Lake County Soil and Water Conservation District (Ohio)

Lake County  Soil and Water Conservation District (Ohio) Lake SWCD will provide leadership and technical expertise to guide the protection and conservation of the unique soil and water resources of the county

Operating as usual

MILKWEED POD COLLECTION TO START SEPTEMBER 20PLANTING MILKWEED FOR MONARCHS IS VITAL!To help foster the creation of habi...
09/13/2021

MILKWEED POD COLLECTION TO START SEPTEMBER 20
PLANTING MILKWEED FOR MONARCHS IS VITAL!
To help foster the creation of habitat for the monarch butterfly, Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative (OPHI), in cooperation with Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Districts is organizing a Statewide Milkw**d Pod Collection this year starting September 1st and ending October 31st.
Milkw**d is essential to the survival of monarch butterflies in Ohio and Ohio is a priority area for monarchs. The monarch butterflies that hatch here in the summer migrate to Mexico for the winter and are responsible for starting the life cycle all over again in the spring.
Since 2015, volunteers have collected approximately 5000 gallons of common milkw**d seed pods, totaling over 22 million seeds! Milkw**d is the only host plant for the Monarch butterfly for egg laying and caterpillar rearing. It also serves as a food source for Monarchs as well as many other pollinator species. The disappearance of milkw**d across the U.S. has contributed to the 80% decline of the eastern monarch butterfly population over the last 20 years.
During September - October, everyone is encouraged to collect Common Milkw**d pods from established plants and drop them off at a pod collection station. The majority of Ohio counties have a Milkw**d Pod Collection Station, most of them being located at the local Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) office such as the Lake Soil & Water Conservation District.
Due to the climate here in Lake County our Milkw**d Pod Collection will run from September 20 - October 31.

Spotted lanternfly has been found in 2 locations in eastern Cuyahoga county. This insect is capable of decimating orchar...
09/03/2021
Ohio population of spotted lanternflies found east of Cleveland

Spotted lanternfly has been found in 2 locations in eastern Cuyahoga county.

This insect is capable of decimating orchards, vineyards and sugarbushes, since grapes, fruit trees and maples are some of their preferred trees to feed on.

You may also find them on Tree of heaven (Alianthus altissima). Tree of heaven is an incredibly invasive tree, so if you were looking for an excuse to get rid of the one in your yard, there is no time like the present.

If you find spotted lanternfly in any of its life stages, kill first, then report. They don't sting or bite, nor are the poisonous, so you can squish without fear.


https://www.dispatch.com/story/news/2021/09/02/ohios-first-spotted-lanternfly-population-found-east-cleveland/5697171001/?fbclid=IwAR1nMo5ZTDFmaAn4bp5CIBhUFYGq9U533TjpBtAqAaSObxAlX4DIfOWbsYM

Here's the latest on the invasive insect, which is attracted to tree-of-heaven and is a threat to many food crops and trees.

Great news for our Great Lake and neighbors to the east!https://www.cleveland.com/news/2021/08/ashtabula-river-removed-f...
09/01/2021
Ashtabula River removed from list of environmentally degraded areas in the Great Lakes region

Great news for our Great Lake and neighbors to the east!

https://www.cleveland.com/news/2021/08/ashtabula-river-removed-from-list-of-environmentally-degraded-areas-in-the-great-lakes-region.html

The removal of PCBs and other contaminants from the Ashtabula River helped get it removed from a bi-national list of U.S. and Canadian areas in the Great Lakes tagged as "Areas of Concern" because of environmental degradation.

08/27/2021

Release of the second eaglet.

08/27/2021

The Mentor Marsh eaglet's that have been under the care of the Wildlife Center at Penitentiary Glen for much of the summer were finally strong enough to release today!

With summer harvests in full swing, it is nice to be able to preserve some of summer's bounty. Muskingum Soil & Water Co...
08/27/2021

With summer harvests in full swing, it is nice to be able to preserve some of summer's bounty.

Muskingum Soil & Water Conservation District has a video series on YouTube called Back to Basics that has some great gardening and canning information! The latest video shows how to can pickled peppers. 🌶🌶🌶

For the full Back to Basics playlist visit: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3kVjFrZmgCZW_K4lF-OFElTjqWGhTqKQ

Back to Basics: Episode 11-Banana Pepper Pickling is now available on our YouTube channel!

https://youtu.be/i9z8drjUQR8

08/24/2021
Eaglet taunts other while taking bath

Even eagle siblings have squabbles!

Great to see these Mentor Marsh eaglets doing well and working toward being strong enough to release. 💪🦅

While Asian longhorned beetle hasn't been found in Lake county, it is still a good idea to check your trees for this bad...
08/09/2021

While Asian longhorned beetle hasn't been found in Lake county, it is still a good idea to check your trees for this bad bug.

https://www.morningagclips.com/check-your-trees-for-the-asian-longhorned-beetle/

photo credit: Gillian Allard, FAO of United Nations, Bugwood.org

While Asian longhorned beetle hasn't been found in Lake county, it is still a good idea to check your trees for this bad bug.

https://www.morningagclips.com/check-your-trees-for-the-asian-longhorned-beetle/

photo credit: Gillian Allard, FAO of United Nations, Bugwood.org

Do you want to install a rain garden, but need some guidance?Luckily there is still space in the next Northeast Ohio Mas...
07/14/2021

Do you want to install a rain garden, but need some guidance?

Luckily there is still space in the next Northeast Ohio Master Rain Gardener class!

The course starts on July 21 so register today!
https://crwp.org/master-rain-gardener/?fbclid=IwAR2M1XiljXb9gCAi7gHobUJtPEs8eSSFOBuWl3kJMVUfeVcXwR_bPbe1Lic

If you want a quick rain garden run down, check out Natalie from Lake SWCD's Rain Garden 101 presentation on Mentor Public Library YouTube channel.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zG_TZECjh0o

Do you want to install a rain garden, but need some guidance?

Luckily there is still space in the next Northeast Ohio Master Rain Gardener class!

The course starts on July 21 so register today!
https://crwp.org/master-rain-gardener/?fbclid=IwAR2M1XiljXb9gCAi7gHobUJtPEs8eSSFOBuWl3kJMVUfeVcXwR_bPbe1Lic

If you want a quick rain garden run down, check out Natalie from Lake SWCD's Rain Garden 101 presentation on Mentor Public Library YouTube channel.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zG_TZECjh0o

06/24/2021

Do you want to be a Master Rain Gardener? Learn how to install rain gardens and be a rain garden expert in your neighborhood with this 5-week course. We’re excited to be able to offer this course in-person again this year! Our in-person course will be held July 21 – August 25 on Wednesdays, 10 am – 1 pm at The Holden Arboretum. Registration is now open for residents and landscape professionals in Northeast Ohio. Space is limited, so sign up before the course is filled!
Find out more and register at crwp.org/master-rain-gardener

This week is Pollinator Week!What is pollination?Pollination is a vital stage in the life cycle of all flowering plants....
06/21/2021

This week is Pollinator Week!

What is pollination?
Pollination is a vital stage in the life cycle of all flowering plants.
When pollen is moved within a flower or carried from one flower to another of the same species it leads to fertilization. This transfer of pollen is necessary for healthy and productive native & agricultural ecosystems.
• About 75% of all flowering plant species need the help of animals to move their heavy pollen grains from plant to plant for fertilization.
• About 1,000 of all pollinators are vertebrates such as birds, bats, and small mammals.
• Most pollinators (about 200,000 species) are beneficial insects such as flies, beetles, wasps, ants, butterflies, moths, and bees.

Why are pollinators important?
Pollinators are often keystone species, meaning that they are critical to an ecosystem. The work of pollinators ensures full harvests of crops and contributes to healthy plants everywhere.
• An estimated 1/3 of all foods and beverages is delivered by pollinators.
• In the U.S., pollination produces nearly $20 billion worth of products annually.

How you can help.
• Reduce your impact. Reduce or eliminate your pesticide use, increase green spaces, and
minimize urbanization. Pollution and climate change affect pollinators, too!
• Plant for pollinators. Create pollinator-friendly habitat with native flowering plants that supply pollinators with nectar, pollen, and homes.
For information on what to plant in your
area, download a free eco-regional guide online at www.pollinator.org.
• Tell a friend. Educate your neighbors, schools, and community groups about the importance of pollinators. Host a dinner, a pollinated food cook-off or other event and invite your friends.
• Join the Pollinator Partnership Go to www.pollinator.org and click on “Get Involved.” Be
part of a growing community of pollinator supporters.

This week is Pollinator Week!

What is pollination?
Pollination is a vital stage in the life cycle of all flowering plants.
When pollen is moved within a flower or carried from one flower to another of the same species it leads to fertilization. This transfer of pollen is necessary for healthy and productive native & agricultural ecosystems.
• About 75% of all flowering plant species need the help of animals to move their heavy pollen grains from plant to plant for fertilization.
• About 1,000 of all pollinators are vertebrates such as birds, bats, and small mammals.
• Most pollinators (about 200,000 species) are beneficial insects such as flies, beetles, wasps, ants, butterflies, moths, and bees.

Why are pollinators important?
Pollinators are often keystone species, meaning that they are critical to an ecosystem. The work of pollinators ensures full harvests of crops and contributes to healthy plants everywhere.
• An estimated 1/3 of all foods and beverages is delivered by pollinators.
• In the U.S., pollination produces nearly $20 billion worth of products annually.

How you can help.
• Reduce your impact. Reduce or eliminate your pesticide use, increase green spaces, and
minimize urbanization. Pollution and climate change affect pollinators, too!
• Plant for pollinators. Create pollinator-friendly habitat with native flowering plants that supply pollinators with nectar, pollen, and homes.
For information on what to plant in your
area, download a free eco-regional guide online at www.pollinator.org.
• Tell a friend. Educate your neighbors, schools, and community groups about the importance of pollinators. Host a dinner, a pollinated food cook-off or other event and invite your friends.
• Join the Pollinator Partnership Go to www.pollinator.org and click on “Get Involved.” Be
part of a growing community of pollinator supporters.

Happy first day of summer!
06/21/2021

Happy first day of summer!

Happy first day of summer!

The barrier to starting farming can be pretty high. Especially if you didn't grow up in a farming community and don't ha...
06/17/2021
Knowing who knows: Beginning farmers need a strong network - Farm and Dairy

The barrier to starting farming can be pretty high. Especially if you didn't grow up in a farming community and don't have any many connections.

Fortunately, there are a growing number of programs designed to help beginner farmers gain knowledge, experience and connections.

https://www.farmanddairy.com/news/knowing-who-knows-beginning-farmers-need-a-strong-network/666532.html

Some would say farmers are the ultimate jacks or jills of all trades. But they don't need to know everything. They just need a network of people who know.

An incredible transformation!
06/14/2021

An incredible transformation!

06/02/2021

Great Job Master Rain Gardeners!

06/02/2021
assets.thesca.org

Are you a high school student or do you know a high school student who is interested in gaining experience in the Natural Resources Conservation field?

If so the Student Conservation Association’s 2021 Cleveland High School Summer Program is accepting applications.

The SCA's Cleveland High School Summer Program will employ a crew for high school members, aged 14-19, working in natural areas throughout the Cleveland Metroparks. The crews will work Monday through Friday each week during the summer program. Members work 32 hours per week.

05/27/2021

Our favorite kind of live stream. #HeadwaterHabitatEvaluationIndex #beautifullakecountyohio

Northeast Ohio Master Rain Gardeners strike again!This group of MRG Professional and NOW Corps students installed a rain...
05/24/2021

Northeast Ohio Master Rain Gardeners strike again!

This group of MRG Professional and NOW Corps students installed a rain garden and Willoughby Eastlake School Of Innovation.

Now if only it would rain! 🌧🌧🌧

Did you know that North America is home to 4,000 species of native bees!
05/20/2021

Did you know that North America is home to 4,000 species of native bees!

This #WorldBeeDay. celebrate the true diversity of bees. Learn more at https://xerces.org/pollinator-conservation

#WorldBeeDay2021

If you have noticed that rain events seem more intense in recent years?100 year storms are supposed to have a 1% chance ...
05/20/2021
Rainfall Estimates Are Outdated for Effective Stormwater Management Design

If you have noticed that rain events seem more intense in recent years?

100 year storms are supposed to have a 1% chance of happening in any given year. Newer estimates are showing that they are occurring at twice that rate.

What does this mean for communities and their residents?

Implement programs and practices that protect and restore healthy soil and water resources.

There has been a lot of buzz about cicadas in the news, but we here at Lake SWCD have noticed a few falsehoods circulati...
05/07/2021

There has been a lot of buzz about cicadas in the news, but we here at Lake SWCD have noticed a few falsehoods circulating. Over the next week or so we will be setting some things straight about these wild, wonderful and somewhat mysterious critters.

Cicadas are not harmful pests.
Are they loud? Yes.
Are they sometimes annoying? Yes.
Are they going to bite or sting you? No.

More about cicada mouths and bites

Cicadas don't have mouthparts to bite, sting or chew. Instead they have a rostrum or beak which is like a straw and is designed for sucking liquid out of plant roots and twigs. For the majority of their lives (the 16.75 years they are underground) they use their rostrum to suck the fluid out of plant roots. While molting into their adult form, they may suck sap out of tree and shrub twigs. If a cicada lands on you and "bites" you it isn't because it is vicious and attacking you, it is because it thinks you are a tree. 🌳🌳🌳 What a compliment! 😍

The website cicadamania.com has a lot of great articles about periodical cicadas. If you aren't thrilled with cicadas landing on you, one recommendation they make is to avoid using yard implements that make loud vibration noises if you are in an area with a lot of cicadas. The females may mistake you with your w**d whip for a male cicada. 😜

Also, if you aren't thrilled to be sharing space with cicadas remember that this is a very minor inconvenience for 5-6 weeks every 17 years.

https://www.cicadamania.com/cicadas/do-cicadas-bite-or-sting/

https://www.cicadamania.com/cicadas/what-do-cicadas-eat/#:~:text=The%20cicada's%20mouth%20parts%20(aka,plants%20and%20drink%20their%20sap.

Stay tuned to future posts for more information about cicadas and your garden.

There has been a lot of buzz about cicadas in the news, but we here at Lake SWCD have noticed a few falsehoods circulating. Over the next week or so we will be setting some things straight about these wild, wonderful and somewhat mysterious critters.

Cicadas are not harmful pests.
Are they loud? Yes.
Are they sometimes annoying? Yes.
Are they going to bite or sting you? No.

More about cicada mouths and bites

Cicadas don't have mouthparts to bite, sting or chew. Instead they have a rostrum or beak which is like a straw and is designed for sucking liquid out of plant roots and twigs. For the majority of their lives (the 16.75 years they are underground) they use their rostrum to suck the fluid out of plant roots. While molting into their adult form, they may suck sap out of tree and shrub twigs. If a cicada lands on you and "bites" you it isn't because it is vicious and attacking you, it is because it thinks you are a tree. 🌳🌳🌳 What a compliment! 😍

The website cicadamania.com has a lot of great articles about periodical cicadas. If you aren't thrilled with cicadas landing on you, one recommendation they make is to avoid using yard implements that make loud vibration noises if you are in an area with a lot of cicadas. The females may mistake you with your w**d whip for a male cicada. 😜

Also, if you aren't thrilled to be sharing space with cicadas remember that this is a very minor inconvenience for 5-6 weeks every 17 years.

https://www.cicadamania.com/cicadas/do-cicadas-bite-or-sting/

https://www.cicadamania.com/cicadas/what-do-cicadas-eat/#:~:text=The%20cicada's%20mouth%20parts%20(aka,plants%20and%20drink%20their%20sap.

Stay tuned to future posts for more information about cicadas and your garden.

Address

105 Main St
Painesville, OH
44077

Opening Hours

Monday 7:30am - 4pm
Tuesday 7:30am - 4pm
Wednesday 7:30am - 4pm
Thursday 7:30am - 4pm
Friday 7:30am - 4pm

Telephone

(440) 350-2730

Products

Rain Barrels
Soil Test Kits
Annual Native Tree and Plant Sale

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Comments

With most landscaping services deemed non essential this means non professionals will be applying lawn and garden chemicals. This is potentially a problem especially if they are over applied. Can you please provide guidance that can be shared, on proper application and also information showing the benefits of allowing a lawn and garden to go natural with native plants and longer grass, no mulch etc.
I am looking to purchase elderberry plants. Do you have them?
Strange request, but does anyone have Wafer Ash/Hoptree that they are willing to let me have some leaves from? I have 6 Giant Swallowtail butterfly eggs that are about to hatch and I don't have enough material to raise them for the next 30 days. She laid eggs on my little tiny Wafer Ash trees I got from the Soil and Water tree sale in the spring and they only have a few leaves. Does anyone know where I can get some material to make sure these guys make it to crysalis stage? Perhaps someone has gotten Wafer Ash in a previous year from the Soil and Water sale. Thank you!