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From Cal Fire
07/12/2021

From Cal Fire

Hot weather and dry conditions continue to drive an increase in wildfire activity spanning across California! Compared to this same time last year, there has been more than 700 wildfires and over 103,000 more acres burned. It's now more critical than ever that all Californians are prepared for wildfires. Learn how you can prepare at www.ReadyForWildfire.org.

CALIFORNIAFires rage in several states as heat wave broils U.S. WestBy Christopher WeberThe Associated PressFirefighters...
07/12/2021

CALIFORNIA
Fires rage in several states as heat wave broils U.S. West
By Christopher Weber
The Associated Press

Firefighters working in searing weather struggled to contain a Northern California wildfire that continued to grow Sunday and forced the temporary closure of a major highway, one of several large blazes burning across the U.S. West amid another heat wave that shattered records and strained power grids.

In Arizona, a small plane crashed Saturday during a survey of a wildfire in rural Mohave County, killing both crew members on board. The Beech C-90 aircraft was helping perform reconnaissance over the lightning- caused Cedar Basin Fire, near the tiny community of Wikieup northwest of Phoenix, when it went down around noon.

Officials on Sunday identified the victims as Air Tactical Group Supervisor Jeff Piechura, 62, a retired Tucson-area fire chief who was working for the Coronado National Forest, and Matthew Miller, 48, a pilot with Falcon Executive Aviation contracted by the U.S. Forest Service. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.

“Our hearts go out to the families of our brave wildland firefighters,” an Arizona Bureau of Land Management spokesperson said in a statement.

In California, officials asked all residents to reduce power consumption quickly after a major wildfire in southern Oregon knocked out interstate power lines, preventing up to 5,500 megawatts of electricity from flowing south into the state.

The California Independent System Operator, which runs the state’s power grid, said Saturday the Bootleg Fire took three transmission lines off-line, straining electricity supplies as temperatures in the area soared.

“The Bootleg Fire will see the potential for extreme growth today,” the National Weather Service in Medford, Oregon, tweeted Sunday.

Pushed by strong winds, the blaze exploded to 224 square miles as it raced through heavy timber in Oregon’s Fremont-Winema National Forest, near the Klamath County town of Sprague River.

To the southeast, the largest wildfire of the year in California was raging near the border with Nevada. The Beckwourth Complex Fire — a combination of two lightning- caused blazes burning 45 miles north of Lake Tahoe — showed no sign of slowing its rush northeast from the Sierra Nevada forest region after doubling in size between Friday and Saturday.

Late Saturday, flames jumped U.S. 395, which was closed near the small town of Doyle in California’s Lassen County. The lanes reopened Sunday, and officials urged motorists to use caution and keep moving along the key north-south route where flames were still active.

“Do not stop and take pictures,” said the fire’s Operations Section Chief Jake Cagle. “You are going to impede our operations if you stop and look at what’s going on.”

Cagle said structures had burned in Doyle, but he didn’t have an exact number. Bob Prary, who manages the Buck-Inn Bar in the town of about 600 people, said he saw at least six houses destroyed after Saturday’s flareup. The fire was smoldering Sunday in and around Doyle, but he feared some remote ranch properties were still in danger.

“It seems like the worst is over in town, but back on the mountainside the fire’s still going strong. Not sure what’s going to happen if the wind changes direction,” Prary said. Erratic winds were a concern for firefighters, Cagle noted, with gusts expected to reach 20 mph.

The blaze, which was only 9% contained, increased to 131 square miles. Temperatures in the area could top 100 degrees again Sunday.

It was one of several fires threatening homes across Western states that were expected to see triple- digit heat through the weekend as a high-pressure zone blankets the region.

Death Valley in southeastern California’s Mojave Desert reached 128 degrees Fahrenheit on Saturday, according to the National Weather Service’s reading at Furnace Creek. The shockingly high temperature was actually lower than the previous day, when the location reached 130 F.

Death Valley also recorded a 130-degree day in August of last year. If that reading and the one Friday are confirmed by experts as accurate, they will be the hottest highs recorded there since July 1913, when the Furnace Creek desert hit 134 F, considered the highest measured temperature on Earth.

The National Weather Service warned the dangerous conditions could cause heat-related illnesses.

Palm Springs in Southern California also hit a record high temperature of 120 F Saturday, while Las Vegas tied the all-time record high of 117 F.

NV Energy, Nevada’s largest power provider, also urged customers to conserve electricity Saturday and Sunday evenings because of the heat wave and wildfires affecting transmission lines throughout the region.

In Idaho, Gov. Brad Little mobilized the state’s National Guard to help fight fires sparked after lightning storms swept across the droughtstricken region.

A firefighter sprays water while trying to stop the Sugar fire, part of the Beckwourth Complex fire, from spreading to neighboring homes in Doyle on Saturday. Pushed by heavy winds amid a heat wave, the fire came out of the hills and destroyed residences in central Doyle.

CALIFORNIA
Fires rage in several states as heat wave broils U.S. West
By Christopher Weber
The Associated Press

Firefighters working in searing weather struggled to contain a Northern California wildfire that continued to grow Sunday and forced the temporary closure of a major highway, one of several large blazes burning across the U.S. West amid another heat wave that shattered records and strained power grids.

In Arizona, a small plane crashed Saturday during a survey of a wildfire in rural Mohave County, killing both crew members on board. The Beech C-90 aircraft was helping perform reconnaissance over the lightning- caused Cedar Basin Fire, near the tiny community of Wikieup northwest of Phoenix, when it went down around noon.

Officials on Sunday identified the victims as Air Tactical Group Supervisor Jeff Piechura, 62, a retired Tucson-area fire chief who was working for the Coronado National Forest, and Matthew Miller, 48, a pilot with Falcon Executive Aviation contracted by the U.S. Forest Service. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.

“Our hearts go out to the families of our brave wildland firefighters,” an Arizona Bureau of Land Management spokesperson said in a statement.

In California, officials asked all residents to reduce power consumption quickly after a major wildfire in southern Oregon knocked out interstate power lines, preventing up to 5,500 megawatts of electricity from flowing south into the state.

The California Independent System Operator, which runs the state’s power grid, said Saturday the Bootleg Fire took three transmission lines off-line, straining electricity supplies as temperatures in the area soared.

“The Bootleg Fire will see the potential for extreme growth today,” the National Weather Service in Medford, Oregon, tweeted Sunday.

Pushed by strong winds, the blaze exploded to 224 square miles as it raced through heavy timber in Oregon’s Fremont-Winema National Forest, near the Klamath County town of Sprague River.

To the southeast, the largest wildfire of the year in California was raging near the border with Nevada. The Beckwourth Complex Fire — a combination of two lightning- caused blazes burning 45 miles north of Lake Tahoe — showed no sign of slowing its rush northeast from the Sierra Nevada forest region after doubling in size between Friday and Saturday.

Late Saturday, flames jumped U.S. 395, which was closed near the small town of Doyle in California’s Lassen County. The lanes reopened Sunday, and officials urged motorists to use caution and keep moving along the key north-south route where flames were still active.

“Do not stop and take pictures,” said the fire’s Operations Section Chief Jake Cagle. “You are going to impede our operations if you stop and look at what’s going on.”

Cagle said structures had burned in Doyle, but he didn’t have an exact number. Bob Prary, who manages the Buck-Inn Bar in the town of about 600 people, said he saw at least six houses destroyed after Saturday’s flareup. The fire was smoldering Sunday in and around Doyle, but he feared some remote ranch properties were still in danger.

“It seems like the worst is over in town, but back on the mountainside the fire’s still going strong. Not sure what’s going to happen if the wind changes direction,” Prary said. Erratic winds were a concern for firefighters, Cagle noted, with gusts expected to reach 20 mph.

The blaze, which was only 9% contained, increased to 131 square miles. Temperatures in the area could top 100 degrees again Sunday.

It was one of several fires threatening homes across Western states that were expected to see triple- digit heat through the weekend as a high-pressure zone blankets the region.

Death Valley in southeastern California’s Mojave Desert reached 128 degrees Fahrenheit on Saturday, according to the National Weather Service’s reading at Furnace Creek. The shockingly high temperature was actually lower than the previous day, when the location reached 130 F.

Death Valley also recorded a 130-degree day in August of last year. If that reading and the one Friday are confirmed by experts as accurate, they will be the hottest highs recorded there since July 1913, when the Furnace Creek desert hit 134 F, considered the highest measured temperature on Earth.

The National Weather Service warned the dangerous conditions could cause heat-related illnesses.

Palm Springs in Southern California also hit a record high temperature of 120 F Saturday, while Las Vegas tied the all-time record high of 117 F.

NV Energy, Nevada’s largest power provider, also urged customers to conserve electricity Saturday and Sunday evenings because of the heat wave and wildfires affecting transmission lines throughout the region.

In Idaho, Gov. Brad Little mobilized the state’s National Guard to help fight fires sparked after lightning storms swept across the droughtstricken region.

A firefighter sprays water while trying to stop the Sugar fire, part of the Beckwourth Complex fire, from spreading to neighboring homes in Doyle on Saturday. Pushed by heavy winds amid a heat wave, the fire came out of the hills and destroyed residences in central Doyle.

07/12/2021

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA WEATHER FORECAST
Gradual cooling is expected this week
By Quinn Wilson
[email protected]

A gradual cool down is expected for many Southern California communities throughout the week as another record-breaking heat wave draws to a close, meteorologists at the National Weather Service said.

On Sunday, Palmdale and Lancaster broke their daily record highs, according to the NWS. Lancaster’s heat peaked at 113 degrees — breaking its 2012 record by two degrees — while Palmdale topped out at 111 degrees, a one degree increase from its previous 1961 record.

Sandberg tied its daily record of 98 degrees, which has stood since 1934, the NWS said.

While the most extreme temperatures have affected the Antelope Valley, the High Desert and parts of the Coachella Valley, much of the Inland Empire has and will continue to benefit from the marine layer influence, said Bruno Rodriguez, meteorologist with the NWS. Today’s temperatures were forecasted in the mid-to-low 90s for much of the Inland Empire, with some marks as high as 100 degrees in parts of Riverside County near Perris and Hemet, Rodriguez said.

“The High Desert will still be pretty hot (to begin the week),” Rodriguez said. “We can expect more substantial cooling (there) as we get into the middle of this week.”

Inland Orange County is projected to see high temperatures in the mid-to-low 80s today while the coast can expect temperatures in the mid-70s, Rodriguez said.

In Los Angeles County, today’s high temperatures are projected to reach 110 degrees throughout the Antelope Valley, about 98 degrees in the Santa Clarita Valley, 96 degrees in Woodland Hills and 83 degrees in Downtown Los Angeles, according to meteorologist Rich Thompson of the NWS’ Los Angeles office.

On Tuesday, highs are expected to dip to 105 degrees in the Antelope Valley and to 92 degrees in Woodland Hills, Thompson said. By Friday, Thompson said the coolest temperatures are expected, with the highs projected at about 98 degrees in the Antelope Valley and 79 degrees in Downtown Los Angeles.

“The more dramatic cooling (for Los Angeles County) will be Wednesday through Friday,” Thompson said.

Today, an “outside shot” of afternoon thunderstorms in the San Gabriel Mountains is on the table, Thompson said. Inland, a monsoonal convection is today and Tuesday that could lead to some precipitation in the mountain and desert areas of Riverside and San Bernardino counties, Rodriguez said.

Elevated fire weather danger is expected to remain throughout the week as low relative humidity and onshore winds are forecast to continue, Thompson said.

Today, July 12th in HistoryIn 1862, Valor above and beyond the call of duty honoredOn July 12, 1862, President Abraham L...
07/12/2021

Today, July 12th in History

In 1862, Valor above and beyond the call of duty honored
On July 12, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signs a law providing for the awarding of medals to Army personnel who "distinguish themselves by their gallantry in action," and the first of these Medal of Honor five-point bronze stars coated in copper will be awarded to six Civil War Union Army volunteers.
While the design of the medal and ribbon has changed, the meaning still holds true today.

Ceiling fan hint
07/11/2021
Top 5 Ways to Beat the Heat

Ceiling fan hint

As more people continue to work from home, some while caring for loved ones, keeping homes cool and comfortable can sometimes be a challenge. Follow these five easy ways to help your body, room and home stay cool all summer long. ...

Remember your equine family members on these hot days
07/11/2021

Remember your equine family members on these hot days

CAN YOU RECOGNIZE HEAT STRESS IN HORSES? ☀️🐴

A horse’s body maintains its normal temperature in hot weather by moving heat through the muscles and out through the skin. Exercise is a major source of body heat, and horses that cannot sweat will usually overheat very rapidly, even in cooler weather with a small amount of exercise.

When outside temperature + relative humidity = 150 or above, it's hard for a horse to keep cool because their ability to sweat is compromised — especially if the humidity contributes over half of the 150.

Signs of heat stroke may range from mild to severe and life-threatening. Foals usually cannot take as much heat as adult horses. A mare may be fine, but her foal may be getting sick from being out on a hot day. Horses with heavy muscling or excess fat or in poor condition will have more problems. Keep in mind that strenuous exercise on a hot, humid day can lead to problems in a short period of time for even the best-conditioned horse.

Does this mean you should not ride on a hot day? Not necessarily. It just means you should take precautions and use your common sense. Remain vigilant for dehydration and signs of heat exhaustion, as heat exhaustion can advance to heat stroke quickly. Above all, be kind and attentive to your equine partner’s need. If you feel hot, they feel hotter. So if they look tired, it’s time for a drink, a cold bath, and a break in the shade.



Source: Heat Stroke | https://aaep.org/horsehealth/heat-stroke

This week
07/11/2021

This week

🦴 Kick-off Parks Make Life Better Month TODAY and dig for fossils between 10 a.m.-12 p.m. at Community Center Park, located at 3900 Acacia Avenue!

📸 While you’re at the park, take a selfie with the "Parks Make Life Better” sign and email the photo to [email protected] to be entered into a prize drawing! Photo submissions are due by July 31, 2021.

ℹ For more information, visit www.norco.ca.us/PMLB or contact the Parks, Recreation & Community Services Department at (951) 270-5632 or [email protected].

Next Friday eveningFRIDAY, JULY 16, 2021 AT 6:30 PM PDT – 8:30 PM PDTConcert in the Park: Blue Breeze Band (Motown R&B)P...
07/11/2021

Next Friday evening
FRIDAY, JULY 16, 2021 AT 6:30 PM PDT – 8:30 PM PDT
Concert in the Park: Blue Breeze Band (Motown R&B)
Pikes Peak Park (97 Sixth Street, Norco)

Next Friday evening
FRIDAY, JULY 16, 2021 AT 6:30 PM PDT – 8:30 PM PDT
Concert in the Park: Blue Breeze Band (Motown R&B)
Pikes Peak Park (97 Sixth Street, Norco)

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