Brendan T Byrne State Forest

Brendan T Byrne State Forest Welcome to the ONLY official page for Brendan T Byrne State Forest! FOLLOW us for updates on our campground and upcoming events!
(15)

Operating as usual

Due to adverse winter weather conditions, all state parks and forests will close today (12/16) at 1 p.m. #NJStateParks
12/16/2020

Due to adverse winter weather conditions, all state parks and forests will close today (12/16) at 1 p.m.

#NJStateParks

Due to adverse winter weather conditions, all state parks and forests will close today (12/16) at 1 p.m.

Reopening updates will be posted on this page tomorrow as parks are plowed and begin to reopen to the public.

#NJStateParks

Hello Everyone! Here is our November 2020 Nature Center Program Schedule!! Event pages will be posted weekly for that we...
11/07/2020

Hello Everyone! Here is our November 2020 Nature Center Program Schedule!! Event pages will be posted weekly for that weekends upcoming programs. These event pages will include more detailed information on each program.

COVID-19 is not gone so all programs will be limited to 15 people. We ask that everyone please practice social distancing within the park and programs. Masks are REQUIRED to attend any programs.

Please call (609)- 726-1191 with any questions or message us on facebook!

We look forward to seeing you all out here in Brendan T. Byrne State Forest!! 🙂

#BrendantByrneStateForest #BrendanTByrneNatureCenter
#NatureCenter #Nature #pinebarrens #freeevents #freeactivities #allages #familyfun #newjerseyparksandforestry #parksandforestry #burlingtoncounty #oceancounty #mtholly #newlisbon #newjerseystateandforests #iheartNJparks #NJStateParks

We hope everyone had a fun-filled Halloween and would like to give a big thank you to everyone who joined in on our Jers...
11/01/2020

We hope everyone had a fun-filled Halloween and would like to give a big thank you to everyone who joined in on our Jersey Devil Day program. Everyone did such a great job and all the masks looked amazingly spooky 👻 !

#halloween2020 #newjerseystateparks #NJStateParks #burlingtoncountynj #oceancounty

Hello Everyone! Here is our October 2020 Nature Center Program Schedule!! Event pages will be posted weekly for that wee...
09/27/2020

Hello Everyone! Here is our October 2020 Nature Center Program Schedule!! Event pages will be posted weekly for that weekends upcoming programs. These event pages will include more detailed information on each program.

COVID-19 is not gone so all programs will be limited to 15 people. We ask that everyone please practice social distancing within the park and programs. Masks are REQUIRED to attend any programs.

Please call (609)- 726-1191 with any questions or message us on facebook!

We look forward to seeing you all out here in Brendan T. Byrne State Forest!! 🙂

#BrendantByrneStateForest #BrendanTByrneNatureCenter
#NatureCenter #Nature #pinebarrens #freeevents #freeactivities #allages #familyfun #newjerseyparksandforestry #parksandforestry #burlingtoncounty #oceancounty #mtholly #newlisbon #newjerseystateandforests #iheartNJparks #NJStateParks

09/23/2020
New Jersey State Parks, Forests & Historic Sites

Tom Considine, Visitor Service Assistant of Cape May Point State Park, invites you to join him in discovering the many species of butterflies that can be seen within the park’s diverse habitats. This park is home to a variety of trees and plants that provide nectar plants for butterflies to feed on and host plants for butterflies to lay their eggs on. One of these trees is the black cherry, a host plant for the beautiful eastern tiger swallowtail butterfly. This yellow and black butterfly can be up to 5.5 inches making it one of the biggest butterflies that call New Jersey home. Cape May is abound with butterflies in the fall season, in fact late September to mid-October is prime time to view the migration of monarchs through the park. We hope you have an opportunity this fall to visit!


#NJStateParks #iheartNJparks #NJParksFromHome

Tom Considine, Visitor Service Assistant of Cape May Point State Park, invites you to join him in discovering the many species of butterflies that can be seen within the park’s diverse habitats. This park is home to a variety of trees and plants that provide nectar plants for butterflies to feed on and host plants for butterflies to lay their eggs on. One of these trees is the black cherry, a host plant for the beautiful eastern tiger swallowtail butterfly. This yellow and black butterfly can be up to 5.5 inches making it one of the biggest butterflies that call New Jersey home. Cape May is abound with butterflies in the fall season, in fact late September to mid-October is prime time to view the migration of monarchs through the park. We hope you have an opportunity this fall to visit!

#NJStateParks #iheartNJparks #NJParksFromHome

#ForestryFridaySince 2001, biologists from the New Jersey Forest Service’s Office of Natural Lands Management have been ...
09/18/2020

#ForestryFriday

Since 2001, biologists from the New Jersey Forest Service’s Office of Natural Lands Management have been walking every stretch of beach south of Sandy Hook surveying for a federally Threatened and state Endangered plant, Seabeach Amaranth (Amaranthus pumilus). In years where Seabeach Amaranth has been abundant, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection has received help on those surveys from partners, including the Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and US Army Corps of Engineers.

The annual 2020 census conducted by the NJDEP and funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Service reported a total of 941 Seabeach amaranth plants; the 3rd highest population size recorded south of Sandy Hook since 2006.

Seabeach amaranth is an annual plant species with succulent, spinach-like leaves and minute, bright yellow anthers that pop out of its small flowers. The plant grows between the base of the dunes and the high tide line on our beaches and works with other early successional species to help form young dunes.

While this year’s census of 941 plants appears to be a major decline from last year's count of 7,195 plants, much higher numbers of amaranth plants were likely present during the growing season this year prior to Tropical Storm Isaias. The storm struck the coastline in early August and buried and/or damaged a large percentage of Seabeach Amaranth plants prior to survey completion. In addition, succession in certain areas coupled with an invasion from a non-native plant called Asiatic Sand Sedge (Carex kobomugi) has also led to a decrease in habitat for Seabeach Amaranth.

The primary threat to Seabeach Amaranth is not storms or habitat succession, which are natural events, but the widespread use of mechanical beach raking and ORVs on NJ's beaches. These actions severely limit habitat across the majority of the NJ shoreline. Non-profits such as Raritan Valley Community College, Pinelands Preservation Alliance, and Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ continue to work closely with townships, the state, and the federal government to expand conservation efforts to protect these critical habitats. The DEP Division of Land Resource Protection also regulates municipal beaches by protecting the habitat where Seabeach Amaranth and other federally listed plant and animal species occur. These efforts focus on increasing habitat protection without inhibiting the recreational uses vital to NJ's economy and culture.

The numbers of amaranth plants found this year despite the effects of Tropical Storm Isaias are significant, as they indicate the continued success of beach management efforts being implemented across the New Jersey shoreline to increase habitat for beach plant and animal species.

The impact from the storm and successional events won't be clear until future surveys are performed. As an annual plant, next year's population depends entirely upon seeds produced in previous years, and the lower amounts produced this year will, in all likelihood, affect the trajectory of recovery witnessed over the past few years.

Learn more about Seabeach Amaranth in our 2019 press release here: https://nj.gov/dep/newsrel/2019/19_0103.htm

#NJForestService #iheartNJforests #NJNaturalLandsManagement

#ForestryFriday

Since 2001, biologists from the New Jersey Forest Service’s Office of Natural Lands Management have been walking every stretch of beach south of Sandy Hook surveying for a federally Threatened and state Endangered plant, Seabeach Amaranth (Amaranthus pumilus). In years where Seabeach Amaranth has been abundant, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection has received help on those surveys from partners, including the Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and US Army Corps of Engineers.

The annual 2020 census conducted by the NJDEP and funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Service reported a total of 941 Seabeach amaranth plants; the 3rd highest population size recorded south of Sandy Hook since 2006.

Seabeach amaranth is an annual plant species with succulent, spinach-like leaves and minute, bright yellow anthers that pop out of its small flowers. The plant grows between the base of the dunes and the high tide line on our beaches and works with other early successional species to help form young dunes.

While this year’s census of 941 plants appears to be a major decline from last year's count of 7,195 plants, much higher numbers of amaranth plants were likely present during the growing season this year prior to Tropical Storm Isaias. The storm struck the coastline in early August and buried and/or damaged a large percentage of Seabeach Amaranth plants prior to survey completion. In addition, succession in certain areas coupled with an invasion from a non-native plant called Asiatic Sand Sedge (Carex kobomugi) has also led to a decrease in habitat for Seabeach Amaranth.

The primary threat to Seabeach Amaranth is not storms or habitat succession, which are natural events, but the widespread use of mechanical beach raking and ORVs on NJ's beaches. These actions severely limit habitat across the majority of the NJ shoreline. Non-profits such as Raritan Valley Community College, Pinelands Preservation Alliance, and Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ continue to work closely with townships, the state, and the federal government to expand conservation efforts to protect these critical habitats. The DEP Division of Land Resource Protection also regulates municipal beaches by protecting the habitat where Seabeach Amaranth and other federally listed plant and animal species occur. These efforts focus on increasing habitat protection without inhibiting the recreational uses vital to NJ's economy and culture.

The numbers of amaranth plants found this year despite the effects of Tropical Storm Isaias are significant, as they indicate the continued success of beach management efforts being implemented across the New Jersey shoreline to increase habitat for beach plant and animal species.

The impact from the storm and successional events won't be clear until future surveys are performed. As an annual plant, next year's population depends entirely upon seeds produced in previous years, and the lower amounts produced this year will, in all likelihood, affect the trajectory of recovery witnessed over the past few years.

Learn more about Seabeach Amaranth in our 2019 press release here: https://nj.gov/dep/newsrel/2019/19_0103.htm

#NJForestService #iheartNJforests #NJNaturalLandsManagement

09/16/2020
New Jersey State Parks, Forests & Historic Sites

Northern Harrier

#WildlifeWednseday The northern harrier, Circus cyaneus, is a medium sized bird of prey with broad wings and a very long tail. Its nickname of “marsh hawk” is derived from one of their common hunting grounds, marshes. A raptor similar in appearance to other well-known species like the red-tailed hawk, the northern harrier is the only species of the harrier family that can be found in the United States.

Males and females have distinct differences. Female harriers are larger than males and have dark brown feathers, whereas the smaller male has grayish feathers. Both sexes have a distinct white “rump patch”, located where the bird’s back meets the tail, which is almost always visible while the harrier is in flight. This is a helpful field mark when identifying harriers in the wild.

Northern harriers are often found, as their nickname implies, in marshes, and also wetlands and grassy fields, where they fly low in order to locate prey near the ground. Harriers hunt mainly for small mammals but will also eat songbirds and reptiles.

Harriers are known for an elaborate courtship dance, during which a male will try to attract a female. The dance has many aerial dives, loops, and rolls. Male harriers can sometimes have more than one mate during a breeding season.

Populations of harriers have been affected by the loss of their natural hunting grounds, wetlands and marshes. These natural areas have been used for agricultural and housing development, thus resulting in a reduction of their prey due to habitat loss.

Words by Sarajane Bruno Naturalist, Liberty State Park

Video courtesy of John Dunstan; used with permission.

The northern harrier, Circus cyaneus, is a medium sized bird of prey with broad wings and a very long tail. Its nickname of “marsh hawk” is derived from one of their common hunting grounds, marshes. A raptor similar in appearance to other well-known species like the red-tailed hawk, the northern harrier is the only species of the harrier family that can be found in the United States.

Males and females have distinct differences. Female harriers are larger than males and have dark brown feathers, whereas the smaller male has grayish feathers. Both sexes have a distinct white “rump patch”, located where the bird’s back meets the tail, which is almost always visible while the harrier is in flight. This is a helpful field mark when identifying harriers in the wild.

Northern harriers are often found, as their nickname implies, in marshes, and also wetlands and grassy fields, where they fly low in order to locate prey near the ground. Harriers hunt mainly for small mammals but will also eat songbirds and reptiles.

Harriers are known for an elaborate courtship dance, during which a male will try to attract a female. The dance has many aerial dives, loops, and rolls. Male harriers can sometimes have more than one mate during a breeding season.

Populations of harriers have been affected by the loss of their natural hunting grounds, wetlands and marshes. These natural areas have been used for agricultural and housing development, thus resulting in a reduction of their prey due to habitat loss.

Words by Sarajane Bruno Naturalist, Liberty State Park

Video courtesy of John Dunstan; used with permission.

09/15/2020
New Jersey State Parks, Forests & Historic Sites

#NotesFromOurNaturalists-Monarch on Milkweed

Hey, Mr. Caterpillar isn’t that swamp milkweed poisonous?

Let’s discuss the early life cycle of the monarch and why it is beneficial for all monarchs to eat the dangerous swamp milkweed as a caterpillar, with our Park Naturalists at Cape May Point State Park.



#NJParksFromHome #iheartNJparks

#NotesFromOurNaturalists

Matt Pelligrine, Naturalist at Cape May Point State Park spots a monarch caterpillar on some swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata). This caterpillar is getting ready to pupate and will likely emerge in a couple of weeks as an adult butterfly that is part of the Methuselah Generation: the millions of monarchs emerging at the end of the summer who are adapted to manage the 2,000-mile migration to Mexico.

#NJParksFromHome #iheartNJparks

#NotesFromOurNaturalists-“Adios y Vaya con Dios!” The Incredible Fall Journey of the Monarch Butterfly By Matt Pelligrin...
09/15/2020

#NotesFromOurNaturalists-“Adios y Vaya con Dios!”

The Incredible Fall Journey of the Monarch Butterfly

By Matt Pelligrine

Naturalist, Cape May Point State Park

For decades, perhaps centuries, communities around Sierra Madre mountains of Central Mexico awaited the magical return of the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus). As the return coincided with “All Souls Day” followed by “All Saints Day” the butterflies took on a magical symbolism for these religious people.

You too may be waiting for these fragile creatures to pass through your neighborhood on their 2,000-mile-long migration south. Because the butterflies are so fragile, they depend on gentle northwest winds to migrate. They can’t fly in strong winds, while south winds push them the wrong way. When the weather isn’t suitable to fly, the butterflies feed on flowers, particularly goldenrod, sunflower, aster and boneset. They find protected corners created by pines, cedars and oaks to sleep.

Because the monarch migration is a rather leisurely affair, starting in late August in Canada and New England, New Jersey residents are rarely aware of it before late September. In fact, in October, local monarchs are still popping out of their chrysalises. New Jersians are often treated to spectacular migrations as south-bound monarchs are funneled through the Cape May Peninsula and concentrated in the town of Cape May Point where they fly past the famous Cape May Lighthouse and attempt the hazardous crossing of the Delaware Bay.

HOW TO VIEW THE SPECTACLE

Watch the weather. COLD FRONTS followed by GENTLE NORTHWEST WINDS concentrate monarchs along the Jersey Shore beaches where they feed heavily on goldenrod in the sand dunes (Remember, it’s against the law to climb or play in the fragile sand dunes). Cape May Point being their ultimate destination before crossing the Delaware Bay.

The butterflies settle to sleep as early as 4:00pm. So, if you arrive late, look for concentrations of roosting monarchs in the trees, particularly pines.

The monarchs will not wait for you! If you call friends at the shore for an update and they say it’s SPECTACULAR, you must GO! The weather can be quite fickle in the Fall so you might not get a second chance till next year!

#iheartNJparks

#NotesFromOurNaturalists-“Adios y Vaya con Dios!”

The Incredible Fall Journey of the Monarch Butterfly

By Matt Pelligrine

Naturalist, Cape May Point State Park

For decades, perhaps centuries, communities around Sierra Madre mountains of Central Mexico awaited the magical return of the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus). As the return coincided with “All Souls Day” followed by “All Saints Day” the butterflies took on a magical symbolism for these religious people.

You too may be waiting for these fragile creatures to pass through your neighborhood on their 2,000-mile-long migration south. Because the butterflies are so fragile, they depend on gentle northwest winds to migrate. They can’t fly in strong winds, while south winds push them the wrong way. When the weather isn’t suitable to fly, the butterflies feed on flowers, particularly goldenrod, sunflower, aster and boneset. They find protected corners created by pines, cedars and oaks to sleep.

Because the monarch migration is a rather leisurely affair, starting in late August in Canada and New England, New Jersey residents are rarely aware of it before late September. In fact, in October, local monarchs are still popping out of their chrysalises. New Jersians are often treated to spectacular migrations as south-bound monarchs are funneled through the Cape May Peninsula and concentrated in the town of Cape May Point where they fly past the famous Cape May Lighthouse and attempt the hazardous crossing of the Delaware Bay.

HOW TO VIEW THE SPECTACLE

Watch the weather. COLD FRONTS followed by GENTLE NORTHWEST WINDS concentrate monarchs along the Jersey Shore beaches where they feed heavily on goldenrod in the sand dunes (Remember, it’s against the law to climb or play in the fragile sand dunes). Cape May Point being their ultimate destination before crossing the Delaware Bay.

The butterflies settle to sleep as early as 4:00pm. So, if you arrive late, look for concentrations of roosting monarchs in the trees, particularly pines.

The monarchs will not wait for you! If you call friends at the shore for an update and they say it’s SPECTACULAR, you must GO! The weather can be quite fickle in the Fall so you might not get a second chance till next year!

#iheartNJparks

Address

Highway Route 72 East
New Lisbon, NJ
08064

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Brendan T Byrne State Forest posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Nearby government services


Other New Lisbon government services

Show All

Comments

Who can I speak with about volunteer trail maintenance? My group would like to reblaze the Mt Misery Trail in November. We were suppose to do it in the spring but covid put it on hold.
Trying to figure out what these are...
Thinking of camping here soon, but can't find any information about how you are handling COVID-19. Are you filling sites at full capacity? Are all facilities open? Thanks so much!
Really awesome display/collection of various rocks and information on how they were formed. Very nice events here! Well done!
Came across a carpenter frog and sundew carnivorous plants on this mornings guided walk.
Saw this leopard frog on this mornings guided trail walk!
Seining at Pakim Pond 💚🌿🐟
Pakim Pond
Seining at Pakim Pond ❤️🌿🐸
Learning about seining in Pakim Pond.
Out and About
Sunset Rancocas State Park