Marinette County Land Information Department

Marinette County Land Information Department To provide information to property owners, businesses and government agencies to make wise land use decisions for Marinette County.

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Nurdles are tiny plastic pellets, and they are causing devastating damage to our environment and marine life. You can fi...
09/10/2021
Industrial plastic pellets called ‘nurdles’ are littering Great Lakes beaches

Nurdles are tiny plastic pellets, and they are causing devastating damage to our environment and marine life. You can find them on your favorite beach, blending in with sand and shells.

The first reported appearance of nurdles on beaches dates back to 1970. A nurdle is a small plastic pellet used to create virtually anything plastic. From plastic bottles to automobile parts, they’re widely used in plastic production.

They are the raw material for everything that’s made of plastic. But even if they’re tiny, their damage is giant and immeasurable. Because of their size, it’s hard to keep them contained, and they spill into rivers, waterways, and the ocean.

Nurdles come in all sorts of colors, and their size and shape make it very easy for marine life to mistake them for food. It’s been recorded that more than 220 species of marine animals ingest microplastics and plastic debris.

Resin pellets are being lost in the manufacturing supply chain and ending up in rivers and lakes.

🤎 Did you know that an oak tree produces about 10 million acorns during its lifetime?🤎 Oaks are one of the oldest and mo...
09/10/2021

🤎 Did you know that an oak tree produces about 10 million acorns during its lifetime?
🤎 Oaks are one of the oldest and most widely spread trees on this planet. They have existed way before humans were here.
🤎 They feed various living creatures with their leaves and acorns.
🤎 Oak trees live up to 1,000 years.
🤎 There are over 600 species of oak trees.
🤎 The largest living oak tree is located in Mandeville, Louisiana.
🤎 Only 1 in 10,000 acorns grow up to be an oak tree.
🤎 Usually, oak trees start to produce acorns when they reach 50 years of age.

#FunFactFriday Here's a riddle for you: What has a mast but doesn't sail?

...

An oak tree! "Mast" refers to the fruit (and nuts and seeds) that many trees, not just oaks, drop in fall. A "mast year" is when trees drop a lot of fruit.

Have you noticed that the crickets are getting louder? As fall progresses, mating becomes imperative as adult crickets p...
09/10/2021

Have you noticed that the crickets are getting louder? As fall progresses, mating becomes imperative as adult crickets perish come winter. The loud monotonous song we hear in the evening is that of the males, singing to attract a mate; they sing a quicker, softer song when a female approaches. There's also a territorial tune, sung when two males meet, and an abrupt "Look out!" chirp that warns everyone to be quiet.

Have you noticed that the crickets are getting louder? As fall progresses, mating becomes imperative as adult crickets perish come winter. The loud monotonous song we hear in the evening is that of the males, singing to attract a mate; they sing a quicker, softer song when a female approaches. There's also a territorial tune, sung when two males meet, and an abrupt "Look out!" chirp that warns everyone to be quiet.

⚫️Adult Wild Indigo Weevils eat the leaves and flowers of this and other Baptisia species; their grubs attack the seeds ...
09/10/2021

⚫️Adult Wild Indigo Weevils eat the leaves and flowers of this and other Baptisia species; their grubs attack the seeds in the pods.
⚫️Bumblebees pollinate the flowers and caterpillars of several skippers, butterflies and moths feed on the foliage.
⚫️New sprouts of White Wild Indigo can be mistaken for asparagus when they push from the ground in spring.

This is so amazing!  Just like the Monarch Butterflies, these dragonflies are also well-known for their iconic nature of...
09/10/2021

This is so amazing! Just like the Monarch Butterflies, these dragonflies are also well-known for their iconic nature of migration from the North United States to the humid climate regions like Mexico and Texas.

#Phenology Friday: One of the most common dragonflies in North America is the Green Darner (Anax junius). This species is rather large, ranging from 2.5-3 inches in length with a green thorax (midsection). Males tend to have a mostly blue abdomen while females have mostly gray. Both have 2 segments of green at the start of the abdomen, behind the thorax. Around this time of year you might see a group of green darners traveling together - they are one of a few species of dragonfly that migrate!

09/10/2021

Falling leaves, flannels, late night bonfires with s'mores - yumm!! Leave a comment letting us know what you like best about fall🍂🎃🍁

09/09/2021
Hum Daddy

Just had to share this video . . . Happy Thursday!

🟡Though there are 19 species of yellow jackets found in North America, only 5 of them are considered as pests🟡They can b...
09/09/2021

🟡Though there are 19 species of yellow jackets found in North America, only 5 of them are considered as pests
🟡They can be easily provoked by sounds and vibrations near the nest
🟡Yellow jackets nest can hold up to 15000 cells in the late summer weeks
🟡Yellow jackets mostly build their nests underground using fibers scraped from wood mixed with their saliva.
🟡 Yellow jackets tend to nest in secure places such as hollow logs, stumps, barks of trees, rodent burrows, etc. They are known to be quite ferocious while defending their nests. Humans often knowingly or unknowingly may disturb their place of dwelling, which results in a vicious retaliation.

Yellow jackets tend to be quite aggressive around this time of year as natural sugar sources decline and they need to find energy. How do you deter yellow jackets and eliminate wasp nests? Learn all about how to avoid yellow jackets as well as prevent and treat yellow jacket stings. Almanac.com/yellow-jacket-alert-taking-sting-out-fall

Here is a book you can download gives you a look at the Outdoor Hazards of Wisconsin.  Check it out here: https://cdn.sh...
09/09/2021

Here is a book you can download gives you a look at the Outdoor Hazards of Wisconsin. Check it out here:https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0145/8808/4272/files/G3564.pdf

Contents:
Amphibians (salamanders, toads)
Reptiles (turtles, snakes)
Birds (defending territory, handling birds)
Mammals (short-tailed shrews, bats, skunks, porcupines, coyotes, gray wolves, deer, black bears)
Stinging insects (bees and wasps)
Blood-feeding insects (mosquitoes, deerflies and horseflies, blackflies, biting midges, ticks, chiggers)

Plants that are poisonous when ingested (poison hemlock, spotted water hemlock, bittersweet nightshade, black nightshade, jimsonw**d)
Plants that are poisonous on contact (poison ivy, poison sumac, wild parsnip, stinging nettle)
Plants that cause hay fever (common ragw**d, giant ragw**d)
Thorny, barbed plants (bull thistle, beggarticks, burdock, cocklebur, sandbur)

Wildlife and insects and plants, oh my!

We all know about autumn and increased wasp activity in Wisconsin's outdoors, but what else is out there to bug us throughout the year? Download this excellent guide from UW-Madison Extension so you're prepared for all the "Outdoor Hazards in Wisconsin" lurking just off the yellow brick road.

http://ow.ly/at7C50G75N4

09/09/2021

Just the other day we posted about how Goldenrod is an important plant for pollinators. This short video was taken by a person that had a PIG (Pollinator Incentive Garden) and shared it with Anne Bartels, Education Specialist. Enjoy!

Do you want the serenity of the woods with colorful flowers?Mark your calendars!  On Wednesday, September 15, 2021 at th...
09/09/2021

Do you want the serenity of the woods with colorful flowers?

Mark your calendars!

On Wednesday, September 15, 2021 at the Wausaukee Village Hall at 2:00 pm, Mary Marquis, Master Gardener, will be giving a 60-minute presentation on Woodland Gardens. This presentation will encompass an analysis of natural shade areas to understand growing conditions and appropriate plant choices. You'll be introduced to plants and design elements that aid in creating relaxing environments to be enjoyed throughout the year. Techniques for creating color contrasts for every season will also be covered. An open discussion will follow the presentation. Master Gardener Volunteers will be available to answer your gardening questions. The Wausaukee Village Hall is located one block east of Hwy 141; turn at Sal’s Foods.

Take a look at this map . . . it shows the bird migration for each month during a year.  Pretty cool!
09/09/2021
Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate Across a Map of the Western Hemisphere

Take a look at this map . . . it shows the bird migration for each month during a year. Pretty cool!

For the first time, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have documented migratory movements of bird populations spanning the entire year for 118 species throughout the Western Hemisphere. The study finds broad similarity in the routes used by specific groups of species—vividly demonstrate...

HAHAHA!  Wednesday's Nature Humor!
09/08/2021

HAHAHA! Wednesday's Nature Humor!

Huzzah!  Today's Aldo Leopoldism . . . 💙💙
09/08/2021

Huzzah! Today's Aldo Leopoldism . . . 💙💙

Our relationship to the land must include both scientific understanding and love born out of first-hand aesthetic experiences.

Where did you learn to love the land? When did you begin to attempt to understand the land?

#wednesdaywisdom #landethic #sandcountyalmanac #leopold #naturelover #outdoors

I love a good ROARIE BUMMLERS!  How about you?  Anyone love to watch the storm clouds on the move?🌩💨
09/08/2021

I love a good ROARIE BUMMLERS! How about you? Anyone love to watch the storm clouds on the move?🌩💨

Share this one with your kids! I might give them a giggle. :)

#WednesdaysWord #newwordwednesday #NatureWords

Wisconsin is home to seven bats.🦇 Little Brown Bat ~ This species is the most common Myotis species in the northern two-...
09/08/2021

Wisconsin is home to seven bats.
🦇 Little Brown Bat ~ This species is the most common Myotis species in the northern two-thirds of the United States. Frequently found in tree hollows and buildings during the summer, it often roosts with big brown bats. It is most likely found near rivers, lakes, or marshes. In winter, it flies to the nearest suitable cave or abandoned mine to hibernate.
🦇 Big Brown Bat ~ This is one of the most common and widespread species of bats in North America. It roosts in colonies in tree hollows, wall spaces, and buildings. More tolerant of cold conditions than other Wisconsin bats, it is the only one that commonly overwinters in walls and attics. It also hibernates in caves and abandoned mines. It ranges in color from pale brown to dark brown with a black wing membrane.
🦇 Silver-Haired Bat ~ This bat gets its name from its black to dark brown fur frosted with silver on the back. It lives in wooded areas of the U.S. and Canada and migrates south to central and southern states where it hibernates in rock crevices and tree hollows. It feeds in forest openings and along forest edges.
🦇 Northern Long-eared Bat ~ This species is similar in appearance to the little brown bat although its hair is somewhat duller. Not as abundant in Wisconsin as the little brown bat, the northern myotis prefers abandoned mines and small caves.
🦇 Eastern Red Bat ~ The red bat is a solitary species found most often in deciduous tree foliage during the summer. It migrates south to the central and southern states where it probably hibernates in tree hollows. The red bat has fine, silky red-orange to yellowish fur. It is often overlooked because it can appear, at quick glance, to be a dead leaf. They are rarely seen far from forested areas, and moths are their favorite food.
🦇 Hoary Bat ~ One of the largest bats in the United States and the most widely distributed, this species has dark yellowish fur tipped with white. It is more common in the prairie states than in the eastern U.S. It roosts in tree foliage, mostly in evergreens. Like the red bat, it eats moths. Northern populations may migrate considerable distances to subtropical areas when the weather gets cold.
🦇 Eastern Pipistrelle ~ This is Wisconsin's smallest bat with a body of 3 inches or less and a wingspan rarely exceeding 7 inches. Pips, as they are called, emerge earlier in the evening than most other bats and have a rather slow erratic flight pattern. They're found in wooded areas.

Info from Wisconsin DNR

Wisconsin is home to seven bats.
🦇 Little Brown Bat ~ This species is the most common Myotis species in the northern two-thirds of the United States. Frequently found in tree hollows and buildings during the summer, it often roosts with big brown bats. It is most likely found near rivers, lakes, or marshes. In winter, it flies to the nearest suitable cave or abandoned mine to hibernate.
🦇 Big Brown Bat ~ This is one of the most common and widespread species of bats in North America. It roosts in colonies in tree hollows, wall spaces, and buildings. More tolerant of cold conditions than other Wisconsin bats, it is the only one that commonly overwinters in walls and attics. It also hibernates in caves and abandoned mines. It ranges in color from pale brown to dark brown with a black wing membrane.
🦇 Silver-Haired Bat ~ This bat gets its name from its black to dark brown fur frosted with silver on the back. It lives in wooded areas of the U.S. and Canada and migrates south to central and southern states where it hibernates in rock crevices and tree hollows. It feeds in forest openings and along forest edges.
🦇 Northern Long-eared Bat ~ This species is similar in appearance to the little brown bat although its hair is somewhat duller. Not as abundant in Wisconsin as the little brown bat, the northern myotis prefers abandoned mines and small caves.
🦇 Eastern Red Bat ~ The red bat is a solitary species found most often in deciduous tree foliage during the summer. It migrates south to the central and southern states where it probably hibernates in tree hollows. The red bat has fine, silky red-orange to yellowish fur. It is often overlooked because it can appear, at quick glance, to be a dead leaf. They are rarely seen far from forested areas, and moths are their favorite food.
🦇 Hoary Bat ~ One of the largest bats in the United States and the most widely distributed, this species has dark yellowish fur tipped with white. It is more common in the prairie states than in the eastern U.S. It roosts in tree foliage, mostly in evergreens. Like the red bat, it eats moths. Northern populations may migrate considerable distances to subtropical areas when the weather gets cold.
🦇 Eastern Pipistrelle ~ This is Wisconsin's smallest bat with a body of 3 inches or less and a wingspan rarely exceeding 7 inches. Pips, as they are called, emerge earlier in the evening than most other bats and have a rather slow erratic flight pattern. They're found in wooded areas.

Info from Wisconsin DNR

September is the mushroom month.  As northland temperatures cool and leaves change color, these fleshy growths appear in...
09/08/2021

September is the mushroom month. As northland temperatures cool and leaves change color, these fleshy growths appear in lawns and woods. Most are getting nutrition from dead wood and decaying leaves; and they are more common in forests. Being highly influenced by available moisture, populations vary from year to year. Despite the weather variables, Milk Cap mushrooms seem to grow each year on the forest floor. These mushrooms contain a substance called latex that is exuded from any bruised or cut part, especially the gills. Though the latex may actually be clear or colored, it is the white, milky liquid that gives the plant its name. Not very abundant, they appear in small groups the caps run the gamut of fungi colors. The caps are often funnel shaped with gills extending onto the stem. Since they usually grow in forests, it is believed that they form mutual relationships with specific trees.

Did you know . . . the word hurricane comes from Hurakan, a cranky one legged Mayan deity that was particularly irritabl...
09/08/2021

Did you know . . . the word hurricane comes from Hurakan, a cranky one legged Mayan deity that was particularly irritable in late summer and fall. 😉 Most Atlantic hurricanes are born off the western coast of Africa when warm ocean water evaporates and rises into the windy upper atmosphere, creating a powerful, spiraling storm with a heated core. Too bad we can't harness all that power, a typical hurricane releases up to 600 trillion watts of heat energy.

Did you know . . . the word hurricane comes from Hurakan, a cranky one legged Mayan deity that was particularly irritable in late summer and fall. 😉 Most Atlantic hurricanes are born off the western coast of Africa when warm ocean water evaporates and rises into the windy upper atmosphere, creating a powerful, spiraling storm with a heated core. Too bad we can't harness all that power, a typical hurricane releases up to 600 trillion watts of heat energy.

Yes it does!  Nature!
09/08/2021

Yes it does! Nature!

Most coral fungi grow on the ground, but some grow on well decayed logs and stumps. They are usually found in forests bu...
09/08/2021

Most coral fungi grow on the ground, but some grow on well decayed logs and stumps. They are usually found in forests but some can also be found in fields. They are decomposers. Some are brightly colored. With club-shaped or fingerlike stalks, coral fungi, can grow to be very large and weigh up to 50 pounds.

Walking through the woods this time of year, you might come across several species of coral fungi. I recently found this one on a hike with my kids. Coral fungi are notoriously hard to identify to species and I’m content to just call this one Ramaria spp. As you probably guessed, this unique group of fungi is named after their resemblance to coral.

Goldenrod . . . not just a w**d!
09/08/2021

Goldenrod . . . not just a w**d!

Researchers at Cornell University have reported that goldenrod (Solidago spp.) is a vital fall-blooming plant that supplies nectar on the butterflies' long migrations to their overwintering site in Mexico. https://tinyurl.com/goldenrodformonarchs

An oldie but a goodie . . . how many remember doing this with Grandma?
09/07/2021

An oldie but a goodie . . . how many remember doing this with Grandma?

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Address

1926 Hall Avenue
Marinette, WI
54143

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Tuesday 8am - 4:30pm
Wednesday 8am - 4:30pm
Thursday 8am - 4:30pm
Friday 8am - 4:30pm

Telephone

(715) 732-7780

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Comments

Now that you’ve sent out notices to everyone with vacation homes that they have to have their septic system inspected in the middle of a global pandemic, are you prepared for the influx of people from across the state traveling to Marinette County?
Little bit of history that i found in my fathers basement. I think my dad told me that the gun shop was the shop building when i was a kid. He still loves his outdoor animals even though he cant go into the woods anymore. The paper he had was marinette county outdoorsman. We still have a few of papers that my mom and dad did. The pic in the comment is the outdoor news interview article with my dad back in 77.