CAUS (color association of the united states)

"Wassily Kandinsky's abstract paintings influenced the colourful yet understated interiors that design studio Holloway L...
07/22/2022

"Wassily Kandinsky's abstract paintings influenced the colourful yet understated interiors that design studio Holloway Li has created inside the Locke hotel in Munich.

The aparthotel, called Wunderlocke, contains 360 serviced studio apartments and is situated in Munich's Obersendling district, taking over an office building that previously belonged to German tech company Siemens. London-based Holloway Li aimed to celebrate the building's raw structure and reveal its 'inner voice', avoiding a more traditional 'material intensive' approach to retrofitting.

This decision was chiefly informed by the work of 20th-century Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky – a pioneer of abstract art who spent a significant portion of his career in Munich.'Kandinsky's work explores how we can develop a closer relationship to nature through abstraction, rather than through more figurative approaches favoured at the time,' explained Holloway Li.

'He believed that by connecting with the 'innerer klang' (inner voice) of things, an artist could reveal the natural essence of objects and materials.' In line with this idea, the studio stripped back the building to its concrete shell and added a carefully curated selection of furnishings using natural colours and materials where possible.

At the heart of the ground-floor reception is a curved timber desk inset with panels of wheat-coloured carpet, which were also used to wrap the lower half of the room's structural columns." - Read full article by Natasha Levy on | photography is by

Some most excellent color work by  ✨
07/18/2022

Some most excellent color work by ✨

This week's CAUS Library Pick is "Inside, At Home with Great Designers," available for pre-order by  Editors, a stunning...
07/17/2022

This week's CAUS Library Pick is "Inside, At Home with Great Designers," available for pre-order by Editors, a stunning collection of the homes of sixty celebrated contemporary global designers and decorators.

"The homes of interior designers are the places where all the knowledge and decorating expertise they have perfected can be seen in their fullest expression. Inside: At Home with Great Designers is a private tour of the homes of sixty of the most talented and accomplished creatives working in the design world today.

This revelatory book allows us unique insight into how and where designers live and showcases an inspiring and aspirational kaleidoscope of homes around the world.

Features top contemporary interior designers and decorators in the US, the UK, France, Italy, and many other countries across the world and the homes of such leading international design talents as Brigette Romanek, Roman and Williams, Sheila Bridges, Darryl Carter, Sig Bergamin, and Joseph Dirand.

Homes included range from apartments, townhouses, and lofts, to country and coastal retreats, bungalows, and palazzi - this is the perfect gift and inspiration for a house-and-design-obsessed global readership." -

Another Couture season has come and gone, and of course, there were some brilliant standouts (here's looking at you, Sch...
07/16/2022

Another Couture season has come and gone, and of course, there were some brilliant standouts (here's looking at you, Schiaparelli), but we were entranced by the colors and finishes that dazzled on the travertine Spanish Steps last week for Valentino's Fall 2022 Couture show. We noticed many colors we accurately forecasted for the season, but as envisioned, a deeply-hued red continues to be the anchor color of the season.

"Pierpaolo Piccioli is at ease in the world of couture. He approaches the metier with consummate confidence, and the record of his memorable shows grows longer by the season. Today he just threaded another pearl in his repertoire, staging the fall Valentino collection on Rome’s Spanish Steps, an almost sacred place so dense in strata of history, meaning, and symbolism that it has become a sort of meta-entity.

'This is a deeply personal collection, because it’s all about the history of Valentino,' Piccioli said at a pre-show press conference, held at the label’s headquarters in Piazza Mignanelli. ...'A radical vision goes against all the anti-democratic idiocies the world is throwing at us,” he said. “Being assertive in creating beauty isn’t escapism, but the only way of fighting conservatism. And giving a stage to people who are considered at the periphery for me is a duty. This morning, when I was looking at the Spanish Steps during the rehearsals,' he went on, 'I had the same feeling of when I was left out of the barriers. When you live at the periphery, so to speak, your perspective is different. You can look at the big picture without being seduced by it, keeping a safe distance, and a cool eye. I still want to stay in that place, outside the fences.'" - Read the full commentary on by Tiziana Cardini
#'PalazzoMignanelli

You know we love a green kitchen and  interiors with playful uses of color. "A pop-up guest bedroom features in this ope...
07/15/2022

You know we love a green kitchen and interiors with playful uses of color. "A pop-up guest bedroom features in this open-plan apartment by Studio Noju, which was renovated to create the illusion of having separate spaces and dressed in colours that nod to its Seville location.

Casa Triana is a 60-square-metre apartment renovation in the Triana neighbourhood of Seville, southern Spain.

It is the debut collaborative project by architects Antonio Mora and Eduardo Tazón, who co-founded their firm Studio Noju – a shortening of 'not just.'

Each area of Casa Triana is distinguished by its own jagged colourful alcove made from readily available and low-cost roof ridges, known as "cumbreras" in Spanish.

The ridges are typically used to cap gabled roofs in traditional construction projects. Studio Noju placed the horizontal V-shaped ridges next to each other vertically to delineate these distinctive spaces.

'We created the alcoves with the idea of 'architectural texture,' which gives them a distinctive three-dimensional backdrop, creating an interesting play of light and shadows while giving depth to the space," said Mora and Tazón." - full article on by Jane Englefield | Images:

A colorful welcome to the week ahead, we had to repost this stunning image by  | She said, "Fell in love with San Juan L...
07/11/2022

A colorful welcome to the week ahead, we had to repost this stunning image by | She said, "Fell in love with San Juan La Lago 💛 Naturally dyed skeins hanging at Casa Flor Ixcaco. Ix means “women” in Mayan Kaqchikel, and caco means cacao" 💛

This week's CAUS Library Pick is "Colors of Art: The Story of Art in 80 Palettes" by Chloë Ashby, available for pre-orde...
07/10/2022

This week's CAUS Library Pick is "Colors of Art: The Story of Art in 80 Palettes" by Chloë Ashby, available for pre-order on August 30, 2022.

"It takes the reader on a journey through history via 80 carefully curated artworks and their palettes. For these pieces, color is not only a tool (like a paintbrush or a canvas) but the fundamental secret to their success.

Color allows artists to express their individuality, evoke certain moods, and portray positive or negative subliminal messages. And throughout history the greatest of artists have experimented with new pigments and new technologies to lead movements and deliver masterpieces. But, as something so cardinal, we sometimes forget how poignant color palettes can be, and how much they can tell us.

When Vermeer painted The Milkmaid, the amount of ultramarine he could use was written in the contract. How did that affect how he used it? When Turner experimented with Indian Yellow, he captured roaring flames that brought his paintings to life. If he had used a more ordinary yellow, would he have created something so extraordinary? And how did Warhol throw away the rulebook to change what color could achieve?

Structured chronologically, Colors of Art provides a fun, intelligent, and visually engaging look at the greatest artistic palettes in art history – from Rafael’s use of perspective and Vermeer’s ultramarine, to Andy Warhol’s hot pinks, and Lisa Brice’s blue women.

Colors of Art offers a refreshing take on the subject and acts as a primer for artists, designers, and art lovers who want to look at art history from a different perspective."

"In Ancient Greece in 530 BCE, visitors to the grave of a young boy and girl would have gazed toward the sky and seen a ...
07/09/2022

"In Ancient Greece in 530 BCE, visitors to the grave of a young boy and girl would have gazed toward the sky and seen a brightly painted sphinx perched atop the 13-foot marble stele that marked the children’s final resting place.

The stele and sphinx, on display as part of the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, appear just like the other sculptures in the museum’s sun-lit halls — a stark white. But a new exhibition, Chroma: Ancient Sculpture in Color, showcases the sphinx in its original vibrant form, one of 14 painted reconstructions of Ancient Greek and Roman statues. On view through March 23 of 2023, Chroma also highlights 40 other objects that contextualize polychromy, the painting of ancient sculpture and pottery.

Chroma is the outcome of an extensive collaboration between conservators, scientists, and curators who helped to create the replica of the sphinx. The exhibition’s other reconstructions were created by Vinzenz Brinkmann, head of antiquities at the Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung in Frankfurt, and Ulrike Koch-Brinkmann. The husband-and-wife team has studied polychromy for over 40 years. Their Gods in Color exhibition has been touring since 2003, and their replicas have been included in museums around the world.

Instead of relegating the colorful reconstructions to a separate gallery space, the works at the Met are interspersed within the museum’s iconic ancient sculpture halls, with a small upstairs gallery dedicated entirely to the show. Throughout the exhibition, labels explain the scientific process for determining the statues’ true colors.

Chroma is the outcome of an extensive collaboration between conservators, scientists, and curators who helped to create the replica of the sphinx. The exhibition’s other reconstructions were created by Vinzenz Brinkmann, head of antiquities at the Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung in Frankfurt, and Ulrike Koch-Brinkmann. The husband-and-wife team has studied polychromy for over 40 years. Their Gods in Color exhibition has been touring since 2003, and their replicas have been included in museums around the world." Text/images by Elaine Velie for Fifth Avenue

"Texas-based jeweler Sarah Murphy  has turned her papier-maché hobby into a full-blown collection of lamps, which are mo...
07/07/2022

"Texas-based jeweler Sarah Murphy has turned her papier-maché hobby into a full-blown collection of lamps, which are more refined but also more whimsical, with tiny bulbs emerging from monolithic structures and flat appendages bulging from the bases. The lamps are mostly monochromatic, with checkers and stripes thrown in for good measure, and include funny details like pullchains and finials in the same color and materials palette." Visit Murphy’s website for more info - by Jill Singer for | Photos by

"Dior is transporting Montauk visitors to the French Riviera this summer with its first beauty and couture pop-up in Ame...
07/05/2022

"Dior is transporting Montauk visitors to the French Riviera this summer with its first beauty and couture pop-up in America.

Debuted Friday morning, the collaboration came to life in the form of a curated boutique and spa experience inside the beach town's premier resort, Gurney's Montauk.

The shop is divided into a blue room and an orange room, both featuring new designs from Maria Grazia Chiuri's Dioriviera capsule collection, including an orange-and-ivory-striped summer knit top, the canvas Dior book tote in fluorescent blue toile de Jouy, a fringed poncho, and a breezy bright pink shirt dress also in the iconic print. The motif is revisited throughout the collection, modernized and often inverted to create elegant contrasts. Outside the boutique, on the resort's outer deck overlooking the ocean, Dior has created a Mediterranean oasis in which toile de Jouy is the new neutral and Dior Eden-Roc adds a woodsy essence to the sea breeze. The lounge area is adorned with Dior umbrellas and lounge chairs, as well as wild animal sculptures pulled straight out of the French fashion house's timeless motif ..." - by Rosa Sanchez for | Photos by

The pop-up is open through September 5.

In honor of Sam Gilliam, this week's CAUS Library Pick is "Fugues in Color" available for pre-order. Edited by  , the bo...
07/03/2022

In honor of Sam Gilliam, this week's CAUS Library Pick is "Fugues in Color" available for pre-order. Edited by , the book was published to accompany the exhibition at the Fondation Louis Vuitton from 27 April-28 August 2022. A stunning exhibition catalog, it reunites international contemporary artists around their usage of color.

"The exhibition brings together five contemporary artists of international stature: (United States, 1933), (Germany, 1961), (United States, 1958-2005), (Canada, 1985), (Switzerland / France, 1937). Their works are characterized by expansive use of color, which emerges from canvas to invade walls, floors, and ceilings. Within the FLV, each of these artists will have a dedicated space. This book presents in an exhaustive way the works of the exhibition. Organized in five main parts, each being dedicated to an artist, it mixes texts by specialists and interviews with artists.

Under the direction of Ludovic Delalande, Nathalie Ogé and Claire Staebler, with texts by great specialists in contemporary art: Jonathan P. Binstock, Philippe Dagen, Frank Gehry, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Florence Ostende, and Ludger Schwarte."

The world lost an incredible artist and human being last Saturday. "Sam Gilliam, whose draping, color-drenched canvases ...
07/02/2022

The world lost an incredible artist and human being last Saturday. "Sam Gilliam, whose draping, color-drenched canvases insisted on the radical potential of abstraction, died at the age of 88.

Emerging at the height of the Civil Rights Movement, a time when many Black American artists harnessed figuration to represent their reality and spur social change, Gilliam did not just pursue non-representational art but managed to turn it on its head. Inspired in part by women he saw hanging laundry on clotheslines from his studio window, he freed the canvas from the stretcher for his pivotal "Drape" paintings, suspending them from the ceiling or on the wall in sensual configurations that embrace the organic folds of fabric. It was the zenith of American postwar painting: Abstract Expressionism, the New York School, and the Color Field movement collided in a frenzy of drips, splashes, and egos, mostly those of a rather male and White coterie of artists. Gilliam, along with contemporaries like Howardena Pindell and Alma Thomas, made their mark on the medium while asserting the creative autonomy of Black artists in the United States." - full article by Valentina Di Liscia for

+ Sam Gilliam, Close to Trees (detail), 2011. Acrylic on polypropylene. Image courtesy of Sam Gilliam.

+ Installation view of "Sam Gilliam: 1967–1973 at Mnuchin Gallery. Photography Tom Powel Imaging. Artwork © Sam Gilliam

+ Sam Gilliam, “Green April” (1969), acrylic on canvas, 98 x 271 x 3 7/8 inches, collection of Kunstmuseum Basel (photo by Lee Thompson)

+ Sam Gilliam, “Seahorses” 1975, Philadelphia Museum of Art (photo by Johansen Krause)

+ Sam Gilliam, “10/27/69” (1969), acrylic on canvas installation, collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York (photo by Fredrik Nilsen Studio

+ Sam Gilliam

From the Vignelli Center for Design Studies: "What brings us joy in the archives? These vintage color images of the Hell...
06/30/2022

From the Vignelli Center for Design Studies: "What brings us joy in the archives? These vintage color images of the Heller rainbow stacking dinnerware! Those colors! Those concentric circles! Bon appetit!

We have many photographs of Vignelli-designed products in the archives. Often we find the original shots for catalogs, publications, and other marketing purposes. But we haven’t seen these images used in any of the promotional materials!

This stacking melamine dinnerware was originally designed in Italy in 1964 and won the Compasso D’oro award. But the manufacturer went out of business and the molds lay dormant for a few years. But Heller brought them to the United States and they eventually created them in rainbow colors.

'The size of the plates, their edge wall concept, their stackability, and the brilliant rainbow colors quickly captured the consumers’ attention and the product became a symbol of contemporary houseware.' design: (1981).

We can’t resist joining the fun of the . On instagram and [Rutgers University Special Collections and University Archives] are challenging Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAMs) and fans of GLAMS to share something that brings them joy every Wednesday in July! [our apologies for being a day late this week.]"

Color transparencies of Heller stacking dinnerware Massimo and Lella Vignelli papers Vignelli Center for Design Studies, Rochester, NY

"The latest incarnation of 'Hermès in the Making,' a roving exhibition that’s already stopped in Copenhagen and Turin, I...
06/29/2022

"The latest incarnation of 'Hermès in the Making,' a roving exhibition that’s already stopped in Copenhagen and Turin, Italy, has landed at the Somerset Collection shopping center in Troy, Michigan, just outside of Detroit. If this seems like a slightly surprising place for the French luxury brand to have set up shop, the show serves as a reminder, even if it’s an unspoken one, that both Hermès and the area have long and rich histories of craftsmanship, the latter as the longtime seat of the American auto industry and a locus of midcentury modern design, and the former as a producer of everything from saddles to scarves to porcelain. It endeavors to give a behind-the-scenes look at how Hermès’s team of artisans create and maintain some of these enduring objects and, in doing so, offers a window into what makes the fashion house stand out. As Guillaume de Seynes, an executive vice president at Hermès who oversees manufacturing and equity investments, says, it’s Hermès’s relationship to its makers — and their relationship to their respective crafts — that gives the maison its human touch, as well as integrity and a certain soulfulness." - by Max Berlinger for | photos by

The Spring/Summer 2023 Runway shows are upon us and we're looking at several Menswear looks that mirror our forecasted c...
06/27/2022

The Spring/Summer 2023 Runway shows are upon us and we're looking at several Menswear looks that mirror our forecasted colors for the season.

This week's CAUS Library Pick is "Paul Smith" edited by Tony Chambers with a foreword by Jony Ive. "Created in close col...
06/26/2022

This week's CAUS Library Pick is "Paul Smith" edited by Tony Chambers with a foreword by Jony Ive. "Created in close collaboration with design legend Sir Paul Smith, Paul Smith celebrates the iconic brand through the lens of 50 diverse objects, personally selected by Sir Paul himself for the inspiration they have provided him over the years.

These carefully-chosen objects have impacted Sir Paul's worldview, creative process, and adherence to a design approach that's imbued with distinctly British wit and eccentricity. Every featured item illuminates a different aspect of the designer's work and leads to discussions on subjects as varied as the formality of a suit, the importance of teamwork, and the power of humor.

Opening with a foreword by Jonathan Ive, former chief design officer of Apple, Paul Smith also includes unique contributions - personal letters, drawings, and photos - from fashion and design icons Manolo Blahnik, James Dyson, Martin Parr, John Pawson, and Alice Rawsthorn.

The book's colorful cloth cover takes its inspiration from yarn wound around card, which, as well as being one of the 50 objects chosen by Sir Paul to feature in the book, also shows how he creates his famous and iconic stripes.

Exploring everything from Sir Paul's very first show in Paris and his cult Floral Street store in London, to the evolution of his iconic stripes and his most recent collections and collaboration, this book provides the ultimate insight into the world of one of the most creative minds working in design today." -

Today we're looking at La Filanda (the Mill), a stunning villa on Lake Como. “We felt it was more interesting having som...
06/25/2022

Today we're looking at La Filanda (the Mill), a stunning villa on Lake Como. “We felt it was more interesting having something beautiful inside that nobody knows,” says Federico Marchetti, 49, the Milan-based entrepreneur behind the Yoox Net-a-Porter online retail empire. For the past four years, he and his partner, the British journalist Kerry Olsen, 41, have devoted themselves to constructing this privately opulent weekend refuge...

In this they had an unusual collaborator: Luca Guadagnino, the Italian filmmaker, who had always wanted to be an interior designer. Inside, the couple sought a harmonious retreat. Guadagnino started with a psychologically detailed questionnaire: What colors do they like? What time of the day do they prefer? How do they see themselves in a room? Answers in hand — bright jewel tones, mornings, playing board games with their 7-year-old daughter, Margherita — the director began composing a storyboard in the form of a workbook, a thick volume that encompassed a minutely detailed inventory of the exemplary collection of 20th-century furniture that Marchetti had been amassing for years. “I’m a storyteller,” Guadagnino says. “That’s my first job.”

Though skilled at creating sumptuous movie sets, the director is neither a trained architect nor an interior designer. Along with a general contractor, the 150 Italian craftspeople Guadagnino assembled like a crew executed his design for the brass-trimmed, ribbed oak paneling used on the lower part of some walls (inspired by, Guadagnino says, “a very precious wood box, the kind you can find in Japan”); upholstered those same walls above the dado with Kvadrat wool fabrics in geometric panels in reference to both the structure’s origins as a textile factory and its mid-20th century Modernist design; and applied in stucco at the cornices a motif of double-ended ogives, a vaguely maritime style that alludes to the lake visible beyond the brass window frames..." Read the full article by Guy Trebay for photography

! "Bands research" by .lieberman | "I am an artist and educator based in New York City. I create artwork with code, and ...
06/23/2022

! "Bands research" by .lieberman | "I am an artist and educator based in New York City. I create artwork with code, and focus on building experimental drawing and animation tools. I make interactive environments that invite participants to become performers. My main focus is how computation can be used as medium for poetry." -

We're heading back to Milan for another recap of Salone del Mobile because there was so much to see and discuss! "Becaus...
06/22/2022

We're heading back to Milan for another recap of Salone del Mobile because there was so much to see and discuss!

"Because of Covid-19 and unrelenting global supply chain issues, the annual Salone del Mobile furniture fair in Milan moved from April to June this year, and thus celebrated its 60th-anniversary last week, a bit behind schedule. Typically the international design scene’s harbinger of spring, this latest edition, which T kicked off with a rollicking garden party at Villa Necchi Campiglio, turned into something of a sticky endurance test, one with 85-degree temperatures, sudden rainstorms, and nary an air-conditioned room in sight. Yet more than a quarter-million attendees decided to brave the elements for the sheer creativity on display, from recent graduates’ wild experiments with material to anticipated new releases from established names." - By Monica Khemsurov for | See images for designers

"An original bathroom is a rare species. An essential place of unmentionables — in a lot of ways, its purpose is clear, ...
06/21/2022

"An original bathroom is a rare species. An essential place of unmentionables — in a lot of ways, its purpose is clear, unchanged. And yet the bathroom is the second most remodeled room in a house after the kitchen, so it’s always a surprise — and a thrill — to find a historical bathroom untouched.

My sister’s bathroom is one of those midcentury ceramic tile relics, the kind that still exist throughout Los Angeles, hiding inside stucco box apartments and modest bungalows, in Spanish-style villas and Hollywood Regency mansions. ...

Even if a pink bathroom isn’t to your taste, it’s easy to appreciate something that has integrity, is fitting to its time, is committed to wearing well. Vintage tile bathrooms come with other bygone luxuries: tidy mortar that lasts forever, a tub stopper that actually stops water and the holy grail itself, high water pressure.

In a world where the past exists on an ever-diminishing scale as buildings get put up and knocked down, L.A.’s midcentury bathrooms feel anchored to a particular lineage. In the Victorian era, bathrooms were about sanitation, dominated by white subway tile, all the better to see dirt and eliminate it. The ’20s brought pastel colors, which got saturated and decorated in the ’30s, influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement. The wars returned things to white, this time in an endless 4-by-4 square grid, while also bringing industrialization, standardization and the beginning of cheaper — and less durable — ways of building.

In the ’50s, postwar optimism brought back color for good, with pink and peach being the most popular colors for the bathroom (hat tip to Mamie Eisenhower’s pink bathroom), but this time not only the tile but the sinks and toilets were pink as well — or mint, or baby blue, or sunflower yellow. The ’60s and ’70s kept the color and threw in everything else: pattern on pattern, wallpaper, faux wood paneling, carpet! Then came the heavy stone of a faux Italian villa and ultra-expensive but utterly boring seamless, white surfaces, but also craftsman chic with tactile materials and tasteful colors — tile came roaring back!"- by Krystal Chang for

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