Medina County Soil & Water Conservation District

Medina County Soil & Water Conservation District To provide the Medina County community with education, guidance, and technical assistance that promotes the wise use of its soil and water resources.
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Operating as usual

Abby Costilow, Bekah Strait, John McGovern, Heather Liccardi sampling the West Branch of the Rocky River. The water was ...
03/05/2021

Abby Costilow, Bekah Strait, John McGovern, Heather Liccardi sampling the West Branch of the Rocky River. The water was freezing yet stoneflies and mayflies were still swimming. All in all, it was a great day with clear waters and quality water samples. The ice was only 1"-2" thick.

Prepare now for spring mud - Farm and Dairy
03/04/2021
Prepare now for spring mud - Farm and Dairy

Prepare now for spring mud - Farm and Dairy

Prepare now for warmer temperatures and increased perci[pitation the last two weeks of March to prevent your pastures from turning into mud.

Lorain Soil & Water Conservation District
03/03/2021

Lorain Soil & Water Conservation District

Happy World Wildlife Day! This day is dedicated to celebrate and raise awareness of the worlds wild animals.

The years themes is "Forests and Livelihoods: Sustaining People and Planet" to highlight the central role forests, forest species, and ecosystems services in sustaining the livelihoods of hundreds of millions of people globally.

The 2021 celebration will be entirely virtual bringing together representatives of UN member States, UN System organizations and multilateral environmental agreements, civil society, and the private sector for a series of discussions along the theme of "Forests and Livelihoods: Sustaining People and Planet".

To learn how to get involved or view the live event visit:

https://www.youtube.com/user/WorldWildlifeDay/live

www.wildlifeday.org/content/get_involved

#ForestsPeoplePlanet #WWD2021 #WorldWildlifeDay #WWD

Summit Soil and Water Conservation District
02/23/2021

Summit Soil and Water Conservation District

With low temperatures and snow we’ve been seeing more ice, but are you using the right S.A.L.T to solve your ice problem...
02/22/2021

With low temperatures and snow we’ve been seeing more ice, but are you using the right S.A.L.T to solve your ice problems?
Stuff- Salt (sodium chloride) only works above 15℉. When temperatures dip below that, switch to sand for some added traction or use a product that melts ice that isn’t salt.
Amount- spreading more salt does not improve deicing. One coffee cup is enough to cover 10 sidewalk squares.
Location- Salt only belongs on sidewalks and driveways. Never salt flower beds, around trees or in our streams.
Time- Salt works best when applied before snow falls or after snow is removed. Never apply salt when rain is in the forecast because it will wash down our drains and enter waterways.

Following these S.A.L.T tips will help improve our water quality. Over using salt or using it incorrectly will result in more salt washing into our storm drains and into our waterways. One teaspoon of salt will permanently pollute 5 gallons of water, increasing salt levels in the water. These high salt levels can be damaging to our plants and animals living in and around streams.

SEEDLING SALE UPDATE!Red Oak, Black Maple, Paw-Paw, Persimmon, Tulip Poplar, Red Oiser Dogwood, Winterberry, Spicebush, ...
02/18/2021

SEEDLING SALE UPDATE!
Red Oak, Black Maple, Paw-Paw, Persimmon, Tulip Poplar, Red Oiser Dogwood, Winterberry, Spicebush, and White Flowering Dogwood are OUT OF STOCK. Be sure to to get your order forms in before our trees are all gone!!!
https://medinaswcd.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/january-2021-newsletter.pdf

Dormant Gardens If you have a native garden or live by a native prairie, you’ll see many pollinators and insects enjoyin...
02/17/2021

Dormant Gardens

If you have a native garden or live by a native prairie, you’ll see many pollinators and insects enjoying the flowers throughout the warm season. In the winter the garden might look dead and messy, with minimal activity. Believe it or not the plants are not dead; they are dormant! These dormant plants play a huge role in supporting native wildlife during the cold season.
When you allow your dormant plants to remain standing, these native plants will provide services all winter, such as providing food, cover, shelter, and habitat for wildlife.
Even after entering dormancy native plants, including native asters and sunflowers, will provide seeds for birds throughout the winter. These standing stems also provide cover from predators for small birds like black-capped chickadees and white-throated sparrows.
Many pollinators will use dormant plant stems as shelters to hide away in until spring. Standing stems protect eggs of solitary bees and other pollinators. This is crucial in helping bees survive, as their population numbers have plummeted throughout the last decade. Next time you see a patch of dormant plants in a prairie or a neighbor’s yard, think of it as a winter home for our pollinators.

Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District
02/09/2021

Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District

Hooray! It's time for snow! When we think about snow, we probably think about activities like sledding and skiing. Or maybe we think about de-icing and plowing. One of the last things on the list - or maybe it didn't even make your list - is stormwater management. It is especially important to consider with all our wacky winter weather with snow, ice and melting, especially with today's featured stormwater control measure: permeable pavement. Check out our winter maintenance tips to learn more about permeable pavement and important winter considerations!
https://mailchi.mp/2cbe2b5122ed/january-permeable-paver-maintenance-tips-5114421

Some great information provided by our friends at Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District.
02/08/2021

Some great information provided by our friends at Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District.

Check out our Stormwater Control Measure Maintenance Tips publication, an outreach campaign to deliver useful information and seasonal tips for property owners, managers, contractors, and HOAs to assist with stormwater control measure (SCM) maintenance needs. Today's SCM: Bioretention! Sometimes referred to as bioswales or engineered rain gardens. These green infrastructure practices help prevent flooding and soak up pollution! Learn more about winter maintenance here: https://mailchi.mp/39b4d79a04bc/january-bioretention-maintenance-tips-5114293

Don't forget to order your plant kits!
02/04/2021

Don't forget to order your plant kits!

Check out our native plant kits for this spring. You can order yours from our seedling order form, follow the link below. Reminder the pick up date for the native plants will not be the same day as our seedling sales.

https://medinaswcd.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/2021-seedling-order-form.pdf

If you are willing to brave the cold you can capture some awesome pictures.  Be sure to share your winter photos with us...
02/04/2021

If you are willing to brave the cold you can capture some awesome pictures. Be sure to share your winter photos with us.

Even when our prairie is dormant it is still working to improve water quality.
02/03/2021

Even when our prairie is dormant it is still working to improve water quality.

This year's been intense, and small things have been falling by the wayside. However, you can make the most of it. If yo...
02/02/2021

This year's been intense, and small things have been falling by the wayside. However, you can make the most of it. If your rain barrel is still out in the snow and ice, send a photo to [email protected] by Feb 26. Even though, it's not good to leave rain barrels outside in the winter, this year it can win you a prize.

Stormwater flows directly to nearby rivers, streams and lakes: not to wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, your stree...
02/01/2021

Stormwater flows directly to nearby rivers, streams and lakes: not to wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, your street is really like waterfront property and everything rinsing off your roof, yard and driveway goes to the creek. A good start to reducing pollution in your neighborhood is cleaning the storm drain outside your house.

Chagrin River Watershed Partners, Inc.
01/28/2021

Chagrin River Watershed Partners, Inc.

Dead plants and downed leaves haven’t outlived their purpose just because it’s wintertime! Many important native animal species depend on plant matter to survive the harsh winter months. Keeping leaves, mulch, spent flowers, and dead stalks around in the winter provides important resources for many species. Consider planting some native late-blooming plants on your property that will offer year-round habitat, while improving soil health and filtering stormwater all year long.

Check out our native plant kits for this spring.  You can order yours from our seedling order form, follow the link belo...
01/26/2021

Check out our native plant kits for this spring. You can order yours from our seedling order form, follow the link below. Reminder the pick up date for the native plants will not be the same day as our seedling sales.

https://medinaswcd.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/2021-seedling-order-form.pdf

Medina County Soil & Water Conservation District
01/25/2021

Medina County Soil & Water Conservation District

Are you thinking about building a pond?

CALL: Medina County Soil and Water Conservation District to schedule a site visit (330) 722-9315. Meeting with the SWCD staff before submitting a permit is highly recommended.

During the site visit we will:
1. Determine the suitability of the soil for a pond utilizing the soil survey.
2. Assist you to help locate a site for the pond
3. Determine the watershed of the pond
4. Discuss the drainage patterns of the site and how they need to be maintained.
5. Discuss the proper permit procedure that is required in the county and what is expected from you as the landowner.

Required steps:
1. Obtain a Stormwater Management and Erosion Control Permit Application from the Medina County Highway Engineer’s Office.
2. Complete Pond Construction Plan standard form and return to SWCD Office.
3. Our office reviews and ensures that all required information is complete and meets current standards.
4. A visual site investigation will be completed by our office to determine if pond site appears as drawn on the plan, and that no apparent drainage problems will be created by construction.
5. The reviewed Pond Construction Plan and the Pond Permit Application must then be submitted by contractor/landowner to the Township Zoning Inspector for township permit, if required.
6. Construction can begin at this time; however, SWCD must be contacted to inspect the completed pond. · It is best to call before the contractor leaves the site so any changes can be made. Final inspection report will be mailed to the landowner and the County Engineer for review.
7. Enjoy your pond!

Be sure to register for this program put on by our friends in Summit.
01/21/2021

Be sure to register for this program put on by our friends in Summit.

Do you have a Honey Locust on your property?  Click the link below and fill out our entry form.  Find out if your tree i...
01/20/2021

Do you have a Honey Locust on your property? Click the link below and fill out our entry form. Find out if your tree is the biggest in Medina County. With permission you can also nominate a neighbors tree.
https://medinaswcd.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/2021-big-tree-entry-form.pdf

Congratulations Tom Miller, our new SWCD board supervisor.  Tom was sworn in today by Medina County Commissioner Bill Hu...
01/19/2021

Congratulations Tom Miller, our new SWCD board supervisor. Tom was sworn in today by Medina County Commissioner Bill Hutson.

The 2021 Tree Seedling sale has begun!  You can find the order form using the link below. https://medinaswcd.org/wp-cont...
01/15/2021

The 2021 Tree Seedling sale has begun! You can find the order form using the link below.

https://medinaswcd.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/2021-seedling-order-form.pdf

The Medina SWCD is happy to announce our new Education Coordinator, Kellie Docherty!  Hi I’m Kellie I was born and raise...
01/07/2021

The Medina SWCD is happy to announce our new Education Coordinator, Kellie Docherty!

Hi I’m Kellie I was born and raised in Springfield Massachusetts but I moved to Seville after college. I attended West Virginia University where I earned a bachelor’s degree in Recreation, Parks & Tourism with a minor in Forestry. Before I got this Education Coordinator position, I’ve worked as a seasonal employee doing a mix of environmental education and habitat restoration. I’m excited to meet more people in the community while increasing education on native plants, insects and birds.
When I’m not working I like to spend my time doing hand embroidery, roller skating, hiking and birding around Medina County.

Our office has decided we are already over winter.  Who is ready for spring and to be out in the yard!
01/06/2021

Our office has decided we are already over winter. Who is ready for spring and to be out in the yard!

Goodbye Linda!It is time to say congratulations to Linda Schneider, Soil and Water Conservation District Education Coord...
01/05/2021

Goodbye Linda!

It is time to say congratulations to Linda Schneider, Soil and Water Conservation District Education Coordinator. Linda retired on December 31, 2020, after seven years of dedicated service and many accomplishments throughout the county.

Several of Linda’s accomplishments were promoting the effort of homeowners to create their own wildlife backyard habitat and have them recognized by the National Wildlife Federation. In doing so made Medina County the first county in the state to be designated a National Wildlife Federation Habitat County, with over 400 registered sites to date.

Congratulations landowners and Linda for seeing this through. Linda was also instrumental in developing additional native plant gardens and a 3 acre prairie around the District building. The entire project was done utilizing grant money and private donations. The plantings will be used as an outdoor education classroom for the public to use at their leisure. Interpretive signs will help to guide onlookers around the grounds to educate them on the benefits of native plants and how plants can help toward water quality. All of this happened due to Linda’s dedication and hard work to see through this project and pursuing volunteers to make it happen. The Soil and Water Conservation District would like to congratulate Linda on a job well done and wish her the best of luck on her next projects. You will be missed.

12/29/2020

New H2Ohio Incentive Program Helps Improve Water Quality

COLUMBUS, Ohio – As part of Ohio Governor Mike DeWine’s H2Ohio initiative, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) is offering a new incentive program to encourage farmers to aid in conservation and improve water quality. ODNR will be accepting applications for its Water Quality Incentive Program (WQIP) from Dec. 1, 2020 through Jan. 29, 2021.

“Improving Ohio’s water quality is incredibly important,” said Governor Mike DeWine. “Giving farmers an incentive to participate in this conservation process is another step toward clean water for future generations.”

The new program is being offered in combination with the Lake Erie Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP). CREP is a USDA conservation program that offers farmers and landowners financial compensation for taking cropland out of production and establishing conservation practices. The H2Ohio Water Quality Incentive Program will offer a one-time payment of $2,000 per acre for new Lake Erie CREP wetlands and forested riparian buffers (buffer strip with trees) to help improve water quality in the Lake Erie watershed. Wetlands and riparian buffers act as filters to reduce nutrient loading into waterways and help reduce flooding. Riparian buffers also stabilize streambanks to reduce soil erosion.

“This program gives farmers a unique opportunity to benefit the environment and themselves,” ODNR Director Mary Mertz said. “The program will let farmers boost Ohio’s environmental health while receiving fair compensation.”

To qualify for the H2Ohio Water Quality Incentive Program, interested farmers and landowners must be eligible for CREP and submit an H2Ohio WQIP application during the announced sign-up period prior to their CREP contract approval. Applicants do not have to sign up for CREP prior to applying for the H2Ohio WQIP. However, if the applicant is approved for the WQIP, an approved CREP contract will be required to receive the WQIP payment. Applications will be scored and selected based on criteria to prioritize the best projects to improve water quality. For qualifying criteria click here.

Farmers interested in more information can contact ODNR technical staff for additional program details, project planning assistance, and help with the application process. To contact an ODNR representative in your area click here.

The new incentive program is one of several H2Ohio efforts currently underway by ODNR including the Forder Bridge Project in Paulding County, the Fruth Wetland Nature Preserve in Seneca County, the St. Joseph Confluence Reconnection in Williams County, the Van Order Wetland and Forest Restoration in Henry County, and the new wetland area east of the Andreoff Wildlife Area in Wyandot County.

H2Ohio is Governor Mike DeWine’s initiative to ensure safe and clean water in Ohio. It is a comprehensive, data-driven approach to improving water quality over the long term. H2Ohio focuses on encouraging agricultural best management practices, restoring, and enhancing wetlands, and replacing home septic systems to reduce nutrients that contribute to harmful algal blooms. For more information on the H2Ohio initiative, please visit h2.ohio.gov.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.gov.

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For more information contact:
Stephanie O'Grady, ODNR Communications
(614) 265-6860

Address

6090 Wedgewood Rd
Medina, OH
44256

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 16:30
Tuesday 08:00 - 16:30
Wednesday 08:00 - 16:30
Thursday 08:00 - 16:30
Friday 08:00 - 16:30

Telephone

(330) 722-9322

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Comments

Please be aware that the Medina Township Zoning Commission is considering changing the zoning near Rt 3 and 71 to allow a Scheetz tranportation/gas center to be built. This area has been identified by the Ohio Soil and Water Conservation District as an important water resource and environmentally sensitive area, and is also included in the Lake Erie balanced growth initiative program, which seeks to protect natural resource areas in the Lake Erie watershed in order to protect water and quality of life. The scenic Buckeye Trail also travels through this area. Please consider attending the meeting (virtually or in person) on March 16 to oppose the rezoning of this area.
Here's an article from cleveland.com about the troubles that some of our lakes are facing. Chippewa Lake is included in it.
Is the conservation contest cancelled ?
Medina County Bee Inspector Report: The rain has been pouring down this year and the honey has been pouring in. So as I am doing inspections in Medina County I’m seeing a lot of honey bound brood nests where the bees have filled up most of the nest with nectar. This means the queen has no place to lay eggs and may lead to swarming. A swarm this time of year has almost no chance of surviving unless cared for intensely by a beekeeper. If you are a beekeeper, make some room by extracting honey or adding drawn comb.
The unseasonably warm weather allowed for some additional apiary inspections to continue our efforts in protecting pollinators.