Michigan Legionary Corps of Volunteer Artillery

Michigan Legionary Corps of Volunteer Artillery We are a small independent artillery unit with Two field pieces.
1 - 2.91 inch King Howitzer 1793, 1 - Four pound Louis de Tousard 1809 gun.

Operating as usual

10/10/2021
Mississinewa 2021
10/08/2021

Mississinewa 2021

10/08/2021
Photos from Michigan Legionary Corps of Volunteer Artillery's post
10/08/2021

Photos from Michigan Legionary Corps of Volunteer Artillery's post

08/25/2021

We hope that the year of 2022 is a year of successful, safe events for all of us. please refresh your fi****ms and or Artillery drills as well as safe handling protocols. Best to all!

Thang Ho Photography
10/23/2018

Thang Ho Photography

04/01/2018
Early American Whiskey

Early American Whiskey

Today Brian Cushing from Historic Locust Grove takes us on a tour of their new distillery and it's history. #townsendswhiskey Locust Grove Website ▶▶ http://...

Laughing Devil Photography
08/10/2017

Laughing Devil Photography

All photographs belong to Laughing Devil Photography. Please do not remove the watermark or alter the photos. Please feel free to tag yourself (MH)

A Brief History of Sailcloth During the Age of Sail
04/18/2017
A Brief History of Sailcloth During the Age of Sail

A Brief History of Sailcloth During the Age of Sail

If one were to wonder what the Age of Sail was really all about, the clue is in the title. Without “Sail”, all you have is “Age of”, and that’s no fun for anyone. The …

National Museum of the U.S. Army Campaign
04/04/2017
National Museum of the U.S. Army Campaign

National Museum of the U.S. Army Campaign

The Army Historical Foundation, one of the nation’s most respected organizations for preserving and promoting the Army’s history, has launched a $200 million Capital Campaign to build the National Army Museum at Fort Belvoir, Virginia.

The Strategic Failure of French Privateering
03/30/2017
The Strategic Failure of French Privateering

The Strategic Failure of French Privateering

Clearly French privateering during the Revolutionary period failed in its perceived strategy: to cripple British marine trade.

The French Navy During the Napoleonic Era
03/30/2017
The French Navy During the Napoleonic Era

The French Navy During the Napoleonic Era

While Jack and Stephen sometimes encounter enemies from other nations, the overwhelming villain of our beloved series is Napoleon Bonaparte acting through the French Navy. Of course, English antipa…

Monroe News
01/23/2017
Monroe News

Monroe News

The community called French Town - now known as Monroe - was the site of one of the worst American defeats during the War of 1812. This year's commemoration events took place Saturday. The video clips that are embedded in our website report include cannon booms and a parade formation.

Tara Ross
01/23/2017

Tara Ross

On this day in 1832, Mary Ludwig Hays McCauley, one of the patriotic women behind the folk hero “Molly Pitcher,” dies in Pennsylvania.

Who on earth is Molly Pitcher?! Have you ever heard of her?

The story of Molly Pitcher is partly legend, which makes it difficult to tell where the real story ends and the mythology begins. But the legend appears to be based on the stories of two women: Margaret Cochran Corbin and Mary Ludwig Hayes McCauley.

In 1778, Mary was married to her first husband, William Hays, an artilleryman in the Continental Army. She was following the army and helping however she could. During the Battle of Monmouth, she was carrying buckets of water onto the field of battle. (The water was needed to swab out the barrels of the cannons.) Unfortunately, Hays collapsed during the battle. Molly took up his duties at the cannon, loading and firing it herself. We know of this incident because a private in the army later wrote about it in his diary. According to the diary entry, a cannonball shot Mary right through the legs, tearing up her petticoats—but she kept going!

Private Joseph Martin explained: “While in the act of reaching a cartridge . . . , a cannon shot from the enemy passed directly between her legs without doing any other damage than carrying away all the lower part of her petticoat. Looking at it with apparent unconcern, she observed that it was lucky it did not pass a little higher, for in that case it might have carried away something else, and continued her occupation.”

Margaret Corbin’s story is similar. Apparently, she took over a cannon at the Battle of Fort Washington when her husband was killed there in 1776. She was wounded during the battle. Both Mary and Margaret later received pensions from a state or the federal government.

You hear less about the women in the Revolutionary War, but they were there! Many of these women followed the army. True, sometimes they were there because they’d lost their homes in the ravages of war and they were seeking safety. And, quite honestly, George Washington found the situation to be challenging. He was having trouble feeding and provisioning his own troops. How could he also take care of whole families? On the other hand, the army needed the women and relied upon them. These women were willing and able to help in many ways: They were cooking, cleaning, doing laundry, caring for the wounded, carrying water and apparently even taking over the cannon when they were called upon to do so.

How AWESOME that there were so many BRAVE men and women who worked so hard to make this country free!! Why would we not take time to learn about them? And why would we waste their effort now?

---------------
If you enjoy these history posts, please know that it is important to LIKE, SHARE & COMMENT. This site’s algorithm will w**d these posts out of your newsfeed if you do not interact with them. (I don’t make the rules! Just following them.) ;)

Gentle reminder: History posts are copyright © 2013-2017 by Tara Ross. I appreciate it when you use the Facebook “share” feature instead of cutting/pasting.

Permalink: http://www.taraross.com/2017/1/this-day-in-history-molly-pitcher

#TDIH #OTD #AmericanHistory #USHistory #liberty #freedom #ShareTheHistory

01/23/2017
Monroe News

River Raisin Battlefield

Cannon fire sounds Saturday morning at the corner of E. Elm Ave. and N. Dixie Hwy. during the annual commemoration of the Battles of the River Raisin. You can find photos and an article about this event in today's edition of The Monroe News.

2nd Lincoln / Provincial Artillery
01/10/2017

2nd Lincoln / Provincial Artillery

11/10/2016
The Popular Vote vs. the Electoral College

The Popular Vote vs. the Electoral College

Right now, there's a well-organized, below-the-radar effort to render the Electoral College effectively useless. It's called the National Popular Vote, and i...

09/26/2016
Military.com

Military.com

Want to know about the M109 Paladin? Here are a couple quick bullet point facts.

09/21/2016
Canister Shot From Civil War Cannon.wmv

Canister Shot From Civil War Cannon.wmv

We fired 17 rounds of Canister from an original Civil War Napoleon Field Cannon for a study on battlefield archeology. Each Canister shell contained 27 steel...

09/21/2016
Aerial America

Aerial America

On this day in 1814, the brave defense of Fort McHenry against the British took place – a battle that inspired a young Francis Scott Key to pen the Star-Spangled Banner. http://bitly.com/AerialMaryland

US Marine Corps Historical Company
09/14/2016

US Marine Corps Historical Company

Tara Ross
09/13/2016

Tara Ross

On this day in 1814, the British begin bombarding Fort McHenry. Famously, a young lawyer named Francis Scott Key watched the battle from a nearby ship. The next morning, Key was relieved to see the American flag waving proudly above the fort. Americans had not surrendered! Key was inspired to write a poem that would later became our national anthem, the Star-Spangled Banner.

Our national anthem has been in the news lately, of course, because of the little-known third stanza of Key’s poem. That verse concludes: “No refuge could save the hireling and slave, From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave.”

Is the song inherently racist? Historians disagree on Key’s motivations. Possibly, he was simply using language common to 18th-century ears but less common to our own. The words could be a more general reference to the British army, which included mercenaries and other troops purchased from German princes.

Also, don’t forget that one of the causes of the War of 1812 was the British tendency to capture American seamen and impress them into service (enslave them) aboard British vessels.

Why was Key on a nearby ship in the first place? Did you ever wonder?

At the time, Key was trying to secure the release of an American prisoner who was being held aboard a British flagship. Key’s efforts were successful, but the British officers refused to let the Americans return to shore right away. They worried that the British plan to attack Baltimore would be revealed. Thus, the men were detained aboard an American truce ship until the bombardment of Ft. McHenry was over.

You have to wonder how Key felt, trapped helplessly behind the British fleet, knowing his fellow countrymen were about to be attacked.

The British began their bombardment on September 13. The Niles’ Weekly Register reported that “Four or five bombs were frequently in the air at a time . . . . never, perhaps from the time of the invention of cannon to the present day, were the same number of pieces fired with so rapid succession.”

You can imagine Key’s worries, helplessly watching such a spectacle all night long! The next morning, he looked anxiously to see if the flag was flying. And it was! The flag that Key most likely saw was a huge, oversized flag specifically requested by the fort’s commander, Major George Armistead. Each star measured 24 inches from point to point. The Major wanted a big flag to ensure that the “British will have no difficulty in seeing it from a distance.”

Key had no difficulty, either! Years later, he spoke of his experience:

“Through the clouds of war, the stars of that banner still shone in his view, and he saw the discomfited host of its assailants driven back in ignominy to their ships. Then, in that hour of deliverance, and joyful triumph, the heart spoke; and Does not such a country and such defenders of their country, deserve a song? was its question. With it came an inspiration not to be resisted . . . .”

Key quickly jotted down the words to a poem. He later refined it and showed it to a judge. Soon, a local newspaper obtained it. The poem was printed, along with instructions that it should be sung to the tune of “Anacreon in Heaven.”

The song quickly became a much-loved patriotic tune. As the decades passed, it was increasingly used as an unofficial national anthem. It gained that title officially in 1931.

Surely Key never imagined such a destiny for the words he’d jotted on the back of an envelope early one morning.

-------------
If you enjoy these history posts, please know that it is important to LIKE, SHARE & COMMENT. This site’s algorithm will w**d these posts out of your newsfeed if you do not interact with them. (I don’t make the rules! Just following them.) ;)

Gentle reminder: History posts are copyright © 2013-2016 by Tara Ross. I appreciate it when you use the Facebook “share” feature instead of cutting/pasting.

Permalink: http://www.taraross.com/2016/09/this-day-in-history-fort-mchenry-and-our-national-anthem

#TDIH #OTD #AmericanHistory #USHistory #liberty #freedom #ShareTheHistory

Niagara Parks Heritage
08/08/2016

Niagara Parks Heritage

Tara Ross
07/22/2016

Tara Ross

On this day in 1789, a signer of the Declaration of Independence writes a letter to John Adams. The letter sounds harsh to modern ears. And yet it makes perfect sense.

“A simple democracy,” Benjamin Rush wrote, “or an unbalanced republic, is one of the greatest of evils.”

Wait. Democracy . . . . evil?! What on earth could he mean?

Simple. Our Founders knew that, as a matter of history, simple democracies tend to implode. Naturally, they wanted to avoid such a catastrophe.

Perhaps you’ve heard the analogy: A democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on what's for dinner. (Yikes!) Our Founders knew this dynamic, too. Pure democracies cannot prevent bare majorities from tyrannizing over large minority groups. Too often, they crumble under the influence of bare majorities or emotional mobs.

Unsurprisingly, then, our Founders did not create a simple democracy. They worked to create something even better.

But what could they do? They still valued self-governance! They’d just fought an entire Revolution because they had no representation in Parliament. They weren’t about to ditch the concept of democracy entirely. In the end, they came up with a unique solution: Our Constitution blends the best elements of democracy (self-governance), republicanism (deliberation and compromise) and federalism (state-by-state action). The many checks and balances in our Constitution are meant to protect our freedom.

Power is separated among three branches of our federal government. Neither the President nor the judiciary is supposed to encroach upon the legislative function. Moreover, most power is left to the states--or to the people themselves! The Constitution requires super-majorities to take some actions, such as to amend the Constitution or to override a presidential veto. And we have an Electoral College!

When we ignore such safeguards in our Constitution, we jeopardize our own liberty. Both Rush and Adams would have understood that.

Perhaps more modern Americans need to know this history, too.

Naturally, at this juncture, I need to offer a friendly reminder that my kids (illustrated) book about the Electoral College is coming out soon! :) www.WeElectAPresident.com.

Permalink: http://www.taraross.com/2016/07/this-day-in-history-benjamin-rush-on-democracy

-------------
If you enjoy these history posts, please know that it is important to LIKE, SHARE & COMMENT. This site’s algorithm will w**d these posts out of your newsfeed if you do not interact with them. (I don’t make the rules! Just following them.) ;)

Gentle reminder: History posts are copyright © 2013-2016 by Tara Ross. I appreciate it when you use the Facebook “share” feature instead of cutting/pasting.

#TDIH #OTD #AmericanHistory #USHistory #liberty #freedom #ShareTheHistory

Tara Ross
02/04/2016

Tara Ross

On this day in 1789, George Washington is unanimously elected President of the United States by the Electoral College. He would be elected unanimously, again, during the election of 1792. Washington was the first and only U.S. President to be unanimously elected.

Allegedly, one other President could have achieved this feat but for the fact that one elector wanted to protect Washington’s achievement. However, the story is a bit of a myth.

In 1820, James Monroe obtained 231 of 232 electors. The final elector, William Plumer, decided to vote for John Quincy Adams instead. However, Plumer did not make his choice to protect Washington. He genuinely did not want to vote for Monroe.

A letter that he wrote to his son on January 8, 1821, explains his vote:

“I was obliged from a sense of duty and a regard to my own reputation to withhold my vote from Monroe and Tompkins; from the first because he had discovered a want of foresight and from the second because he had grossly neglected his duty.”

So, yes, Washington really was the only President to obtain a unanimous electoral vote! James Monroe came close, but he could not convince every elector to vote for him.

America needed and wanted Washington. But Washington would have been happier living out his days at Mt. Vernon. In late 1788, he wrote to Major General Benjamin Lincoln:

“At my time of life and under my circumstances, nothing in this world can ever draw me from [retirement], unless it be a conviction that the partiality of my Countrymen had made my services absolutely necessary . . . . I call Heaven to witness, that this very act would be the greatest sacrafice of my personal feelings & wishes that ever I have been called upon to make. It would be to fore go repose and domestic enjoyment; for trouble, perhaps; for public obloquy: for I should consider myself as entering upon an unexplored field, enveloped on every side with clouds & darkness.”

Fortunately for us, Washington was willing to make that great sacrifice of his “personal feelings & wishes.” Our country would not have been the same without him.

-------------
If you enjoyed this post, please don’t forget to “like” and SHARE. Our schools and media don’t always teach our own history! Let’s do it ourselves.

Gentle reminder: History posts are copyright © 2013-2016 by Tara Ross. I appreciate it when you use the Facebook “share” feature instead of cutting/pasting.

#TDIH #OTD #Americanhistory #USHistory #liberty #freedom #ShareTheHistory

Laughing Devil Photography
02/02/2016

Laughing Devil Photography

All photographs belong to Laughing Devil Photography. Please do not remove the watermark or alter the photos. Please feel free to tag yourself (VH)

Laughing Devil Photography
02/02/2016

Laughing Devil Photography

All photographs belong to Laughing Devil Photography. Please do not remove the watermark or alter the photos. Please feel free to tag yourself (MH)

Address

Owosso, MI
48867

General information

Independent artillery unit with Two reproduction field pieces. 1 - 2.91 inch King Howitzer 1793, 1 - Four pound Louis de Tousard 1809 gun. Our unit attend events in the mid west, south, and Canada. We are looking for members, if interested call ( 989 - 277 - 8055 ) between 8:00am and 8:00pm . will train and help get equipped.

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Michigan Legionary Corps of Volunteer Artillery posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Michigan Legionary Corps of Volunteer Artillery:

Videos

Nearby government services


Other Public & Government Services in Owosso

Show All