Oneida Nation

Oneida Nation The official page of the Oneida Nation. This page is registered with the Oneida Tribal Secretary’s Office.
(111)

Tribal Government, social services, health services, community planning, environmental services, retail operations, cigarette sales, gasoline sales, convenience store sales, hotels operations, amenities, Oneida cultural experiences

Mission: To strengthen and protect our people, reclaim our land, and enhance the Environment by exercising our sovereignty.

Technology is changing our lives. Learn more.
01/30/2020

Technology is changing our lives. Learn more.

The Oneida Nation extends condolences to the family and friends of Kerry, prayers go out for a peaceful journey to the n...
01/30/2020
Newcomer Family Obituaries - Kerry R. Brunette 1952 - 2020

The Oneida Nation extends condolences to the family and friends of Kerry, prayers go out for a peaceful journey to the next world and may he rest in peace.

Obituary for Kerry R. Brunette, 1952 - 2020 Green Bay, WI. View ceremony time and location and leave condolences here.

Oneida History Snippet - Language Speaker: Alex Cornelius was born in 1902 on the Oneida Reservation and was the son of ...
01/30/2020

Oneida History Snippet - Language Speaker: Alex Cornelius was born in 1902 on the Oneida Reservation and was the son of Mason and Sophie Antone Cornelius. Alex and his wife Linda Skenandore Cornelius lived on a farm out near the long house on Reformatory Road. Alex and Linda enjoyed raising chickens and growing potatoes as big as a baby's head and had a wood pile bigger than Art Skenandore Jr.'s. Alex wasn't able to go to school because he broke his back when he was young, when it healed he went to Tomah Indian Boarding School for a while. He returned home when his father got sick and had to work the farm. When he was 10 years old his father asked him if he could pick up a plow, he did, that's when his father told him he was old enough to plow, so he hooked up the horses and started to plow. Alex said tractors are better because they get 20 acres instead of 1, but horses don't get stuck in the mud, he laughed. Alex and his wife Linda spoke Oneida all the time and welcomed visitors who would come to them to ask about the Oneida language and stories. Alex loved telling funny stories. He once had a big pig that was three feet high and weighed 600 pounds, and answered to kos kos (Oneida term for pig) When Alex was able he bought 92 acres of land for $25 and cleared it and made it useful. He told the girls who interviewed him, "If you want proof just go look at my potatoes" Told to Linda King and Dawn Thomas in 1982.

History Snippet - Oneida Language Speaker: Rebecca Ninham was born on the Oneida Reservation in 1909 and was the daughte...
01/30/2020

History Snippet - Oneida Language Speaker: Rebecca Ninham was born on the Oneida Reservation in 1909 and was the daughter of Samuel and Esther House Schuyler. Rebecca married Nelson Ninham and they had 12 children, Vernon, John, Harold, Clyde, Harlan, Darwin, Cletus and Leland, daughters, Telka, Nona, Annabeth, Debbie and Regina. Rebecca spoke only Oneida until she went to Tomah Indian Boarding school when she was 7 years old. Rebecca loved hearing and telling the old Oneida stories. She never was a smoker but recalled arguing with her brothers and sisters for a chance to light Gramma Schulyer's pipe for her as she got ready to tell them ghost stories when they were young. Rebeccas father Samuel was a farmer and she helped him in whatever ways she could, mostly picking blackberries, blueberries, raspberries and helped to can them. Rebecca and her brother Lloyd were both fluent speakers and were well liked in the Oneida Language program. Story told to Peril Lucas-Huff in 1982.

History Snippet - Oneida Language Speaker: Mary Jourdan was born on the Oneida Reservation, the daughter of Whitney and ...
01/30/2020

History Snippet - Oneida Language Speaker: Mary Jourdan was born on the Oneida Reservation, the daughter of Whitney and Lavinia Doxtator Powless. Mary was educated at the Tomah Indian Boarding School. When Mary went to Tomah she said they spoke English adn she wasn't punished for speaking Oneida. At Tomah she learned to sew, clean the dining room and had a lot of play time. In school the classes included math, reading and spelling. They had a half day of school and they worked a half day scrubbing floors, doing dishes, and mending clothes. When Mary returned home from Tomah she worked at home milking cows, doing dishes and laundry. Mary married Henry Jourdan and they had 10 childrren, Barbara, Yvonne, Pat, Judy, Henrietta, Henry, Diane, Virgil, Ronald and Kenneth. Mary retired as a fluent Native Speaker in the Oneida Language Program. Story told to Bobbi Webster 1982.

Oneida History Snippets - Oneida Language Speaker: Mamie Ryan was born on the Oneida Reservation, the daughter of Taylor...
01/29/2020

Oneida History Snippets - Oneida Language Speaker: Mamie Ryan was born on the Oneida Reservation, the daughter of Taylor and Elizabeth Wheelock Summers. (Elmer who was previously featured was her brother) Mamie was a fluent Oneida Speaker who worked with the Oneida Language teacher trainees as both a speaker and basket maker. Mamie attended a little brown school house by the Methodist Church where she was taught by Lena Charles Wheelock. At age 9 she went to Wittenberg Boarding School where she learned to speak English. After that she went to Tomah Boarding School for 3 years. In her youth, Mamie enjoyed rollerskating, ice skating, playing basketball and sewing. She learned to make baskets from her mother. Black Ash was the kind of tree her mother would make baskets out of. In the summer her mother and the family would go on a picnic and her mother would notch a tree and see if it was good enough for splints and if it was the boys would cut it down and pound it for splints. "And that was our picnic" said Mamie who was well known as a speaker and basket maker in Oneida. Told to Lorena Torres and Tina Batista in 1982.

Oneida History Snippet - Oneida Language Speaker: Elmer Summers was born in 1901 on the Oneida Reservation and was the s...
01/29/2020

Oneida History Snippet - Oneida Language Speaker: Elmer Summers was born in 1901 on the Oneida Reservation and was the son of Taylor and Elizabeth Wheelock Summers. Elmer was a WW1 Veteran and enjoyed carving bows and arrows out of white ash. Elmer became interested in wood work as a yought boy when he would cut trees down an dpund splingf for his mother, Elizabeth who made baskets. Other interests of Elmer indlcuded leatherwork and he liked to hunt. Elmer resided in the Anna John Nursing Home in his final years and liked to have the Oneida School students visit him and ask him how to say things in Oneida. He liked telling them about the good old days. Told to Shannon Powless in 1982.

History Snippet - Oneida Language Speakers: David Skenandore was born January 20, 1900 on the Oneida Reservation and was...
01/29/2020

History Snippet - Oneida Language Speakers: David Skenandore was born January 20, 1900 on the Oneida Reservation and was the son of Elijah and Mary Skenandore. David married Josephine John Skenandore after attending school in Wittenberg WI. Dave was an excellent fluent speaker of the Oneida Language and knew very little English growing up. David was a strong man with a soft spoken way about him. He started farming in 1926 with the help of his two older brothers. David liked to hunt and one time he caught a mother bear and her cub. David also worked for the WPA project in the 1930's. He lived out his time on his original family homestead on Overland Road and spent his time relaxing and keeping the old woodstove rolling. Told to Nina Hellendrung and Peril Lucas Huff, Oneida Tribal School students in 1982.

History Snippets - Oneida Native Speakers: (L) Alice Skenandore was born January 3 1882 and was 101 years old at the tim...
01/29/2020

History Snippets - Oneida Native Speakers: (L) Alice Skenandore was born January 3 1882 and was 101 years old at the time of this inteview. Alice was the daughter of Asa and Rachal Spruce. Married to Edgar Skenandore in 1909 she was a member of the Oneida VFW Post 7784 and the Oneida Episcopal Guild. Alice was one of the last Oneida women who knew how to do tatting, a type of Oneida lace making. Alice met her husbank Edgar while working as a cook and seamstress at an Indian government school in Bena, Minnesota. She and Edgar had 8 children, all born at home. She spent many years as a housekeeper in Green Bay for the Farah family. She was a fluent Oneida Speaker and enjoyed having young people visit her and teach them how to pronounce Oneida correctly. On the right is Melissa O. Cornelius, born September 22, 1882 on the Oneida Reservation. Melissa was the daughter or Esther and William Cornelius and a lifelong resident of the Oneida Reservation. In the early years of the Oneida Language program, around 1974 and later, Melissa told stories and assisted Dr. Clifford Abbott in the Oneida Language recordings and writings. One story she translated was called "Kwakoli" or whippperwill. That story was made into the first children's book of the Oneida Language program. Melissa and Alice were the two of the eldest fluent Native Speakers when the Oneida Language program was established in 1974. The Director of the Oneida Language Program was Bill Gollnick and the first language teacher-trainees were, Gail (Ellis) Danforth, Nancy Osborne, Bobbi Webster and Dale Wheelock.

01/28/2020

OCHD ALERT:OCHD ALERT: The Oneida Health Center will be open for business as usual January 29, 2020. All water issues have been repaired.

We hope you have enjoyed and learned from our Oneida Hymn Singers History Snippets. There have been hundreds of Oneida S...
01/28/2020

We hope you have enjoyed and learned from our Oneida Hymn Singers History Snippets. There have been hundreds of Oneida Singers over the years, these snippets are just a few that we had short biographies on from the 1980's Oneida Language Program. These stories were told in interviews with the individuals or their families. Below is a group photo of a few more. L-R front row, Mrs. Mitchell Stevens, Gunhit Silas, Minnie Elm, Melissa O. Cornelius, Mary Metoxen, Whitney Powless and Anderson Summers. Back Row L-R Layfette Webster, Albert Webster, Mitchell Stevens, Marshall Denny, Lomas John and William Metoxen. In our next segment of our Oneida History Snippets we will share some from our fluent Oneida Speakers. Stay tuned.

History Snippet - Oneida Hymn Singers: Sarah Skenandore was the daughter of Dixon and Jane Skenandore born June 17, 1908...
01/28/2020

History Snippet - Oneida Hymn Singers: Sarah Skenandore was the daughter of Dixon and Jane Skenandore born June 17, 1908 on the Oneida Reservation. Sarah was educated at the Oneida Government Boarding School. Sarah was married to Sherman "Shorty" Skenandore and together they planted Oneida white corn, harvested, dried and prepared it for making Kanastohale and Olana. (Cornbread and cornsoup) This couple would share their traditions with the younger generation and often taught the Oneida Language while grinding corn in their garage. In 1974 Sarah and Shorty were the first two Native Speakers supporting the Oneida Language Program through the University of Wisconsin Green Bay when the Oneida Language first became an accredited course. Sarah and Shorty were both active Oneida Hymn Singers and grassroots agriculturalists that practiced the old Oneida ways of planting, harvest and preservation of Oneida corn and kidney beans.Told to Bobbi Webster and Amelia Cornelius.

More Historical Snippets coming next month. Oneida Tribal Chairmen and women, coming soon. Shown here, Oscar Archiquette...
01/28/2020

More Historical Snippets coming next month. Oneida Tribal Chairmen and women, coming soon. Shown here, Oscar Archiquette, Native Speaker, Oneida Hymn Singer and Tribal leader pre-Oneida Constitution era.

01/28/2020

History Snippet - Oneida Hymn Singers: Melinda Doxtator was born December 12, 1907, she was the daughter of Chancey and Emma King Doxtator. Melinda married Clifford Doxtator and they had 11 children, 5 sons, Roman, Victor, Donald, Allen, and Clifford, 6 daughters, Rachel, Marilyn, Gloria, Patricia, Clarissa and Ruth Ann. Melinda was an Oneida Singer for several years, she was also very active as a native speaker in the original Oneida Language Program. Melinda was an active elder and spent time teaching songs and language to the Oneida Language teacher/trainees as well as the children in the local schools and Head Start. Melinda was happy to teach in her home as well. As a fluent Native Speacker Melinda worked translating and transcribing several of the Oneida stories written in the 1930's WPA Project. She loved spending time reading. listening and correcting the stories. Melinda was one of the first to teach the Oneida Head Start children Oneida Christmas songs in 1984. Melinda spent many years working on an Oneida dictionary with Amos Christjohn and Maria Hinton. Told to Bobbi Webster 1984.

01/28/2020

Reminder Oneida Health Center is closed today for repairs, Tuesday, January 28th, re-opens tomorrow.

History Snippet - Oneida Hymn Singers: Ruth Cornelius Baird was born July 24, 1905 on the Oneida Reservation and was the...
01/28/2020

History Snippet - Oneida Hymn Singers: Ruth Cornelius Baird was born July 24, 1905 on the Oneida Reservation and was the first baby to be delivered by Dr. Rosa Minoka Hill. Her parents were Taylor and Katie Powless Cornelius. Ruth was raised in Oneida until the age of 9 when her family moved to Green Bay. Throughout her education she attended the Oneida Government Boarding School, St. Josephs in Oneida, Keshena Indian School and Flandreau Indian School in South Dakota. While in Oneida in the early 60's, Ruth was active on the Business Committee, Oneida Housing Board, CAP Program Co-ordinator and member of the Holy Apostles Senior Guild and Choir. Ruth was active in the Oneida Language Program as both a speaker and a singer. In 1937 Father Christain of the Holy Apostles Church requested the Oneida Choir to sing the Oneida Hymns at which time Ruth began singing with the choir. Ruth attributed her interest and singing talent to the teachings of Ida Baird and Ed Metoxen. Ruth was a member of the Oneida Singers for over 47 years. The photo below is Ruth (L) and Abbie Coulon, making traditional Oneida cornbread, she called "Kanastohale". Ruth was proud to share the unique traditions of the Oneida people. Told to Bobbi Webster and Amelia Cornelius in 1984.

01/28/2020
Kalihwisaks

https://www.facebook.com/128949947129650/posts/2946640578693892/

The Oneida Community Health Center will be CLOSED on Tuesday 1/28/2020 during our normal hours of operation (7:00 AM to 6:00 PM) due to emergency repairs requiring the water line to be shut off for several hours. All Staff within the Health Center will be unavailable due to the building being without water.
There will be no pharmacy on Tuesday so please plan accordingly so you do not run out of your medications. Staff will be contacting all patients who have appointments on 1/28/2020 to reschedule.
It is anticipated that all work will be completed on Tuesday and we will be open for business as usual on Wednesday (2/29/20).
Emergency contact for 1/28/2020 will be via the Answering Service and the Nurse On-call (920) 869-2711. If you have an emergency, call the (920) 869-2711 number, the answering service will take your information and the nurse on-call will contact you.
NOTE: This will have no impact on AJRCCC, Behavioral Health or Employee Health Nursing. They will conduct business as usual on Tuesday (1/28/20).

Oneida History Snippet - Oneida Hymn Singers: Sadie Powless-Hill was born May 1, 1903 in Oneida, her parents were Jerry ...
01/27/2020

Oneida History Snippet - Oneida Hymn Singers: Sadie Powless-Hill was born May 1, 1903 in Oneida, her parents were Jerry and Cynthia Denny Powless. In 1921 on April 13, Sadie married Dennison Hill and they had 7 children. Sadie was an Oneida Singer for over 40 years She became a singer through working with her friends in the Oneida Holy Apostles Church. In her later years, singing and working in the church were the two most important things in her life. Sadie was involved in the Oneida Language Program as a native speaker and also did volunteer work at the Anna John Nursing Home. She also served on the Senior Altar Guild at the Holy Apostles Church. She was proud to be one of the lead singers for years. While singing with the Oneida Singers Sadie traveled around Oneida, Milwaukee, Bowler and often sang in Green Bay in churches and nursing homes. Sadie loved to sing and passed her love for singing on to her daughter, Lorraine Metoxen. Told to Amelia Cornelius, 1984.

History Snippet - Oneida Hymn Singers: Blanche King McLester, Turtle Clan born April 25, 1893. Blanche was married to Le...
01/27/2020

History Snippet - Oneida Hymn Singers: Blanche King McLester, Turtle Clan born April 25, 1893. Blanche was married to Lee McLester Sr. and they had 6 children. Lee Jr., Clarence and Wendell (pictured here) and three daughters, Winnefred, Mary Edna and Winona. Blanche's parents were traditionally Oneida Singers and she herself sang all her life and was one of the original Oneida Episcopal (Charter member) singers with the choir. Blanche was so involved in the Oneida Singers, she was adamant about passing it on to her children and often sang along with her son Wendell who was also an active Oneida Singer. She also helped coordinate the original Episcopal Choir in January 1938 and she was a member of the quartet that went on tour in 1940 in the Eastern United States, this group along with Father Christian also appeared at the 1940 Worlds Fair. Blanche was the daugther of Baptist and Mary Doxtator King. She along with a few others were instrumental in keeping one of the most precious Oneida traditions alive. Told to Bobbi Webster by Mary Edna Greendeer in 1984.

Oneida History Snippet - Oneida Hymn Singers: Absolum Cooper was born February 9, 1889, the son of Martin and Margaret S...
01/27/2020

Oneida History Snippet - Oneida Hymn Singers: Absolum Cooper was born February 9, 1889, the son of Martin and Margaret Summers Cooper. He was raised in Oneida and educated at the Oneida Government Boarding School. Absolum married Katie Cooper and their children were Bertha, Elenore, Lillian, Lisbeth, John and William. Absolum shared, several years ago the Oneida would entertain in their homes, and their social evenings usually consisted of singing and making music. Absolum became well thought of for his fiddle playing abilities and his talent for playing came from his father, Martin. Absolum always liked the sound of the fiddle and played with his fathers fiddle and taught himself how to play at about 18 years of age. Usually Absolum played at square dances and weddings, and he recalled an old game played at these social gatherings called "16 pennies in a hat" this was a gambling game similar to the "Peachstone Game" the winner got the 16 pennies in the hat. In his last 30 years Absolum became interested in becoming one of the Oneida Singers and sang mostly in his church. Old timers remember him best for the years he provided pleasure and entertainment on his fiddle. Told to Bobbi Webster by his daughter Lillian.

Address

N7210 Seminary Rd
Oneida, WI
54155

General information

The Oneida Nation is a tribal government with an array of programs, services and enterprises. Please visit our website for more information: http://oneida-nsn.gov/

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 16:30
Tuesday 08:00 - 16:30
Wednesday 08:00 - 16:30
Thursday 08:00 - 16:30
Friday 08:00 - 16:30

Telephone

(920) 869-1676

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Oneida Nation posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Nearby government services


Comments

Your commercial is wonderful and a true work of art. Thank you for putting it together. Thank you even more for sharing it.
Does the Oneida Tribe have a Travel Agency service?
These idiots CAN'T be serious! Bitching and crying over a NAME. Omg crying over Washington Redskins is just SO pathetic!!! Get the chip off your shoulders. WE should whine about how you blatantly rip people off at your den of thieves(casinos).
This is a strawberry box purse
Opening soon....
Does anyone know the correct way to download the Oneida font and get it to work on a Mac? I've followed the directions on the website repeatedly and it doesn't work.
Spread the word. Walpole island. Stop by Victoria Showay's new craft and gift store this Saturday from 1:00-5:00 p.m. Light refreshments to be served.
Wonderful People's
I am so proud to be a member of the Oneida Tribe. I am aware of the Tribes contribution to the history of this nation and see Us as being wise and helpful in so many ways. I know there is discussion about what exactly makes one member of the Tribe. Is it percentage of blood or something deeper and more intangible? I know this will seem like a radical thought to some, but what if the Oneida Tribe adopted Elizabeth Warren into the Tribe. We could be militant and angry that she claimed Native American blood, or we could be understanding and proud that she did so. When I receive my news from Oneida, I see faces of many different shades and am so proud that Oneidas come in these variations of color. Wouldn't it be radical if this wonderful Tribe welcomed Elizabeth Warren in because of her untiring devotion to the Nation. Sincerely, Lois Metoxen Pearson
Does any one have a supply list for 3 sisters head start
Dear Oneida Nation: I'm a reporter at the Voice of American in Washington, covering Native American issues. This weekend, during your annual pow wow, you paid tribute to three little girls whose remains were returned from Carlisle. This must have been an emotional event--and an important step toward healing from the traumatic impact of the boarding school era. I'd really love to hear from some of you about what this means to you personally and include some of your comments, with or without names, in an article I'm writing for the VOAnews.com website. Many thanks in advance! Cecily