USGS Science in New Jersey

USGS Science in New Jersey http://nj.usgs.gov/ — Providing reliable, unbiased scientific information about New Jersey's wate
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http://usgs.gov/ - The USGS serves the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from nature.

Get to know the   New Jersey Water Science Center’s Administration Officer, Nancy Gibbs. Nancy has been with the   for 3...
11/08/2023

Get to know the New Jersey Water Science Center’s Administration Officer, Nancy Gibbs.

Nancy has been with the for 33 years. As Administration Officer, she ensures that the rest of the center stays in line, and her work is crucial for our center to run smoothly and within budget! Our cooperators count on us to get our work done with the funding provided to us. Nancy also oversees personnel, travel, property, and all our agreements and billing. 👩‍💻🗃️

Before joining the USGS, Nancy worked for the Department of Defense, working on C&CM in Wuerzburg, Germany, or here in New Jersey on Fort Dix, where she was stationed when not in Germany. Nowadays, Nancy spends time outside of work off base with her four cats and dog 🐾. Her and her pupper love to explore the many different parks around New Jersey to play in! After a day of work and dog walking, everyone can get together to eat ice cream and watch her favorite movie, Home Alone.

  reached the coast of New Jersey and New York (USGS Science in New York) on October 29th, 2012. The destruction from th...
10/30/2023

reached the coast of New Jersey and New York (USGS Science in New York) on October 29th, 2012. The destruction from the storm was unlike anything this region had seen before. The northeast showed its distinguishing resilience, analyzing the storm's outcome to create better infrastructure along our coasts. USGS Water Sciences Centers identified data gaps from this and improved our methods of collecting storm data.

🌀Visit the link in our bio to find more information on significant events as well as our webpage from the 10th anniversary last year:
📲 https://hootbio.com/usgs_nj

photo 1: Union Beach, NJ
photo 2: old Waretown gage (Barnegat Bay at Waretown 01409110)
photo 3: new hurricane hardened Waretown gage (Barnegat Bay near Waretown 01409124)

Candid camera! Streamgage 01475001 Mantua Creek at East Holly Avenue is part of an ongoing project collecting images for...
10/27/2023

Candid camera! Streamgage 01475001 Mantua Creek at East Holly Avenue is part of an ongoing project collecting images for Flow Photo Explorer (FPE) at smaller streams to develop an innovative new method for estimating the amount and variability of water flowing in small stream networks using time-lapse images captured by inexpensive and off-the-shelf cameras.

15-minute photos are taken using a trail camera and photos are uploaded into FPE where a model estimates flows directly from the time-lapse imagery using the photos and data collected through FPE. In efforts to remove any photos with humans and cars, a screening processing was created. An added bonus: it identifies animals, too!

Here are some photos of animals and hydrographers at USGS streamgage 01475001 Mantua Creek at East Holly Avenue operated in cooperation with the . Real-time, continuous data for this site can be found here: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/monitoring-location/01475001/

Check out Flow Photo Explorer: https://www.usgs.gov/apps/ecosheds/fpe/ #/user-guide

USGS scientists Lukasz Niemoczynski, Sarah Collins, and Jennifer Closson install a deep rod at site 01409124 Barnegat Ba...
10/25/2023

USGS scientists Lukasz Niemoczynski, Sarah Collins, and Jennifer Closson install a deep rod at site 01409124 Barnegat Bay near Waretown, NJ (Photo 1), which is part of our New Jersey Tide Network. Driven 55 feet underground, this survey monument can maintain a stable elevation while surrounding surfaces, such as bridges or platforms, may heave and subside. Since tidal elevation sensors are oftentimes attached to these surfaces, having a known stable elevation is an essential component for manually correcting any data that has been affected by a change in elevation (Photo 2).

Installations such as this should last decades but can become unusable through urban development or unanticipated geophysical forces. A previous deep rod at this location was destroyed after only 3 years by a dramatic example of storm induced shoreline erosion (Photo 3).

👉 Check out tidal elevation data from this site at: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/monitoring-location/01409124/ =00010&period=P7D&showMedian=true

Field work at the   has been in full swing these past three weeks since the Coastal Plain Synoptic ( ) started, and folk...
10/20/2023

Field work at the has been in full swing these past three weeks since the Coastal Plain Synoptic ( ) started, and folks have been eager to lend a hand... or hoof! 🐐 Taking place every five years, data is collected at over 1,000 wells to document levels and changes in the major confined of New Jersey.

Since groundwater is the primary source of potable water supply 🚰 in the New Jersey Coastal Plain, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection uses the data for water supply planning and allocation decisions. The data serves as an early warning system for , overuse of the aquifers, and aquifer recoveries noted due to Critical Area allocation cutbacks.

To learn more and view a Geonarrative, visit: https://www.usgs.gov/centers/new-jersey-water-science-center/science/coastal-plain-aquifer-synoptic-chloride-network-0.

Photos 2-3: Hydrographers Chris Mooney and Eric Jacobsen at Millstone, NJ
Photo 4: Hydrographer Liam Kenefic taking a steel tape measurement in Springfield, NJ
Photo 5: Hydrographer Eric Jacobsen taking an electric tape measurement at Sandy Hook, NJ

10/18/2023

Say cheese!

and are taking photography to the next level, using cameras to create a physical image of temperature anomalies caused by cooler seeps in the watershed in New Jersey.

This is useful for the study of habitats, as trout prefer cooler water.

Trout Unlimited, Musconetcong Watershed Association, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, New Jersey Center for Water Science and Technology

Hydrographers Kathryn Cahalane, Lucas Sirotniak, and Jacob Gray working hard and enjoying the season’s beautiful weather...
10/13/2023

Hydrographers Kathryn Cahalane, Lucas Sirotniak, and Jacob Gray working hard and enjoying the season’s beautiful weather at 01463500 Delaware River at Trenton, NJ! 👩‍🔬🚤👨‍🔬

This site collects both continuous and discrete water-quality data, which help serve the National Water Quality Network (NWQN). 💧 The was established to facilitate national-scale understanding of surface-water quality conditions in large rivers and small streams in different geographic and land-use settings. Data collected by the NWQN support the needs of federal, state, and local stakeholders tasked with managing our nation’s water resources. 👏

📊 Check out some Delaware River data (and view our monitoring camera!) at https://ow.ly/1gcE50PWpJ9

👉 Learn more about the NWQN here: https://ow.ly/rnwy50PWpJb

This site is operated in cooperation with Philadelphia Water Department, Philadelphia District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Delaware River Basin Commission.

Last Friday, students from an environmental science field methods course at Rowan University came to visit USGS streamga...
09/29/2023

Last Friday, students from an environmental science field methods course at Rowan University came to visit USGS streamgage 01467150 Cooper River at Haddonfield! The students spent the morning working as hydrographers: inspecting site sensors, collecting data, and thinking about how USGS data helps us preserve and protect our water resources. We love meeting other curious minds in the field! To peruse data at this site and the rest of our network, visit https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nj/nwis/rt/



Photos provided courtesy of Rowan University. (Rowan University)

owHappy  !!! It's officially sweater weather and time to usher in the new season! We hope you're finding beauty in the c...
09/23/2023

owHappy !!! It's officially sweater weather and time to usher in the new season! We hope you're finding beauty in the crunchy leaves, apple picking, and all the other traditional fall festivities. Make sure to get outside and explore the great outdoors that we are so blessed to enjoy and protect at the ! 🍂

Watch the fall foliage around our gages in real time using https://apps.usgs.gov/hivis/

1st 📷: 01458570 Nishisakawick Creek near Frenchtown NJ
2nd 📷: 01464290 Crosswicks Ck at Hockamik Rd near Cookstown NJ
3rd 📷: 01391102 Saddle River below Hohokus Brook at Paramus NJ

Adopted by the Water Environment Federation (WEF) in July 2006, World Water 🌊Monitoring Day (WWMD) is an international o...
09/18/2023

Adopted by the Water Environment Federation (WEF) in July 2006, World Water 🌊Monitoring Day (WWMD) is an international outreach program that builds public awareness 📢 and involvement in protecting water resources worldwide. Held annually between September 18 and October 18, the program engages communities in monitoring the condition of local rivers, streams, estuaries, and other water bodies. Since its inception in 2002, more than 90,000 people have participated in 50 countries.

Since 1903, the NJWSC has collected high-quality hydrologic data and conducted unbiased water-science research to address the water-resource priorities of the Nation's global trends and support statewide water-resource infrastructure and management needs 🏞️. Here, we highlight Hydrologic Technician Skyler Massen sampling at a monitoring well at Moore's Beach for a salinity encroachment study through USGS IWWAs. To learn more about our current water data for New Jersey, check out: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nj/nwis/rt/

Last week, the NJWSC assisted USGS Science in New York in their efforts to characterize low   (DO) levels in the Arthur ...
09/15/2023

Last week, the NJWSC assisted USGS Science in New York in their efforts to characterize low (DO) levels in the Arthur Kill, a major shipping channel separating Staten Island, NY, and Union and Middlesex Counties, NJ. 🚢

This 24-hour sampling event involved the conducting transects of near-surface continuous water-quality data and the collecting vertical profiles of water-quality parameters at depth using a random stratified approach. In addition to DO, both crews collected water temperature, specific conductance, pH and turbidity data. 🧪💧

The is prone to poor water-quality from industrial use. A combination of stormwater runoff, chemical spills, and sewer outflows can alter dissolved oxygen levels, impairing ecosystem function (HEP, 2021). 🚱🦀🎣

Since this waterway is a shared interstate boundary, it is crucial to have common standards for and . The results will help to determine a common DO threshold, allowing for more effective coordination in regulatory and restoration efforts. 🤝

Keep your eyes peeled for a data release with the mapped-out values:
👉 https://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/


📝Reference:
New York-New Jersey Harbor Estuary Program, 2021, Harbor-Wide Water Quality Monitoring Report: Regional Waterbody Summary Arthur Kill and Kill van Kull (The Kills), 2021. https://ow.ly/pzi750PKPqc

Wishing you all a happy and safe Labor Day! 🌞🌊 Although the unofficial end to summer can be a bittersweet time, we hope ...
09/04/2023

Wishing you all a happy and safe Labor Day! 🌞🌊 Although the unofficial end to summer can be a bittersweet time, we hope that you were able to make lots of memories recreating in New Jersey waters! And don't forget, local summer is right around the corner. 👀

This beautiful sunset was captured by one of our HIVIS Dashboard cameras at 01407770 Shark River at Belmar NJ. Check out more shots from this site, and others around the nation, at https://apps.usgs.gov/hivis/

8/31 marks the 2 year anniversary of Hurricane Ida's landfall in NJ. 🌧️ Although the storm weakened to a tropical depres...
09/02/2023

8/31 marks the 2 year anniversary of Hurricane Ida's landfall in NJ. 🌧️ Although the storm weakened to a tropical depression by that time, it interacted with a low-pressure system causing torrential rain & flash flooding in urban communities throughout the northeast - producing nearly 10" within 24 hours in localized areas! ☂️

Hunterdon and Mercer counties were the hardest hit, followed by Somerset, Middlesex, Union, Essex & Hudson counties. At 01378500 Hackensack River at New Milford (Photo #2), you can see how flooding from Ida compared to Hurricane Irene.

In response, USGS field staff collected discharge measurements, confirmed provisional period-of-record peaks, assessed damages to streamgages, assisted FEMA in surveying the extent of the flooding, & even helped local authorities with rescues. 📋

👉 Here are some tools/resources you can use to view historical data from past storms or find current flood conditions:

- 🗺️Flood Inundation Mapper: see real-time streamflow data, flood forecasts, potential loss estimates, etc.
- 📅Flood Event Viewer: view historical data from past events such as high water marks
- 📷HIVIS Dashboard: webcams providing still-frame images & timelapse videos of current water conditions
- 🚧Real-Time Flood Impact Map (pilot): when affiliated USGS sensors record a gage height exceeding that of a critical infrastructure such as a road or bridge, an icon will show that this location may be flooded
- 🌊Storm Tide Monitoring: permanent NJ Tide Network along with temporary rapid deployment gages & Storm Surge Sensors during storms
- ⚠️ : email/text notification when specific parameters exceed user-definable thresholds

See a visual of Hurricane Ida's impact by The Vizlab in USGS Water Resources at https://ow.ly/ynE350PGQlc

See comments for additional photo descriptions and gage locations.

Happy 120th birthday to 01403060 Raritan River Below Calco Dam at Bound Brook NJ! 😱🎉 After a century and two decades of ...
09/01/2023

Happy 120th birthday to 01403060 Raritan River Below Calco Dam at Bound Brook NJ! 😱🎉 After a century and two decades of data collection, you've grown from, well, gage house to gage house... that's ok; some things are just created to last, and that you have! Check out this site's impressive record of discharge and gage height data here 👉 https://waterdata.usgs.gov/monitoring-location/01403060/ =00065&period=P7D&showMedian=true

This site is operated in cooperation with New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

Last week, 15 NJ WSC employees traveled to Phoenix, AZ, to participate in the 2023 National Water Data Training Workshop...
08/30/2023

Last week, 15 NJ WSC employees traveled to Phoenix, AZ, to participate in the 2023 National Water Data Training Workshop (NWDTW). The NWDTW is an annual event that provides training and workshops for hydrologic technicians, hydrologists, and others who collect, process, and analyze water data. Due to COVID restrictions, this was our first workshop since August 2019! Our scientists got the opportunity to present their exciting research in a poster session, network with fellow USGS employees and equipment specialists, and attend a variety of presentations and trainings (over 180 sessions offered!).

Note: Some poster information and data may be provisional.

Last week,   Chemist Sara Breitmeyer and her team released a groundbreaking study detailing   contamination in rivers ac...
08/29/2023

Last week, Chemist Sara Breitmeyer and her team released a groundbreaking study detailing contamination in rivers across Pennsylvania in partnership with and Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. This is the first study to investigate PFAS in rivers throughout an entire state in such detail. The study found that over 75% of the streams and rivers tested contained PFAS.

We have discussed PFAS before, but as a review, PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) are synthetic compounds used in a variety of industries. Dubbed “forever chemicals,” these substances endure in the environment for extended periods. In high concentrations, PFAS exposure can harm humans and other animals relying on the water.

To read more about the study, check out Sara's project page here: https://www.usgs.gov/news/state-news-release/pfas-chemicals-detected-many-rivers-and-streams-across-pennsylvania

🎂🏞️Happy Birthday to the National Park Service!Today we raise our water samples 🧪 to celebrate the founding of the  (NPS...
08/25/2023

🎂🏞️Happy Birthday to the National Park Service!

Today we raise our water samples 🧪 to celebrate the founding of the (NPS)! On August 25, 1916 President Woodrow Wilson signed the Organic Act, creating the NPS. Today, 107 years later, the park service has grown to include 425 units, 9 of which are right here in NJ!

We want to take a moment to voice our appreciation for our collaborative NPS/USGS Water Quality Partnership. While the NPS nurtures and preserves the beautiful landscapes, we at the USGS are honored to provide the scientific information needed to protect and restore water quality within the national parks. Here at the NJWSC we have two active projects, one looking at water quality in Paterson's Great Falls National Historical Park and another looking at PFAS in NPS waters across the country. To learn more about these projects and the NPS/USGS Partnership visit: https://webapps.usgs.gov/nps-partnership/

We look forward to many more years of collaboration!

To learn about the NPS units in NJ visit: https://www.nps.gov/state/nj/index.htm

To celebrate the NPS, why not visit one of their parks!? They also have fantastic social media pages that we think are worth following! They always give us a hoot 🦉!

This photograph of very dapper USGS employees was taken on April 10, 1940, in front of our streamgage  01445000, Pequest...
08/17/2023

This photograph of very dapper USGS employees was taken on April 10, 1940, in front of our streamgage 01445000, Pequest River near Huntsville! Since its establishment, this streamgage has been visited by a wide variety of hydrographers for water quality sampling, flood events, and routine visits to ensure that our equipment is recording correctly. Hydrographer Chris Mooney snapped a photo of the gage in 2023 (photo 2) during his routine visit. He used a cell phone camera, traveled in a vehicle with fuel injection, and declined the opportunity to wear a suit.

View data for the many parameters collected at this site here: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/monitoring-location/01445000/ =00065&period=P7D

🚨Job Alert🚨Are you or do you know a college student interested in working for the USGS New Jersey Water Science Center? ...
08/14/2023

🚨Job Alert🚨

Are you or do you know a college student interested in working for the USGS New Jersey Water Science Center? 💧 It's your lucky day! The NJWSC is searching for students that are currently pursuing associate, undergraduate, and graduate degrees to join us as a Student Trainee. These are part time positions at the GS-4 grade with a promotion potential of GS-9.

But what does a Student Trainee do? 🤔 As a Student Trainee you will serve in a trainee capacity, performing routine and recurring development assignments to acquire knowledge and understanding of functions, principles, practices, and methods used in the field of hydrology.

If you are interested in this position, be sure to check out the job announcement on USAJobs! Either through the links on our social media (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter) or by searching on USA Jobs for "Student Trainee (Hydrology)" and setting the location as "New Jersey". Alternatively, you can navigate to https://www.usajobs.gov/job/742798000

The application period for this position closes August 25th. 📅

Happy birthday to 01407290 Big Brook near Marlboro! No longer a teenager, this site has been collecting continuous data ...
08/12/2023

Happy birthday to 01407290 Big Brook near Marlboro! No longer a teenager, this site has been collecting continuous data for 20 years now. To celebrate, you might want to visit and collect some ancient fossils deposited during the late Cretaceous period that are frequently found in the stream! You can also celebrate by perusing the 20 years of data here (https://waterdata.usgs.gov/monitoring-location/01407290/ =00065&period=P7D).

From August 11th through August 14th, 2000, an astounding 18.65 inches of rain inundated northern New Jersey. During thi...
08/11/2023

From August 11th through August 14th, 2000, an astounding 18.65 inches of rain inundated northern New Jersey. During this period, monitoring stations on Lake Hopatcong, Musconetcong River, Green Pond Brook, Rockaway River, and Russia brook tributary registered their highest flood peaks on record at the time. Additionally, 13 USGS gaging stations experienced greater than 50% AEP (2-year) flood events.

To learn more about this flooding event, please read our Water-Resources Investigations Report 02-4099:https://pubs.usgs.gov/wri/2002/4099/report.pdf

🦋💧 Water Wednesday Wonders! 💧🦋Happy Water Wednesday! Today, we have a special field find during one of our routine inspe...
08/09/2023

🦋💧 Water Wednesday Wonders! 💧🦋

Happy Water Wednesday! Today, we have a special field find during one of our routine inspections – meet our curious skipper friend! 🦋 This little butterfly decided to grace us with its presence right atop our calibration cup used for multi-instrument meters. 🌿💧

During our water resources monitoring, we use this calibration cup to ensure the accuracy of our meters by checking them against various standards. It's all part of our mission at USGS to provide reliable scientific data on water resources. 💦🔬

But this skipper seemed to have a keen interest in our work! 🧐 No matter how hard we tried, it simply didn't want to leave the equipment! Maybe it knows that water is essential for all life and was drawn to our tools?

In the world of hydrology, every creature and every drop counts. So, we shared this special moment with our winged companion and then carefully carried on with our important work, knowing that our efforts contribute to a healthier water ecosystem for all living beings. 🌱🌎

Let's take a moment today to appreciate the wonders of water and the unexpected joys it brings during our field adventures. Have a wonderful Water Wednesday, everyone! 💧🌿🦋

Last week the USGS NJWSC partnered with Princeton University's Integrated GroundWater Modeling Center and the Watershed ...
08/08/2023

Last week the USGS NJWSC partnered with Princeton University's Integrated GroundWater Modeling Center and the Watershed Institue (The Watershed Institute) during one of their outreach programs to demonstrate how our water scientists do their research at gage 01460440 Delaware and Raritan Canal at Port Mercer! The future scientists learned about the sensors that collect our data and the equipment that transmits it. They also learned the basics of stream gaging and had the opportunity to measure streamflow using an ADCP!

Teaching students about our work and water science in general is essential to fostering a deeper understanding of a precious resource and provides them the knowledge to become more responsible stewards of water, leading to a more sustainable and water-conscious future.

To see our data at this gage, visit:
https://ow.ly/nIKU50PuOsF

Photos provided by Integrated GroundWater Modeling Center, Princeton University

We are taking a trip to the past to celebrate National Lighthouse Day! Back in the day, routine measurements such as dis...
08/07/2023

We are taking a trip to the past to celebrate National Lighthouse Day! Back in the day, routine measurements such as discharge and gage height were taken at site 01409147 Barnegat Inlet at Barnegat Light. Not only did these site visits provide essential data for Barnegat Inlet, but they also came with a spectacular view of the historically significant Barnegat Lighthouse, located on the northern tip of Long Beach Island.

Find historical data for this site at https://waterdata.usgs.gov/monitoring-location/01409147/ =00060&startDT=2016-01-01&endDT=2016-03-31

August is  ! The goal of the month is to raise awareness and focus on the importance of water quality and its impact on ...
08/04/2023

August is ! The goal of the month is to raise awareness and focus on the importance of water quality and its impact on public health, the environment and all aspects of life. 💧

Here at the , we are committed to monitoring and safeguarding your water resources. With a network of 120 sites that produce real-time water quality data throughout the state, and numerous projects investigating various topics such as harmful algal blooms, emerging contaminants, and more, we understand how vital it is to have access to clean and safe water.

To learn more about our water quality work, please visit: https://www.usgs.gov/centers/new-jersey-water-science-center/science/water-quality or click the link in our bio.

Last week, the New Jersey Water Science Center hosted a Motorboat Operator Certification Course (MOCC) as well as a Moto...
07/21/2023

Last week, the New Jersey Water Science Center hosted a Motorboat Operator Certification Course (MOCC) as well as a Motorboat Operator Instructor Certification Course (MOICC). 🛥️

hydrologist Michal Niemoczynski, along with 4 other instructors from the North Atlantic and Appalachian Region (NAAR), led this vital safety training for 15 USGS staff, two of whom will go on and be able to instruct the same training within their respective Centers.

The provides students with advanced watercraft handling skills. While the course includes some hours of classroom instruction, the majority of the course involves “hands-on” activities, including boat maintenance, safety equipment, navigation, watercraft handling/maneuvering, docking, water rescue, emergency procedures, fire suppression, and trailering exercises.

These trainings are one of the many ways hydrographers learn safe and effective practices for collecting data. Have you ever seen a USGS watercraft in action? Let us know where!

🚨Job Alert🚨Are you interested in working as a Hydrologic Technician for the USGS? 💧Well, have we got a surprise for you!...
07/19/2023

🚨Job Alert🚨

Are you interested in working as a Hydrologic Technician for the USGS? 💧

Well, have we got a surprise for you! The New Jersey Water Science Center is searching for three recent graduates to join us as Hydrologic Technicians in beautiful New Jersey (yes, we aren't all city and turnpike, in New Jersey, you'll have easy access to hundreds of miles of hiking trails, 27 state parks, and 130 miles of beaches in addition to New York City and Philadelphia). Recent graduates are anyone who have graduated from an accredited educational or certificate program within the last 2 years or 6 years if you're a veteran. These are full-time positions starting at a GS-5 grade and with a promotion potential of GS-9.

But what does a hydrologic technician do? A lot! Here are a few examples of the many job duties you may have the opportunity to perform:
-Collect, measure and analyze surface-water, groundwater, tidal, water quality, and atmospheric data using a wide range of instruments and online databases.
-Install and maintain equipment and instrumentation.
-Write summaries and reports of results and field procedures, including material for publication.
-Operate a boat.

If you are interested in this position, be sure to check out the job announcement on USAJobs! Either through the link on our social media posts (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter) or by searching "Hydrologic Technician" and setting the Location as "New Jersey". Alternatively, navigate to https://www.usajobs.gov/job/736878200

The application period for this position closes on July 27th. 📅

A new USGS study, led by NJWSC Research Hydrologist Kelly Smalling, is the first to compare PFAS in tap water from both ...
07/18/2023

A new USGS study, led by NJWSC Research Hydrologist Kelly Smalling, is the first to compare PFAS in tap water from both private and public supplies on a broad scale throughout the country. The study suggests that at least 45% of the nation's tap water could have one or more types of PFAS.

PFAS are a large group of chemicals that can pose health risks to people in high concentrations. Their persistence in the environment is why they are commonly called "forever chemicals," and their prevalence across the country makes them a unique water-quality concern.

This USGS study will help members of the public understand their risk of exposure and can inform policy and management decisions regarding testing and treatment of drinking water.

To read more about the study, visit: https://www.usgs.gov/publications/and-polyfluoroalkyl-substances-pfas-united-states-tapwater-comparison-underserved.

The month of June is  ! In addition to drinking water, rivers provide food, recreation, transportation, and aesthetic be...
06/30/2023

The month of June is ! In addition to drinking water, rivers provide food, recreation, transportation, and aesthetic beauty. At the NJWSC, we conduct science that helps to protect our water resources for future generations. Our river monitoring networks and cutting-edge research provide the information needed for flood forecasting, emergency response, and recreational safety, as well as understanding drinking water availability and quality. We have been recording continuous discharge at streamgage 01463500 Delaware River at Trenton since 1913 and currently have 238 sites in our surface water network! We also monitor water quality, conduct nutrient and contaminant studies, and maintain a tidal network, among many other projects. Check out all of the cool things we do here: https://www.usgs.gov/centers/new-jersey-water-science-center/science

Today marks a significant flood anniversary! From June 23 to June 28, 2006, continuous rainfall totaling 3 to 6.5 inches...
06/28/2023

Today marks a significant flood anniversary! From June 23 to June 28, 2006, continuous rainfall totaling 3 to 6.5 inches in New Jersey brought major flooding to the Delaware River Basin.

According to the 2006 Water-Data Report, maximum discharge at streamgage 01440200 Delaware River Near Delaware Water Gap, PA was 224,000 ft^3/s on June 29 at around 0400, with a peak gage height of 33.47 ft (from a high water mark). All gages along the mainstem of the Delaware River reported levels with less than a 2% probability of occurrence in any given year!

For more info, visit: https://ow.ly/LIFn50OYenW

Find more data: https://ow.ly/eNIg50OYenR

🌞 Dive into Summer, Dive into Water Science! 🌊💧Happy first day of summer! As hydrologists at the USGS, we're here to ens...
06/21/2023

🌞 Dive into Summer, Dive into Water Science! 🌊💧

Happy first day of summer! As hydrologists at the USGS, we're here to ensure your summer fun flows smoothly. 🏊‍♀️💦 Our work involves collecting and sharing reliable scientific information on rivers, lakes, estuaries, groundwater, and water resources across New Jersey and beyond. 🌍 These valuable data provide the knowledge engineers, planners, and managers need to make informed decisions about our precious water resources.

Whether planning a beach day, fishing trip, or simply enjoying the sun by a sparkling river, water is at the heart of it all. 💙🌞 On this first day of summer, take a moment to appreciate the beauty and importance of water in our lives. Remember that while you're splashing in the waves, we're hard at work to understand and protect these resources for future generations.

Join us this summer as we share more fascinating insights, water facts, and behind-the-scenes glimpses of our work. Let's make waves together! 🌊💙

Today, the NJ USGS would like to take a moment to recognize and highlight Juneteenth, an important day in our nation's h...
06/19/2023

Today, the NJ USGS would like to take a moment to recognize and highlight Juneteenth, an important day in our nation's history, and one that was not widely recognized until recently.

Celebrated annually on the 19th of June, Juneteenth – also known as Freedom Day and Jubilee Day – honors the end of slavery in the United States, specifically when Major General Gordon Granger read the order that "all slaves are free." in Galveston, Texas. This news sparked celebrations across Texas which continue generations later, nationwide.

Let's take some time to acknowledge the invaluable contributions and positive impact African Americans have had at the USGS. Despite facing many barriers, African Americans have played a vital role in our understanding of the Earth's resources. We honor pioneers like Dr. Warren Washington, the second African American to receive a PhD in Meteorology, who later worked at the USGS. We also recognize the importance of a diverse and inclusive environment to ensure the USGS has a broad range of knowledge and experiences, not only with our science, but with addressing today's challenges and making the USGS a better environment for all people.

Juneteenth is an opportunity to celebrate African American history, resilience, and achievements, but it's essential to recognize that the fight for racial justice and equity is ongoing. Let's use this day to reflect, learn, and take action toward fostering a more inclusive and equitable future.

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08648

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 4:30pm
Tuesday 8am - 4:30pm
Wednesday 8am - 4:30pm
Thursday 8am - 4:30pm
Friday 8am - 4:30pm

Telephone

+16097713900

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