Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office

Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office We work with partners to conserve, protect, and enhance aquatic organisms and their habitat the Lake Michigan basin and support fish management in the Great Lakes.

The Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office implements the Service’s Fisheries Programs in the Lake Michigan and Great Lakes basins to conserve, protect, manage, and restore native fish and the habitats they rely on. We partner with many state, local, non-governmental, tribal, and other federal agencies and organizations and encourage cooperative management of fishery resources of the Great Lakes. Our Programs include: -Native Species Conservation: Focuses on restoration, rehabilitation and conservation of important native fish populations, with emphasis on lake trout, lake sturgeon and lake whitefish. -Mass Marking of Great Lakes Stocked Trout and Salmon: Provides coded-wire tagging, tag recovery, and other science support services to state and tribal agencies that stock trout and salmon into the Great Lakes. -Habitat Restoration: Coordinates with partners to restore quality fish habitat including instream, riparian, wetland, coastal, lake and upland habitats benefiting native species in the Lake Michigan basin. -Aquatic Invasive Species: Conducts activities for the prevention, early detection, and rapid response planning of aquatic invasive species introductions. The work we do helps to maintain the overall function and health of the Great Lakes, providing opportunities for Americans to enjoy the outdoors and our shared natural heritage. We are devoted to the management of these important natural resources to preserve them for present and future generations. To learn more about the work we do, please visit https://www.fws.gov/midwest/greenbayfisheries/programs.html

Operating as usual

It’s Identi-Friday!  Can you identify this fish? This isn’t your standard ID photo, but it should be all you need to ide...
11/06/2020

It’s Identi-Friday! Can you identify this fish? This isn’t your standard ID photo, but it should be all you need to identify this Lake Michigan invasive species.

Photo shows the underside of a small fish, with fused pelvic fins.
Photo credit: Grace Loppnow / USFWS

Habitat restoration in action!!  Our partners at Trout Unlimited's Great Lakes Program recently completed a remnant logg...
11/05/2020

Habitat restoration in action!!
Our partners at Trout Unlimited's Great Lakes Program recently completed a remnant logging dam removal on the north branch Oconto River in Wabeno, WI. The dam was originally installed over 100 years ago to help float logs down the river and it was a vertical and velocity barrier for aquatic organisms that could not pass. Removing this structure reconnected important coldwater habitat to provide spawning and thermal refuge for fish, turtles, and other aquatic species. The dam materials (large rocks and hemlock logs) were repurposed on site as bank stabilizing materials and in-stream habitat.

Congratulations! A job well done by the Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Forest Service, Forest County, Town of Wabeno, landowners, community members, and Trout Unlimited!

Photo: Images show the progress of a dam removal on the Oconto River in Wisconsin. The upper left photo is a before construction image where white water flows rapidly over the dam in the river with overgrown banks. The upper right photo is during construction where an orange excavator is stationed on the bank to pull out the dam. The bottom left and right photos depict the downstream and upstream aspects (respectively) of the river after the dam was removed and the banks were pulled bank to widen the stream with water now flowing over a small, rocky riffle.
Credit: Chris Collier/Trout Unlimited

While tidying up around the GBFWCO boat garages, we found these artifacts of the Great Lakes fishery! These old dairy ta...
11/04/2020

While tidying up around the GBFWCO boat garages, we found these artifacts of the Great Lakes fishery!

These old dairy tanks were used by both state and federal hatcheries to transport juvenile lake trout and Pacific salmon to their Great Lakes destinations. Stocking salmon and trout has been a major responsibility of state and federal agencies since the 1950s. Salmon were introduced by Dr. Howard Tanner of Michigan in 1966 for the expressed reason to "elevate the fisheries resource of the Great Lakes...for recreational fishing". Today, milk cans like these have been replaced with specially designed modern stocking trucks and ships, but what a cool piece of history in our very own office!

Photo of the two metal milk cans found in the office boat bays, one labeled "Marquette Fish Hatchery". Photo by Claire Stuart/USFWS

Working from home may not be the most fun, but our pets sure are enjoying having us around more often. Let’s see your pe...
11/03/2020

Working from home may not be the most fun, but our pets sure are enjoying having us around more often. Let’s see your pet co-workers!

Photo is of two dogs, one black, and one yellow in color looking up. Photo by Dalton Hendricks/USFWS

Coming soon to an outreach event near you! A stressball version of our 56’research vessel, the Stanford H. Smith. Now we...
11/02/2020

Coming soon to an outreach event near you! A stressball version of our 56’research vessel, the Stanford H. Smith. Now we just need a tiny Captain Stormi for the bridge!
While we don’t have any outreach events currently scheduled, these fun little hand-outs will be waiting for you at our next event! We look forward to that as much as you do!

Photo shows a palm-sized toy version of the R/V Smith, a brown and tan vessel with cabin, net lifter, USFWS logo, and vessel name on the back (stern).
Photo credit: Grace Loppnow / USFWS

The pandemic has brought changes for all of us, and for our invasive species crew it has meant working closer to home. L...
11/01/2020

The pandemic has brought changes for all of us, and for our invasive species crew it has meant working closer to home. Local projects such as this nearshore gears comparison enable us to continue to improve our ability to detect invasive species while staying safe. This minifyke net is being compared with beach seines and cloverleaf fish traps to determine the most effective way for us to survey the small fish community.

Photo: A survey net is deployed in the water along a shoreline. The net is perpendicular to the shore with two round, orange buoys on either side. An orange safety cone is set on shore to provide information.
Credit: Grace Loppnow / USFWS.

Happy Halloween and the end to our Frankenfish Week! This little guy is bright orange and at a quick glance you would th...
10/31/2020

Happy Halloween and the end to our Frankenfish Week!

This little guy is bright orange and at a quick glance you would think it was a goldfish but you would be wrong. This is actually a Black Crappie! These orange variations are rare but do exist due to a pigment mutation in the fish.
We hope you enjoyed these weird looking fish and feel free to post any strange looking fish you have found.

Photo is of a small brightly orange fish laying on a white piece of paper. Photo has been used with permission.

Happy Identi-Friday Frankenfish Week Folks!Can you ID this Ghoulish looking fish? Photo is of a large greenish to brown ...
10/30/2020

Happy Identi-Friday Frankenfish Week Folks!

Can you ID this Ghoulish looking fish?

Photo is of a large greenish to brown colored fish with a very wide mouth and a chin whisker being held above a white cooler of ice. Photo by Robert Elliot/USFWS.

This buffalo was injured long before it was collected during an electrofishing survey in Illinois. You can see that it h...
10/30/2020

This buffalo was injured long before it was collected during an electrofishing survey in Illinois. You can see that it has healed surprisingly well! The caudal wound is closed and uninfected and the scales along its body have regrown. You can tell they are regrown scales by the way they swirl instead of lay in straight lines.

Photo is of a buffalo fish being held by an employee on a boat. Photo by INHS

This rusty cray fish emerged from a Green Bay tributary looking as though it was straight off the set of Swamp Thing. Ru...
10/29/2020

This rusty cray fish emerged from a Green Bay tributary looking as though it was straight off the set of Swamp Thing.
Rusty crayfish are a notorious invasive species in Great Lakes tributaries, which is frightful enough, but a shell carpeted in algae made this individual particularly eerie. Mature female crayfish like this one usually only molt (shed their old shell) once a year, and this individual was probably due!
Caption: Photo shows a rusty crayfish whose shell, pincers, and antennae are carpeted in algae. Photo by Matt Kornis/USFWS

Frankenfish Week continues….Is this Lake Sturgeon turning into a zombie or does it just have an eye infection?No matter ...
10/29/2020

Frankenfish Week continues….

Is this Lake Sturgeon turning into a zombie or does it just have an eye infection?
No matter the case, this Lake Sturgeon is looking quite strange. Unfornately, it is common for fish to get small infections from swimming either through dirty waters or from being injured.

Photo is of a Lake Sturgeon with a red swollen eye. Photo by Robert Elliott/USFWS

Frankenfish Alert!Here this fish has their jaw bone is bent backwards. This Chinook salmon was able to thrive even with ...
10/28/2020

Frankenfish Alert!
Here this fish has their jaw bone is bent backwards. This Chinook salmon was able to thrive even with his jaw bone essentially, this most likely happened when it was young and healed over quite well.

Photo is of a close up of the head of a Chinook salmon who’s jawbone is bent backwards. Photo by Shannon Cressman/USFWS.

Happy Hump/Frankenfish day!This day-glow flathead catfish collected on the Wabash River in Illinois is not albino, it’s ...
10/28/2020

Happy Hump/Frankenfish day!

This day-glow flathead catfish collected on the Wabash River in Illinois is not albino, it’s luecistic! That means it’s missing darker pigment in its skin.

Photo is of a long yellow catfish being held by an employee on a boat. Photo by INHS

This lake trout was hatched at a Great Lakes Region Fish and Wildlife Service fish hatchery. This two-headed monster con...
10/27/2020

This lake trout was hatched at a Great Lakes Region Fish and Wildlife Service fish hatchery. This two-headed monster consists of one fully formed fish which supplies oxygen and nutrients to its conjoined twin.

Photo of a young Lake Trout with two heads and one body. Photo by Allen Lane/USFWS

Franken Fish Week Continues!Walleye native to the Great Lakes also included a sub-species, the Blue Walleye, which was d...
10/27/2020

Franken Fish Week Continues!
Walleye native to the Great Lakes also included a sub-species, the Blue Walleye, which was declared extinct in the watershed nearly 50 years ago. The blue is caused by the protein Sandercyanin in the mucous which helps protect the fish. Populations of this sub-species are still present in Canada.

Photo is of a blue tinted Walleye. Photo by Boundary Waters Canoe Area.com

When night falls, Frankenfish come out to play...Here we see a Sauger with a deformed spine when it was captured for a n...
10/27/2020

When night falls, Frankenfish come out to play...

Here we see a Sauger with a deformed spine when it was captured for a night survey. It was tagged with a floy tad and returned back to the lake.

Photo is of a 15 inch Sauger on a white measuring board with a deformed spine. Photo by Pete Leonard/USFWS.

Here is something you don’t see every day, a Lake Sturgeon with no eyes. This sturgeon seems to be thriving even with no...
10/26/2020

Here is something you don’t see every day, a Lake Sturgeon with no eyes. This sturgeon seems to be thriving even with no eyes. It’s amazing what creatures can adapt to.
Photo is of a 3 foot Lake Sturgeon with no eyes. Photo by Robert Elliott/USFWS

Today's Frankenfish is a common carp that is missing its tail but grew a larger anal fin to compensate! Fish are amazing...
10/26/2020

Today's Frankenfish is a common carp that is missing its tail but grew a larger anal fin to compensate! Fish are amazingly adaptive to injury or genetic conditions, and common carp are particularly hardy. They have also been seen with healed wounds from bow fishing and bird strikes!

Photo is of a large scaled common carp with no tail. Photo has been used with permission from photographer.

Happy Frankenfish week! This week we are sharing our encounters with frankenfish! You'll see fish with weird coloration ...
10/25/2020

Happy Frankenfish week!
This week we are sharing our encounters with frankenfish! You'll see fish with weird coloration and deformities and hopefully learn something new!

Here is our first one; this is a Black Crappie with a black line going down the top center of its body!

Photo is of a small-scaled fish with a thick black line on the top of its body. Photo by Matt Faust/OHDNR

Always take time to appreciate nature! When you get a surprise visit from a winged friend, it is time to take a break fr...
10/22/2020

Always take time to appreciate nature!
When you get a surprise visit from a winged friend, it is time to take a break from the office work to get a good look. Here, one of our staff is marveling at a snowy owl perched on a road sign across the field.

Photo is of an USFWS employee outside looking through a spotting scope in a parking lot. Photo by Matt Petasek/USFWS

Mind your fishing tackle! A friendly public service announcement to remember to keep an eye on your fishing tackle while...
10/20/2020

Mind your fishing tackle!
A friendly public service announcement to remember to keep an eye on your fishing tackle while fishing and properly dispose of unused tackle. The tackle shown here was found wrapped around the bill and feet of this gull, preventing the bird from feeding or flying. Using a net from our electrofishing boat we were able to capture the bird and free it.

Photo: A biologist holds a gray and white bird in a net while an outstretched hand holds a green and yellow fishing lure and attached fishing line that was removed after becoming entangled on the gull’s beak and legs.
Credit: Bradley Smith/USFWS

Crossing paths with other Fish and Wildlife teams. With all the important work being done around the Great Lakes, we fre...
10/19/2020

Crossing paths with other Fish and Wildlife teams.
With all the important work being done around the Great Lakes, we frequently run into our friends and co-workers from other programs. In this case, the Jordan River National Fish Hatchery, which raises species such as cisco, lake, rainbow and brook trout for stocking in the Great Lakes region.

Photo is of the Jordan River National Fish Hatchery stocking truck at a gas station. Photo by Matt Petasek/USFWS

Sampling for invasive Bloody Red Shrimp in Green Bay! This year, we’ve been able to continue an early detection and moni...
10/15/2020

Sampling for invasive Bloody Red Shrimp in Green Bay!
This year, we’ve been able to continue an early detection and monitoring project for the invasive Bloody Red Shrimp in the Fox River here in Green Bay. Contents of baited traps are seived down into small bottles like this one then taken back to the laboratory where captured organisms will be identified.

Photo: A plastic jar containing a water sample is collected to help identify an invasive organism called a Bloody Red Shrimp in Green Bay. The container is labeled ‘Site 1 – 31 Aug 2020’.
Credit: Bradley Smith/USFWS

Our Partnerships and Habitat Program works to help restore and conserve aquatic habitat across the basin. Road stream cr...
10/14/2020

Our Partnerships and Habitat Program works to help restore and conserve aquatic habitat across the basin. Road stream crossings, like the one pictured below on the left, that are undersized can be a barrier for fish, turtles, and other animals to pass through a stream and these types of undersized crossings can greatly affect habitat conditions. Changes in stream temperature, water velocity, substrate, and habitat features like woody cover can all be impacted by improper road stream crossings. Restoration work to replace these crossings with much larger, bottomless arch culverts are one of the many projects we focus on. This crossing, in the Peshtigo River watershed in Wisconsin, was restored by our partners at Trout Unlimited's Great Lakes Program to create access to vital upstream habitat for Brook Trout.

Photo: The before and after of a barrier removal. On the left, three undersized culverts (metal pipes) underneath a road stream crossing. On the right, the undersized culverts were removed and replaced with a bottomless arch crossing that allows the river to flow freely underneath the road and restores habitat in the system.
Credit: Laura MacFarland, Trout Unlimited

This little organism is the cause of a big problem in the Great Lakes! This is a larval sea lamprey, one of the most wel...
10/12/2020

This little organism is the cause of a big problem in the Great Lakes! This is a larval sea lamprey, one of the most well-known invasive species to the Great Lakes basin. As adults, they can cause massive damage to the Great Lakes Fisheries. Control of this species requires thousands of person hours of on the ground management each year and extensive collaboration among State, Tribal, Federal, and International agencies.

Photo description: A 1 ½ inch larval sea lamprey on a person's index finger. Photo by Nathan Barton/USFWS

Maybe winter won’t be bad this year? Well if you believe old wives tales, Woolly Bear caterpillars are the predictors of...
10/09/2020

Maybe winter won’t be bad this year?
Well if you believe old wives tales, Woolly Bear caterpillars are the predictors of how harsh winter will be by the width of their orange bands. According to this Woolly Bear who has no orange band, we won’t have winter!

Photo is a black Wooly Bear Caterpillar on the ground. Photo by Shannon Cressman/USFWS

Cool fact: Some prey fish have the ability to ‘smell fear’. When fish from some minnow species are injured, they release...
10/07/2020

Cool fact:
Some prey fish have the ability to ‘smell fear’. When fish from some minnow species are injured, they release a chemical cocktail called schreckstoff (German for “scary stuff”) that triggers a fear response in other prey fish. Austrian scientist Karl von Frisch, who discovered the substance in the 1930s, noted that fish respond to this substance by engaging in predator avoidance tactics like darting or freezing in place, similar to other animals that can signal fear or unease through odor!

Photo: A longnose dace, a species of minnow, is held in an angler’s hand. Photo by Matt Kornis/USFWS

New Employee Spotlight! The GBFWCO welcomes Nathan Barton to our team! Nathan is a new addition to the Green Bay FWCO, h...
10/05/2020

New Employee Spotlight!
The GBFWCO welcomes Nathan Barton to our team!
Nathan is a new addition to the Green Bay FWCO, hired on in March of this year. Prior to joining the GBFWCO, Nathan worked for the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians as a Great Lakes Fisheries Biologist for 5 years. Much of the work conducted in that prior position was focused on monitoring and managing the commercial harvest of lake whitefish and lake trout, as well as restoration work on other culturally significant species such as lake sturgeon. Nathan is excited to join both the Native Species and the Partnerships and Habitat programs of the GBFWCO.


Photo: A person wearing a Fish and Wildlife Service uniform.
Credit: Nathan Barton/USFWS

USFWS Fisheries
10/02/2020

USFWS Fisheries

It’s FWCO Friday and today we are featuring the Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office located in New Franken, Wisconsin. This office just participated in the Save our Sturgeon (SOS) efforts on the Big Manistee River in Michigan. The Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office has combined forces with the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians (LRBOI) and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources to locate and remove young-of-year lake sturgeon from the Manistee River to help protect them from the effects of future lampricide treatments that are used to control invasive sea lamprey. http://ow.ly/waiC50BH5DM
Photo USFWS Sharon Rayford

Happy Identi-Friday!Can you identify this very large, highly defensive turtle one of our field crews came across recentl...
10/02/2020

Happy Identi-Friday!
Can you identify this very large, highly defensive turtle one of our field crews came across recently?

Photo description: a large turtle swims within a river. Photo by Sharon Rayford/USFWS

Update on our Kewaunee River sturgeon telemetry project!  Last fall, we fitted 20 young of year lake sturgeon with speci...
10/01/2020

Update on our Kewaunee River sturgeon telemetry project! Last fall, we fitted 20 young of year lake sturgeon with special temporary backpacks holding acoustic tags. Our biologists have been in the field a few times to detect movement and location of these fish through the lower river and have set up stationary receivers to help with this tracking. Our biologists were out again in late summer and detected several tags. We’re still processing all the data so stay tuned for more details!

Photo: A gray Vemco receiver sits in a canoe and is used to detect acoustic tags in the Kewaunee River.
Credit: Nathan Barton/USFWS

Field sampling and data collection is a very important aspect of our work at Green Bay Field Office, but it also gives u...
09/29/2020

Field sampling and data collection is a very important aspect of our work at Green Bay Field Office, but it also gives us unique opportunities to explore areas that many people are not able. This scenic area on Long tail Point in Green Bay is one of those areas that only anglers and other boaters are able to enjoy up close.

Photo is of an old stone building surrounded by tall grasses and trees on the water. Photo by USFWS

New Employee Spotlight! The GBFWCO would like to welcome Zac Locklear to our office.  Zac is joining the Partnerships an...
09/28/2020

New Employee Spotlight!
The GBFWCO would like to welcome Zac Locklear to our office. Zac is joining the Partnerships and Habitat Program and brings with him a wealth of knowledge and experience!
A Note from Zac to all our Facebook Followers: Hello Everyone! A little about me – I was born and raised in North Carolina and grew up with a love of outdoor places and the ways they brought my family and friends closer together. With humble beginnings of walking the fields behind my childhood home to beachcombing for shells to hiking my home state’s best peaks, I set out on a career journey that’s brought me from North Carolina to the Everglades to the Wyoming desert to the Oregon coast, back to Wyoming in the Tetons and now to Green Bay, with a passion for natural and wild places for ecosystem health and human enjoyment. Outside of my professional goals, I love to hike, camp and fish, play games of pretty much any variety, make good food and curl up with an intriguing book. A couple fun facts about me are that I was born missing 5 adult teeth (I have fake ones now), I’ve studied abroad in Ireland, and I’m a total soccer nerd! I’m looking forward to learning and exploring more of the upper Midwest, because to me, that’s what life is all about.


Photo: A man standing on a boat holding a large Lake Trout fish. In the background are snow-capped mountains, conifer trees, and bright blue skies with wispy clouds.
Credit: Zac Locklear

Address

2661 Scott Tower Drive
New Franken, WI
54229

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 16:30
Tuesday 08:00 - 16:30
Wednesday 08:00 - 16:30
Thursday 09:00 - 16:30
Friday 08:00 - 16:30

Telephone

(920) 866-1717

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WILDLIFE CONSERVATION TO SAVE OUR PLANET VIDEO I am a songwriter that cares about our planet. I felt a duty to write a song and make a video to make a difference. The video is about endangered species, deforestation, global warming, and how men like Donald Trump are destroying the planet. Here is our save the planet music video. Please spread. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xoI-8NDiMWs Thanks Leonard Shea