Prevention Institute

Prevention Institute Prevention Institute aligns strategy, policy and networks of organizations to build health, foster equity and prevent injury in communities across the US
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Prevention Institute is a national non-profit that aligns strategy, policy and networks of organizations to build health, foster equity and prevent injury in areas where people live, work, learn and play. We work with communities, government, and foundations to design primary prevention strategies that save lives and money in communities across the country.

Mission: Prevention Institute was founded in 1997 to serve as a focal point for primary prevention practice—promoting policies, organizational practices, and collaborative efforts that improve health and quality of life. As a national non-profit organization, we are committed to preventing illness and injury, to fostering health and social equity, and to building momentum for community prevention as an integral component of a quality health system. Prevention Institute synthesizes research and practice; develops prevention tools and frameworks; helps design and guide interdisciplinary partnerships; and conducts training and strategic consultation with government, foundations, and community-based organizations nationwide and internationally.

Sharing a call to action and easy advocacy action from the American Psychological Association! Now is the time to stand ...
07/28/2020
Tell Your Senators to Support Health Equity Provisions from the HEROES Act

Sharing a call to action and easy advocacy action from the American Psychological Association!

Now is the time to stand up for health equity! Recently, the House passed H.R.6800 (the Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions Act or the HEROES Act) that includes important data collection, health equity, and mental health provisions addressing psychosocial supports. Specifically, the bill:

Requires the Secretary of HHS, to update and make publicly available the report to Congress required by the Paycheck Protection and Health Care Enhancement Act on the collection of data on race, ethnicity, age, sex, and gender of individuals diagnosed with COVID-19;
Urges the Secretary of HHS to expand on a report to Congress required by the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act to include the testing, positive diagnoses, hospitalization, intensive care admissions, and mortality rates associated with COVID–19, disaggregated by race, ethnicity, age, sex, and gender;
Authorizes grants to state, local, and territorial health departments in order to support the modernization of data collection methods and infrastructure to increase data collection-related health inequities;
Requires the National Institutes of Health to conduct a 10-year Longitudinal Study on the full impact of SARS–COVID–19 on infected individuals, including both short-term and long-term health impacts;
Supports $3 billion to SAMHSA for increased mental health support, substance abuse treatment, and increased outreach;
Provides $2.1 billion to address health care needs related to coronavirus for Native Americans;
Gives $100 million for Aging and Disability Services Programs to prevent, prepare for, and respond to the coronavirus:
Protects certain noncitizens as well as certain immigrant visa applicants affected by processing delays and travel restrictions related to the COVID-19;
Includes $10.1 billion for the Administration for Children and Families to provide supportive services for families, fund childcare programs for essential workers, and prevent child abuse and neglect;
Supports $600 million in funding to address the COVID-19 crisis in state and local prisons and jails;
Includes $15 million for the Housing for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) program to maintain operations, rental assistance, supportive services, and other necessary actions to mitigate the impact of coronavirus on low-income persons with HIV/AIDS;
Expands safety net programs such as the Social Services Block Grant, Tax Credits for low-income households, Family and Medical Leave, Emergency Rental Assistance, and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program to support children, families, and communities; and
Prohibits discrimination in the administration of programs and services receiving federal funding based on any factor that is not merit-based, such as age, disability, sex (including sexual orientation, gender identity, and pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions), race, color, national origin, immigration status, or religion.

We applaud the House for passing this important legislation, but a deal in the Senate is needed! Now is the time to start building the bipartisan support necessary in the Senate to advance the relief package. Please contact your Senators, Democrats and Republicans alike, and ask them to support important provisions like these that address equity in the Senate legislation.

Now is the time to stand up for health equity! Recently, the House passed H.R.6800 (the Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions Act or the HEROES Act) that includes important data collection, health equity, and mental health...

Contact your senators today and ask them to take immediate action to pass an equitable COVID-19 relief and recovery bill...
07/28/2020
Urge your Senators to pass an equitable COVID-19 relief and recovery bill

Contact your senators today and ask them to take immediate action to pass an equitable COVID-19 relief and recovery bill that meets the needs of families and communities. You can copy and paste text from the talking points below. Find contact info at democracy.io!

The next relief bill must:

Prioritize direct support to individuals, families, and communities that need it most—not to corporations. We need to make sure people are able to meet their basic needs during this devastating economic crisis. Individuals, families, and communities need immediate economic assistance, food assistance, and policies that will support their ability to take care of their own health, such as paid sick leave. They also need to be able to access timely COVID-19 testing and treatment. Learn more from the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP).

Support Black, Indigenous, Latino, and communities of color. In addition to economic and health assistance, we need policies that will reverse the disproportionate impact of the coronavirus on communities of color and position those communities to be able to achieve a just and equitable recovery. The Movement or Black Lives’ National Demands for COVID-19 include supporting essential workers—43% of whom are people of color; protecting voters—especially Black voters, who are being targeted for disenfranchisement; and releasing people from jails, prisons, and detention centers.

Provide direct funding for state and local governments: State and local governments are staring down enormous budget deficits after having stepped up to meet their residents’ needs during this crisis. Without federal assistance, they will have to cut health and social services, education, environmental protection, and other crucial programs. Cities and states are on the frontline of our country’s response to COVID-19, and we can’t afford to let them to go bankrupt as they try to meet their residents’ needs during this crisis. Visit the National League of Cities for more information.

Protect immigrant families during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic: The laws that Congress has enacted so far to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic have excluded immigrants and their families—a tragic slight that has left all of us more vulnerable. The next COVID-19 health and stimulus bill needs to work for immigrants, including making sure everyone can access COVID-19 testing, treatment, and emergency assistance regardless of immigration status. Learn more by visiting Protecting Immigrant Families.
We need Congress to ensure that everyone, regardless of where they were born and what community they call home, has access to economic support, healthcare, and other resources they need to weather this pandemic and move toward recovery. Please take action today—and share this email with colleagues, friends, and family members. Your senators need to hear from you now.

The last COVID-19 relief bill was signed into law in April, and many of the measures it included to support struggling families and small businesses—such as extending and increasing unemployment benefits—are about to or have already expired. The same is the case with the moratoriums on evictions...

In this section on PBS NewsHour that honors the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Hari Sreenivasa...
07/27/2020
30 years after ADA, inaccessibility persists for the disabled

In this section on PBS NewsHour that honors the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Hari Sreenivasan talks with Dr. Feranmi Okanlami, assistant professor at the University of Michigan, about the long road we still have ahead to creating more access for communities with disabilities.

"The way that I am directly impacted by the lack of accessibility in our world is something that is a harder pill to swallow than some of the unconscious bias and racism and prejudice that people can practice, but not as directly. Disability is ubiquitous. It does not discriminate based on race, gender, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status, but there is an entire demographic of individuals that doesn't have equal rights, and that doesn't have something as simple as the ability to enter a building because it is structurally not accessible for them to come in... It shouldn't take lived experience to be able to acknowledge the lack of access some communities still face."

On the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, we look at what the landmark civil rights law, which guarantees equal access to public resources and employment to disabled people has achieved and how much work remains. Dr. Oluwaferanmi Okanlami, assistant professor at the University....

Let’s urge our California legislators to support these bills about housing, criminal justice, emergency response, and co...
07/27/2020
Action Items for a Safer, Healthier, and More Equitable California | Prevention Institute

Let’s urge our California legislators to support these bills about housing, criminal justice, emergency response, and community resources.

The California Legislature returns from its extended recess today, and we want to use this week to flood our legislators with calls to support key bills addressing racial justice and health equity in our California communities!

Earlier this year, we developed a policy platform with a group of advocacy partners, calling for policymakers to look beyond immediate COVID-19 recovery and instead consider how we can help make California a more just and equitable state. That policy platform guided the bills we’re currently advancing, in housing, criminal justice, emergency response, and community resources.

Take action today. Click through to our website for contact information and scripts you can use to call or write to your policymakers.

The California Legislature returned from its extended recess today, July 27, and we want to use this week to flood our legislators with calls to support key bills addressing racial justice and health equity in our California communities!

PI's Media Digest is up! In this week's edition: Civil rights leader John Lewis passes away; eviction moratorium to end ...
07/24/2020

PI's Media Digest is up! In this week's edition: Civil rights leader John Lewis passes away; eviction moratorium to end July 25; counties anticipate $200B+ shortfall.

Each week, PI compiles a round-up of the latest public health-related news, with an eye toward media framing and language, particularly as they relate to the role of primary prevention. The views expressed in these articles do not reflect those of Prevention Institute.

https://bit.ly/2D4IUOR

Hogg Foundation for Mental Health
07/21/2020
Hogg Foundation for Mental Health

Hogg Foundation for Mental Health

In this milestone 100th episode of our Into the Fold podcast, we dive into Black Lives Matter and the topic of racism and historical trauma with a panel of experts.

Together, we discuss the impact of police brutality on African American mental health and ways non-Black allies can best support their friends and the Black Lives Matter movement.

In this brief interview, NPR's Noel King speaks with Matt Desmond, founder of Princeton's Eviction Lab, about how the im...
07/21/2020
As Protections Expire, Millions Of Americans Face Threats Of Eviction

In this brief interview, NPR's Noel King speaks with Matt Desmond, founder of Princeton's Eviction Lab, about how the impending increase in evictions across the country will not only continue to disproportionately harm low-income communities and communities of color, but will contribute to the spread of COVID.

"Before the pandemic, the majority of renters below the poverty time were already spending half of their income or more on rent. And one in four families were spending 70% of their income just on rent and utilities. When you're spending 70-80% on rent and the lights, you don't need to have a big emergency wash over your life to get evicted. something very small can do it.

Across the US, 1 in 20 renters faces eviction every year, but for African American renters, that statistic is 1 in 11. We've created in low income communities of color a "semi-permanent renter class." Most white American families own their home and they're buffered from the exigencies of rent increases, and from the eviction crisis. But most black and Latino families rent their homes and they're disproportionately exposed to these problems.

If evictions continue to increase once federal evictions relief draws to a close, our homeless shelter systems are going to be flooded and stressed. This will be horrible for social distancing. At a moment when staying home is the safest thing we can do to stop the spread of this virus, exposing people to the lack of a home is going to spread more disease and pain."

NPR's Noel King speaks with Matt Desmond, founder of Princeton's Eviction Lab, about the threat of a rising number of evictions nationwide as federal evictions relief draws to an end.

In their op-ed in California Health Report, Sarah-Michael Gaston of Youth Forward and PI's Juliet Sims explain how citie...
07/21/2020
California Health Report

In their op-ed in California Health Report, Sarah-Michael Gaston of Youth Forward and PI's Juliet Sims explain how cities' taxes on marijuana are going toward funding for the police instead of the communities most harmed by the War on Drugs. They offer recommendations for how cities can shift these funds from the criminal justice system back into the communities they were intended to benefit in the first place.

As cries to “defund the police” reverberate across the country, cities are looking at ways to shift funds from policing into communities. In California, tax revenues from marijuana should be a clear point of entry. When voters legalized cannabis in 2016, they expected the taxes would be invested in communities that were adversely impacted by the war on drugs. Instead, a new report finds that these revenues are actually funding the police.

The last COVID-19 relief bill was signed into law in April, and many of the measures it included to support struggling f...
07/21/2020
Urge your Senators to pass an equitable COVID-19 relief and recovery bill

The last COVID-19 relief bill was signed into law in April, and many of the measures it included to support struggling families and small businesses—such as extending and increasing unemployment benefits—are about to or have already expired. The same is the case with the moratoriums on evictions and power shutoffs that were put into place in hundreds of cities and states. Meanwhile, unemployment is still at historic levels, and thousands of small businesses are on the brink as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to worsen. Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and other people of color have been impacted the most.

While the House of Representatives passed the HEROES Act back in May, the Senate has failed to take up a new relief package—until this week. Now that our Senators have returned from recess, we must push them to support families and communities by providing immediate relief with a focus on the communities that are most impacted.

The pandemic and our so far inadequate federal response have thrown tens of millions of people out of work, and many are struggling to afford food and housing and access healthcare. The relief packages that have been passed to date have not gone far enough and have left too many people out, especially immigrants and communities of color that have been hardest hit by both the virus and the economic fallout.

Contact your senators today and ask them to take immediate action to pass an equitable COVID-19 relief and recovery bill that meets the needs of families and communities. You can copy and paste text from the talking points in our e-alert.

The last COVID-19 relief bill was signed into law in April, and many of the measures it included to support struggling families and small businesses—such as extending and increasing unemployment benefits—are about to or have already expired. The same is the case with the moratoriums on evictions...

"About 43 million people — roughly one of every eight Americans — now receive SNAP, The Times found. That is well below ...
07/20/2020
Amid a Deadly Virus and Crippled Economy, One Form of Aid Has Proved Reliable: Food Stamps

"About 43 million people — roughly one of every eight Americans — now receive SNAP, The Times found. That is well below the peak, nearly 48 million, reached after the Great Recession. But unless Congress acts this month, about 20 million Americans will lose a $600 weekly bonus to unemployment checks. Since that bonus disqualifies most people from SNAP, its elimination could add millions to the rolls.
...

“SNAP is very well suited to quickly meet the needs of low-income individuals,” said Tom C. Rawlings, the director of the Division of Family and Children Services in Georgia, where the program grew 34 percent, with double-digit increases in all 159 counties. “It is also pumping hundreds of millions of dollars into the economy.”

Though benefits normally vary with income, Congress temporarily expanded the program in March by offering all recipients the maximum aid for their household size ($509 for three people). As a result, spending, which totaled about $60 billion last year, has grown even faster than caseloads. But unlike in the last recession, the size of the top payment did not grow, and despite the expanding rolls, surveys show elevated rates of hunger, especially among families with children.

Those turning to SNAP in recent months include people as varied as Musad Nasser, a Detroit truck driver, originally from Yemen, who quit for fear of infecting an asthmatic young son; Kelly Cintron, a single mother in Orlando recovering from her fiancé’s suicide; and Desiree Rasmer, who lost her job managing an Ann Arbor chiropractic clinic and hopes to become a social worker to promote “holistic healing and restorative justice.” "

In the first three months of the coronavirus pandemic, more than six million people joined a program the Trump administration tried to cut.

Congrats to the City of Kansas City, Mo., Health Department on the KC Blueprint For Violence Prevention passing City Cou...
07/17/2020
KC Blueprint, new plan to curb crime, unanimously passes city council

Congrats to the City of Kansas City, Mo., Health Department on the KC Blueprint For Violence Prevention passing City Council unanimously! PI is honored to have partnered in the planning process and worked with so many sectors to outline roles that everyone can play in creating a safe and healthy community.

Its creators say the plan is a way for everyone to get involved and fight violence in Kansas City at the source.

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At Prevention Institute, we're committed to advancing quality, primary prevention -- policy and environmental changes that support health, in the first place. Quality prevention means: - Advancing solutions Rooted in Community Wisdom—the combined knowledge, assets, and skills of community members which is the foundation for a stronger, healthier community environment and successful, sustainable prevention efforts. - Pursuing Comprehensive Action to solve complex problems and achieve far-reaching gains in health and safety. Applies a layered framework of mutually supportive community prevention strategies to improve social and physical environments. - Taking Two Steps to Prevention, tracing a pathway from medical concerns to the community conditions, norms, and root factors leading to poor health and inequality in the first place. Finds community solutions supporting prevention and wellness for everyone. Promoting Norms That Support Equity, Health, and Safety. Norms are "behavior shapers," levers for effective prevention. Altering policy is a vital tipping factor for changing norms, leading to supportive behavior and improved health and safety. Encouraging Interdisciplinary Partnerships to help break down silos; synthesize and integrate knowledge, perspectives, and tools across disciplines; and construct shared comprehensive solutions. Catalyzing Innovative Strategies and Analysis that change community-wide systems and foster a new way of thinking where prevention is primary.

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March 25th 2020 Press Release Your Vacuum Cleaner Could Be a COVID-19 Coronavirus Super Spreader! The Federal Government experts and doctors on the news do a great job of explaining how to take important precautions such as washing your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, using anti-bacterial hand sanitizer, keeping hard surfaces clean and sanitized while staying away from crowds of more than 10 people in a room. However the news and infectious disease health experts never think of explaining to the people in charge the importance of keeping indoor environments in homes and buildings clean and safe by explaining in detail that poorly sealed vacuum cleaners should be without question a huge concern because they can and will become SUPER SPREADERS of the COVID-19 Coronavirus when used to vacuum clean unknown or known contaminated areas and are then used to clean carpeting and surfaces in other homes and buildings that have not been contaminated. Most brands and models of vacuum cleaners are without question poorly sealed at both the units filters and the case itself causing them to spew dust, bacteria, mold spores and viruses back into the air while operating to contaminate every surface in the areas being vacuumed, the people working in these now contaminated areas and the person or people doing the cleaning. This also goes for most brands of highly marketed and sold HEPA filtered vacuum cleaners because they have been proven by laser particle and smoke testing that they are all to often, also poorly sealed. Anyone that has to dust the furniture and countertops after vacuuming should know that they are now operating a COVID-19 Coronavirus Super Spreader. It is important to know that when a COVID-19 infected person sneezes or coughs into the air, the live virus infected mucus that hits the carpeting will bind into and live in the carpet dust for 3-10 days or more, just waiting for a poorly sealed vacuum cleaner to spread the virus impregnated dust to contaminate many others in multiple areas that will be vacuumed next. This could include different homes by housekeepers or office spaces by cleaning services. A simple test that anyone can do to see if their vacuum cleaner may be a COVID-19 Super Spreader is to place their running partially dust filled vacuum cleaner into a beam of sunlight coming through a window. If the vacuum cleaner is not properly sealed you will easily see tens of thousands of dust particles spewing into the beam of sunlight. The only residential / commercial vacuum cleaner we have tested to be totally sealed at both the HEPA filter and the case itself that can pass a laser particle test over and over again when loaded with dust at 99.97 percent of efficiency at .03 microns of particle size (Which Is 1 third of one micron of size) is the (Made In The USA) Air Storm HEPA Vacuum Cleaner that is made to Military Specs where absolutely no dust will escape from this vacuum cleaner while operating! This makes the Air Storm HEPA vacuum cleaner the best choice for the best chance to avoid the spread of the COVID-19 Coronavirus while vacuuming. We can’t 100 percent guarantee that the Air Storm will absolutely stop the virus from getting through it without further testing that we would like to see. However we do truly feel that since the virus binds into the dust being vacuumed and no dust escapes from this vacuum cleaner while the vacuuming is being done, the Air Storm its without question the best choice to utilize when cleaning homes and office spaces during and after this COVID-19 Coronavirus Pandemic! Especially when comparing the 100 percent sealed to Military specs Air Storm HEPA vacuum cleaner to the many extremely, poorly sealed vacuum cleaners now being used every day to clean with while actually contaminating populated areas while the quickly on the move forward COVID-19 Coronavirus has already actively infected hundreds of thousands of people worldwide. Family’s, housekeepers, cleaning services and the people having their homes and office spaces cleaned will all greatly benefit when a truly sealed HEPA vacuum cleaner is being used! For more information on the 100 percent sealed to Military Specs Air Storm HEPA vacuum cleaner see the website at https://www.aircleaners.com/residential-commerical-hepa-vacuum-cleaners/ Or Call 1-888-578-7324
thank you for doing such great important work
Stop #GunViolence; Carry a gun. (Legally)
Earth and Arbor day 2018 with a Health, Safety and Environmental community fair. And both McGruff and Sparky arrive via air to support the Kids Boxing Against Crime activity! https://www.facebook.com/ivpress/videos/10156125864624985/
Victim/Survivor Isis Jashauna Shaw (Arrest date 04/24/2015- DUI WHILE ACCOMPANIED BY A MINOR STATUTE: 316.193(4) (FIRST DEGREE MISDEMEANOR) Fwd: Professional standards violation relating substance abuse & child abuse, DUI WITH A MINOR IN THE VEHICLE,failure to report to FL DCF CPI Services, durung which time child custody modification petitions were being entered into the family court by the mother, nondisclosure, unconsolidated cases involving parties to family law cases, Florida's Substance Abuse Impairment Act governs the voluntary and involuntary commitment and treatment for substance abuse (Fl. Stat. Ann. § 397.301 to 397.998). The act is also known as the Hal S. Marchman Alcohol and Other Drug Services Act or Marchman Act. The Marchman Act pe
The CLEVER ACTION LDA (Portugal) is developing a new medical nebulizer named CACHEGRIP. The R&D TEAM OF CACHEGRIP project asks for comments, opinions and collaboration. The CACHEGRIP is a new self-portable (SCARF) medical nebulizer, regulable and programmable remotely by the Doctor, to administrate therapeutic solutions (provided by pharmaceutical companies exclusively), in ambulatory regimen, for treatment and prevention of respiratory and allergic diseases, keeping the patient PERMANENTLY RELIEVED OF AGGRESSIVE SYMPTOMATOLOGY, without need to intervene, isolate or change his daily life. We do this campaign to generate a “DEMANDE FORCE to induce the pharmaceutical companies to perform PARTNERSHIPS for its development. ADOPTS THE CACHEGRIP, stating your Opinion and LIKE at page: www.facebook.com/Cachegrip-1854962898167005
My name is David Dooley. I run a small nonprofit in Bakersfield, CA called Advancing Parenting. We are pioneering a new approach to parenting education that reaches everyone, everywhere, all the time. Specifically, we place fifty concise and unambiguous parenting tips in public spaces, including but not limited to windows of stores, offices, restaurants, automobiles, and billboards. This, in an effort to elevate the quality of parenting, reduce ACES (adverse childhood experiences), and improve educational outcomes for children. Visit our website, advancingparenting.org to see examples and the complete list of parenting tips. The purpose of this post is simply fyi. Contact us if you would like more information or if you would like to order sets of the fifty parenting tips bumper stickers for waiting room displays or to give away at events. Parenting tips bumper stickers will be read 1000s of times by 1000s of people of all ages. We call this approach proactive, passive/public parenting education. Thank you.
Stupid Idea...
There is a bill that has been quickly pushed through Sacramento (without any health or safety over-site) that 2/3 of cities are actively against. It would put mini cell towers (not so mini) all over our streets (on every 4-5) lampposts, schools, libraries and other public buildings (except for firefights, they got an exemption due to safety reasons). The reason is so we can have ROBOT, self-driving cars and Tesla as well as the telecom folks can make a ton of money and bear no risk. The telecom folks can't even get insurance, so the liability is on tax payers and this bill strips our rights to make decisions within our cities and counties if and where these things are placed. If you read the non-industry science including the latest 25 million dollar NTP (federal) study you will see that wireless radiation has been proven to cause cancer and tax the immune system so other health problems become more likely (autoimmune, neurological) and kids are most at risk. This is INSANITY. Sign this and then please call your state senator and representative and beg them to vote NO on SB 649 (see link below)! also call Assembly Member Lorena S. Gonzalez Fletcher. The chair of the Appropriations Committee. (916) 319-2081. The vote is in 2 weeks. Please share widely!!!! https://petitions.moveon.org/sign/oppose-sb-649-stop-the?source=c.em&r_by=18419194 http://findyourrep.legislature.ca.gov/