Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office

Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office We work with partners to conserve, protect, and enhance aquatic organisms and their habitat the Lake Michigan basin and support fish management in the Great Lakes.

The Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office implements the Service’s Fisheries Programs in the Lake Michigan and Great Lakes basins to conserve, protect, manage, and restore native fish and the habitats they rely on. We partner with many state, local, non-governmental, tribal, and other federal agencies and organizations and encourage cooperative management of fishery resources of the Great Lakes. Our Programs include: -Native Species Conservation: Focuses on restoration, rehabilitation and conservation of important native fish populations, with emphasis on lake trout, lake sturgeon and lake whitefish. -Mass Marking of Great Lakes Stocked Trout and Salmon: Provides coded-wire tagging, tag recovery, and other science support services to state and tribal agencies that stock trout and salmon into the Great Lakes. -Habitat Restoration: Coordinates with partners to restore quality fish habitat including instream, riparian, wetland, coastal, lake and upland habitats benefiting native species in the Lake Michigan basin. -Aquatic Invasive Species: Conducts activities for the prevention, early detection, and rapid response planning of aquatic invasive species introductions. The work we do helps to maintain the overall function and health of the Great Lakes, providing opportunities for Americans to enjoy the outdoors and our shared natural heritage. We are devoted to the management of these important natural resources to preserve them for present and future generations. To learn more about the work we do, please visit https://www.fws.gov/midwest/greenbayfisheries/programs.html

It's Fish Fact Friday! The Blackstripe Topminnow is a small fish native to much of the Mississippi River basin and parts...
07/10/2020

It's Fish Fact Friday!
The Blackstripe Topminnow is a small fish native to much of the Mississippi River basin and parts of the Great Lakes basin. This species tends to live in very shallow water around submerged and emergent vegetation where it feeds primarily on insects, especially at the water surface. This individual was observed feeding along a small patch of Spike-rush in Upper Genesee Lake in Waukesha County Wisconsin.

Photo: A small, gray with a black later stripe swims near the surface of shallow water against the backdrop of emergent vegetation.
Credit: Bradley Smith/USFWS

Too much of a bad thing! Rusty Crayfish are considered invasive throughout much of the Upper Midwest. This species disru...
07/08/2020

Too much of a bad thing! Rusty Crayfish are considered invasive throughout much of the Upper Midwest. This species disrupts local ecosystems by damaging aquatic plants, disproportionately preying on some macroinvertebrate species, and displacing native crayfish species. They also achieve very high abundance under the right habitat conditions. In the stream where this picture was taken, Rusty Crayfish make up 99.8% of the crayfish found.


Photo: Numerous invasive crayfish are found along the bottom of a shallow stream.
Credit: Bradley Smith/USFWS

07/07/2020
Monarch Caterpillar Changing to Chrysalis

Have you ever wondered how a Monarch makes its chrysalis (cocoon)?

Check out this time-lapse video of a Monarch caterpillar forming its chrysalis. It takes a caterpillar around 15 to 20 minutes to be completely cocooned and two weeks later it will hatch out as a Monarch Butterfly.

Video is of a Monarch caterpillar forming a chrysalis. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G8hQU-Zj99g

A time lapse video made of the monarch caterpillar changing to a chrysalis. Ryan Hagerty, Videographer and Brett Billings, Video Editor, USFWS, National Cons...

When we think of stream-dwelling species we usually think of fish, but streams provide habitat for an untold number of s...
07/06/2020

When we think of stream-dwelling species we usually think of fish, but streams provide habitat for an untold number of species. We found this juvenile snapping turtle (only a few inches long) exploring a riffle in Baird Creek, not far from the Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office.

Photo: A small turtle is depicted along the bottom of a shallow, rocky creek bed.
Credit: Bradley Smith/USFWS

Thanks for featuring our office USFWS Fisheries! We love to showcase the work our awesome staff is doing to conserve and...
07/06/2020

Thanks for featuring our office USFWS Fisheries! We love to showcase the work our awesome staff is doing to conserve and protect the Great Lakes!

We are celebrating the Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office today on FWCO Friday! This office facilitates and manages the entire Great Lakes Fish Tagging and Recovery Program, which collects data to manage the fisheries of the Great Lakes. http://ow.ly/Y5a450Am5Dc

Photo USFWS

Happy Throwback Thursday! A great photo of GBFWCO Habitat Biologist Stewart Cogswell measuring a fish along a stream ban...
07/02/2020

Happy Throwback Thursday!
A great photo of GBFWCO Habitat Biologist Stewart Cogswell measuring a fish along a stream bank as partners help record the data. This photo was taken in spring 2001.

Photo: A USFWS Biologist in waders kneels in the water along a stream bank while hold a small fish against a measuring board. Partners nearby record data and observe the process.
Credit: USFWS

Naturally vegetated lakeshores are important for wildlife. As humans increasingly develop lakeshores it’s important to p...
06/30/2020

Naturally vegetated lakeshores are important for wildlife. As humans increasingly develop lakeshores it’s important to preserve aquatic vegetation. Submerged and emergent vegetation provides essential habitat for fish, waterfowl, amphibians, reptiles, and many other creatures. This picture was taken on Upper Genesee Lake in Waukesha County Wisconsin and shows a mat of Bullhead Lily in the foreground and a stand of bulrush off to the right.

Photo: The surface of a lake covered in large, circular lily pad leaves with round, yellow flower buds emerging. Tall grass-like emergent vegetation is in the background set against a bright blue sky with white clouds.
Credit: Bradley Smith/USFWS

Happy Macro Monday! This week we are featuring a zooplankton! Ceriodaphnia are a cladoceran copepod, living in freshwate...
06/29/2020

Happy Macro Monday!
This week we are featuring a zooplankton! Ceriodaphnia are a cladoceran copepod, living in freshwater lakes, ponds, and marshes in most of the world. They are small, generally less than 1 millimeter in length. They move by using a powerful set of second antennae. This specimen came out of a highly invasive silver carp stomach.

Photo Credit: Cari-Ann Hyaer
Image: A small zooplankton seen through a microscope.

It’s Lightning Safety Awareness week! Did you know that boaters have a high chance of being struck by lightning while on...
06/27/2020

It’s Lightning Safety Awareness week!

Did you know that boaters have a high chance of being struck by lightning while on the water? This is because they and their boats are normally the highest point around! Also, lightning can strike miles away from its thunderstorm, which is why you should wait 30 minutes after the last clap of thunder before making your way back on to water. This is something we do as an agency and encourage others to do too.
Good rule to follow: If you hear thunder, go indoors! Get off the water and seek shelter.

Photo: A dark blue background surrounds a pie chart with four slices showing the percentage of water-related activity fatalities caused by lightning. Fishing has the largest portion at 48%, followed by boating at 23%, hanging out at a beach at 21%, and swimming at 8%. The National Weather Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration logos are in the top corners. Credit: NOAA.

Happy Thursday! The weekend is almost here and that has us smiling!! Photo: A gravid female Black Sandshell freshwater m...
06/25/2020

Happy Thursday!
The weekend is almost here and that has us smiling!!

Photo: A gravid female Black Sandshell freshwater mussel displaying her lure (frilled tissue flaps) and stark-white marsupial gill that look like teeth and gives the mussel the appearance of smiling.
Credit: M.C. Barnhart, Unio Gallery

Spring has sprung! Across the Midwest, ground is being tilled and seeds are being bought. Its time to garden! Gardening ...
06/24/2020

Spring has sprung!
Across the Midwest, ground is being tilled and seeds are being bought. Its time to garden! Gardening can be a fun way to provide local clean food for yourself and your family. For those new to gardening the thought of growing something from seed to table can be intimidating.
But don’t worry, there are lots of good resources available. Most seeds come with lots of helpful information on the back of the packages; this information includes planting depth, spacing, time of year, and approximate length to harvest time. Whether its one tomato plant in a pot on your apartment patio or an entire garden growing your own food can be fun. Give it a try!
Top photo is of a plot of dirt surrounded by trees, bottom photo is of different type of seeds on the ground next to some gardening tools. Photos by Anthony Rieth/USFWS

We are looking forward to summer at the Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation office! Our technician Ben is looking f...
06/22/2020

We are looking forward to summer at the Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation office! Our technician Ben is looking forward to family canoe trips once the water gets a little warmer. What are you looking forward to this summer? Share your favorite summertime photos below.
Photo of a Loon on the Wisconsin River. Photo by Ben Sasse/USFWS

Did you know that the Great Lakes have Jellyfish?!!These freshwater non-stinging jellyfish (Craspedacusta sowerbii) are ...
06/19/2020

Did you know that the Great Lakes have Jellyfish?!!
These freshwater non-stinging jellyfish (Craspedacusta sowerbii) are no bigger than an inch in size and can have up to 400 tentacles. They are invasive and were transported from China most likely by way of transporting aquatic plants overseas to the US and by bird migration coming into contact with those aquatic plants. So, next time you are swimming and you see a small clear floating jellyfish, no you are not going insane, they do exist!
Photo is of a clear small jellyfish in water with a black background. Photo by Daiju Azuma/Creative Commons

Happy Throwback Thursday! Spring stream surveys in 2001 were led by Habitat Biologist Stewart Cogswell.  Stewart has sin...
06/18/2020

Happy Throwback Thursday!
Spring stream surveys in 2001 were led by Habitat Biologist Stewart Cogswell. Stewart has since moved on to exciting work in Alaska, but he left behind a great legacy of partnership and stewardship (or ‘Stewartship’, as we like to call it!).

Photo: A USFWS Biologist walks in between two volunteers in a shallow stream as the survey for fish.
Credit: USFWS

Here a fish biologist measures an angler- caught Steelhead. Since data collection and coded-wire tag recovery began in 2...
06/16/2020

Here a fish biologist measures an angler- caught Steelhead. Since data collection and coded-wire tag recovery began in 2012, the Great Lakes Mass Marking Program has examined over 125,000 fish on Lakes Michigan and Huron.
Photo is a fishery biologist measuring a fish outside at a cleaning station. Photo by USFWS.

Happy Identify-Friday!  We are changing things up a bit this week and featuring a beautiful, nonaquatic insect! Do you k...
06/12/2020

Happy Identify-Friday!
We are changing things up a bit this week and featuring a beautiful, nonaquatic insect!
Do you know what butterfly species this is?
Hint: It’s Federally Endangered

Photo: A light gray and dull-blue butterfly with white margins along its wings and a row of five dark spots with orange crescents on the lower wings.
Photo Credit: Cari-Ann Hayer

Although the pandemic has forced Fish and Wildlife Service employees to temporarily cancel all field work and work from ...
06/10/2020

Although the pandemic has forced Fish and Wildlife Service employees to temporarily cancel all field work and work from home, the natural resources that we work to manage and protect remain the same. This creek flows near a home of an employee and is abundant with fish and wildlife that seem unraveled by the recent changes in the world.
Photo is of Smith Creek in Wisconsin that is overflowing with water.
Photo by Kevin Pankow/USFWS

Lake sturgeon spawning season is approaching quickly. Spawning typically occurs from April to June depending on location...
06/08/2020

Lake sturgeon spawning season is approaching quickly. Spawning typically occurs from April to June depending on location, with ideal temperatures between 55-64°F.
Photo is a close up of a Lake Sturgeon’s head in the river. Photo by Ben Sasse/USFWS

It’s time for Identi-Friday! Can you identify the fish species seen here? Photo: Two cupped hands hold a dozen small fis...
06/05/2020

It’s time for Identi-Friday!
Can you identify the fish species seen here?

Photo: Two cupped hands hold a dozen small fish with dark olive coloration on their back, a cream colored belly, and a black mid-lateral strip that extends from their nose to the base of their tail. The tail fin is a rusty orange color.
Photo credit: Cari-Ann Hayer

Happy Throwback Thursday! This photo was taken in the spring of 2001 when GBFWCO Habitat Biologist Stewart Cogswell was ...
06/04/2020

Happy Throwback Thursday!
This photo was taken in the spring of 2001 when GBFWCO Habitat Biologist Stewart Cogswell was leading a stream electrofishing survey with tribal partners.

Photo: Three people in waders walk through a shallow stream. Two are holding metal poles and one is towing a small, white barge boat.
Credit: USFWS

DYK: Grass carp, an invasive species in the United States, were brought to aquaculture facilities in 1963 from Asia to c...
06/01/2020

DYK: Grass carp, an invasive species in the United States, were brought to aquaculture facilities in 1963 from Asia to control aquatic vegetation. They escaped into Central US waters in the late 1970’s and have become invasive. In the Great Lakes, grass carp have been found in all lakes except Lake Superior; however, Lake Erie is considered the epicenter and reproduction has been documented. Negative impacts associated with grass carp are their ability to decrease the biomass and abundance of aquatic plants and filamentous algae: important habitats for all aquatic species.

Photo: An up close photo of a grass carp head.
Credit: USFWS

Happy Invasive Identi-Friday!!Can you identify this large algae species? A few hints: The yellow arrow points to a branc...
05/29/2020

Happy Invasive Identi-Friday!!
Can you identify this large algae species?
A few hints: The yellow arrow points to a branch on the algae. One of the characteristics of this species is the branching pattern is uneven (one side shorter than the other).

Photo: A thin, green filamentous algae is spread out on a light gray surface. A yellow arrow points to a small, shorter branch off one of the filaments.
Photo credit: Cari-Ann Hayer

What’s your story?Fishing has always been an important part of my life. I obsessed over it as a child, I spent time when...
05/26/2020

What’s your story?
Fishing has always been an important part of my life. I obsessed over it as a child, I spent time whenever and with whomever would take me, and I often dreamed of being a fish. It’s no doubt that fish are a huge part of my life. I don’t spend as much time fishing as I used to, but I still enjoy getting out whenever I can, spending time with my family, and I love seeing new anglers learning and enjoying the sport. I eagerly anticipate the warming of spring days and the time I will get to spend on the water. Who else is as excited as me?
~Tony Rieth, GBFWCO Biologist

Photos: A photo collage of GBFWCO Biologist Tony Rieth enjoying fishing as a young child and then teaching his own child how to fish.
Credit: Tony Rieth/USFWS

Happy Macro Monday! Did you know one of the most common freshwater algae can be found all over the world, including righ...
05/25/2020

Happy Macro Monday!
Did you know one of the most common freshwater algae can be found all over the world, including right her in the Great Lakes?! Scenedesmus are a green algae that form long chains called colonies. The specimen on the left was identified through a microscope after being extracted from a highly invasive silver carp stomach. The image on the right is a high resolution image to show the beautiful detail on this colony.

Left Photo Credit: Cari-Ann Hayer FWS; Right Photo Credit: Mike Morgan

Photos: The oval cells of a green algae stack together to form a colony. Each segment is a single cell.

Today is the International Day for Biological Diversity or Biodiversity.A good example of biodiversity is a vernal pool....
05/22/2020
Glacier Pools Preserve (7)

Today is the International Day for Biological Diversity or Biodiversity.
A good example of biodiversity is a vernal pool. Vernal pools are isolated wetlands that fill up with water in the winter and spring and will dry up in the summer. However, these vernal pools while flooded with water can hold a wide array of rare plants and animals, giving them a place to reproduce and grow.
Photo of a large vernal pool in a forest. Photo by Nicholas Tonelli/Creative Commons https://flic.kr/p/vM8tFo

Large vernal pool (or ephemeral pond), Glacier Pools Preserve, Lycoming County.

Wood Ducks Check!April 15, 2020.  Ahead of schedule, 18 eggs!  Extras are likely eggs laid by another female.  Wood Duck...
05/20/2020

Wood Ducks Check!

April 15, 2020. Ahead of schedule, 18 eggs! Extras are likely eggs laid by another female. Wood Ducks are notorious dump nesters, and will leave eggs in other nests for the other parents to raise.

April 24, 2020. 21 eggs in total! Now that the eggs are warm and covered in down while the female is gone, we know she is incubating. In 28-30 days, the eggs will hatch and be on their way. Stay tuned to see what happens next!

Photos: Left ; seven cream colored eggs surrounded by wood chips in the nest box, Right; 18 eggs covered in feathers and wood chips. Photos by Ted Treska/USFWS

This black-capped chickadee found his way into my garage and tried to exit by way of a closed window. Not wanting to sca...
05/19/2020

This black-capped chickadee found his way into my garage and tried to exit by way of a closed window. Not wanting to scare him back to the window, I picked him up at a distance using an ice fishing skimmer. After a few minutes recovering in a bush, he was able to fly away. Window crashes kill hundreds of millions of birds every year. One good way to help avoid window crashes is to put birdfeeders and bird houses either very close (less than 3 feet) or very far (more than 30 feet) from windows. Various products also exist to make windows more visible to birds.

Photo: Black-capped chickadee on an orange plastic ice fishing skimmer being dropped off in a bush to recover.
Credit: Grace Loppnow/ USFWS.

Have you’ve seen what the inside of a Wood Duck box looks like?One of our biologist volunteers to help with setting up a...
05/18/2020

Have you’ve seen what the inside of a Wood Duck box looks like?
One of our biologist volunteers to help with setting up and caring for Wood Duck boxes. Here is a progression of what has been observed so far:
March 27th, 2020. Wood Duck box put up on local stream near our office, filled with woodchips. Wood Ducks were whistling overhead, a great sign!

April 2nd, 2020. Nest box check reveals 2 eggs, so female likely started laying April 1. Female doesn't incubate until all eggs are laid and usually lays 1 egg per day.

April 7, 2020. On schedule! 7 eggs and counting. Notice wire mesh for ducklings to climb out. Check back with us to see more of the progression.

Photos: Left; Wood Duck box in the woods, Right; two eggs inside the Wood Duck box. Photos by Ted Treska/USFWS

Today is National Endangered Species DayDwarf Lake Iris, Eastern prairie fringed orchid, Topeka Shiner, these are just a...
05/15/2020

Today is National Endangered Species Day
Dwarf Lake Iris, Eastern prairie fringed orchid, Topeka Shiner, these are just a few of the endangered species that reside in and around the Great Lakes. Take the opportunity today to learn what endangered species are in your area and how you can help.
Photo is of a purplish blue flower that is yellow in the center. Photo by Joshua Mayer/Creative Commons https://flic.kr/p/8c4sF4

Hello from GBFWCO staff member Tony Rieth! Northern pike are one of my favorite fish. Also called “gators” by anglers th...
05/12/2020

Hello from GBFWCO staff member Tony Rieth!

Northern pike are one of my favorite fish. Also called “gators” by anglers their aggressive personalities make them a joy to catch. Thankfully I’ve enjoyed catching them most of my life from my first ever around age 5 (with my grandpa and brother) to my most recent and personal record a few weeks ago. They are easily caught ice fishing in shallow water with simple gear of a tip-up and a golden shiner or white sucker. The ease of tip-up fishing allows it to be a communal sport often sharing lot of time on the ice with friends and family grilling burgers and goofing around waiting for someone to yell “flag” as a fish bites. -Tony


Photos: A family photo of Tony with his Grandfather and his brother when he caught his first Northern Pike and a recent photo of Tony holding his personal record for largest Northern Pike.
Credit: Tony Rieth, USFWS

Happy Mussel Monday!! This Wavyrayed Lampmussel (Lampsilis fasciola) is showing off her darter mimic lure. The mussel wi...
05/11/2020

Happy Mussel Monday!!
This Wavyrayed Lampmussel (Lampsilis fasciola) is showing off her darter mimic lure. The mussel will flick and wiggle her lure to resemble a darter and attract larger fish. When the fish attempt to strike the ‘darter’, larval mussels, called glochidia, are released and attach to the gills of their host fish. The glochidia will develop on the host for a short period of time and then drop off and transform into adult mussels. Host fish for Wavyrayed Lampmussel are Rock Bass, Smallmouth Bass, and Largemouth Bass.

Photo: A mussel is nestled in the substrate between rocks displaying a light colored, mottled tissue flap with eyespots that resembles a small fish.
Photo courtesy of Freshwater Mollusk Conservation Society Credit: Kurt Jirka

Address

2661 Scott Tower Drive
New Franken, WI
54229

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 16:30
Tuesday 08:00 - 16:30
Wednesday 08:00 - 16:30
Thursday 09:00 - 16:30
Friday 08:00 - 16:30

Telephone

(920) 866-1717

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WILDLIFE CONSERVATION TO SAVE OUR PLANET VIDEO I am a songwriter that cares about our planet. I felt a duty to write a song and make a video to make a difference. The video is about endangered species, deforestation, global warming, and how men like Donald Trump are destroying the planet. Here is our save the planet music video. Please spread. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xoI-8NDiMWs Thanks Leonard Shea