BART Police Department

BART Police Department The official FaceBook page for the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) Police Department. In case of an emergency, please call 911. For BART Police related issues, please contact 877.679.7000.

The BART Police Department is the law enforcement agency responsible for the Bay Area Rapid Transit system in Northern California. The BART system covers more than 130 miles of track with 50 stations throughout five counties of the San Francisco Bay Area. The BART Chief of Police is Chief Ed Alvarez. Chief Alvarez leads more than 200 sworn officers and 100 non-sworn staff.

Operating as usual

06/02/2021

On Friday, June 4, BART Police and San Jose Police personnel will hold a community event at Berryessa Station in front of the Station Agent booth from 2-5 pm.

The event is to highlight the BART to San Jose extension, of which Berryessa Station is a part of, and to build community relationships between BART, SJPD, VTA and stakeholders in Santa Clara County who benefit from public transportation and police services.

The landscape around Berryessa Station includes single-family homes, high-density apartment and townhome complexes, retail plazas, the San Jose Flea Market, a one-directional bus zone, and multidirectional streets.

The event will have an ice cream truck serving free ice cream, an obstacle course to showcase the SJPD bicycle unit, and swag giveaways.

05/27/2021

BART and VTA are connected through shared goals, values and commitment to the public to move the Bay Area together. Today, we also share their grief.

We extend our condolences to the VTA family who've witnessed a terrible and horrific tragedy this morning.

#TransitStandsTogether with Valley Transportation Authority, today and always.

It is with great sadness that BART Police announces the passing of BART PD K9 Bandi, on Wednesday, May 19, 2021. Bandi w...
05/20/2021

It is with great sadness that BART Police announces the passing of BART PD K9 Bandi, on Wednesday, May 19, 2021. Bandi was taken to the veterinarian yesterday by his partner and best friend of many years, BART PD Officer Scott Edwards, for fluid located in his abdomen. Sadly, the fluid was cause by a ruptured tumor located on his spleen and unfortunately, due to the excessive bleeding, Bandi did not survive his injuries.
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Bandi was born August 3, 2012, in Lackland, Texas. Bandi learned his job of explosive detection at the TSA Explosive Detection School before we met on March 25, 2013. During the time at school, we learned to locate explosives as well bond with one another. This was a trying time for the both of us since we both wanted to be alpha. Toward the end of school Bandi began to trust me and our time at school became easier. On June 3, 2014, we graduated as a team from the TSA handler course.

When Bandi and I returned to our home in California, I didn’t know what to expect. Luckily for me, he enjoyed his new home and seemed glad to be out of the heat and humidity of Texas. While with BART Police, Bandi knew when it was time to go hunting for explosives or when it was time to be the BART ambassador. Every time we were in public someone always wanted to take a picture with him. It was like I was with a celebrity all the time. Now thinking about it, Bandi was a celebrity, and I was just lucky to be with him.

Bandi has conducted a number of explosive K9 sweeps for BART, the Bay Area, and the nation, including but not limited to:

Dignitary Sweeps for Vice President Mike Pence
Super Bowl 50
Super Bowl 52
PGA Tours
NCAA Football Championships
Gymnastic National Championships

These are just a few of the notable sweeps he performed for outside agencies. There are more to list, but it would take up too much paper.

Bandi and I were fortunate enough to train with some great handlers in our unit. We learned a lot from the old, as well as the new handlers. Throughout Bandi’s career we met so many wonderful people and handlers which helped him become better along the way.

While in the TSA program, TSA requires the K9 team to take a yearly evaluation to make sure they are conducting the proper training. At the end of the evaluation, the K9 unit must score a minimum of 92 percent to pass. Bandi passed all eight evaluations he had taken. These tests were very difficult, and I usually stressed out about it. Bandi always had a way of making me feel calm and confident while running the evaluations. At the end of the evaluations, all the evaluators were impressed with Bandi and how well he searched areas. A couple of his evaluators had this to say:

“Bandi was a loyal and hard working-working dog. Very easy to control, level-headed and cared immensely for his kong (paycheck). Worked through initial detection with a breeze and became automatic as a seasoned detection dog.” - Rick Ridel, TSA evaluator/trainer

“Bandi was a determined and a phenomenal working dog. Bandi showed he was a seasoned vet by displaying his work ethic in all of his search.” - Harold Little, TSA evaluator

One of Bandi’s favorite things to do was conducting demonstrations for adults and children - he sure loved children. The last demonstration Bandi performed was on April 24, 2021, for a group of Cub Scouts located in San Francisco. Bandi loved every second he spent out there allowing all the kids to pet him and watch him do what he loves best. The Cub Scout Leader, Bryan Mcdonald, said this about Bandi:

“Bandi is one of the calmest dogs I’ve seen around a large group of young, excited children. All the kids were so excited to see Bandi, watch him in action as he found a demonstration pack of black powder, and to pet him. Some of the kids invaded Bandi’s personal space on more than one occasion and might have been a bit too enthusiastic in petting him, but Bandi never made any aggressive moves or sounds in response. He is an amazing animal with a great temper and is the perfect complement to Officer Edwards for making presentations to young groups.”

On Bandi’s off time he loved spending time with our family at home or in the park. Most of his time was spent with his younger brother, Javen. When we would arrive home, Bandi would immediately jump out of the car and run straight to Javen because he knew they were going to play, and he would be giving him his favorite treats. Bandi loved his brother Javen so very much.

Thank you to all members of BART Police for all their support during this difficult time. Bandi was a friendly, hard-working, lovable, gentle, and peaceful dog/best friend. He will be missed not only by me, but my entire family. We all love you, Bandi.

- BART Police K9 Officer Scott Edwards

EOW 05-19-2021
Bandi V612

The men and women of the BART Police Department extend our heartfelt condolences to the families, friends, and colleague...
05/12/2021

The men and women of the BART Police Department extend our heartfelt condolences to the families, friends, and colleagues of San Luis Obispo Police Department Detective Luca Benedetti and Stockton Police Department Officer Jimmy Inn who were murdered while performing their duties and serving their communities. Their tragic deaths serve as a constant reminder of the dangers men and women in law enforcement face every day. May we never forget their service and ultimate sacrifice.

BART is hiring more safety staff as part of our new Progressive Policing and Community Engagement Bureau. The positions ...
03/27/2021

BART is hiring more safety staff as part of our new Progressive Policing and Community Engagement Bureau. The positions are now posted at bart.gov/jobs

BART is now hiring Transit Ambassadors and Crisis Intervention Specialists (CIS) to provide more unarmed staff presence & connect resources to those experiencing crisis, homelessness, mental health, and substance use found on BART.

Learn more and apply at http://bart.gov/jobs

Since last February, Ambassadors have provided unarmed patrols in trains and stations and rider customer service.

Crisis Intervention Specialists is a new position created to perform outreach to individuals experiencing crisis, homelessness, mental health, and substance use. CIS candidates are required a background in social work.

The BART Police Department has agreed to a three-year extension of the labor contracts with the BART Police Officers’ Association and the BART Police Managers’ Association. The BART Board of Directors approved the contracts at its meeting on Thursday. The agreements will help BPD to fully staff its new Progressive Policing and Community Engagement Bureau by adding new classifications to the unions, including the Crisis Intervention Specialists and the Transit Ambassadors, as well as by providing officers assigned to the bureau with an increased 10% special assignment pay.

The contract also provides for the hiring of additional Transit Ambassadors. The new bureau will eventually include 20 Crisis Intervention Specialists, 10 Transit Ambassadors, and 12 sworn officers.

BART Police Chief Ed Alvarez has issued the following statement:The BART Police Department condemns violence, bigotry an...
03/24/2021

BART Police Chief Ed Alvarez has issued the following statement:

The BART Police Department condemns violence, bigotry and xenophobia toward Asian American Pacific Islanders.

Incidents of hate, violence, harassment, discrimination, shunning, and bullying against Asians, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders will not be tolerated in or around BART, an essential public transportation system that we intend to make a welcoming place for all.

Just as the death of George Floyd forced many of us to take a personal inventory of ourselves in regard to our society’s oppression of African Americans, we must now each examine what we, as individuals, can do to advance anti-racism against the Asian American Pacific Islander community.

As public servants, we members of the BART Police Department stand against hate and we stand for equity, respect, and tolerance.

BART Police Chief Ed Alvarez has issued the following statement:

The BART Police Department condemns violence, bigotry and xenophobia toward Asian American Pacific Islanders.

Incidents of hate, violence, harassment, discrimination, shunning, and bullying against Asians, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders will not be tolerated in or around BART, an essential public transportation system that we intend to make a welcoming place for all.

Just as the death of George Floyd forced many of us to take a personal inventory of ourselves in regard to our society’s oppression of African Americans, we must now each examine what we, as individuals, can do to advance anti-racism against the Asian American Pacific Islander community.

As public servants, we members of the BART Police Department stand against hate and we stand for equity, respect, and tolerance.

BART Police Community Service Officers pitched in recently to help deliver boxes of fresh fruits, vegetables and pantry ...
03/16/2021

BART Police Community Service Officers pitched in recently to help deliver boxes of fresh fruits, vegetables and pantry goods to dozens of homes in need, in partnership with the Alameda County Community Food Bank.

“I was looking for something we could do to help those in need directly,” said Jonathan Moreland, Community Engagement Coordinator for BART PD. “With Covid, there are folks who need food who are also not able to go out right now and get what they need, so they’ve been kind of hit with a double-whammy.”

The Food Bank provided the officers with a list of names and addresses so they could make contact-free deliveries, and phone numbers so they could follow up afterwards and make sure people got the food, in an effort led by Moreland and his co-coordinator Shirley Lara.

“Everyone was very thankful,” Moreland said. “It is very important to us that people know we are actually doing what our title says – serving the community. We are all about building trust and strengthening our relationships in the community.”

BART Police Community Service Officers pitched in recently to help deliver boxes of fresh fruits, vegetables and pantry goods to dozens of homes in need, in partnership with the Alameda County Community Food Bank.

“I was looking for something we could do to help those in need directly,” said Jonathan Moreland, Community Engagement Coordinator for BART PD. “With Covid, there are folks who need food who are also not able to go out right now and get what they need, so they’ve been kind of hit with a double-whammy.”

The Food Bank provided the officers with a list of names and addresses so they could make contact-free deliveries, and phone numbers so they could follow up afterwards and make sure people got the food, in an effort led by Moreland and his co-coordinator Shirley Lara.

“Everyone was very thankful,” Moreland said. “It is very important to us that people know we are actually doing what our title says – serving the community. We are all about building trust and strengthening our relationships in the community.”

Ed Alvarez has worked his entire career to meet this moment. Reflecting on his first year as BART Police Chief, Alvarez ...
02/05/2021

Ed Alvarez has worked his entire career to meet this moment. Reflecting on his first year as BART Police Chief, Alvarez sat down for an interview in which he laid out an ambitious agenda.

“I want to build the most progressive police department in America,” Alvarez said, of the just under 400 personnel under his watch. “Not just the most progressive transit police department. The most of any PD.”

Alvarez joined BPD almost a quarter-century ago. It was his first job in law enforcement and he has served his whole career at BART, working his way up through the ranks and making deep connections to the community.

He was appointed as chief on Jan. 1, 2020, and sworn in on Feb. 7, 2020, in a ceremony with blue and gold balloons, sheet cake, handshakes and hugs, just one month before the coronavirus was declared a pandemic. His long years of experience gave Alvarez the insights to quickly implement many strategic initiatives that already have paid off, with more on the way.

Notably, Alvarez created a new Bureau of Progressive Policing and Community Engagement that is an umbrella over a growing team of non-armed personnel that includes the award-winning Transit Ambassadors and soon will include an additional 20 Crisis Intervention Specialists. They’ll focus on connecting those experiencing homelessness, mental illness and substance abuse with services.

The Bureau also will include 10 police officers who will receive specialized training.

“We’re infusing 40 additional bodies into our system,” Alvarez said. “These are people who are providing presence, resources, who are extra eyes and ears. We’re going to have more presence than we’ve ever had at BART.” BART Police also have prioritized making it easy to contact them; there is the BART Watch app to communicate in real-time with Dispatch as well as a direct text-BPD line.

Deputy Chief Angela Averiett, who leads the new Bureau of Progressive Policing, said Alvarez has been a steady hand in a time of great change.

“I think the chief’s leadership is a reflection of the resilience of this organization,” she said. “Through all the major challenges of the past year, he has led us courageously and transparently and kept us focused on the mission. His creating this bureau speaks to his very forward-thinking way of how law enforcement needs to change and adapt, how we need to make meaningful reforms.”

The pandemic and associated economic misery has exacerbated homelessness, stressed an already-fractured patchwork of services, and has exposed disparities in health, safety and other outcomes along race and class lines.

Additionally, the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer in May 2020 drew worldwide attention and built a movement demanding more accountability from law enforcement. Alvarez said he was appalled by the abuse of power “and the arrogance” in the Minnesota case – and that he conveys that message to BPD personnel.

“We have to earn the public’s trust every day,” Alvarez said. “We can’t take their trust for granted. We have to do better.”

“It shouldn’t have happened,” Alvarez has said of Floyd’s death. “And a lot of departments are changing how they operate because of it, because of him and the other individuals before and after him. It’s been a call to action.”

He’s committed to meeting the moment by increasing training (which already goes beyond state standards), including the innovative ICAT, or Integrating Communications, Assessment and Tactics course. ICAT is designed especially for situations involving people who are unarmed or armed with weapons other than firearms, and who may be experiencing a mental health or other crisis.

Alvarez also has prioritized working collaboratively with the Citizen Review Board and the Office of the Independent Police Auditor, two civilian oversight bodies that provide another layer of police accountability at BART.

“We all have the same goal of making sure BART is safe for the riding public and our employees,” Alvarez said.

As a first-generation immigrant, Alvarez is keenly aware of the issues of mistrust that arise when there are disparate impacts from policing, and that BART is not immune from them.

“We need to be treating all people fairly and equitably,” he said. “That is my expectation for everyone at BPD. We are here to protect and serve. We will continue to work on building bridges and engaging with the communities we serve."

02/03/2021

BART Police Officer Eric Hofstein got in contact with an unhoused woman suffering from mental illness during his patrols in San Francisco, and kept tabs on her safety over the years.

Thanks to his efforts, she is now reconnected with her mother and is getting psychiatric care.

READ FULL ARTICLE here: https://www.bart.gov/news/articles/2021/news20210202

“She was one of our ‘regulars,’ “ Hofstein said, with dozens of calls for service when Dell (using a pseudonym to protect her privacy) would have mental health breakdowns, usually in a paranoid and manic state. He personally was the responding officer on some of those calls. In one call, at Powell Street Station, Hofstein found Dell dangling her legs over the side of the trackway as a train approached and he was able to talk her literally off the ledge.

Hofstein got in touch with her mother, Cinda Romero, in Orange County and worked as a lifeline between Romero and Dell, and keep Romero updated when he would see Dell on the streets.

Romero, who spoke with BART Communications, says her eldest daughter was an "overachiever" in school, studying Latin and enjoying Tolkien. “It was a really bad, nightmare roller coaster,” Romero said of the years her daughter was lost to her.

Each time Dell was detained on a mental health hold she would go through a revolving-door bureaucracy, Hofstein said, that put her back out on the street without follow-up care. Twice she was hit by cars while walking as a pedestrian, “totally unaware of her own safety,” Romero said.

In October 2020 there was another brush with death when Dell suffered an aneurysm on the streets and was hospitalized for brain surgery. Hofstein found Dell in a station after her surgery; she was sitting on the floor picking at a jagged scars on her partially shaved head. She bolted, leaving him to put out a “be on the lookout” or BOLO alert to all law enforcement agencies in the region.

Dell was spotted around Thanksgiving near a BART station but a social worker assigned to her case was off for the long weekend, her mother said, making it a heartbreaking holiday. Then in December, thanks to Hofstein’s BOLO, patrol officers found Dell huddled under a bridge and ultimately found her a safe spot for treatment at San Francisco General. He was out of state preparing for his upcoming retirement, but he worked the phones from afar to keep Romero informed.

Hofstein helped Romero use AB1424, a state law regarding involuntary treatment that allows family members to communicate about a relative’s mental health history. The goal is to stop the revolving door and require that decisions about involuntary treatment consider information supplied by family members. In part because of the AB1424 paperwork Hofstein filed, conservatorship for Dell was approved, paving the way for her care.

“He is a hero, a saint and guardian angel clothed in a BART police officer uniform,” Romero said. “If it weren’t for him, my daughter would most likely not be alive.”

Later this week, Dell is scheduled to move from the psychiatric unit to a residential treatment center to continue her recovery. Dell recently celebrated her 32nd birthday with her family members over Zoom.

When Hofstein delivered the care package last week, Dell gave him a hug and had a coherent conversation, the first he’d ever had with her. They recorded a video for her mom.

Hofstein is part of BART's Progressive Policing commitment, focused on connecting those in need found on trains and stations to services they need. Hofstein last year was involved in another rescue of a unhoused individual suffering from mental illnesses at behest of the individual's mother: https://www.bart.gov/news/articles/2020/news20200730

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If you are in a similar situation, please connect with or visit National Alliance of Mental Illnesses (NAMI) website at www.nami.org for resources on education, advocacy and support.

A 24-hour National Suicide Prevention Hotline is available for anyone in crisis. CALL 800-273-8255

You are not alone.

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