Princeton Fire Department

Princeton Fire Department The Princeton Fire Department is a combination career & volunteer department and was founded in 1788.
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Operating as usual

This past week our firefighters continued their training focused on ladder operations, using both ground ladders and Lad...
10/02/2020

This past week our firefighters continued their training focused on ladder operations, using both ground ladders and Ladder 60 to refine their capabilities.

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Kevin Delaney.Kevin was a member of the Princeton Fire Departme...
09/27/2020

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Kevin Delaney.

Kevin was a member of the Princeton Fire Department for well over 50 years. During his time, he held multiple positions including many years as President of Engine Co. No. 1. Kevin also achieved the position of Foreman within the department, a rank similar to today’s Captain. Most recently, Kevin served as a Fire Police Officer.

While on scene this week, we found this beautiful artwork in show of support for healthcare providers and first responde...
09/17/2020

While on scene this week, we found this beautiful artwork in show of support for healthcare providers and first responders. Thank you to the local kids who created such a nice gesture.

Princeton Fire Department dispatched for the dwelling.  Upon arrival DC60 observed light smoke from behind structure.  F...
09/13/2020

Princeton Fire Department dispatched for the dwelling. Upon arrival DC60 observed light smoke from behind structure. Further investigation found a small shed on fire. Ladder 60 crew stretched 1 line in operation and contained the fire. Chief 60 ran Operations. The fire is under investigation with the Fire Marshal's office. Thank you to Princeton Police Department for assisting on scene.

This evening Princeton Fire Department staffed two crews to provide fire protection services for a local golf club celeb...
09/13/2020

This evening Princeton Fire Department staffed two crews to provide fire protection services for a local golf club celebrating their 125 year anniversary with a fireworks display.

Today we honor the 2,997 lives lost from the attacks on September 11, 2001.  Many first responders made the ultimate sac...
09/11/2020

Today we honor the 2,997 lives lost from the attacks on September 11, 2001. Many first responders made the ultimate sacrifice on that day and many others since that day due to 9/11 attributed illnesses. #neverforget

Princeton Fire Department on scene yesterday managing a carbon monoxide incident with levels above acceptable limits.  C...
09/10/2020

Princeton Fire Department on scene yesterday managing a carbon monoxide incident with levels above acceptable limits. Crews were able to secure the utilities. We remind residents to ensure they have CO detectors in their residences.

Today several of our members participated in Swiftwater Rescue Operations training, along with members of Kingston Fire ...
08/30/2020

Today several of our members participated in Swiftwater Rescue Operations training, along with members of Kingston Fire Department.

08/30/2020
Generator Safety

As we have entered into hurricane season, Princeton Fire Department would like to share these general safety practices when using generators.

Thinking of getting a backup generator? These tips will help you safely keep power flowing during momentary power interruptions.

The members of Princeton Fire Department would like to take a moment to remember the ultimate sacrifice that EMT &  Resc...
08/29/2020

The members of Princeton Fire Department would like to take a moment to remember the ultimate sacrifice that EMT & Rescue Tech Michael Kenwood, of Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad, made serving the community of Princeton. We shall never forget...

Today is a day of remembrance for PFARS. 9 years ago today, we lost one of our own, Michael Kenwood, during a rescue attempt. Please keep his wife Beth, daughter Laney, and other family members in your thoughts and prayers. We have honored Michael in our new station to always remember who he was and the sacrifice he gave that night.

In a letter describing a car crash that left him badly injured shortly before his high school graduation, Michael Kenwood wrote, “I swore to myself that if I lived, I would learn the skills to care for myself and others should another medical emergency ever confront me again.” He kept that promise, becoming an emergency medical technician (EMT) in college, and volunteering his time to help his campus community.

His desire to give back to his community continued long after his college graduation. Despite a budding career, as both a practicing attorney and owner of an information technology consulting business, and commitment to his wife and daughter, he continuously sought out opportunities to help others. One way in which he did this was by volunteering with the Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad (PFARS) and becoming trained in technical rescue disciplines (motor vehicle extrication, ice rescue, confined space rescue, and swiftwater rescue). As an EMT and technical rescuer, Michael’s courage, determination, and cool under pressure were manifest as he provided care for victims of life-threatening medical emergencies, newly born infants, and people stuck in tight domestic spaces, crashed cars, or elevators. They were similarly manifest in training exercises, which he embraced as part of his commitment to being prepared to perform rescues or deliver care unflinchingly and with the highest level of skill and professionalism.

Such was his intention on the evening of August 27, 2011, hours before Hurricane Irene brought extraordinary damage upon the town of Princeton, New Jersey. After ensuring that his family was safely out of the storm’s path, Michael drove to PFARS to offer his assistance. He was not scheduled to be on duty, but he knew that as a swiftwater rescue technician, he had the skills necessary to help those who could be gravely affected by the looming storm. His friends and colleagues at the Squad were happy to have him there. In addition to being a skilled EMT and Rescuer, Michael was a mentor and source of comfort to everyone around him. Though he had only been a member of PFARS for three years, the Squad had benefited from his presence in so many ways. Michael’s unflappable optimism and extraordinary acts of kindness, bravery, and selflessness were so regular that they defined a level of “ordinary” that few people ever attain. Simply put, he was a beloved part of our EMS family.

At 4:38 AM on August 28, at the height of Hurricane Irene’s winds and torrential downpour, PFARS and other emergency services agencies were dispatched to Rosedale Road in Princeton, in the area of Stony Brook, for a water rescue. When the crews, including Michael, arrived on the scene, they found a sedan partially submerged in two-foot deep floodwaters in the roadway, approximately seventy yards from the water’s edge. Emergency personnel were unable to see whether the vehicle was occupied, but after repeated attempts to signal to the vehicle using spotlights and a PA system, the vehicle’s rear taillights began to flash. Believing that people might have been trapped inside the vehicle and seeing the rising and quickening floodwaters as an imminent threat to their safety, Michael proceeded into the water on a tether in order to reach and rescue any victims. Michael and another swiftwater rescue technician entered the water at 5:05 AM and were able to proceed approximately halfway to the vehicle before they were both swept from their feet by a rush of water. The haul team was unable to pull the rescuers back to shore and Michael was caught underwater in a stand of trees. The haul line was cut to free him from the trees and he was carried approximately 100 yards downstream with the current. When rescuers arrived at his location, they found Michael in cardiac arrest. Emergency services personnel on scene worked feverishly to save Michael, performing CPR and rushing him to the University Medical Center of Princeton. Through the efforts of the EMTs, nurses, and doctors, Michael’s heart was restarted, but he remained unresponsive. As word of the incident spread,Michael’s family and friends gathered in the intensive care unit of the hospital, utilizing every resource they could to find passable roads and flights to get to his side. Everyone prayed for him to regain consciousness. He never did. Late in the evening of August 28, Michael succumbed to his injuries. He was 39 years old.

It was later determined that the car was empty – the flashing taillights were likely caused by a malfunction of the car’s electrical system as it filled with water. The fact that there was no victim, per se, to be rescued does not detract from Michael’s intention when he entered the water to aid somebody whose life was in danger. Instead, Michael’s resolution in the face of the great uncertainty of the situation is a testament to his courage – few men or women possess the bravery to attempt such a rescue for a confirmed victim, much less for one that may not actually exist.

Michael’s death resonated across the country, as stories of his commitment to helping others and his untimely passing spread through close-knit networks of first responders and the media. Inspired, humbled, and deeply affected by this tragedy, hundreds of rescuers who had never met Michael came from throughout and beyond New Jersey to attend the funeral and pay tribute to the bravery and sacrifice he exhibited in his death. Those of us who did have the privilege of knowing him, who had long been inspired by his many virtues, attended instead to pay tribute to the love, generosity, and selflessness he exhibited in his life.

Last night our firefighters spent time reviewing roof operations and procedures for ventilation. Thank you to Plainsboro...
08/19/2020

Last night our firefighters spent time reviewing roof operations and procedures for ventilation. Thank you to Plainsboro Fire Company for allowing us to train at their station.

Princeton firefighters responded to over 30 calls in the last day, including two separate first alarm assignments in tow...
08/05/2020

Princeton firefighters responded to over 30 calls in the last day, including two separate first alarm assignments in town. Members staffed 3 apparatus during the day with all 3 chiefs in town.

Princeton Fire Department has crews in the station today to respond during the storm.  Please adhere to the guidelines f...
08/04/2020

Princeton Fire Department has crews in the station today to respond during the storm. Please adhere to the guidelines for the State of Emergency.

UPDATE: I am declaring a STATEWIDE STATE OF EMERGENCY for Hurricane Isaias effective at 5:00 AM on Tuesday, August 4, 2020:
☑️Do not be on the roads unless absolutely necessary
☑️If you MUST drive, take it slow, use caution, and leave extra time to get to your destination



☑️All State offices will be CLOSED tomorrow
☑️Non-essential @NJGov personnel should NOT report to work for their normal shift
☑️Essential employees should report on schedule


☑️Visit 511nj.org for traffic updates and ready.nj.gov for additional info
☑️There is no travel ban at this time

☑️Take down ALL temporary structures, including outdoor dining tents and umbrellas
☑️Secure loose furniture and other objects
☑️Charge your devices
☑️Stay updated: New Jersey Office of Emergency Management, New Jersey Board of Public Utilities


The State Emergency Operations Center will be open throughout the storm. Check back for more updates and stay tuned to your local weather to plan ahead.

For those living in Central and Southern New Jersey, stay updated at @NWS_MountHolly or by visiting http://www.weather.gov/phi/. For those living in Northern New Jersey, check for updates at @NWSNewYorkNY or by visiting http://www.weather.gov/okx/

This evening Princeton firefighters responded to a reported smoke condition.  Upon arrival L60 went interior to investig...
07/21/2020

This evening Princeton firefighters responded to a reported smoke condition. Upon arrival L60 went interior to investigate. AC60 took command, while DC60 and C60 took operations. The first alarm was called with high readings of CO and light smoke found of the second floor. Plainsboro Fire Company, Rocky Hill Fire Department, Kingston Volunteer Fire Department, and Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad were on scene to assist with operations. The source was isolated and secured.

Following the first call, L60 was called to Lawrence for the second alarm fire. Crews assisted on scene with fire suppression and operations.

This evening Rescue 60, Deputy 60, and Assistant 60 responded into Plainsboro for the reported apartment fire.  Plainsbo...
07/18/2020

This evening Rescue 60, Deputy 60, and Assistant 60 responded into Plainsboro for the reported apartment fire. Plainsboro Fire Company put a quick stop on the fire's spread. Princeton firefighters assisted with operations and overhaul.

PFD would like to thank the Princeton Regional Educational Support Staff Association and the Princeton Regional Educatio...
07/09/2020

PFD would like to thank the Princeton Regional Educational Support Staff Association and the Princeton Regional Education Association for providing lunch to us today. Your support is truly appreciated.

We want to wish everyone in the community a safe and happy 4th of July - as we celebrate the birth of America's independ...
07/04/2020

We want to wish everyone in the community a safe and happy 4th of July - as we celebrate the birth of America's independence. Be safe!

On behalf of the Line Officers, we are pleased to recognize Firefighter Justin Immordino on passing the department house...
06/26/2020

On behalf of the Line Officers, we are pleased to recognize Firefighter Justin Immordino on passing the department house test. Thank you for your dedication to serving the town of Princeton. We appreciate your volunteerism and commitment to excellence.

This morning our firefighters sharpened their engine and ladder operations skills through 3 evolutions joined by Chief 6...
06/20/2020

This morning our firefighters sharpened their engine and ladder operations skills through 3 evolutions joined by Chief 60, Deputy 60, and Assistant 60. Our volunteers and career staff work side by side to ensure Princeton receives professional fire and rescue services.

Interested in serving your community and joining the Princeton Fire Department?  Learn why our volunteers choose to join...
06/17/2020
Princeton Firefighter Spotlight: Henry Pannell

Interested in serving your community and joining the Princeton Fire Department? Learn why our volunteers choose to join and continue to serve the community of Princeton today.

The Princeton Volunteer Fire Department will be sharing a series of profiles on their firefighters to get to know who they are.

06/17/2020
Princeton Flag Day Ceremony 2020

This past Sunday our members participated in the Princeton Flag Day Ceremony along side Princeton Police Department and Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad. We were honored to join our fellow first responders and want to thank the Spirit of Princeton for hosting the event to honor our flag.

This is "Princeton Flag Day Ceremony 2020" by Princeton TV on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

On behalf of the Princeton Fire Department, it is with deep regret and sorrow that we inform you of the passing of past ...
06/08/2020

On behalf of the Princeton Fire Department, it is with deep regret and sorrow that we inform you of the passing of past Chief Benjamin “Roz” Warren.

Roz was a long time member of Princeton Engine Co. #1 and life-long resident of Princeton. He will be missed by many whose lives he touched in a positive way. Our thoughts and condolences are with the Warren family in this difficult time.

Earlier today crews responded to a multi-unit dwelling with residents entrapped.  In partnership with Princeton First Ai...
06/04/2020

Earlier today crews responded to a multi-unit dwelling with residents entrapped. In partnership with Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad and Princeton Police Department all residents were rescued and the property was secured for the tree to be removed.

Today our crew took advantage of the beautiful weather and kept up their training with several evolutions including wate...
05/30/2020

Today our crew took advantage of the beautiful weather and kept up their training with several evolutions including water supply, hose deployment, and ladder operations. #PFD60

Earlier today members of the department remembered and honored those that have served our country and made the ultimate ...
05/25/2020

Earlier today members of the department remembered and honored those that have served our country and made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom alongside with Princeton Police Department and Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad.

We remember and honor those that have made the ultimate sacrifice for our great nation and protect our freedom.
05/24/2020

We remember and honor those that have made the ultimate sacrifice for our great nation and protect our freedom.

National EMS Week - this week we celebrate and honor the dedication of those who provide lifesaving services of medicine...
05/20/2020

National EMS Week - this week we celebrate and honor the dedication of those who provide lifesaving services of medicine's "front line". Thank you to our dedicated partners at Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad for your passion and relentless services to our community.

05/12/2020
Birthday Drive-by

This Friday (May 15th) is the last day you can schedule a drive-by birthday celebration for your child! If your child's birthday plans have been cancelled due to COVID-19, call the station at 609-497-7648 by this Friday to schedule a drive-by.

Consider volunteering today!  We are always seeking Princeton residents to join the department and give back to our comm...
04/30/2020
Princeton Firefighter Spotlight: Ziad Bouzaiene-Ayari

Consider volunteering today! We are always seeking Princeton residents to join the department and give back to our community. Contact us: message us via FaceBook if you would like to volunteer and learn more.

The Princeton Volunteer Fire Department will be sharing a series of profiles on their firefighters to get to know who they are.

This evening our members joined other departments and first responders to help pay tribute to the doctors, nurses, and s...
04/12/2020

This evening our members joined other departments and first responders to help pay tribute to the doctors, nurses, and staff at Penn Medicine Princeton Health for all their hard work and dedication to care for patients during this epidemic. Thank you to Plainsboro Fire Company for organizing this terrific event.

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363 Witherspoon St
Princeton, NJ
08540

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9-11-19
Hightstown Engine Company is having a comedy night. Come join us... https://www.facebook.com/events/2064504493809339/?active_tab=about
The Princeton Fire Department is sorry for Worcester’s FD loss of FF Roy, our thoughts and prayers are with you all! Rest Easy Brother ...
Palmer Square Tree Lighting with Princeton Fire Department 🎅🤶🏻
Prepare for power outages by reviewing storm preparation tips @ https://nj.pseg.com/safetyandreliability/stormsafety. To report an outage: Call PSE&G Customer Service 1-800-436-PSEG. and Go to pseg.com/outagecenter for updates Report an outage by texting “OUT” to 4PSEG (47734).
PSE&G’s Energy Strong Upgrades Protect Against Severe Storms Monday Marks 6th Anniversary of Superstorm Sandy (NEWARK, N.J. – October 28, 2018) Six years after Superstorm Sandy’s arrival in New Jersey, Public Service Electric and Gas Company’s (PSE&G) Energy Strong program has meant that nearly half a million more people would keep their power on if a similar hurricane hit today. Since Sandy, PSE&G’s $1.2 billion of Energy Strong investments have raised and reinforced electric switching and substations, replaced vulnerable natural gas mains and added technology to prevent customers from losing power. “Many of our electric customers experience faster restoration times today than when Sandy hit. Our electric grid is becoming safer, more reliable and more resilient,” said Jack Bridges, PSE&G’s vice president, electric operations. “Yet, we have a lot more work to do to ensure that the full benefits of Energy Strong reach many more of our customers.” In June 2018, PSE&G proposed to invest an additional $2.5 billion during the next five years to further strengthen the utility’s electric and gas systems to withstand storms, improve reliability and significantly enhance resiliency. The Energy Strong II proposal is with the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities for review. When Sandy hit New Jersey on Oct. 29, 2012, about 90 percent of PSE&G’s 2 million electric customers lost power, most for an extended period. Since then, scientists have predicted that climate change and other factors will continue to pummel New Jersey with storms that bring heavy snow and/or rain and cause damaging flooding – like those that hit this March, May and September. Under the first phase of Energy Strong (2014 to 2018), PSE&G: •Raised, relocated or protected 26 switching and substations that were damaged by water in recent storms, including Sandy, benefiting 490,000 customers. •Made additional circuits available to 260 critical facilities (police, fire, hospitals, etc.) to improve resiliency; 412,500 other customers also benefit from this work. •Deployed smart grid technologies to better monitor system operations to increase our ability to more swiftly deploy repair teams. •Installed smart communications devices at 111 stations that serve 1.4 million customers, allowing for the remote detection of outages. •Replaced and modernized 240 miles of low-pressure cast iron gas mains in or near flood areas, removing 90,000 customers from risk of losing gas service due to flooding. •Protected five natural gas metering stations and three gas storage facilities affected by Sandy or located in flood zones. If approved by the NJBPU, Energy Strong II will mean that more customers will experience fewer outages, faster restoration times and other improvements. The program also will create jobs, improve worker safety and add more advanced technology and redundancy to make our systems even more resilient. Energy Strong II Proposal Highlights: Electric ~$1.5 billion • $428 million to raise and harden 14 stations and eliminate two stations in flood zones • $478 million to rebuild 15 outdoor stations, most built before 1956 and in need of replacement • $345 million to upgrade 475 miles of circuits, reducing power outages by making them more resistant to tree and limb damage • $145 million to upgrade to smart grid technologies to reduce the number of people impacted by an outage (rerouting electricity quickly around problems), enable swifter deployment of repair teams and reduce outage durations • $107 million to create an advanced distribution management system -- deploying advanced technology to upgrade and secure vital communications networks Gas ~$1 billion •$863 million to add redundancy to the gas distribution system to ensure more reliable service in the event gas deliveries into New Jersey are curtailed by a supplier. •$136 million to modernize seven natural gas metering stations, including two located in flood zones.
PSE&G Prepares for Nor’easter Offers Storm Preparation Tips (NEWARK, N.J. – October 25, 2018) Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE&G), New Jersey’s largest utility, is making preparations for the forecasted nor’easter that could affect New Jersey late Friday night into Saturday morning. Experts predict the remnants of Hurricane Willa will merge with a cold front and hug the Eastern Seaboard throughout the weekend. The utility is closely monitoring the weather and preparing for cold, gusty winds; heavy, driving rains, and flooding – with some models showing snowflakes in the northern most parts of the state. “The first nor’easter of the season is always tricky because trees are still full of leaves, creating an increased chance of outages from trees and branches downing power lines,” said Jack Bridges, PSE&G vice president, electric operations. “We are scheduling our construction, damage assessment and tree crews around the clock to be ready to restore service.” PSE&G employees are ensuring that all objects are secured at stations, division headquarters and work sites. Customers are encouraged to do the same at their homes and businesses. High winds can cause flying debris, and bring down trees and power lines. Customers should be cautious and stay alert to their surroundings during and after storms. What you can do now: • Be ready to communicate about your situation. • Make sure you have a family emergency plan. • Prepare an emergency kit. Stay connected: • Compile a list of emergency phone numbers; include PSE&G Customer Service 1-800-436-PSEG. • Go to pseg.com/myaccount to sign up to report outages online and to check restoration progress. • Go to pseg.com/outagecenter to check the “Outage Map,” which is updated every 15 minutes with PSE&G outage information, and to register for MyAlerts to receive text notifications. • You can report an outage by texting “OUT” to 4PSEG (47734). • “Like” PSEG on Facebook and follow PSEG on Twitter @PSEGdelivers. Formulate a plan: • Discuss storm safety with your family, determining: • How will my family/household get emergency alerts and warnings? • How will my family/household get to safe locations? • How will my family/household get in touch if cell phone, internet or landline doesn’t work? • How will I let loved ones know I am safe? How will my family/household get to a meeting place after the emergency? • Be sure everyone in the family is prepared. Go to sesamestreet.org/toolkits/ready to download the PSEG and Sesame Street “Let’s Get Ready!” emergency preparedness app for young children. Make an emergency kit that includes, at minimum: • One gallon of water per person, per day for three days • A three day supply of non-perishable foods and a manual can opener • A battery-powered radio and fresh batteries • Flashlights and extra batteries; and, • A first aid kit. Consider purchasing a portable gas generator. More information on how to prepare an emergency plan and kit is available at ready.gov. Stay away from downed wires: • Downed wires should always be considered “live.” Stay at least 300 feet away from downed wires. Do not approach or drive over a downed line and do not touch anything it might be in contact with. If a wire falls on or near your car, stay inside the car, call 911, and do not get out until PSE&G deenergizes the line. If you MUST get out of the vehicle because it is on fire, jump as far as possible away from the vehicle, with both feet landing on the ground at the same time, and hop or shuffle away. Other important safety notes: • To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, do not run any gasoline-powered generators in a garage or any other enclosed space. • If you are on life-sustaining medical equipment, ensure that you have alerted PSE&G in advance and notify your local police and fire departments.
Please Join the Princeton Fire Department for a Pasta Dinner on Friday November 9, 2018 @ Station 60 located at 363 Witherspoon Street!
The Princeton Fire Department remembers and honors all who gave their lives that day and the families and loved ones left behind ❤️
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 7/27/18 PSE&G Prepares for Thunderstorms, Heavy Rain and Gusty Winds Extra personnel and equipment at the ready (NEWARK, N.J. – July 27, 2018) Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE&G), New Jersey’s largest electric and gas utility, is preparing for the approaching system that could bring thunderstorms, heavy rain and gusty winds. "We are carefully monitoring the weather that is expected to affect our service territory later this afternoon and we’re prepared to respond to any outages,” said John Latka, senior vice president of electric and gas operations for PSE&G. “We'll have additional personnel scheduled and contractors on standby, with extra tree personnel and equipment at the ready. Our employees are rechecking that all objects are secured at our stations and division headquarters. We encourage our customers to do the same at their homes and businesses.” High winds can cause flying debris, and bring down trees and power lines. Customers should be cautious and stay alert to their surroundings during and after storms: • Downed wires should always be considered “live.” Do not approach or drive over a downed line and do not touch anything it might be in contact with. If a wire falls on or near your car, stay inside the car, call 911, and do not get out until PSE&G deenergizes the line. If you MUST get out of the vehicle because it is on fire, jump as far as possible away from the vehicle, with both feet landing on the ground at the same time, and hop or shuffle away. • To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, do not run any gasoline-powered generators in a garage or any other enclosed space. To report downed wires or power outages, call PSE&G’s Customer Service line at 1-800-436-PSEG. Also, customers can report outages by logging into their PSE&G account online or by texting “OUT” to 4PSEG (47734). The utility’s mobile-friendly website includes an “Outage Map” that is updated every 15 minutes and displays the location and status of power outages in PSE&G’s service area. # # # Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE&G) is New Jersey’s oldest and largest regulated gas and electric delivery utility, serving nearly three-quarters of the state’s population. PSE&G is the winner of the ReliabilityOne Award for superior electric system reliability. PSE&G is a subsidiary of Public Service Enterprise Group Incorporated (PSEG) (NYSE:PEG), a diversified energy company. Visit PSEG at: www.pseg.com PSEG on Facebook PSEG on Twitter PSEG on LinkedIn PSEG blog, Energize! PSEG 80 Park Plaza Newark, NJ 07102 See what's happening on our social sites