NC Department of Natural & Cultural Resources

NC Department of Natural & Cultural Resources The official page of the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.
The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state's natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina.

The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state's natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susi Hamilton, NCDNCR's mission is to improve the quality of life in our state by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature in North Carolina by stimulating learning, inspiring creativity, preserving the state's history, conserving the state's natural heritage, encouraging recreation and cultural tourism, and promoting economic development. NCDNCR includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette's Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C. Zoo, the nation's first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology, along with the Division of Land and Water Stewardship. For more information, please call (919) 807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov.

Mission: Our mission is to improve the quality of life in North Carolina by creating opportunities that promote economic development, stimulate learning, preserve the state’s history, spark creativity and conserve the state's natural heritage to experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature. Our organization was the first in the nation to include all state agencies for arts and culture under one umbrella.

National Library Week kicks off today!
04/19/2020

National Library Week kicks off today!

Show your support for libraries by adding the National Library Week frame to your Facebook profile picture.

Go to your profile on the Facebook app and tap "Edit" on your profile picture, then tap "Add Frame." If you don't see it in the list search for "National Library Week."

On April 19, 1877, the first agricultural experiment station opened in a one-room chemistry lab at UNC. It was the first...
04/19/2020

On April 19, 1877, the first agricultural experiment station opened in a one-room chemistry lab at UNC. It was the first such station in the South, and the second in the nation.

A movement had been building to found the research station since 1885, when the General Assembly directed the Board of Agriculture to start acquiring land and machinery for it. The actual legislation establishing the station was passed in February 1877 with a focus on research that would aid in plant nutrition and develop new fertilizers.

In 1889, management of the station was transferred to what is now N.C. State University. The change was the result of the federal Hatch Act, which sent federal funds for agricultural research to the states through land grant colleges.

At the same time, the N.C. Department of Agriculture began establishing “test farms” across the state to try different crop, fertilizer and soil combinations and discover which crops were best suited to particular regions.

The program has continued to grow, and today the department and the N.C. State jointly operate 18 research stations around the state.

Pictured here is the Border Belt Tobacco Research Station in Whiteville, circa 1940. Image from NCSU Libraries.

Today’s #NCEarthDay50 theme is Spring!
04/18/2020

Today’s #NCEarthDay50 theme is Spring!

Post your pics below!

Did you know April 22nd marks the 50th Anniversary of 🌎Earth Day?! Since 1970, Earth Day has increased awareness of the planet we live on. Join us as we countdown to #EarthDay For the next 2 weeks, we'll be celebrating with an #EarthDay photo challenge. Check out NC Department of Natural & Cultural Resources for more info. Tag NC Department of Natural & Cultural Resources and use #NCEarthDay50 to join in on the fun!

Today's Theme: Spring
🌼🌹☘🌸

#NCEarthDay50 #NCDCR

On April 18, 1927, Jimmie Rodgers – one of country music’s first superstars – got his big break on Asheville radio stati...
04/18/2020

On April 18, 1927, Jimmie Rodgers – one of country music’s first superstars – got his big break on Asheville radio station WWNC.

Born in 1897 near Meridian, Mississippi, James Charles Rodgers liked to yodel and won an amateur talent contest at age 13. That same year he became a railroad water boy. In March 1927, Rodgers moved to Asheville, working as a railway brakeman and doing other jobs until he and friend Otis Kuykendall began performing live weekly on WWNC. The duo soon added other musicians and billed themselves as the Jimmie Rodgers Entertainers.

In August 1927, Victor Records recorded Rodgers doing two songs. One, “The Soldier’s Sweetheart,” became an instant hit. Another hit, “Blue Yodel,” quickly followed. By 1929, Rodgers was a star. He appeared in a short film, “The Singing Brakeman”; toured the Midwest with humorist Will Rogers; and recorded with a young trumpeter, Louis Armstrong.

By the time he returned to Asheville in December 1929, the “Father of Country Music” had been living with tuberculosis for five years. He died in 1933. In 1961, Rodgers became the first performer inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. A state highway historical marker in downtown Asheville also honors him.

Image courtesy Country Music Hall of Fame.

04/17/2020
NC Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores

Please enjoy this otterly adorable content.

Our otter keeper gave Eno, Neuse, and Pungo a leaf-pile enrichment activity this week. The otters spent a lot of time moving leaves from one area to their bed area behind the scenes. This is a very natural behavior for otters! In the wild, they like to line their den with bark, moss, grass, and leaves to make it comfy, dry, and soft. Thanks, Kristen for sharing these videos!

What are you? 📖
04/17/2020

What are you? 📖

We’re neutral good. 😬 #LibraryLOL

North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort
04/17/2020

North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort

On this day in 1873 the U.S. Lighthouse Board issued a notice to mariners announcing changes that would make lighthouses more readily distinguishable in the daytime. A distinct pattern was chosen for several red brick lighthouses along the North Carolina coast, "Cape Hatteras ... spiral bands, Cape Lookout ... checkered, Bodie Island ... horizontal bands." The oldest of the three, Cape Lookout built in 1859, was red brick for much longer than the other two. Cape Hatteras was built in 1870 and Bodie Island 1873. Currituck was not finished until 1875 and was left red brick. Maybe they ran out of paint? Ocracoke light (1823) was already a distinct solid white and Old Baldy (1817) was pretty unique as it was octagonal in shape and more of a natural gray color.

On April 17, 1937, the first switch was thrown at the Eason-Tarboro substation, jumpstarting rural electrification effor...
04/17/2020

On April 17, 1937, the first switch was thrown at the Eason-Tarboro substation, jumpstarting rural electrification efforts in North Carolina.

As part his New Deal, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Rural Electrification Administration (REA) in May 1935 with the dual goals of helping rural areas get electricity and providing work to the unemployed. High startup costs and anticipated low returns on investments, made existing electric companies unenthusiastic about entering rural markets, so communities turned to cooperative ventures instead.

North Carolina’s first co-op–the Edgecombe-Martin County Electric Membership Corporation, or EMC-EMC, was formed by citizens in the northeastern part of the state. After receiving a $32,000 loan in June 1936, work quickly began to bring electricity to the region. The switch was thrown on April 17 at the Eason-Tarboro substation and electricity began to flow. The plant is still in operation today.

Before the EMC-EMC, North Carolinians had long been interested in rural electrification. The state actually established its own Rural Electrification Authority in April 1935, one month before Roosevelt’s REA. North Carolina’s progressive attitude toward rural electrification helped to make the EMC-EMC more than a flash in the pan.

Pictured here is an unidentified highway lined with electric poles. Image from 1910-1920 and now in the collection of the N.C. Museum of History.

Wonderful news!
04/17/2020

Wonderful news!

It's a boy! -- The first foal of 2020 has been born on Shackleford Banks!

NC LIVE
04/17/2020

NC LIVE

Find out what NC LIVE offers for genealogy and local history research! Monday April 20th at 11am. Can't make it? Register and we will send you the recording afterwards. https://go.ncsu.edu/zqhib1f

Madison County is home to Paint Rock, American Indian pictographs created approximately 5,000 years ago during the Archa...
04/16/2020

Madison County is home to Paint Rock, American Indian pictographs created approximately 5,000 years ago during the Archaic Period.

Its creators used pigments that were apparently of exceptional quality and complex design from ingredients that were clearly local. The rock outcropping, which features red and yellow markings, straddles the North Carolina-Tennessee border and has long been a landmark for travelers.

Paint Rock sits in a gorge along a road archaeologists suggest may have been a major travel route through the mountains and to natural crossings of the French Broad River. The panel of Paint Rock on the North Carolina side of the border displays alternating red and yellow rectilinear lines painted against the vertical cliff face.

Archaeologists have suggested the paints may have been created as a road marker, for use in healing rituals and for a combination of both, since healing pilgrimages to nearby hot springs may have been popular.

Campfires and weathering over the centuries have damaged the pictographs. In 2004, images on the rock panels were formally recorded, and archaeologists did more mapping and sampling in 2006 to support conservation and management.

Pictured here is a postcard of Paint Rock, published by the International Post Card Co., New York, NY. Image courtesy North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, UNC-Chapel Hill.

Today’s theme is water! #NCEarthDay50
04/16/2020

Today’s theme is water! #NCEarthDay50

April 22, 2020, marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day 🌎. Since 1970, Earth Day has increased awareness of the planet we live on. Join NC Department of Natural & Cultural Resources as they countdown to #EarthDay with a photo challenge. Use the guide to post a picture a day until Earth Day with the hashtag #NCEarthDay50. Today's challenge: Water!

On April 16, 1953, Seagrove’s Mountain View Canning Company was incorporated. Before the year was over, the business wou...
04/16/2020

On April 16, 1953, Seagrove’s Mountain View Canning Company was incorporated. Before the year was over, the business would change its name to Luck’s.

Founded in 1947 by Alfred Spencer and Ira Luck, the original purpose of Mountain View Canning was to can homegrown vegetables and farm raised meat. The first commercial product produced at the two-story cinderblock cannery was Mountain View Beef and Gravy.

Pinto beans, Great Northern beans, and black eyed peas–-all home-style with pork seasoning–were added to the company line in 1950 and 1951.

When Luck’s Beans sponsored the country group Tommy Floyd and the Blue Ridge Buddies for a series of short musical spots syndicated on television stations in the Southeast, it helped the canned legumes grow in popularity.

In 1967, Luck’s merged with American Home Products. Then in 2000, Lucks was acquired by food processing giant Con Agra and the production of the canned beans was moved to Tennessee. The Seagrove cannery ceased operations two years later.

Luck’s Beans continue to be canned and sold today with their signature yellow label, although they are now produced in Tuscon, Arizona, by the Arizona Canning Company, which purchased the line in 2011.

Pictured here is an early image of Luck’s Beans. Image from the town of Seagrove.

North Carolina Office of State Archaeology
04/16/2020
North Carolina Office of State Archaeology

North Carolina Office of State Archaeology

Learn about the history of our Underwater Archaeology Branch in the first blog in our Submerged NC series! And stayed tuned for much more! #ncarchaeology #SubmergedNC

04/15/2020
Kristin Cooper, First Lady of North Carolina

Happy National Poetry Month!

We are so thrilled to have North Carolina Poet Laureate Jaki Shelton Green join us to celebrate #PoetryMonth! Today, our Poet Laureate reads a poem she wrote for our state when installed as North Carolina's ninth poet laureate. #AtHomeWithFLONC

In North Carolina in the early 20th century, #SheChangedtheWorld when the suffrage movement revived in late 1913 with Ge...
04/15/2020

In North Carolina in the early 20th century, #SheChangedtheWorld when the suffrage movement revived in late 1913 with Gertrude Weil's formation of the North Carolina Equal Suffrage League. Pictured in this photograph is a banner of the Equal Suffrage Association headquarters on Fayetteville Street in Raleigh.

The Equal Suffrage League helped develop local groups while lobbying legislators and publicizing its cause through pamphlets and speeches.

Image courtesy State Archives of North Carolina.

Happy #WildlifeWednesday! Featured this week is the American Oystercatcher, seen here at Hammocks Beach State Park.Ameri...
04/15/2020

Happy #WildlifeWednesday! Featured this week is the American Oystercatcher, seen here at Hammocks Beach State Park.

American Oystercatchers are the most recognizable of all North Carolina shorebirds. They can be found along the North Carolina coast year-round, nesting on sandy beaches and islands.

Oystercatchers find food wherever shellfish can be found, on oyster beds, partly submerged rocks, and sometimes even beaches. They look for food usually at low tide, when shellfish beds are exposed.

Oystercatchers also lay their eggs on the beach, another reason why it's important to watch where you step and make sure your pets are kept on a leash.

On April 15, 1960, about 150 student leaders from 10 states met at Shaw University in Raleigh for the “Southwide Leaders...
04/15/2020

On April 15, 1960, about 150 student leaders from 10 states met at Shaw University in Raleigh for the “Southwide Leadership Conference on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation.” The meeting took place just two months after the Woolworth sit-ins in Greensboro had launched the protest effort.

The session was designed to consolidate isolated sit-in efforts and map strategy. It was organized by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference whose executive director, Ella Baker (pictured here), was a Shaw graduate. The conference created the “Temporary Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee” headquartered in Atlanta.

The weekend’s keynote speaker, the Reverend James Lawson of Nashville, criticized established older groups such as the NAACP for moving too slowly and acting too conservatively. The Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. spoke to a large group in Memorial Auditorium, urging students to adopt the nonviolent philosophy of Ghandi and face jail time for peaceful protest if necessary.

SNCC members were the “shock troops” and frontline leaders in the civil rights movement, especially in Mississippi in the summer of 1964. John Hope Franklin called them “probably the most courageous and the most selfless” of the civil rights workers.

NC Aquarium on Roanoke Island
04/14/2020

NC Aquarium on Roanoke Island

Have you explored Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge? It's just a short drive to the west from Manteo and home to black bears, white-tailed deer, migratory birds, snakes, alligators and many more species.🐻🐊🦉🦆🦅🐍🐺

NC Department of Natural & Cultural Resources #NCEarthDay50

NC Department of Health and Human Services
04/14/2020

NC Department of Health and Human Services

Warm weather making you want to be outdoors? Follow these tips to stay safe during #COVID19NC:

🌲 Stay close to home – get outside in your own backyard or neighborhood!

🚴‍♂‍ Stay six feet away from others on trails/paths

🏃‍♀‍ Avoid crowded areas where social distancing isn’t possible

👉 Don’t use playground equipment, picnic tables or other high-touch surfaces

🚫 Don’t trespass in closed state or local parks

She Changed the World: NC Women Breaking Barriers
04/14/2020

She Changed the World: NC Women Breaking Barriers

Carrie Early Broadfoot was born on June 13, 1870 in Lynchburg, Virginia. She was educated at Frederick Douglass Memorial Hospital in Philadelphia, graduating in 1899. She was Superintendent there from 1900-1904 and moved to Raleigh in fall 1904 or winter 1905. There, she became the Superintendent of St. Agnes Hospital School of Nursing which had been established in Raleigh in 1896 for the African American community. She joined the Red Cross and planned to go overseas during World War I. Instead she was directed to work at home to help control the influenza epidemic sweeping the country at the time.

In 1920, she and four other North Carolina African American nurses attended a meeting of the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses in Washington, DC. In 1923, these five nurses founded the North Carolina Colored Graduate Nurses Association (later renamed the North Carolina Association of Negro Registered Nurses). Broadfoot served as its president for the first eight years. This professional organization continued until 1949 when it merged with the North Carolina Nurses Association. In 1923, North Carolina opened a Negro Division of the State Sanatorium for tuberculosis patients and Broadfoot served of the Nursing Superintendent of the African American division of the Sanatorium as well as Director of its African American nursing school. She directed this Division until 1944, when a stroke forced her to move in with her sister in Roxbury, MA.

Carrie Bradfoot passed away on January 8, 1945 and was buried in Fayetteville's Elmwood Cemetery. In 2016 she was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the North Carolina Nurses Association.

Photo: St. Agnes Hospital Nursing School, St. Augustine's College, Raleigh, NC, 1949. State Archives of North Carolina

Beautiful!
04/14/2020

Beautiful!

From our coast to our mountains, our state is beautifully unique! 💙 Where in NC do you live? Along the coastline, in the mountains, somewhere in between?⁣⁣
⁣⁣
Did you know the NC Natural Heritage program has identified MORE THAN 300 distinct natural communities in our state? ⁣⁣#WeLoveNC
⁣⁣
These communities are comprised of plants, animals, and even fungi and bacteria. Each tiny part plays a role in the success and survival of the community.⁣⁣
⁣⁣
Everything is connected! Be thankful for the intricate relationships found in nature, and thankful for your friends and neighbors in the North Carolina family. ⁣⁣
⁣⁣
#NCEarthDay50

North Carolina Museum of Art
04/14/2020

North Carolina Museum of Art

Looking for a dose of art between scrolling Instagram and jumping on a conference call? We created phone wallpapers featuring works of art from the NCMA's collection and views of the Museum Park. Save to your phone and change your wallpaper in your settings.

https://bit.ly/2RrRgnT

#ArtNaturePeople #MuseumFromHome

State Library of North Carolina
04/14/2020
State Library of North Carolina

State Library of North Carolina

The Pack Horse Library Project was a Works Progress Administration program that delivered books to remote regions in the Appalachian Mountains between 1935 and 1943. Women were very involved in the project which eventually had 30 different libraries serving 100,000 people.

On April 14, 1942, the destroyer USS Roper sank the German submarine U-85 off the Outer Banks between Wimble Shoals and ...
04/14/2020

On April 14, 1942, the destroyer USS Roper sank the German submarine U-85 off the Outer Banks between Wimble Shoals and Cape Hatteras.

By January 1942 as many as 19 German U-boats patrolled the Atlantic coastline on any given day, with two or three hiding at Diamond Shoals at any given time to attack ships as they rounded Cape Hatteras. At the height of what is now called the Battle of Torpedo Junction, the Germans were sinking a ship nearly every day; between freighters, tankers and passenger ships the losses were tremendous.

At the same time, the American military was learning how to detect and defeat the U-boats. The first hit was on U-85. Navy divers surveyed the area near the wreck and attempted to salvage the ship, but efforts were not successful. Since men were needed elsewhere, the submarine was left to the elements.

The wreck was explored by recreational divers for many years. In July 2001, divers salvaged the submarine’s Enigma machine. The Germans used the complex coding device for secret communications, especially for divulging locations of enemy vessels and supply convoys.

Pictured here is the USS Roper. Image from the Naval History and Heritage Command.

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Why is Historical Commission not taking up the Issue of Silent Sam and the July 23, 2015 NC Law G.S. 100-2.1 Page 1 § 100-2.1. Protection of monuments?
Hello. As you may well know my name is Frederick Demond Wilson. I have no reference with you not. I don't know who would help me. I don't need a lawyer not. I am really rich and no one will pay me It is documented with wire taps and video and plus 1000 witnesses. I just have to file the complaint. I need documents subpoenaed. I need the witnesses subpoenaed and of course some will come forth. My number is (252)474-5937. I will of course reimburse to every cause like none other. The Evidence that I have is as follows: a document from the Coach Dean E Smith public historical records- Coach Smith and Coach Guttheridge created a document for myself 20 years ago concerned about my ability to do a lot of lucrative work and business and the partners would not pay me. He also wrote it in an account fashion entitled I&O a make up of IRS document tax form 1000. Three others have this to my knowledge: Christy Bond (A long time friend from childhood), Attorney Norman Kellum, And Frmr Officer Edward Dean Thorton(He was my resource officer for twenty years concernng my failsafe authorization to be awarded my money in twenty or inasmuch as by now sirs and madames. On the two for Offc. Thorton and Ms. Bond The documents State that I am not the devil to them. They are not the devil to me. We are not the devil to one another. We don't have two days. We have twenty years. And it is not then to not portray "all" of "his"(meaning mine) money. It is told to Agent Durheye to never use that wrongly and to never cry about it. We have $80 million dollars(it states) to never do this wrong. It goes on to state in so many words that everyone is happy with things fair. We are good at God's talking and we don't look at it wrong. Bless you all and good day. We are good at God's own speech. We are good at God's own available argument. We have no dumb. Please let it out? Mm hmm? Hell yeah it confirms. These are the filed federal trade Commission complaint service code numbers aling with the phone numbers and addresses if every company. Ftc phone no. 1-877-382-4357 114377418 Hidden Valley Ranch file number ph. (510)272-7000 114380046 For BMI 1-888-689-5264 114380272 The Major Motion Picture Association 114380636 Marvel Entertainment 114385387 Merck for penicillin. 114613753. GVm anson rearch and marketing. (252)463-3450 114373981 The Internet and Computer Number and Naming Association. (ICANN) (202)570-7240
... for those in or near Graham, NC, Alamance County this afternoon ... https://www.facebook.com/events/483035405592458/ ... Crystal Lee Sutton, a true barrier-breaking woman! ...
Frylandia forever!!🌊
https://youtu.be/oRBbXJq7yvs Check out the famous, legendary musical geñuis that live in Kinston NC. Robert Dick Knight, 2018 NC Heritage Award and Bill Myers manager of The Monitors and 2014 NC Heritage Award winner. Wilbur Croom, Fig Jones, Sony Bannerman and Earl Ijames Check out the only Chitlin Circuit in the state of Norrh Carolina. Be Sponsor Invite the Chitlin Circuit to your town.
Sunflower are God made Living Art
The historic Major James Scarborough plantation is for sale. Situated on 3 beautiful acres the main house, built in 1821 and on the National Register of Historic Places, is 6,038 square feet- 8 bedrooms, 2 bonus room & 4 baths. The guest house is 2,500 square feet- 3 bedrooms & 4 baths. The in-ground pool and pool house are fixed up to entertain with a separate kitchenette and bathroom. The house is ideally located 30 seconds off highway 264 and convenient to EVERYWHERE!! 15 minutes to Wilson, 20 minutes to Greenville, 30 minutes to Goldsboro, 35 minutes to Rocky Mount and 50 minutes to Raleigh.
I respectfully request that Governor Cooper posthumously award Riley Howell the North Carolina Award. The North Carolina Award is the highest civilian award bestowed by the U.S.State of North Carolina. It is awarded in the four fields of science, literature, the fine arts, and public service. Sometimes referred to as the "Nobel Prize of North Carolina", the award has been given to up to nine individuals each year since 1964. The awards, provided for by chapters 140A and 143B of the North Carolina General Statutes, are chosen by the North Carolina Awards Committee appointed by the Governor of North Carolina and supervised by the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. Clearly the act of unselfish heroism displayed by this young man - laying down his life so that others may live - exemplifies public service at it's highest level. Regards, Earl Hardy 172 Clifford Lane Kenansville, NC 28349 Email: [email protected]
Is the @NorthCarolinaCulture aware of the RDU Airport Authority lease of public land to Wake Stone Corporation for 25-30+ years for a quarry? What is the history of the old Odd Fellows Tract? What is the impact of this sale to Umstead State Park? Umstead Coalition Capital Group Sierra Club