Federation of North Carolina Historical Societies

Federation of North Carolina Historical Societies The Federation of North Carolina Historical Societies promotes the local history work of member organizations across the state. Since 1976, the organization has been a partnership between the Department of Natural & Cultural Resources and members.

The Federation of North Carolina Historical Societies is a statewide coalition of societies, associations, and commissions that are dedicated to preserving and promoting history. An advisory board made up of members oversees the work of the Federation. Membership dues are only $25 per year per organization. The Federation encourages any group in North Carolina concerned with history, whether on a local, regional, or state level, to join. Organizations are billed in January but can join at any time. The Federation co-sponsors National History Day in North Carolina with the NC Dept. of Cultural Resources and the North Caroliniana Society.

03/24/2020
Western Regional Archives

Great local (and virus) history from the Western Regional Archives!

A little history of our historic location- and something to think about during this health crisis... Thanks to Rod Doty and the Asheville VA Medical Center for helping us put this together!

03/18/2020
blog.joangarry.com

This guide has good points to consider when planning virtual meetings.https://blog.joangarry.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/JG_Blog_Virtual.pdf

More materials up on DigitalNC from one of our members, Greensboro History Museum! https://www.digitalnc.org/blog/more-i...
03/17/2020
More additions to the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection Now Online at DigitalNC

More materials up on DigitalNC from one of our members, Greensboro History Museum! https://www.digitalnc.org/blog/more-issues-of-the-greensboro-student-newspaper-added-to-digitalnc/

More additions to the R. Kelly Bryant Obituary Collection, provided by our partner, the Durham County Library, are now online at DigitalNC. This collection of funeral programs and obituaries of African American residents of Durham …

03/16/2020
A History of Wendell

Great way to package local history for audiences far, wide, and stuck at home nearby!

A picture history of Wendell

Gathering for a workshop at the Johnston County Heritage Center.
02/20/2020

Gathering for a workshop at the Johnston County Heritage Center.

Glad one of our members is teaching others these important restoration skills!
02/20/2020

Glad one of our members is teaching others these important restoration skills!

Have you ever noticed that many of the doors at the Capitol have a special decorative finish? The graining effect is painted on, rather than being the natural quality of the wood. Time and use cause chipping to the finish, which ruins the illusion. Luckily, skilled artisans from @JohnCanningCo are here to fix them and bring the doors back to their 1840 appearance as part of our restoration project. Swipe to see our progress!

#historicpreservation #statecapitol #thisplacematters #1840

Grassroots effort to preserve the Sedgefield Showgrounds near Greensboro. Rezoning is threatening this near-century-old ...
02/18/2020
Please Save and Preserve the Sedgefield Showgrounds

Grassroots effort to preserve the Sedgefield Showgrounds near Greensboro. Rezoning is threatening this near-century-old equestrian venue. The showgrounds will hold its 85th annual horse show this year.

http://bit.ly/ShowgroundsPetition

As members of the Equestrian Community that Sedgefield Showgrounds has served for many generations, we are STRONGLY OPPOSED to any rezoning that would result in the loss of use of this community facility located at 3701 Groometown Rd, Greensboro, NC 27407; Case# Z-20-02-005.

Valentine's greetings from one of our members.
02/14/2020

Valentine's greetings from one of our members.

Happy Valentine's Day! These vintage cards are just a few of the many treasures you might find at the Sampson County History Museum

02/13/2020
Erwin Historical Society

Consider supporting this N.C. history initiative in the State Senate.

A special message from the Erwin Historical Society’s President, LTC (Ret.) Sion H. Harrington III

REQUEST FOR SUPPORT FOR A STATEWIDE, STATE-FUNDED NAVAL STORES EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

North Carolina Senator Jim Burgin is sponsoring an initiative to secure State funding for a special educational program. He plans to seek State funding to make it possible for the people of North Carolina, especially our school children, to learn about the naval stores industry and its vital role in our State’s economy from the very early 1700s until the early 1920s. It was a major agricultural industry that provided jobs for African Americans, Native Americans, and Whites who worked the long leaf pines for the sap necessary to produce tar, pitch, turpentine, and rosin for export. The industry supported other endeavors such as barrel making, ship building, and the shipping industry and gave rise to our proud nickname, “Tar Heels.” Naval stores were essential to the operation of ships throughout the age of sail until steel replaced wood as the primary construction material. The British Empire depended on our naval stores, and it is not an exaggeration to say “Britannia Rules the Waves” would not have been possible without the tar and pitch produced in North Carolina.
If you agree the story of this fascinating and important industry should be shared with the descendants of the hard-working people of all races who made North Carolina the leading naval stores producing area in the nation for two hundred years, please consider drafting a short letter or even a simple two or three sentence statement of support for the use of tax dollars to fund this unique educational experience. This industry and the legacy of our hard-working ancestors who produced the naval stores are too valuable to be consigned to the dusty recesses of history.
Please send your letters and messages of support for State funding of this unique educational experience addressed to “To Whom It May Concern” to Mr. Bryan Avery at 3191 Harnett Central Road, Angier, NC 27501. Mr. Avery will hand-deliver them to Senator Bergin for presentation to the North Carolina General Assembly.
Time is critical, so we must act fast. The letters need to be in Senator Bergin's hands no later than the middle of March. Will you help?
Thanking you in advance for your support, I am,
Sincerely,

LTC (Ret.) Sion H. Harrington III
President
Erwin Historical Society, Inc.

Great collaboration between two member orgs for Black History Month program!
02/13/2020

Great collaboration between two member orgs for Black History Month program!

We spent a wonderful afternoon with the New Bern Historical Society sharing some history about the underground railroad in Washington's sister city New Bern. The Neuse River in New Bern was designated as an National Park Service-Underground Railroad-Network To Freedom site in 2008. We had so many great stories to share. One of my favorite stories I did not get to share was about an enslaved woman living on a plantation in Bath name Fan who was owned by Alderson Ellison and ran away while very pregnant. She gave birth while on the underground railroad to New Bern. Legend has it she named the child 'Gaol' which is the old British term for jail. Gaol is Latin for cage and from we derive the word jail. She supposedly named the child Gaol because the said the child's name would be the closest it ever got to (jail) because she determined her child would be free. Freedom seekers were often kept in jail until their owners could come get them. We have no records that Fan was ever caught.

Upcoming member event in the Triangle next month!
01/28/2020

Upcoming member event in the Triangle next month!

PRESERVATION SPEAKER SERIES: "EDUCATING CARY" - HISTORY OF CARY HIGH SCHOOL

Tuesday, February 25, 2020
7:30 PM - ~8:30 PM
Free Admission

Did you know that classes at Cary High School began before the Town of Cary was incorporated on April 3,1871?

Come join us to learn about some of the highlights of Cary High School's 150-year-old history as a private and a public school based on recently digitized documents found in the Cary High School archives. We will share photographs and documents from the collection to celebrate this milestone in Cary's history.

The Preservation Speaker Series is free and open to the public.

Page-Walker Arts & History Center
119 Ambassador Loop, Cary NC 27513
919-460-4963

This member event sounds like a pop-up museum!
01/16/2020

This member event sounds like a pop-up museum!

Pitt County Historical Society
14th Annual Antique Show & Tell

New exhibit in Greenville from member Country Dr. Museum!
01/09/2020

New exhibit in Greenville from member Country Dr. Museum!

"Care and Comfort in The Sick Room": A NEW exhibit in Greenville, NC featuring 9 cases of artifacts from the museum collection, as well as Brenda Rewalt's invalid feeder and baby item collection on loan was installed in December. This unique exhibit details the Victorian time of caring for the sick at home, women's commonly used remedies and everyday items, as well as items for babies and children. The exhibit is located in the hallway between the Vidant Medical Center and Brody School of Medicine and will be in place until the end of 2020.

Congrats to member Chatham County Historical Association for more materials on Digital NC!www.digitalnc.org/blog/new-cha...
01/07/2020
New Chatham County Photographs and the Story of Navigation on the Cape Fear and Deep Rivers

Congrats to member Chatham County Historical Association for more materials on Digital NC!
www.digitalnc.org/blog/new-chatham-county-photographs-and-the-story-of-navigation-on-the-cape-fear-and-deep-rivers/

Thanks to our partners at the Chatham County Historical Association, DigitalNC now hosts nearly 100 new photos of Chatham County, as well as a profile of the Cape Fear and Deep River Slack Water Navigation …

12/19/2019

Happy Holidays 2019 from Federation members statewide!

Interesting seasonal, local history from the Outer Banks!
12/19/2019

Interesting seasonal, local history from the Outer Banks!

On the Sixth Day of Christmas, North Carolina gave to me…
Old Christmas, and Old Buck

It all starts when the British Empire decides to adopt the Gregorian Calendar in 1752. Prior to this, the Western World had operated on the Julian Calendar, which had celebrated Christmas around January 5th. With the adoption of the new calendar, Christmas is now celebrated on December 25th. This is a problem.

Despite the fact the new Calendar is more accurate than the old Julian Calendar, its origin is the Roman Catholic Church. In fact, it's named for Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in 1582. This makes it automatically suspect among the Protestants and Eastern Orthodox. Indeed, the last European Country to adopt it will be Greece in 1923. However, in the interest of convenience in a world that is rapidly shrinking, most of the International community is, like England, adopting the new calendar.
However, there are pockets of resistance, especially in isolated places like Rodanthe on the Outer Banks, where time is far more tuned to the rise and fall of the tides than to the needs of the international community. In short, the Islanders refuse to accept the new date for Christmas. They continue to celebrate "Old Christmas" or "Little Christmas" on January 5th.

Now in time, Old Christmas (January 5th) gets merged with the new Epiphany (January 6th), creating a joint observance not seen in the West since the fourth century. A few communities in coastal North Carolina became a minority within a minority by maintaining the distinction. In time, December 25th becomes the focus of the holy and religious aspects of Christmas, and Old Christmas becomes...secular. Decidedly secular. Most researchers say it goes at least as far back as Medieval England, where Christmas was a combination of Christian origin story, and Druid Winter celebration.

In the early isolated Island traditions of Old Christmas, there are dancing, feasting, exchanging gifts, but it has little or no special Christmas meaning. It is customary to bless fruit trees, and girls and unmarried women sometimes set out a meal at a "dumb table" on the eve of Old Christmas, hoping to glimpse the apparitions of their future husbands hovering over the empty places. Oyster roasts are common, and loose bands roam from house to house in disguise, making raucous music, and soliciting food, drink (lots of drink), and...well, close interpersonal contact. There is a lot of that, which is encouraged by the disguises that are frequently worn. In short, it is a day of lowered inhibitions.

And then there is Old Buck. This odd make-believe bovine beast is probably the key role in the entire celebration. "Old Buck" is said to be able to connect the dead past with the living present, which creates a feeling that long-dead loved ones are present in spirit. Local folklore has it that "Old Buck" is the Beast of Trent Woods, a sparse piece of nearby woods where he hides throughout the year, to show himself only at Old Christmas.

Although only a combination of plywood and cowhide (the humans that occupy the inside and give life to Old Buck are absolutely sworn to secrecy), the appearance of Old Buck is a treasured tradition from at least two centuries back. It is the highlight of the celebration and a very real symbol of their ancient yuletide. Old Buck will move among the celebrants creating near pandemonium among the children and womenfolk. In the past, many of those shrieking womenfolk would not have been the least bit surprised to feel a decidedly human hand as the Beast went snorting by. Afterall it was merely the spirits of Christmas past.

Old Buck has survived to the present day, especially in Rodanthe. What other parts of the original Old Christmas celebrations have survived to present day depends in large part on where on the Banks you are, and to what extent the local population has been diluted by outsiders over the years. This is especially true in the years after the bridges connected the Banks to the mainland. It is probably safe to say that the celebrations of today are mild compared to that special Old Christmas Day of wild revelry and abandon that occurred in the isolation and privacy of the old original Island communities.

~Kevin E. Spencer, Author, North Carolina Expatriates

Pictured:
- Islanders climb aboard "Old Buck" for a good luck ride.
-"Old Buck" makes his appearance at Rodanthe's Old Christmas in 1952.
-Elvira Payne served as drum beater for Old Christmas celebrations.
These pictures courtesy of the Raleigh News and Observer

Exciting changes in Garner!
12/11/2019

Exciting changes in Garner!

The Historic Depot is getting ready for the "road trip" on Saturday morning (12/14). Another step closer to Garner's first museum!! You know you grew up in Garner, NC when... Town of Garner, NC Government Garner Chamber of Commerce

Missed posting this last week...Chapel Hill Historical Society also contributed to Digital NC! https://www.digitalnc.org...
11/12/2019
More newspapers and engineering drawings from the Chapel Hill Historical Society are now available

Missed posting this last week...Chapel Hill Historical Society also contributed to Digital NC! https://www.digitalnc.org/blog/more-newspapers-and-engineering-drawings-from-the-chapel-hill-historical-society-are-now-available/

Thanks to our partners at the Chapel Hill Historical Society, DigitalNC is happy to be able to provide access to two groups of materials from their collection online. A new set of drawings that illustrate …

Two members have contributed new materials to Digital NC this week! The Greensboro History Museum and the Mount Airy Mus...
11/12/2019
Yearbooks, Early Journals, and More Student Newspapers from Greensboro High School / Grimsley High Now Online

Two members have contributed new materials to Digital NC this week! The Greensboro History Museum and the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History. www.digitalnc.org/blog/yearbooks-early-journals-and-more-student-newspapers-from-greensboro-high-school-grimsley-high-now-online/
http://www.digitalnc.org/blog/more-yearbooks-from-surry-county-are-now-available-on-digitalnc/

We've worked with the Greensboro History Museum to add more publications from Greensboro High School (now Grimsley High School) to DigitalNC. Included in this most recent batch are more of the school's student newspaper, the …

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109 E. Jones Street
Raleigh, NC
27601

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Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00

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(919) 814-6641

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Help Nurture a Statewide History Network!

The Federation of North Carolina Historical Societies is a statewide nonprofit coalition of societies, associations, and commissions that are dedicated to preserving and promoting history. An advisory board made up of members oversees the work of the Federation. Our mission is to inspire local history organizations through collaborative learning projects and to promote history education statewide. Membership dues are only $25 per year per organization. The Federation encourages any group in North Carolina concerned with history, whether on a local, regional, or state level, to join. Visit fnchs.org to learn more or to become a member. The Federation co-sponsors National History Day in North Carolina with the NC Dept. of Cultural Resources and the North Caroliniana Society.


Comments

Please help us preserve a historical facility that is almost 100 years old and still in use today. They are trying to rezone this area and demolish the stables and showgrounds. The showgrounds will hold their 85th Annual Horse Show this year.
Was driving by the old Lutheran church near one of the county dump facility's just down from SIlver Valley Elementary School on old Hwy. #64, near the red light at 109/old 64 and noticed a for sale sign at the church!!! This really made me sad, is there anything you all can do? Davidson County is the location.
Sherman's March in Anson, Union and Chesterfield Counties, Part 2 is available for purchase at Lacy's Gift Shop, 121 South Greene Street in Wadesboro. Phone # is 704 694 4646. Pick up is $20 each or if mailing then provide a little extra for postage. Not accepting payment by credit card this time. Credit card fees are too costly. Accepting payment by either cash, money order or personal check. Is also available at the Chesterfield County SC Visitors Center in the Old Chesterfield Court House located at 100 Main Street. Phone # is 843 623 9673 – Pick up is $20 each or if mailing then provide a little extra for postage.
The North Carolina Museum's Council is currently accepting awards nominations if you've got a program, exhibit or person you want to recognize.
The Governor of our great State has proposed to move the up front statues at the State Capital Building and have an "on line debate" to avoid the chance of the violence in Charlottesville, Va. What he proposes is to spout another lie that the historical society is in full agreement with his agenda. Hi is, and always has been a liar, especially when he wants to shape public opinion to the Jim Hunt Political Machine's way of seeing things. Racists, college kids from out of state, anti-fa (which stands for anti first amendment, not anti fascist) want the monuments to our forebearers valor taken out of the public eye. What would they replace them? Maybe a statue to Lenin, like Seattle bought in Russia and put in a city park? The time has come to stand up for our states values and tell this mealy mouthed politician to find another soap box? George Dixon [email protected]