you in advance for doing your part in protecting abortion access in Texas!
    Citizens at Last: Texas Women Fight for the Vote Airing on PBS Channel 8 on 05/24/2021 and streaming now online. https://www.citizensatlastfilm.com/ #suffrage #TexasWomen #CitizensAtLast #NOWPassTheERA
    Is anyone planning on testifying at the House Public Health Committee on 4/7 at 8 am? Written testimony is being accepted too. Lots of very bad anti-abortion bills are on the docket:
    😡😡😡😡😡 In the Texas State Senate today... It’s time to start calling your state rep as often as possible to push back against these abortion restrictions. Texans will die if these pass into law.
    VOTER SUPPRESSION EFFORTS BY REPUBLICANS Please provide feedback to your state senators and representatives. PLEASE SHARE WITH YOUR CONTACTS #VoterSuppression ---- Attacks on Voting Rights: SB7 and HB6 By now, you may have heard the latest major Republican attacks on voting rights - SB 7 by Sen. Paul Bettencourt and HB 6 by Rep. Briscoe Cain. Both are omnibus bills that aim to make voting harder and ensure fewer Texans vote. SB 7 by Sen. Paul Bettencourt Requires a disabled voter who applies to vote by mail to include a doctor's note verifying their disability Allows poll watchers to video record voters who are receiving assistance in the polling place if the watcher "believes" the voter is receiving unlawful assistance Requires all Election Day polling places in counties with county-wide vote centers to have the same number of voting machines Limits early voting hours to 7am - 7pm HB 6 by Rep. Briscoe Cain Mandates a strict construction of the Election Code and that all election administration must be done uniformly throughout the state, meaning that Loving County (approximately 120 registered voters) and Tarrant County (approximately 1.1M registered voters) have to run their elections the same way May discourage current and future election judges from participating out of fear of prosecution by adding criminal penalties for election activities that may be the result of simple human error These bills, both separate and together, would continue rolling back voters’ access to the ballot box and would take away the limited flexibility county clerks have in administering elections in the way that may be needed for their voters.
    What is so remarkable is the gullibility of Prev-Pres followers! The first twenty minutes of this video outlines actions taken and there will be many more deaths! All attributable directly to Prev-Pres! Doctors and the CDC know better than governors or or Prev-Pres! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IC2lk7Wygag&list=WL
    Most of you may be aware that it is Women's History Month. What you may not be aware about is that we have a chance to make history right now. Although originally purposed in 1924 The Equal Rights Amendment was not passed. The ratification was stymied by a deadline imposed on it (something no other amendment ever had). The required number of states to ratify (38) did not take place under this deadline, however the number needed to ratify has been reached since, although under the direction of the previous administration the archivist was not able certify this. You can be part of finally ensuring the passage by doing your part. You can contact your representatives in the U. S. Congress to urge them to sign on as co-sponsors of vital legislation to remove the time limit placed upon the ERA by Congress in 1972. The bill in the U. S. House of Representatives is: H. J. RES 17 The bill in the U.S. Senate is S. J. Res 1 Ratification will then allow for President Biden to sign it into law which he and Vice President Harris pledge to do in their first 100 days.