Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office

Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office We work with partners to conserve, protect, and enhance aquatic organisms and their habitat the Lake Michigan basin and support fish management in the Great Lakes.

The Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office implements the Service’s Fisheries Programs in the Lake Michigan and Great Lakes basins to conserve, protect, manage, and restore native fish and the habitats they rely on. We partner with many state, local, non-governmental, tribal, and other federal agencies and organizations and encourage cooperative management of fishery resources of the Grea

The Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office implements the Service’s Fisheries Programs in the Lake Michigan and Great Lakes basins to conserve, protect, manage, and restore native fish and the habitats they rely on. We partner with many state, local, non-governmental, tribal, and other federal agencies and organizations and encourage cooperative management of fishery resources of the Grea

Operating as usual

The insect above is the ebony jewlwing (Calopteryx maculata), it is the only damselfly with metallic green and black win...
11/11/2021

The insect above is the ebony jewlwing (Calopteryx maculata), it is the only damselfly with metallic green and black wings. Its preferred habitat is densely vegetated streambeds with nearby trees for roosting. They are found near most streams throughout eastern North America.

Photo Description: Dull black juvenile/female ebony jewlwing with white wingtips perched on leafy vegetation.

Photo Credit: Sean Cazier/USFWS

The insect above is the ebony jewlwing (Calopteryx maculata), it is the only damselfly with metallic green and black wings. Its preferred habitat is densely vegetated streambeds with nearby trees for roosting. They are found near most streams throughout eastern North America.

Photo Description: Dull black juvenile/female ebony jewlwing with white wingtips perched on leafy vegetation.

Photo Credit: Sean Cazier/USFWS

The upper-jaw bone. called the maxillary, is one of two aging structures used to determine the age of wild Lake Trout. O...
11/10/2021

The upper-jaw bone. called the maxillary, is one of two aging structures used to determine the age of wild Lake Trout. Once brought back to the lab, the bone is cut and analyzed under a microscope. Viewed through the microscope you will see rings like a tree, these represent the different seasons the fish has lived through. By counting these rings we can determine the age of the fish and the year it was produced.

Photo Description: A Lake Trout maxillary being in held in the hand with a blue nitrile glove.

Photo Credit: Sarah Mansfield / USFWS

The upper-jaw bone. called the maxillary, is one of two aging structures used to determine the age of wild Lake Trout. Once brought back to the lab, the bone is cut and analyzed under a microscope. Viewed through the microscope you will see rings like a tree, these represent the different seasons the fish has lived through. By counting these rings we can determine the age of the fish and the year it was produced.

Photo Description: A Lake Trout maxillary being in held in the hand with a blue nitrile glove.

Photo Credit: Sarah Mansfield / USFWS

Over 184 aquatic invasive species have been established within the Great Lakes region, making the Laurentian Great Lakes...
11/08/2021

Over 184 aquatic invasive species have been established within the Great Lakes region, making the Laurentian Great Lakes among the most heavily invaded ecosystems on the planet. Some of the species, such as the zebra mussel, quagga mussel, round goby, sea lamprey, and alewife, are among the worst invasives. Non-native plants such as purple loosestrife and Eurasian watermilfoil have also harmed the Great Lakes ecosystem.

Photo Description: A black and tan Zebra Mussel.

Picture Credit: USFWS

Over 184 aquatic invasive species have been established within the Great Lakes region, making the Laurentian Great Lakes among the most heavily invaded ecosystems on the planet. Some of the species, such as the zebra mussel, quagga mussel, round goby, sea lamprey, and alewife, are among the worst invasives. Non-native plants such as purple loosestrife and Eurasian watermilfoil have also harmed the Great Lakes ecosystem.

Photo Description: A black and tan Zebra Mussel.

Picture Credit: USFWS

Coded-wire tags are imprinted with a number that denotes the stocking group (year class, hatchery, stocking site, etc.) ...
11/05/2021

Coded-wire tags are imprinted with a number that denotes the stocking group (year class, hatchery, stocking site, etc.) a fish belongs too, but they are too small to extract in the field!

When a tag is detected in a fish with a special wand designed for that purpose, we collect the snout. Back at the lab, a variety of cutting tools and a highly sensitive tag detector are used to dissect the snout until the tag is found! The number on the tag can be read under a microscope, and paired to a stocking group, giving us information on survival, growth, and movement of stocked fishes.

Photo Description: on the left is tools used in coded-wire tag extraction, including tag detector, mallet, belly knife, scalpel, tweezers, and tape. Photo on the right is an extracted tag placed on the index finger for scale.

Photo Credit: Katie Anweiler/USFWS

Coded-wire tags are imprinted with a number that denotes the stocking group (year class, hatchery, stocking site, etc.) a fish belongs too, but they are too small to extract in the field!

When a tag is detected in a fish with a special wand designed for that purpose, we collect the snout. Back at the lab, a variety of cutting tools and a highly sensitive tag detector are used to dissect the snout until the tag is found! The number on the tag can be read under a microscope, and paired to a stocking group, giving us information on survival, growth, and movement of stocked fishes.

Photo Description: on the left is tools used in coded-wire tag extraction, including tag detector, mallet, belly knife, scalpel, tweezers, and tape. Photo on the right is an extracted tag placed on the index finger for scale.

Photo Credit: Katie Anweiler/USFWS

The butterfly shown above is a red-spotted purple (Limenitis arthemis astyanax), and they are masters of disguise. These...
11/04/2021

The butterfly shown above is a red-spotted purple (Limenitis arthemis astyanax), and they are masters of disguise. These butterflies are most found in Florida, but this one was found very far north in its range (Wisconsin). In adolescence, the caterpillar and pupae of the red-spotted purple camouflage themselves as bird droppings and later as twigs. Then in adulthood these butterflies are mimicking the poisonous Pipevine Swallowtail, (Papilio philenor). Such a tricky butterfly!

Photo Description: Red-spotted purple sitting on small, serrated, green leaves. The butterfly has a black body, dark navy-blue wings, then there is patterning around the edge of the wings with a light blue, black, white, and in small sections orange.

Photo Credit: Sean Cazier/USFWS

The butterfly shown above is a red-spotted purple (Limenitis arthemis astyanax), and they are masters of disguise. These butterflies are most found in Florida, but this one was found very far north in its range (Wisconsin). In adolescence, the caterpillar and pupae of the red-spotted purple camouflage themselves as bird droppings and later as twigs. Then in adulthood these butterflies are mimicking the poisonous Pipevine Swallowtail, (Papilio philenor). Such a tricky butterfly!

Photo Description: Red-spotted purple sitting on small, serrated, green leaves. The butterfly has a black body, dark navy-blue wings, then there is patterning around the edge of the wings with a light blue, black, white, and in small sections orange.

Photo Credit: Sean Cazier/USFWS

Use non-felt soled boots to further reduce the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species. Fish caught for eating or tax...
11/03/2021

Use non-felt soled boots to further reduce the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species. Fish caught for eating or taxidermy should be cleaned at designated fish cleaning stations or placed on ice. Dispose of unwanted bait, fish parts, and packing materials, in the trash; do not dump them in the water or on land. Never dump live fish or other organisms from one water body into another.

Image is of multiple colored signs that read "Don't
Dump Bait", "Drain bait bucket before moving to another waterbody", "Dispose of all unwanted bait and hitchhikers in the trash", "Never release organisms caught from one waterbody into another", "Protect your waters, unused bait and invasive plants and animals hitchhiking in bait buckets can ruin your fishing", "Remove non-bait fish, plants, and other hitchhikers from bait bucket before fishing". Photo Credit: iiseagrant.org

Use non-felt soled boots to further reduce the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species. Fish caught for eating or taxidermy should be cleaned at designated fish cleaning stations or placed on ice. Dispose of unwanted bait, fish parts, and packing materials, in the trash; do not dump them in the water or on land. Never dump live fish or other organisms from one water body into another.

Image is of multiple colored signs that read "Don't
Dump Bait", "Drain bait bucket before moving to another waterbody", "Dispose of all unwanted bait and hitchhikers in the trash", "Never release organisms caught from one waterbody into another", "Protect your waters, unused bait and invasive plants and animals hitchhiking in bait buckets can ruin your fishing", "Remove non-bait fish, plants, and other hitchhikers from bait bucket before fishing". Photo Credit: iiseagrant.org

Invasive species in the Great Lakes threaten the industry, jobs, and recreation that the lakes support. Previous estimat...
11/01/2021

Invasive species in the Great Lakes threaten the industry, jobs, and recreation that the lakes support. Previous estimates have shown that each year, invasive species cause up to 5.7 billion dollars in economic losses in the Great Lakes basin. These losses include effects on recreational and commercial fishing, prevention, eradication and removal efforts, damage to equipment and much more.

Photo Description: A silhouette of a fishing rod at sunset.

Photo credit: creative commons

Invasive species in the Great Lakes threaten the industry, jobs, and recreation that the lakes support. Previous estimates have shown that each year, invasive species cause up to 5.7 billion dollars in economic losses in the Great Lakes basin. These losses include effects on recreational and commercial fishing, prevention, eradication and removal efforts, damage to equipment and much more.

Photo Description: A silhouette of a fishing rod at sunset.

Photo credit: creative commons

Happy Halloween and the end to our Frankenfish Week! This little guy is bright orange and at a quick glance you would th...
10/31/2021

Happy Halloween and the end to our Frankenfish Week!

This little guy is bright orange and at a quick glance you would think it was a goldfish but you would be wrong. This is actually a Black Crappie! These orange variations are rare but do exist due to a pigment mutation in the fish.
We hope you enjoyed these weird looking fish and feel free to post any strange looking fish you have found.

Photo is of a small brightly orange fish laying on a white piece of paper. Photo has been used with permission.

Happy Halloween and the end to our Frankenfish Week!

This little guy is bright orange and at a quick glance you would think it was a goldfish but you would be wrong. This is actually a Black Crappie! These orange variations are rare but do exist due to a pigment mutation in the fish.
We hope you enjoyed these weird looking fish and feel free to post any strange looking fish you have found.

Photo is of a small brightly orange fish laying on a white piece of paper. Photo has been used with permission.

Franken Fish Week- Trick or Treat! Similar to digging through your candy collection on Halloween, one of our staff membe...
10/30/2021

Franken Fish Week- Trick or Treat!

Similar to digging through your candy collection on Halloween, one of our staff members is shown digging through a survey sample for that special prize! Instead of a Purple Laffy Taffy, staff is looking for baby Lake Sturgeon. These little guys are small, usually less than 20mm! It’s hard work and conditions might not always be ideal (hence the bugs swarming around the desk light), but our Partnership and Habitat crew believe it’s all worth it to find that special candy –er, baby sturgeon rather.

Photo: Staff member using a special spoon to measure the size of a larval lake sturgeon found in a river sample. Photo by Casey Coombs / USFWS

Franken Fish Week- Trick or Treat!

Similar to digging through your candy collection on Halloween, one of our staff members is shown digging through a survey sample for that special prize! Instead of a Purple Laffy Taffy, staff is looking for baby Lake Sturgeon. These little guys are small, usually less than 20mm! It’s hard work and conditions might not always be ideal (hence the bugs swarming around the desk light), but our Partnership and Habitat crew believe it’s all worth it to find that special candy –er, baby sturgeon rather.

Photo: Staff member using a special spoon to measure the size of a larval lake sturgeon found in a river sample. Photo by Casey Coombs / USFWS

10/29/2021

We can’t do a Franken Fish Week without the vampire of the Great Lakes.

Here is a video of an invasive Sea Lamprey squirming on a survey table. You can see how many people confuse them with eels by their movements, however, one look at those teeth and you know what it is.

Video is of a Sea Lamprey moving on a white table. Video by Shannon Cressman/USFWS.

Franken Fish Week Continues….Bowfin are native to much of the southeastern United States. They are stalking, ambush pred...
10/28/2021

Franken Fish Week Continues….

Bowfin are native to much of the southeastern United States. They are stalking, ambush predators known to move into the shallows at night to prey on fish and aquatic invertebrates such as crawfish, mollusks, and aquatic insects. Bowfin are also called mudfish, mud pike, dogfish, griddle, grinnel, swamp trout, and choupique.

Photo is of a Bowfin laying over a fish skeleton on the shore. Photo by Cari-Ann Hayer/USFWS.

Franken Fish Week Continues….

Bowfin are native to much of the southeastern United States. They are stalking, ambush predators known to move into the shallows at night to prey on fish and aquatic invertebrates such as crawfish, mollusks, and aquatic insects. Bowfin are also called mudfish, mud pike, dogfish, griddle, grinnel, swamp trout, and choupique.

Photo is of a Bowfin laying over a fish skeleton on the shore. Photo by Cari-Ann Hayer/USFWS.

Franken Fish Week ContinuesWe’re not always sure why some fish exhibit growth deformities, but this Chinook Salmon was s...
10/27/2021

Franken Fish Week Continues

We’re not always sure why some fish exhibit growth deformities, but this Chinook Salmon was still able to thrive even with it’s two humps due to its spine curvature.

Photo is of a Chinook Salmon that’s spine is curved creating two distinct humps. Photo by USFWS.

Franken Fish Week Continues

We’re not always sure why some fish exhibit growth deformities, but this Chinook Salmon was still able to thrive even with it’s two humps due to its spine curvature.

Photo is of a Chinook Salmon that’s spine is curved creating two distinct humps. Photo by USFWS.

Franken Fish Week SeriesWhat lurks in the mud, and is slimy?Mudpuppies!!They are native to the Great Lakes and are actua...
10/26/2021

Franken Fish Week Series

What lurks in the mud, and is slimy?

Mudpuppies!!

They are native to the Great Lakes and are actually fully amphibious salamanders, often caught by anglers. These unique odd-looking creatures diet consists of mostly insect larvae, crayfish, snails and even invasive round gobies! They play a major role in the environment acting as early warning systems for scientists because of their sensitivity to pollutants and water quality.

Photo of a dark mudpuppy laying on top of a white background. Photo by Robert Terrell/Creative Commons, https://flic.kr/p/4jZb8C

Franken Fish Week Series

What lurks in the mud, and is slimy?

Mudpuppies!!

They are native to the Great Lakes and are actually fully amphibious salamanders, often caught by anglers. These unique odd-looking creatures diet consists of mostly insect larvae, crayfish, snails and even invasive round gobies! They play a major role in the environment acting as early warning systems for scientists because of their sensitivity to pollutants and water quality.

Photo of a dark mudpuppy laying on top of a white background. Photo by Robert Terrell/Creative Commons, https://flic.kr/p/4jZb8C

Welcome to Franken Fish WeekEach day leading up to Halloween we will be posting about werid oddities that we see in fish...
10/25/2021

Welcome to Franken Fish Week

Each day leading up to Halloween we will be posting about werid oddities that we see in fish. This first one is an oldie, but goodie.

Is this Lake Sturgeon turning into a zombie or does it just have an eye infection?
No matter the case, this Lake Sturgeon is looking quite strange. Unfornately, it is common for fish to get small infections from swimming either through dirty waters or from being injured.

Photo is of a Lake Sturgeon with a red swollen eye. Photo by Robert Elliott/USFWS

Welcome to Franken Fish Week

Each day leading up to Halloween we will be posting about werid oddities that we see in fish. This first one is an oldie, but goodie.

Is this Lake Sturgeon turning into a zombie or does it just have an eye infection?
No matter the case, this Lake Sturgeon is looking quite strange. Unfornately, it is common for fish to get small infections from swimming either through dirty waters or from being injured.

Photo is of a Lake Sturgeon with a red swollen eye. Photo by Robert Elliott/USFWS

Why should I care about invasive species? A significant amount long-distance spread of invasive species is connected wit...
10/25/2021

Why should I care about invasive species?

A significant amount long-distance spread of invasive species is connected with the activities of people simply enjoying the great outdoors. Recreational boating is a major cause of invasive species spread including zebra mussels and Eurasian watermilfoil. Its up to us to become informed, attentive, and accountable for our potential role in the spread of invasive species.

Do we play a part in invasive species spread?

Being aware of the pathways of spread can help us reduce the risk of accidentally moving harmful invasive species. By learning how to inspect and clean our belongings and knowing the source of the things we buy, we can begin to reduce the chance of accidentally spreading something that could harm the natural places that we cherish.

Picture Credit: PlayCleanGo.org

This photograph depicts a six-spotted fishing spider (Dolomedes triton). These spiders most often run away from humans b...
10/22/2021

This photograph depicts a six-spotted fishing spider (Dolomedes triton). These spiders most often run away from humans but are deadly to small fish who cross their path. These spiders can dive up to 7.1 in to capture and consume small fish, tadpoles, and frogs. They grab their prey with their front two arms, inject it with venom, then consume it.

Photo Description: Six-spotted fishing spider supported by a large leaf in the water. The spider has all legs splayed out and the distinctive markings are visible. The spider is a light brown color.

Photo Credit: Sean Cazier/USFWS

This photograph depicts a six-spotted fishing spider (Dolomedes triton). These spiders most often run away from humans but are deadly to small fish who cross their path. These spiders can dive up to 7.1 in to capture and consume small fish, tadpoles, and frogs. They grab their prey with their front two arms, inject it with venom, then consume it.

Photo Description: Six-spotted fishing spider supported by a large leaf in the water. The spider has all legs splayed out and the distinctive markings are visible. The spider is a light brown color.

Photo Credit: Sean Cazier/USFWS

Address

2661 Scott Tower Drive
New Franken, WI
54229

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 4:30pm
Tuesday 8am - 4:30pm
Wednesday 8am - 4:30pm
Thursday 9am - 4:30pm
Friday 8am - 4:30pm

Telephone

(920) 866-1717

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Nearby government services


Other Government Organizations in New Franken

Show All

Comments

WILDLIFE CONSERVATION TO SAVE OUR PLANET VIDEO I am a songwriter that cares about our planet. I felt a duty to write a song and make a video to make a difference. The video is about endangered species, deforestation, global warming, and how men like Donald Trump are destroying the planet. Here is our save the planet music video. Please spread. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xoI-8NDiMWs Thanks Leonard Shea