NAACP McDowell County

NAACP McDowell County The mission of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate race-based discrimination.
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Objectives The following statement of objectives is found on the first page of the NAACP Constitution - the principal objectives of the Association shall be: To ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of all citizens To achieve equality of rights and eliminate race prejudice among the citizens of the United States To remove all barriers of racial discrimination through democratic processes To seek enactment and enforcement of federal, state, and local laws securing civil rights To inform the public of the adverse effects of racial discrimination and to seek its elimination To educate persons as to their constitutional rights and to take all lawful action to secure the exercise thereof, and to take any other lawful action in furtherance of these objectives, consistent with the NAACP's Articles of Incorporation and this Constitution.

Mission: Our mission is to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate race-based discrimination.

Operating as usual

10/11/2020
VOTE 2020: WNC voter election guide
09/27/2020
VOTE 2020: WNC voter election guide

VOTE 2020: WNC voter election guide

The 2020 General Election is just weeks away. Here is a list of important dates and information about voting you should know. Timeline: October 9, 2020 - Regular voter registration deadline (Would-be voters may same-day register and vote in-person during the early voting period. ) October 15, 2020 -...

Historians want to honor convicts' contributions to WNC railroads
09/26/2020
Historians want to honor convicts' contributions to WNC railroads

Historians want to honor convicts' contributions to WNC railroads

It’s an idea to honor a group of people who contributed to Western North Carolina’s history but have largely gone unrecognized — those who built the railroad system across the mountains. Caption: WLOS. Because of a lack of funds at the end of the Civil War, the state needed cheap l...

The mural in Old Fort is now finished. It was to honor two civil rights leaders. George Sandlin, who worked to preserve ...
09/20/2020

The mural in Old Fort is now finished. It was to honor two civil rights leaders. George Sandlin, who worked to preserve the Catawba View Grammar School in Old Fort after it was shut down in 1950 and that of Albert Joyner, who fought against segregation on behalf of Old Fort’s children in 1955.
Here's a picture from today of the two men’s families and community neighbors at the mural.

This Letter to the Editor was in the McDowell News edition on August 28,, 2020.  Thanks to Richard and Pat Faulkner for ...
08/29/2020

This Letter to the Editor was in the McDowell News edition on August 28,, 2020. Thanks to Richard and Pat Faulkner for your continued support.

This moment is long overdue. For far too long, we have undervalued Black women's political power and their role in shapi...
08/12/2020

This moment is long overdue.

For far too long, we have undervalued Black women's political power and their role in shaping our culture, communities, and country. The selection of Sen. Harris as a vice-presidential candidate on a major party ticket is the culmination of the tireless work of Shirley Chisholm, Charlene Mitchell, Sojourner Truth, Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, Barbara Jordan, Ida B. Wells, and Myrlie Evers in their fight for representation and equality. Their sacrifices, told and untold, made it possible for Sen. Harris to make political history today. Regardless of party affiliation, every American should be proud that this milestone was finally reached.

While we do not support a political party, we recognize the overwhelming significance of this moment and what it means for this nation. We must not allow coverage of Sen. Harris' historic candidacy to decline into ugly racist and sexist stereotypes and attacks.

We call upon the media, members of both political parties, and the people of this nation to honor this historic moment and treat Sen. Harris's candidacy with the respect and esteem it deserves throughout this election season.

As the presidential campaign progresses, the NAACP remains steadfast in our pursuit of full participation in democracy for Black people. With our ongoing commitment to dismantling institutional injustice, uplifting Black culture, and maximizing our economic and political power, we know that this pivotal moment sets the stage for our continued work to realize equal justice.

In Solidarity,

Derrick Johnson
@DerrickNAACP
President and CEO
NAACP

Photo credit: MSNBC

Important Election Dates.  Please share!
08/07/2020
Important Election Dates

Important Election Dates. Please share!

Important Dates 2020 Deadlines for Requesting an Absentee Ballot November General Election: Tuesday, October 27, 2020 by 5 p.m. Last Day to Register to Vote October 9…

Together, You Can Redeem the Soul of Our NationBy John LewisMr. Lewis, the civil rights leader who died on July 17, wrot...
07/31/2020

Together, You Can Redeem the Soul of Our Nation

By John Lewis

Mr. Lewis, the civil rights leader who died on July 17, wrote this essay shortly before his death, to be published upon the day of his funeral.

While my time here has now come to an end, I want you to know that in the last days and hours of my life you inspired me. You filled me with hope about the next chapter of the great American story when you used your power to make a difference in our society. Millions of people motivated simply by human compassion laid down the burdens of division. Around the country and the world you set aside race, class, age, language and nationality to demand respect for human dignity.
That is why I had to visit Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington, though I was admitted to the hospital the following day. I just had to see and feel it for myself that, after many years of silent witness, the truth is still marching on.
Emmett Till was my George Floyd. He was my Rayshard Brooks, Sandra Bland and Breonna Taylor. He was 14 when he was killed, and I was only 15 years old at the time. I will never ever forget the moment when it became so clear that he could easily have been me. In those days, fear constrained us like an imaginary prison, and troubling thoughts of potential brutality committed for no understandable reason were the bars.
Though I was surrounded by two loving parents, plenty of brothers, sisters and cousins, their love could not protect me from the unholy oppression waiting just outside that family circle. Unchecked, unrestrained violence and government-sanctioned terror had the power to turn a simple stroll to the store for some Skittles or an innocent morning jog down a lonesome country road into a nightmare. If we are to survive as one unified nation, we must discover what so readily takes root in our hearts that could rob Mother Emanuel Church in South Carolina of her brightest and best, shoot unwitting concertgoers in Las Vegas and choke to death the hopes and dreams of a gifted violinist like Elijah McClain.
Like so many young people today, I was searching for a way out, or some might say a way in, and then I heard the voice of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on an old radio. He was talking about the philosophy and discipline of nonviolence. He said we are all complicit when we tolerate injustice. He said it is not enough to say it will get better by and by. He said each of us has a moral obligation to stand up, speak up and speak out. When you see something that is not right, you must say something. You must do something. Democracy is not a state. It is an act, and each generation must do its part to help build what we called the Beloved Community, a nation and world society at peace with itself.
Ordinary people with extraordinary vision can redeem the soul of America by getting in what I call good trouble, necessary trouble. Voting and participating in the democratic process are key. The vote is the most powerful nonviolent change agent you have in a democratic society. You must use it because it is not guaranteed. You can lose it.
You must also study and learn the lessons of history because humanity has been involved in this soul-wrenching, existential struggle for a very long time. People on every continent have stood in your shoes, through decades and centuries before you. The truth does not change, and that is why the answers worked out long ago can help you find solutions to the challenges of our time. Continue to build union between movements stretching across the globe because we must put away our willingness to profit from the exploitation of others.
Though I may not be here with you, I urge you to answer the highest calling of your heart and stand up for what you truly believe. In my life I have done all I can to demonstrate that the way of peace, the way of love and nonviolence is the more excellent way. Now it is your turn to let freedom ring.
When historians pick up their pens to write the story of the 21st century, let them say that it was your generation who laid down the heavy burdens of hate at last and that peace finally triumphed over violence, aggression and war. So I say to you, walk with the wind, brothers and sisters, and let the spirit of peace and the power of everlasting love be your guide.
John Lewis, the civil rights leader and congressman who died on July 17, wrote this essay shortly before his death.

Marion Police Department
07/28/2020

Marion Police Department

With concerns about public safety due to Covid-19, we are unfortunately canceling the 2020 National Night Out. This event is held by the Marion Police Department on the first Tuesday in August of each year on Main Street. We always have many community partners that join us to make this event a huge success.

The Marion Police Department has to do our part to keep the community safe.

Thank you.

Civil rights legend Rep. John Lewis dead at 80
07/18/2020
Civil rights legend Rep. John Lewis dead at 80

Civil rights legend Rep. John Lewis dead at 80

John Robert Lewis, the son of sharecroppers who survived a brutal beating by police during a landmark 1965 march in Selma, Alabama, to become a towering figure of the civil rights movement and a longtime US congressman, has died after a six-month battle with cancer. He was 80.

And if you are not registered, REGISTER TODAY. Do not wait.
07/04/2020
North Carolina Election Center - Vote.org

And if you are not registered, REGISTER TODAY. Do not wait.

Vote.org election center. Register to vote, check your registration status, get your absentee ballot, learn the voter ID laws, and find all the dates, deadlines and forms you need.

06/19/2020
McDowell Arts Council Association
06/05/2020

McDowell Arts Council Association

Today and everyday ✌

Guest column: How much is too much?
06/03/2020
Guest column: How much is too much?

Guest column: How much is too much?

I understand the rage of Minneapolis, Minnesota (George Floyd). I agree with the demands of Brunswick, Georgia (Ahmaud Arbery). I support the protest of Louisville, Kentucky (Breonna Taylor).

NAACP ISSUES STATEMENT SURROUNDING THE EVENTS OF PROTEST IN MINNEAPOLISMAY 28, 2020President and CEO of the NAACP, Derri...
05/28/2020

NAACP ISSUES STATEMENT SURROUNDING THE EVENTS OF PROTEST IN MINNEAPOLIS
MAY 28, 2020

President and CEO of the NAACP, Derrick Johnson, issued the following statement surrounding the events of protest in Minneapolis:

“The murder of George Floyd by police is an unspeakable tragedy. Sadly, police brutality against the Black community has been an ever-present circumstance since its origin to preserve the system of slavery.

Black families and communities across this country are unified at this moment by unfortunate circumstances. The uprising spreading across this country is fueled by systemic racial issues that have been ingrained in the fabric of this nation for decades. As we’ve seen over the last few days, these issues have now manifested into anger, sadness, fear, and confusion. Many throughout the country are left to consider at this moment after watching the horrific footage of George Floyd: When is enough, enough?

As a father, I know what it’s like when my sons and daughters want to leave the house and being scared that they may never return. As a husband, I consider my wife and the life she would be left to navigate if I was prematurely taken from her and my children as yet another unexplainable death. As a Black man, I consider how much longer I can be asked to bear the brunt of these social injustices without meeting force with force. But as a community, we must also find what is at stake. We must consider the lives we are attempting to forge for our families and communities. Additionally, we must act in our best interest to knock down the walls of injustice that will grant future generations access to higher social, economic, and political power.

In this hour, our communities are angry, saddened. But we must be strategic and measured as we battle this latest grave injustice. The NAACP will not rest until we see these officers charged and convicted for the murder of George Floyd. We must keep our focus on redressing the systemic racism against our community that led to this tragedy. We cannot afford to do so while losing more Black sons and daughters.

We must protest peacefully, demand persistently, and fight politically. But most of all, we must vote in November.”

Thanks to those serving and/or served !!
05/16/2020

Thanks to those serving and/or served !!

Our Teachers and staff are awesome!
05/04/2020

Our Teachers and staff are awesome!

Happy Easter!
04/12/2020

Happy Easter!

04/02/2020

The regularly scheduled Monthly Meetings of NAACP McDowell County are postponed until further notice!!! Your continued support is greatly appreciated!!!

56 people tested for COVID-19 in McDowell; Governor issues new restrictions. Click blue link for ... from McDowell Count...
03/23/2020
56 people tested for COVID-19 in McDowell; Governor issues new restrictions. Click blue link for ... from McDowell County Emergency Management : Nixle

56 people tested for COVID-19 in McDowell; Governor issues new restrictions. Click blue link for ... from McDowell County Emergency Management : Nixle

As of Monday at 5 p.m., there is a total of 56 persons who have been tested for COVID-19 in McDowell County. Twenty-four tests have returned back negative. The medical screening hotline is open from ...

Marion East Community
03/16/2020

Marion East Community

Check your mailboxes, neighbors! The United States Census, first conducted in 1790, is going virtual this year. You should have received or will be receiving your census invitation in the mail with your Census ID.

Respond to the census at my2020census.gov by April 1 as mandated by law and the constitution.

Results from the 2020 census will be used to:

- direct billions of dollars in federal funds to local communities for schools, roads, and other public services.

- help your community prepare to meet transportation and emergency readiness needs.

- determine the number of seats each state has in the US House of Representatives and your political representation and all levels of government

Let's get counted! And, help your neighbors get counted if they do not have reliable online access!

Thanks to Lt. Johnsie Parker, Community Paramedic with McDowell County Emergency Services.  Today she shared with our me...
03/14/2020

Thanks to Lt. Johnsie Parker, Community Paramedic with McDowell County Emergency Services. Today she shared with our membership McDowell County’s readiness for responding to the COVID-19 (Coronavirus). She also made us aware of much of the misinformation being spread about this pandemic and where one seeking factual information should go. She fielded several questions and responded with great professionalism to the satisfaction of those of us in attendance.
Thanks Lt. Parker and all of McDowell County Emergency Service personnel for your service.
Ray McKesson, President
NAACP McDowell County

Black History MomentUnity in the Community (written and directed by Perry L. Smith) was a play based on the 221 bypass i...
02/24/2020

Black History Moment

Unity in the Community (written and directed by Perry L. Smith) was a play based on the 221 bypass in Marion in the 1980's. "The highway goes through the West Marion Community which is historically comprised of black residents and has cut the community in two." The road was sold as an upgrade for access and the community was promised by city officials that it would be reconnected with an overpass or walkway and that West Henderson Street would be restored. However neither of those things happened and the community was split and completely disconnected from direct access to any main artery. The community complained and went to city officials to remind them of the promise, but their complaints fell on deaf ears. Decades later, the situation was magnified when a fire occurred on one of the streets. Even though the response from the fire and police department was quick, a large section of the community was locked in with no access in or out except by foot. Had another emergency occurred at the same time, the results could have been devastating. Which was the same concerns our ancestors verbalized prior to the road construction.

02/14/2020
N.C. State Board of Elections
02/05/2020

N.C. State Board of Elections

REMINDER: Friday (Feb. 7) is the regular voter registration deadline for the March 3 primary election. If you miss this deadline, you may still register and vote during the early voting period, Feb. 13-29.

More info: ncsbe.gov/Voters/Registering-to-Vote. #YourVoteCountsNC

Black History Month   “Although this month was mainly established to celebrate and honor the work of African Americans, ...
02/01/2020

Black History Month

“Although this month was mainly established to celebrate and honor the work of African Americans, it signifies unity and recognition cutting across racial and geographical barriers. It therefore holds a very special position and importance in today’s world where the importance to highlight the work and effort of every single citizen of the nation irrespective of his regional or national identity is honored and celebrated”.

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PO Box 1823
Marion, NC
28752

Telephone

(828) 652-2842

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Mission My Care Now - McDowell in Marion - CLOSING 8:00 PM today OPENING 9:00 AM tomorrow Tomorrow: Asheville Cardiology Associates in Marion - OPENING 10:00 AM Mission Community Medicine in Nebo and Old Fort - OPENING 12:00 PM Mission Pediatrics McDowell in Marion - OPENING 12:00 PM Mission Surgery - McDowell in Marion - OPENING 10:00 AM Mission Urology - McDowell in Marion - OPENING 10:00 AM All hospitals and emergency departments will remain open 24/7
The republican legislature says that republicans are not racists. Just sayin'.
Asheville Buncombe County NAACP urges you to attend the 2017 African Americans in WNC & Southern Appalachia Conference starting October 19th thru 21st. The Conference offers scholars and the community an opportunity to address the African American experience in Southern Appalachia. This year's theme is "Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow." In addition to history, this year's conference will highlight research from UNC Asheville's State of Black Asheville classes, as well as examples of current-day community resilience.The OPENING PROGRAM is on October 19, 6:30 - 8:30 will be at the YMI Cultural Center 39 So. Market St., Avl 28801. The next two-days, October 20th & 21st, will be at UNCA in Wilma M. Sherrill Center, Ingles Mountain View Room. Go to the link below to see the full schedule, and to download a pdf with all the details. OCTOBER 19TH PROGRAM: Conference Welcome: Darin Waters, Ph.D. UNC Asheville Welcome: Chancellor Mary Grant Remarks: Tracey Greene-Washington, CoThinkk Presentation of Community Award: Sarah Judson, Ph.D. Community Award: Shirley Whitesides Introduction Keynote: Dwight Mullen, Ph.D. Jesse & Julia Ray Lecture: A Conversation with Judge Yvonne Mims Evans and Phyllis Utley