Norco Events

Norco Events This page is dedicated to promote "Horsetown, USA", Norco events & other community activities along with providing city wide updates.

From Mosquito Control.
09/20/2021

From Mosquito Control.

Football is back!! Remember Aedes Aegypti mosquitos only fly about the distance of a football field so make sure to dump and drain all water holding container on your property.

New 15 Freeway lane targets traffic chokepointMile-long lane from Cajalco Road to Weirick Road set for 2022 completionBy...
09/20/2021

New 15 Freeway lane targets traffic chokepoint
Mile-long lane from Cajalco Road to Weirick Road set for 2022 completion
By David Downey
[email protected]

A fix is on the way for a 15 Freeway choke point in Corona known as the “Cajalco Crush” — a $5 million project that aims to ease congestion at the point where the new toll lanes end has been approved.

The Riverside County Transportation Commission voted unanimously Wednesday to OK work that involves building a mile-long, general-purpose lane on the freeway’s southbound side, from Cajalco Road to Weirick Road.

Construction is expected to start in March and end in August, with the lane opening in September 2022, a commission report states.

Driving south on the 15 Freeway weekday afternoons and nights has been a nightmare for commuters for years.

The construction of 15 miles of express lanes on the freeway was meant to ease some of the congestion, and provide a smoother, more reliable ride farther north. That $472 million project was completed in April, delivering four new toll lanes — two in each direction — from the 60 Freeway on the Eastvale-Jurupa Valley border to Cajalco Road in south Corona.

But officials knew there would be problems with the express lanes’ debut David Thomas, toll project delivery director, told commissioners the agency anticipated a bottleneck developing at Cajalco Road.

“We have a single express lane at that point that becomes a general-purpose lane,” Thomas said.

An outside general-purpose lane ends there, too, he said.

“However, the congestion was more substantial than expected,” Thomas said.

The area has seen a 50% increase in accidents since the express lanes opened, he added.

The problems have spurred numerous driver complaints and prompted Corona, Riverside County, Caltrans and commission officials to begin meeting in June to seek a solution.

“I travel that quite a bit at all different times of the day, at all
different times of the week, and it literally has no letup,” said Commissioner Wes Speake, a Corona City Council member. “It’s continuous and it’s an assault. I call it soul crushing.”

Speake said he would have preferred extending the disappearing southbound lane from the point where it ends approaching Cajalco, through the Cajalco interchange to Weirick. But Thomas said the commission wasn’t able to get a required air-quality rule exemption.

“I’m bummed that we can’t make it happen,” Speake said, adding, “Those lane drops are killer.”

Instead, the commission will build what is called an auxiliary lane that will be nearly as long, extending from the Cajalco Road onramp to the Weirick Road off-ramp, Thomas said.

A southbound lane still will drop or disappear just before Cajalco, going south. But a lane will reappear just beyond Cajalco.

Thomas said models show the new lane will improve traffic flow, though not eliminate congestion.

Temescal Valley resident Jerry Sincich said the valley generally supports the planned fix for what they refer to as the “Cajalco Crush.”

“That’s where the bottleneck really hits,” Sincich said.

New 15 Freeway lane targets traffic chokepoint
Mile-long lane from Cajalco Road to Weirick Road set for 2022 completion
By David Downey
[email protected]

A fix is on the way for a 15 Freeway choke point in Corona known as the “Cajalco Crush” — a $5 million project that aims to ease congestion at the point where the new toll lanes end has been approved.

The Riverside County Transportation Commission voted unanimously Wednesday to OK work that involves building a mile-long, general-purpose lane on the freeway’s southbound side, from Cajalco Road to Weirick Road.

Construction is expected to start in March and end in August, with the lane opening in September 2022, a commission report states.

Driving south on the 15 Freeway weekday afternoons and nights has been a nightmare for commuters for years.

The construction of 15 miles of express lanes on the freeway was meant to ease some of the congestion, and provide a smoother, more reliable ride farther north. That $472 million project was completed in April, delivering four new toll lanes — two in each direction — from the 60 Freeway on the Eastvale-Jurupa Valley border to Cajalco Road in south Corona.

But officials knew there would be problems with the express lanes’ debut David Thomas, toll project delivery director, told commissioners the agency anticipated a bottleneck developing at Cajalco Road.

“We have a single express lane at that point that becomes a general-purpose lane,” Thomas said.

An outside general-purpose lane ends there, too, he said.

“However, the congestion was more substantial than expected,” Thomas said.

The area has seen a 50% increase in accidents since the express lanes opened, he added.

The problems have spurred numerous driver complaints and prompted Corona, Riverside County, Caltrans and commission officials to begin meeting in June to seek a solution.

“I travel that quite a bit at all different times of the day, at all
different times of the week, and it literally has no letup,” said Commissioner Wes Speake, a Corona City Council member. “It’s continuous and it’s an assault. I call it soul crushing.”

Speake said he would have preferred extending the disappearing southbound lane from the point where it ends approaching Cajalco, through the Cajalco interchange to Weirick. But Thomas said the commission wasn’t able to get a required air-quality rule exemption.

“I’m bummed that we can’t make it happen,” Speake said, adding, “Those lane drops are killer.”

Instead, the commission will build what is called an auxiliary lane that will be nearly as long, extending from the Cajalco Road onramp to the Weirick Road off-ramp, Thomas said.

A southbound lane still will drop or disappear just before Cajalco, going south. But a lane will reappear just beyond Cajalco.

Thomas said models show the new lane will improve traffic flow, though not eliminate congestion.

Temescal Valley resident Jerry Sincich said the valley generally supports the planned fix for what they refer to as the “Cajalco Crush.”

“That’s where the bottleneck really hits,” Sincich said.

RIVERSIDE COUNTYNeighbors, businesses are at odds over horse trailsRiders say paths are ‘being destroyed;’ officials say...
09/20/2021

RIVERSIDE COUNTY
Neighbors, businesses are at odds over horse trails
Riders say paths are ‘being destroyed;’ officials say issue is more complex
By Allyson Escobar
[email protected]

Residents of the Gavilan Hills area near Lake Mathews are concerned about losing their rural lifestyle and access to beloved horse-riding trails.

They say these long-distance trails, set on a plateau and popular among horseback riders and outdoor enthusiasts, are being blocked by a business and surrounding development. Longtime neighbors in the area south of Riverside say a growing 420-acre nursery, Altman Plants, is prohibiting access to the paths, and that community trails “are being destroyed,” a news release from a residents’ group states.

Both Riverside County and nursery officials said some parts of the trails are on private property.

In late August, members of Greater Lake Mathews/ Gavilan Hills Residents United rallied at a county Board of Supervisors meeting, spoke and delivered a petition with at least 1,000 signatures, they said. They added that the long-distance trails — designed to link communities, open-space areas and regional parks — are being blocked by the nursery and other development, and that a more permanent trails system is needed.

“A large number of regional and community trails are being destroyed and eliminated from the county-adopted trails system, which is part of the county general plan,” the group’s release said. “The county is unwilling to protect these trails even though many are on county-owned property.”

Residents’ concerns about the nursery include land grading, construction noise, constant bright lighting, water runoff and the use of pesticides, which some allege is killing livestock and wildlife. They allege that a gas station at Wood and Cajalco roads is blocking a “critical segment” of the regional trail, and that crossing the roads to access an approved community trail nearby is dangerous.

Chris Herron, a cattle rancher who lives next to Altman Plants, called the nursery a “commercial distribution center created within our rural community.” He alleged that a combination of pesticides and runoff from nursery operations has killed about 10 of his cows.

“Hundreds of commercial trucks are driving up narrow winding country roads day and night,” Herron said. “It has been years now trying to make someone accountable for the destruction of our community with the distribution center being built illegally. It appears as the county is defending Altman’s and issuing permits that do not meet the zoning and are not being held to the same standards.”

Herron and other residents say the nursery also blocks access to Idaleona Road, a county-registered road — part of a regional trail network that connects to the west to Lake Mathews Drive — with chain-link fencing, barbed wire and large planted trees.

Jim Hessler, director of west coast operations for Altman Plants, said in a statement that the nursery acquired the property 20 years ago, is “highly regulated” as a business and has a grading permit.

“These were never officially sanctioned county trails. If you look at the entire map, a very small portion relates to the land owned by the nursery,” Hessler said.

“The issue of a comprehensive county trail system is much larger than our nursery,” Hessler added.

But residents said Idealona Road has a trail easement granted by the county Regional Park and Open-Space District and deeded to the Western Municipal Water District. This would permit public access to the trail network — a significant part of which they said goes through Altman Plants’ land.

Hessler said Altman is working with a surveyor to determine the exact boundaries, and will “take quick action to modify” its fence if it crosses an easement. The fence was installed less than a year ago, he said.

Gary Andre, a former county trails commissioner, was outraged “that the county is not willing to protect the adopted trails that they spent years mapping and approving.”

But District 1 Riverside County Supervisor Kevin Jeffries, who represents the area, said the lines may be more blurred than residents realize.

Some lines on the county’s updated comprehensive trails plan represent “potential trails that don’t exist, and some may never exist,” he said by email. Some parts of the roads that residents allege are on trails are actually on private Altman Plants property, Jeffries said — and gating those parts off is the business’ right.

Jeffries called the county’s trails plan a “planning wish list map, not a map of ‘actual’ trails.”

Julia Doty, a member of Gavilan Hills Residents United, told supervisors in August that Jeffries has promised the area was “built for the horse trails and the horse community, and that it would remain rural.”

“Now, developers and large businesses are taking away our rural lifestyle,” Doty said. “And it just can’t be accepted.”

The residents said they want the county to work with the parks department and the water district to get an easement for a trail, which could protect it from further development.

“Supervisor Jeffries and (county Chief Operating Officer) Juan Perez have stated the trails are just a line on a map,” said Debbie Walsh, a neighbor and president of the Rural Association of Mead Valley. “For us, they are much, much more. They are our trails.”

Thank you Cal Fire
09/19/2021

Thank you Cal Fire

Today, more than 10,00 personnel remain assigned to 11 active large wildfires. To date, more than 2.3 million acres have burned statewide. Get the latest on these incidents at: https://fire.ca.gov/incidents

09/19/2021

This week at Ingalls Park:

The main entrance to the George A Ingalls Veteran's Memorial Plaza is closed during the construction of the Gold Star Family Monument, visitors can access the Plaza from the upper level. During construction ADA access is limited.

Sunday, September 19, 2021 (TODAY)
8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
World Series Team Roping Dynamite Production

Monday, 9/20 through Wednesday, 9/22
10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Open Riding is CLOSED due to upcoming event prep

Thursday, September 23, 2021
5:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Community Barrel Racing @ Moreno Arena

09/19/2021

This week's meeting at City Hall
Wednesday, September 22, 2021
6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Measure R Citizens' Oversight Committee Regular Meeting

09/19/2021

This week's weather forecast for Norco. No rain is predicted, but it will be very warm starting Tuesday through Saturday.

SEPTEMBER 19 - SEPTEMBER 30
SUN 9/19 86° /59° Plenty of sun

MON 9/20 93° /62° Sunny

TUE 9/21 97° /66° Hot with plenty of sun

WED 9/22 97° /67° Hot with plenty of sun

THU 9/23 96° /65° Partly sunny and warm

FRI 9/24 94° /61° Sunny and very warm

SAT 9/25 93° /61° Sunny and remaining very warm

SUN 9/26 91° /63° Plenty of sunshine

09/19/2021

Sunday morning with Jon Coupal

DIRECT DEMOCRACY
Protect recall power from politicians

It is the richest of ironies that those who identify as progressives today bear no resemblance to the true progressives of the early 1900s, including California Gov. Hiram Johnson. In fact, so called “progressives” today seek to tear down Johnson’s legacy of clean government and fighting special interests. This includes efforts to weaken the powers of direct democracy, which Johnson recognized as an indispensable tool to bypass an indolent, unresponsive, and corrupt political system.

The latest assault on direct democracy is brought to us by Assemblyman Marc Berman, D-Silicon Valley, and Senator Steve Glazer, D-Orinda, who are upset that California citizens launched a recall against Gov. Gavin Newsom. The fact that the recall failed — which one would assume would satisfy Newsom’s allies — is of little consequence to these politicians.

Berman and Glazer would be well-served by leaving their offices in the Capitol for an hour or two and wandering over to the California Museum to see the exhibit on Newsom’s predecessor by more than a century. This is what they would learn about Gov. Hiram Johnson: “Whether serving as an attorney, a California governor, or a United States senator, Hiram Warren Johnson placed principles solidly above politics. His progressive vision of a better society became the stepping- off point for California’s journey through the 20th century.”

Hiram Johnson’s biography includes the fact that in his first case as a prosecutor he secured a conviction in a prominent graft and bribery case, which established him as an anti-corruption champion. Less than two years after becoming the leader of the Progressive movement, he was elected governor in 1910 promising to confront special interests — especially the all-powerful railroads — and return political power back to the people. These progressive reforms led to a major revision of the state’s constitution in 1911.

The reforms advanced under Johnson’s leadership included the rights of direct democracy: initiative, referendum and recall which remain a powerful check against political elites and special interests who care little for the average taxpaying citizens of California.

In announcing last week their intention to weaken the power of recall, Berman and Glazer use the cost of the election as an excuse. According to Berman, “Californians are very frustrated that we just spent $276 million on this recall election that, from the looks of it, certified what voters said three years ago and what voters could have said next year.” It is doubtful that many voters are frustrated by such cost in a state that just wasted an estimated $30 billion dollars on fraudulent claims to the California Employment Development Department.

Moreover, the rejection of the recall can hardly be characterized as a ringing endorsement of Newsom’s policies when, rather than running on his own record, his campaign was focused on a rejection of former President Donald Trump, who remains wildly unpopular in California even though he no longer holds public office.

The original Progressive movement was designed to break the stranglehold that Southern Pacific Company had on the state capital. Today the names of the special interests may have changed but they remain as powerful as the railroads ever were. Public sector unions, high tech billionaires and Hollywood corporate interests provided the lion’s share of more than $100 million in campaign contributions to ensure Newsom’s victory. But these are the same sort of powerful interests that Hiram Johnson recognized could skew the balance of power in their own favor to the detriment of the middle class.

In any event, in their attempt to weaken or eliminate the power of recall, these politicians will run into strong headwinds. First, although Californians are sometimes frustrated with the number and complexity of initiatives, the tools of direct democracy remain consistently popular. A Public Policy Institute of California poll in 2020 revealed that 60% of Californians are satisfied with the process. Second, it is possible to believe that this recall effort was ill-advised while also desiring to retain this tool in the arsenal of weapons to check concentrated political power. Third, while Berman and Glazer say they want this effort to be bipartisan, let’s be serious. For years, Democrats have been manipulating election rules governing direct democracy in an effort to game the system.

Voters are aware that political elites abhor direct democracy because it allows the great unwashed and unsophisticated to deal with matters such as taxation, victims’ rights, insurance and, most importantly, political reform. These are issues over which politicians strongly desire to exercise a legislative monopoly.

President Theodore Roosevelt, in his “Charter of Democracy” speech to the 1912 Ohio constitutional convention, stated: “I believe in the Initiative and Referendum, which should be used not to destroy representative government, but to correct it whenever it becomes misrepresentative.”

In California, the political left has successfully consolidated political power through legislation, executive action and a leftist judiciary to such an extent that that the rights advanced by Hiram Johnson and Teddy Roosevelt are more important now than they were 100 years ago. There is nothing that needs to be altered in our current right of recall.

Jon Coupal is president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association.

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