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Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office

The Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office implements the Service’s Fisheries Programs in the Lake Michigan and Great Lakes basins to conserve, protect, manage, and restore native fish and the habitats they rely on. We partner with many state, local, non-governmental, tribal, and other federal agencies and organizations and encourage cooperative management of fishery resources of the Grea

The Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office implements the Service’s Fisheries Programs in the Lake Michigan and Great Lakes basins to conserve, protect, manage, and restore native fish and the habitats they rely on. We partner with many state, local, non-governmental, tribal, and other federal agencies and organizations and encourage cooperative management of fishery resources of the Grea

Operating as usual

12/28/2022

After recovering from the surgical insertion of a telemetry tag, tagged lake trout are released back onto the reefs from which they were collected. By targeting fish prior to spawning, crews can catch larger numbers of fish with less effort and are better able to identify the s*x of the fish as one objective of this study was to look at spawning site fidelity and movement among reefs in the area. (Part 2)

Video Description: A tagged lake trout is released back into Lake Michigan and can be seen swimming down in the water column. Video Credit: Josh Hug/USFWS

This fall, the Green Bay FWCO Native Species crew, in collaboration with USGS staff, conducted telemetry tagging efforts...
12/27/2022

This fall, the Green Bay FWCO Native Species crew, in collaboration with USGS staff, conducted telemetry tagging efforts on lake trout in the Northern Refuge surrounding Beaver Island in northern Lake Michigan. The telemetry tags were surgically implanted into 48 female lake trout. These tags, along with 160 fish tagged last year,will transmit location information to receivers throughout the area to track movements of these fish for years to come. (Part 1)

Photo Descriptions: Left Image: Lake trout swimming in a recovery tank after being tagged. Right Image: A tagged female lake trout ready to be released back into Lake Michigan. Photo Credit: Josh Hug/USFWS

Happy Holidays! From the Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office. Photo is of a juvenile lake trout wearing a cl...
12/25/2022

Happy Holidays!

From the Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office.

Photo is of a juvenile lake trout wearing a clipart red and white Santa hat with a blue and white USFWS logo in the foreground. Photo by USFWS.

Happy Identi-Friday! What could this grumpy little fish be? Take a guess in the comments below, and the answer will be r...
12/23/2022

Happy Identi-Friday!

What could this grumpy little fish be?

Take a guess in the comments below, and the answer will be revealed at the end of the day! Best of luck!

Picture Description: A small fish, approximately 4 inches in length, with orange/black mottling, large pectoral fins, and a large gaping mouth being held in someone’s hand.

Picture Credit: Annaliese Kondrat/USFWS

Here is another reminder of why you need to check watercraft, and any other equipment that encounters water before movin...
12/21/2022

Here is another reminder of why you need to check watercraft, and any other equipment that encounters water before moving to another body of water. The Native Species program was out in Green Bay earlier this summer tending an acoustic receiver array. While the receivers were submerged for approximately 1 year, zebra and quagga mussels were able to take advantage of the free real estate. The receiver pictured had 15 pounds of mussels attached, and one had over 30 pounds of mussels. Feel free to ask a question or look up your state’s recommendations for preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species.

Photo Description: Left side, a round orange float is attached to two cylindrical receivers. Right side, same configuration but completely covered with brown and tan mussels. Photo Credit: Jacob Synnott/USFWS

Lake Sturgeon and Sea Lamprey.  You may think, what do these two species have in common?  Under certain environmental co...
12/19/2022

Lake Sturgeon and Sea Lamprey. You may think, what do these two species have in common? Under certain environmental conditions, like high stream alkalinity, lampricide treatments used to target invasive larval Sea Lamprey can be harmful to young Lake Sturgeon.

This summer staff from the Green Bay FWCO partnered with USFWS’s Sea Lamprey Control Program, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, and the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians (LRBOI) to protect young sturgeon from lampricide treatments in the Muskegon River. Crews went out at night to spot and collect young Lake Sturgeon. The sturgeon were then held at a rearing facility provided and operated by LRBOI while the river was being treated for the Sea Lamprey. After the treatment of the river concluded, each sturgeon was tagged and returned to the Muskegon River. Over 40 sturgeon were collected before the lampricide treatment, and no sturgeon sick or dead sturgeon were observed after the treatment.

Photos: Left Image: Two crews on boats with spotlights pointed in the water at dusk starting to look for young sturgeon on the Muskegon River. Right Image: A small one year old Lake Sturgeon swimming in a black tote after being collected from the Muskegon River. Credit: Jennifer Johnson/USFWS

Last call!Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal h...
12/19/2022

Last call!

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this summer! Apply by December 19 at USAJobs. These positions have flexible start and end dates.

Direct link to application:
https://www.usajobs.gov/job/693976500#

There are multiple USFWS locations hiring off this application, please take a look to see if they might interest you as well.

Photo Description: USFWS staff stands on the bow of a ship and shines a flashlight over a foggy river at night.

Photo Credit: Sharon Rayford

Last call!Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal h...
12/19/2022

Last call!

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this summer! Apply by December 19 at USAJobs. These positions have flexible start and end dates.

Direct link to application:
https://www.usajobs.gov/job/693976500#

There are multiple USFWS locations hiring off this application, please take a look to see if they might interest you as well.

Photo Description: USFWS staff stands on the bow of a ship and shines a flashlight over a foggy river at night.

Photo Credit: Sharon Rayford

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this ...
12/18/2022

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this summer! Apply by December 19 at USAJobs. These positions have flexible start and end dates.

Direct link to application:
https://www.usajobs.gov/job/693976500#

There are multiple USFWS locations hiring off this application, please take a look to see if they might interest you as well.

Photo Description: 2 USFWS staff walk into Lake Michigan pulling a seine.

Photo Credit: Sharon Rayford/USFWS

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this ...
12/17/2022

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this summer! Apply by December 19 at USAJobs. These positions have flexible start and end dates.

Direct link to application:
https://www.usajobs.gov/job/693976500#

There are multiple USFWS locations hiring off this application, please take a look to see if they might interest you as well.

Photo Description: A USFWS staff collects organisms from a bucket.

Photo Credit: Sharon Rayford/USFWS

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this ...
12/16/2022

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this summer! Apply by December 19 at USAJobs. These positions have flexible start and end dates.

Direct link to application:
https://www.usajobs.gov/job/693976500#

There are multiple USFWS locations hiring off this application, please take a look to see if they might interest you as well.

Photo Description: View of a harbor and lighthouse over the bow of a large boat.

Photo Credit: Sharon Rayford/USFWS

The USFWS GBFWCO Grass Carp strike team was very successful their last trip in October! They captured and removed five g...
12/15/2022

The USFWS GBFWCO Grass Carp strike team was very successful their last trip in October! They captured and removed five grass carp in the St. Joseph River in Michigan. The fish ranged from 39.7 inches long and 25.8 pounds to 54.6 inches long and 54.7 pounds.

Photo Description: Five olive, large-scaled fish lying in the bottom of a large aluminum bin, in the bottom of a gray aluminum boat. Photo Credit: Ben Sasse/USFWS

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this ...
12/15/2022

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this summer! Apply by December 19 at USAJobs. These positions have flexible start and end dates.

Direct link to application:
https://www.usajobs.gov/job/693976500#

There are multiple USFWS locations hiring off this application, please take a look to see if they might interest you as well.

Photo Description: 2 USFWS staff set a gillnet from a large research vessel into Lake Michigan.

Photo Credit: Sharon Rayford/USFWS

Moss Spores! One of the many types of plants you can encounter in Wisconsin streams are mosses; they are abundant in aci...
12/14/2022

Moss Spores!

One of the many types of plants you can encounter in Wisconsin streams are mosses; they are abundant in acidic wet soils which we have plenty of in our cedar swamps! Sometimes you’ll see small stalks with little capsules on the end rising from mosses. These mosses have been fertilized, and the capsules that you see are actually Sporophytes, preparing to release spores.

Photo Description: Displays a close up picture of moss clinging to a water-logged branch in a stream. The moss has been fertilized, and small stalks (sporangium on seta) rise from the moss, ready to release their spores when conditions are right. Photo Credit: Sean Winter/USFWS

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this ...
12/14/2022

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this summer! Apply by December 19 at USAJobs. These positions have flexible start and end dates.

Direct link to application:
https://www.usajobs.gov/job/693976500#

There are multiple USFWS locations hiring off this application, please take a look to see if they might interest you as well.

Photo Description: 2 USFWS employees wade into Lake Michigan while carrying equipment for a survey.

Photo Credit: Sharon Rayford/USFWS

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this ...
12/14/2022

Are you interested in working with us? We have a few temporary technician positions to fill for our seasonal hires this summer! Apply by December 19 at USAJobs. These positions have flexible start and end dates.

Direct link to application:
https://www.usajobs.gov/job/693976500#

There are multiple USFWS locations hiring off this application, please take a look to see if they might interest you as well.

Photo Description: 4 USFWS staff process a gillnet in a metal boat.

Photo Credit: Sharon Rayford/USFWS

USFWS – Equipment edition – BLOCK NETS The Fish and Wildlife service uses a lot of different pieces of equipment to acco...
12/12/2022

USFWS – Equipment edition – BLOCK NETS

The Fish and Wildlife service uses a lot of different pieces of equipment to accomplish our work. One of those things are block nets. These are used to briefly ‘block’ passage of fish in a survey. By placing block nets, fish biologists can ensure that the fish they measure in a given area are not moving into the area up or downstream during the survey. These nets must be adequately held in place, as the force from fast moving water in a stream can be intense!

Photo Description: Displays a net which is tied up to both banks of a river, forcing all water to flow through it. The river is surrounded by lush, varied, green vegetation. A large amount of detritus is caught in the net, as foliage goes downstream it gets caught on the net, increasing pressure and drag. Photo Credit: Sean Winter/USFWS

On a recent cold and icy day, the Research Vessel Stanford H. Smith was motored to Sturgeon Bay to be put away for the w...
12/09/2022

On a recent cold and icy day, the Research Vessel Stanford H. Smith was motored to Sturgeon Bay to be put away for the winter after a long and successful field season. The 32-ton vessel was lifted out of the water will be dry docked until the beginning of the 2023 field season.

Photo Descriptions: Bow and stern views of the Stanford H. Smith as it was successfully lifted out of the water. Photo Credit: Josh Hug/USFWS

Beaver Sign! Beavers can be found in some of Wisconsin’s streams gnawing nearby trees to create dams on the waterways ca...
12/07/2022

Beaver Sign!

Beavers can be found in some of Wisconsin’s streams gnawing nearby trees to create dams on the waterways caulked with mud. Some things to look for if you are looking for beavers:

Trees with hour glass shapes near the base, from gnawing or branches like the one shown below.

Large branch-laden log jams that dam a stream from one side to the other completely.

Messy, often indistinct footprint paths in the mud near the shore.

They mark their territory by excreting from their glands in mud which can resemble the smell of vanilla!

Photo Description: Displays a tree branch being held over a moving stream, whose end has been bitten off, showing characteristic bite marks of a beaver. Photo Credit: Sean Winter/USFWS

Can you identify this threatened species of frog? The answer will  be given at the end of the day; good luck!!
12/05/2022

Can you identify this threatened species of frog?

The answer will be given at the end of the day; good luck!!

Happy Identi-Friday! What could this handsome fish be? A Hint: These fish inhabit quiet, warm temperate waters. They are...
12/02/2022

Happy Identi-Friday!

What could this handsome fish be?

A Hint: These fish inhabit quiet, warm temperate waters. They are usually associated with abundant aquatic vegetation and sandy to muddy bottoms!

Take a guess in the comments below, and the answer will be revealed at the end of the day! Best of luck!

Picture Description: A palm sized fish with black splotches and a dark stripe through the eye, being held in a hand over a tank of water. Picture Credit: Annaliese Kondrat/USFWS

In this picture is a large stand of manoomin, or wild rice, photographed in Michigan. This cherished and federally prote...
11/30/2022

In this picture is a large stand of manoomin, or wild rice, photographed in Michigan. This cherished and federally protected plant is both beautiful and important, as it supports many people who harvest it annually in late summer. This plant is often targeted by crayfish and Canadian geese in the early summer, and is not very tolerant of cold weather or disease. Consequently, it is important to recognize it and protect it!

Photo Description: Displays a stream that is laden from each side, thick with tall stalks of wild rice, early in the summer. Photo Credit: Sean Winter/USFWS

Here we have a juvenile lake sturgeon. As you can see in this picture sturgeon have four barbels, or feelers. These flex...
11/28/2022

Here we have a juvenile lake sturgeon. As you can see in this picture sturgeon have four barbels, or feelers. These flexible appendages dangle in a row on the lower side of the snout just in front of the mouth. The barbels act as sensory organs that detect the presence food as the fish coasts slowly over the substrate at the bottom of the water.

Picture Description: Juvenile lake sturgeon (fish with bony plates and barbels) in a dark tank. Picture Credit: Annaliese Kondrat/USFWS

Happy Thanksgiving Day! Here at the Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office, we hope you have a great day filled...
11/24/2022

Happy Thanksgiving Day!

Here at the Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office, we hope you have a great day filled with great food and even better memories!

Photo is of a male turkey in a field. Photo by Frank Schulenburg/Creative Commons.

USFWS – Equipment edition – YSI Water quality data can tell fish biologists a lot about a stream; from what creatures mi...
11/23/2022

USFWS – Equipment edition – YSI

Water quality data can tell fish biologists a lot about a stream; from what creatures might live in the water given those measurements, to information about how best to use our equipment in the field. The YSI pictured below is showing several measurements (from top to bottom): temperature, pressure, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, pH, turbidity, and depth. This equipment can gather all this data in about 30 seconds and all of these measurements are recorded and used for analysis later!

Photo Description: Displays a handheld water quality measurement device: the YSI. A blue screen displays readouts of water quality measurements taken in real time with a probe in the water. Photo Credit: Sean Winter/USFWS

USFWS – Equipment edition – Side Scanning Sonar At times, scientists need to know more about the substrate of a river. P...
11/21/2022

USFWS – Equipment edition – Side Scanning Sonar

At times, scientists need to know more about the substrate of a river. Particularly to learn about what habitats are available for creatures in the river. One way to capture what the bottom of a body of water looks like is by using side-scanning sonar. The sonar sends out a high frequency sound pulse through the water and then receives it after bouncing off of a surface. Depending on the speed of the return bounce as well as the angle, the equipment can give a visual representation of the bottom of the river.

Photo Description: Displays a console of a small river boat travelling on the Grande River in MI. The focal point of the photo is a screen that the boat captain is looking at, displaying where the driver is in the water geographically, as well as the time, depth of water, and gives a visual readout of the sediment on the bottom of the river. Photo Credit: Sean Winter/USFWS

Fish biologist and veteran address student body at area school on using Army Values as guide for life and beyond.  Livin...
11/17/2022

Fish biologist and veteran address student body at area school on using Army Values as guide for life and beyond. Living by the seven core values of the Army: Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity, and Personal Courage can help us become a better person and citizen. Loyalty, bearing true faith and allegiance is a matter of believing in and devoting yourself to someone. Duty, duty means being able to accomplish tasks as part of a team. Respect, treat people as they should be treated. Selfless Service, the basic building block of selfless service is the commitment of each team member to go a little further, endure a little longer, and look a little closer to see how he or she can add to the effort. Honor, honor is the carrying out, acting, and living the seven Army core values. Integrity, do what is right, legally, and morally. Personal Courage, face fear, danger, or adversity (physical or moral) by daily standing up for and acting upon the things that you know are honorable. The Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office would like to thank all those that have or are serving.

Photo Caption: In honor of Veterans Day, fish biologist addresses students and faculty at area school. Photo by Jamie Lane.

Address

2661 Scott Tower Drive
New Franken, WI
54229

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 4:30pm
Tuesday 8am - 4:30pm
Wednesday 8am - 4:30pm
Thursday 9am - 4:30pm
Friday 8am - 4:30pm

Telephone

+19208661717

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The Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office's AutoFish marking/tagging trailer, for the Fish Habitat Utilization Program.

Adipose fins are removed and a coded wire tags are inserted into the snout of over 1.4 million lake trout.
For more information on AutoFish marking/tagging trailer please contact:

Charles Bronte
U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office
2661 Scott Tower Drive
New Franken, WI 54229

Photo: Fingerling lake trout being piped out of AutoFish trailer and into assigned raceway in Production Building.
Photo by Mallory Mackey/USFWS
Our coaster brook trout and lake trout in the production building are growing-fast!
Every September our Production Building fish are marked and tagged by Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office's AutoFish marking/tagging trailer and staff.

For more information please contact:
Charles Bronte
U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office
2661 Scott Tower Drive
New Franken, WI 54229

Want to learn more about the Great Lakes Fish Habitat utilization Program and the AutoFish marking/tagging trailers?

Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office
Check out this link for a great explanation on it all!
https://www.fws.gov/…/greenb…/documents/Mass-Marking2013.pdf
https://www.fws.gov/midwest/greenbayfisheries/programs.html

Photo: Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office's AutoFish marking/tagging trailer, used for the Fish Habitat Utilization Program, parked outside our production building.
Photo by Mallory Mackey/USFWS
Happy Friday! Todays fish comes from our colleagues over at the Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office. Can you identify this fish species??

Photo: Employee holding large fish on boat by Green Bay FWCO USFWS.
GREAT PHOTO Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office!! Thanks for sharing!
HAPPY IDENTIFISH FRIDAY! Today's mystery fish is courtesy of Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office. Check back on Monday for the answer!
HAPPY IDENTIFISH FRIDAY! This week's mystery critter comes from Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office's field crew. Any guess? Check back on Monday to find out the answer.
After tagging over 1.4 million lake trout fingerlings the 2019 tagging operations is now complete!!! 😀

A HUGE thank you to the Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office and the animal caretakers who make this Fish Habitat Utilization Program happen.

If you would like more information on the AutoFish marking/tagging trailer please contact:
Charles Bronte
U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office
2661 Scott Tower Drive
New Franken, WI 54229

Video: Green Bay FWCO truck and AutoFish marking/tagging trailer being backed out of Production building-for further disinfection and transport preparations.
Video by Mallory Mackey/USFWS
Today is the last FULL day of operation for the AutoFish marking/tagging trailer. Tomorrow they will finish up the remaining lake trout, then cleaning and disinfecting the trailer. When it’s all said and done over 1.4 million lake trout will have gone through the AutoFish marking/tagging trailer!! A BIG thanks to the Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office and the animal caretakers who make this Fish Habitat Utilization Program happen!!

For more information on the AutoFish marking/tagging trailer please contact:
Charles Bronte
U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office
2661 Scott Tower Drive
New Franken, WI 54229

Photo: Animal caretakers marking and tagging lake trout fingerlings by hand, the ones that were able to slip through computer automated system.
Photo by Mallory Mackey/USFWS
Just over 1.1 million lake trout yearlings have gone through Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office's AutoFish marking/tagging trailer-only 287,560 to go!!
The trailer and crew will be operating through the weekend. If you haven’t seen this process, or even if you have, you should come check it out.
For more information on the AutoFish marking/tagging trailer please contact:
Charles Bronte
U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office
2661 Scott Tower Drive
New Franken, WI 54229

Photo: Fingerling lake trout being netted into compartment that sends fish to different ports, where they will be marked and tagged.
Photo by Mallory Mackey/USFWS
Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office staff are back onsite and the AutoFish marking/tagging trailer, for the Fish Habitat Utilization Program, is back up and operating.
Adipose fins are removed and a coded wire tags are inserted into the snout of over 1.43 million lake trout.
Come check it out. Better yet, stop by our Open House THIS SATURDAY for a guided tour. See you this weekend!

For more information on AutoFish marking/tagging trailer please contact:
Charles Bronte
U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office
2661 Scott Tower Drive
New Franken, WI 54229

Photo: Fingerling lake trout being piped out of AutoFish trailer and into assigned raceway in Production Building.
Photo by Mallory Mackey/USFWS
The Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office AutoFish marking/tagging trailer will be operating and open for tours for our Open House on September 21st-come check it out!!
For information on AutoFish marking/tagging trailer contact:
Charles Bronte
U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office
2661 Scott Tower Drive
New Franken, WI 54229

Photo: A dark and hazy production building with the silhouette of a Green Bay FWCO staff, netting lake trout from a raceway into buckets-to go through the AutoFish marking/tagging trailer.

Photo by Mallory Mackey/USFWS
It's that time of the year again!
Staff from Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office are onsite with the AutoFish marking/tagging trailer for the Fish Habitat Utilization Program. Adipose fins will be removed and a coded wire tag will be inserted into the snout of over 1.43 million lake trout. Come check it out!

For more information please contact:
Charles Bronte
U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office
2661 Scott Tower Drive
New Franken, WI 54229

Photos by Mallory Mackey/USFWS
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