USGS Coastal and Ocean Science

USGS Coastal and Ocean Science USGS serves the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from nature.

From Sea to Shining Sea…and Beyond: The #USGS is an important participant in the ongoing effort to identify and map the ...
06/11/2020

From Sea to Shining Sea…and Beyond: The #USGS is an important participant in the ongoing effort to identify and map the extent of the U.S. land territory beyond 200 nautical miles. This submerged land area, called the extended continental shelf (ECS), is an important maritime zone with valuable resources and critical marine habitats. Its size may exceed one million square kilometers, encompassing areas in the Arctic, Atlantic, and Pacific Oceans as well as the Bering Sea and the Gulf of Mexico.

#JuneisOceanMonth #science #technology #advancingourknowledge #seafloormapping #marinegeology #explore #partners #OceanMonth2020

From Sea to Shining Sea…and Beyond: The USGS is an important participant in the ongoing effort to identify and map the extent of the U.S. land territory beyond 200 nautical miles. This submerged land area, called the extended continental shelf (ECS), is an important maritime zone with valuable resources and critical marine habitats. Its size may exceed one million square kilometers, encompassing areas in the Arctic, Atlantic, and Pacific Oceans as well as the Bering Sea and the Gulf of Mexico.

The USGS is a member of the U.S. ECS Task Force, an interagency group that brings together a wide range of U.S. government agencies, including the Department of State, the USGS, and NOAA, to understand and determine the geographic extent of this deep-water maritime zone. Together, these agencies are mapping the morphology of the seafloor and determining sediment thickness to delineate the outer limits of the U.S. ECS using conditions set forth in Article 76 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Within our ECS, the United States is entitled to exercise its sovereign rights under customary international law to manage, conserve, and exploit seafloor and subseafloor resources.
#oceansmonth2020

Photo Caption: The 200-nautical mile U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone is shown in dark gray on the map. In the area beyond 200 nautical miles, the Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources Program (CMHRP) has collected sediment-thickness data for defining the extended continental shelf (ECS) in the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans and the Bering Sea (yellow tracks). The CMHRP also contributes geological framework studies of other areas where an ECS exists that is not defined by the sediment thickness criterion.

06/10/2020
CHANGING SEAS

CHANGING SEAS

BLUE HOLES - what are these submerged holes found reaching depths beyond 400 feet into the seafloor?

Tune in to learn more from a team of exploration scientists and technical cave divers who set out to uncover the mysteries of what makes these submerged holes ecological oases in the sea.

PREMIERES
Wednesday, June 24th at 8 pm on WPBT2 South Florida PBS
Sunday, June 28th at 9 pm on WXEL - South Florida PBS

Available to stream on Facebook, YouTube, and ChangingSeas.tv on June 24!

FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute
06/10/2020

FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute

Did you know corals are growing in mangrove habitats in the Florida Keys?

A recent study conducted by Mary Jacobsen, intern with FWRI Coastal Wetlands Research Program, set out to identify locations where corals are growing in Florida Keys mangrove habitats. In collaboration with USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, researchers were looking for single or cluster coral colonies growing on mangrove prop roots or underneath the mangrove canopy.
They had much success - identifying several different locations where corals were growing directly on mangrove prop roots. This confirmed their hypothesis that mangrove shorelines in the Florida Keys do in fact have the right environmental conditions to serve as habitats for some species of coral.

USGS scientist Dr. Kimberly Yates published a study in 2014 that documented over 30 species of scleractinian corals growing on or under mangrove prop roots in Hurricane Hole, St John, US Virgin Islands. This led to the hypothesis that mangrove canopy cover protects the corals from extra heating and solar radiation, serving as good habitat for some coral species experiencing stress in their natural reef habitats. Learn more here: https://www.biogeosciences.net/11/4321/2014/

This research was funded in part by a grant awarded from Mote Marine Laboratory’s Protect Our Reefs Program, which is funded by proceeds from the sale of the Protect Our Reefs specialty license plate. Learn more at www.mote.org/4reef

Ilsa Kuffner is a Research Marine Biologist with the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center. Here’s why s...
06/09/2020

Ilsa Kuffner is a Research Marine Biologist with the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center. Here’s why she studies the ocean:

“The ocean covers 71% of Earth’s surface. While only 15% of Earth’s species live in the ocean, one out of four of them lives on a coral reef! But, like many ecosystems on land, coral reefs are an ecosystem in crisis — and they need our help. I study coral reefs to help provide knowledge humans need to make decisions on how best to manage and restore these critical natural resources. Coastal communities throughout the tropics are safer and more economically prosperous with healthy coral reefs than without them.”

Learn more about Ilsa’s research: http://ow.ly/HMHG50A26vj

#WhyTheOcean? #OceanMonth2020 #WomeninSTEM
#CoralReefs #Ocean

Ilsa Kuffner is a Research Marine Biologist with the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center. Here’s why she studies the ocean:

“The ocean covers 71% of Earth’s surface. While only 15% of Earth’s species live in the ocean, one out of four of them lives on a coral reef! But, like many ecosystems on land, coral reefs are an ecosystem in crisis — and they need our help. I study coral reefs to help provide knowledge humans need to make decisions on how best to manage and restore these critical natural resources. Coastal communities throughout the tropics are safer and more economically prosperous with healthy coral reefs than without them.”

Learn more about Ilsa’s research: http://ow.ly/HMHG50A26vj

#WhyTheOcean? #OceanMonth2020 #WomeninSTEM
#CoralReefs #Ocean

The USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center’s General Information Product was awarded two 2020 National Associ...
06/08/2020

The USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center’s General Information Product was awarded two 2020 National Association of Government Communicators (NAGC) Blue Pencil 1st place awards!

Read more about it in Sound Waves: http://ow.ly/ypM350zZ2BN

You can view the full list of categories and 2020 winners, as well as the 2020 virtual awards ceremony on the NAGC website: http://ow.ly/odHi50zZ2BM

#USGS #nagcbluepencil #nagc #2020nagcbluepencilawards #2020nagcbluepencil #soundwaves

USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center
06/08/2020

USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center

#WhyTheOcean? Julie Richey is a Research Geologist leading paleoclimate research at the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center. Julie loves studying the #ocean because she appreciates having the privilege of doing work that contributes to our collective understanding of global climate change, an issue that not only she finds important, but that has broad-reaching societal implications.

Learn more about Julie’s research: http://ow.ly/r0Mk50zZIZM

#OceanMonth2020 #WomeninSTEM

Photo: Meaghan Faletti, USGS, February 2020

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Total Water Level viewer is forecasting high wave heights at many locations along Flor...
06/04/2020

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Total Water Level viewer is forecasting high wave heights at many locations along Florida’s Gulf Coast this weekend which could result in potential dune erosion and overwash. Tropical Storm #Cristobal is forecast to begin moving northward across the Gulf of Mexico this weekend driving these increased water levels. For official forecast information visit the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS).

http://ow.ly/tqKy50zYLj9

#HurricaneSeason2020 #TropicalStormCristobal
#DOIDelivers

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Total Water Level viewer is forecasting high wave heights at many locations along Florida’s Gulf Coast this weekend which could result in potential dune erosion and overwash. Tropical Storm #Cristobal is forecast to begin moving northward across the Gulf of Mexico this weekend driving these increased water levels. For official forecast information visit the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS).

http://ow.ly/tqKy50zYLj9

#HurricaneSeason2020 #TropicalStormCristobal
#DOIDelivers

Hurricane season is here! Read about the comprehensive scientific information, data, and tools produced by the USGS Coas...
06/04/2020

Hurricane season is here! Read about the comprehensive scientific information, data, and tools produced by the USGS Coastal and Marine Science Centers that can be used by decision makers, emergency planners, and communities to protect lives and property across the United States. http://ow.ly/S5CD50zYP5k

#USGS #hurricaneseason #hurricaneresources #oceanmonth2020 #DOIDelivers

The April-May edition of #SoundWaves newsletter is out! Read about U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) #hurricane research, #O...
06/03/2020

The April-May edition of #SoundWaves newsletter is out! Read about U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) #hurricane research, #OceansMonth2020, and the Woods Hole Coastal & Marine Science Center's Award-Winning Publication: http://ow.ly/mfSs50zXGqg

Subscribe to Sound Waves: http://ow.ly/GtqJ50zXGqf #DOIDelivers

06/02/2020
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

The 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season officially started yesterday.
Learn how the USGS is ready to respond.
#Hurricanes #extremestorms #coastalchange #naturalhazards #erosion #stormsurge #risk #scienceforsafety @USGSCoastChange #flood #BePrepared #forecasts #alerts #warning #ready

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season starts June 1, and the U.S. Geological Survey is prepared to provide science that can help guide efforts to protect lives and property if a major storm makes landfall this season. For more information, visit: http://ow.ly/Q1GP50zVxJs

Satellite image from NOAA.

Nearly two-thirds of our planet is covered by water with more than 120 million Americans living near an ocean or Great L...
06/01/2020
Celebrate the Ocean! June is Ocean Month

Nearly two-thirds of our planet is covered by water with more than 120 million Americans living near an ocean or Great Lake. Growing worldwide demand for natural resources will increase our dependence on coastal and marine environments while people, infrastructure, and ecosystems face increasing risks from hazards.

More and more, we need ocean and coastal science!
USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources scientists and staff study coastal and ocean resources and processes from shorelines and estuaries to the continental shelf and deep sea so that we can fulfill our vision for a nation prepared for coastal and ocean changes.

Learn more about the USGS science in, on and below the ocean. https://www.usgs.gov/center-news/celebrate-ocean-june-ocean-month?qt-news_science_products=4#qt-news_science_products

#JuneisOceanMonth #OceanMonth2020 #SaveOurHome #USGS #EarthisBlue #OceanPlanet

June is National Ocean Month! Here at the @USGS, our scientists conduct cutting edge research about the oceans every day...
06/01/2020
Proclamation on National Ocean Month, 2020 | The White House

June is National Ocean Month! Here at the @USGS, our scientists conduct cutting edge research about the oceans every day. Our oceanographic research at the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center covers topics as diverse as seafloor mapping, ocean acidification, critical habitats and ecosystems, and the impacts of waves on coastlines. Celebrate Oceans Month by following along with us as we share our research and our passion with you.

“During National Ocean Month, we reaffirm our commitment to responsible stewardship of our ocean resources to strengthen and expand economic opportunities, while also ensuring that the natural beauty and wonder of the oceans are preserved and maintained for future generations.”

http://ow.ly/aT3n50zVHni

#NationalOceanMonth #USGS #OceanMonth2020 #oceans #research #science

Our ocean and coastal waterways are essential to our national security, international trade, maritime commerce, global competitiveness, and transportation.

** We’re hiring! ** The Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center in Woods Hole, MA is hiring a Physical Scientist! A...
05/28/2020

** We’re hiring! **

The Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center in Woods Hole, MA is hiring a Physical Scientist! Applications are due tomorrow May 29, 2020.

For more information and to apply view the job posting on http://ow.ly/sXXR50zSPR1: http://ow.ly/rgGU50zSPR5

To view more employment opportunities with the Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center, visit their dedicated job postings page: http://ow.ly/NBkh50zSPR3

For more information on the center itself, visit their website and take a look at their General Information Product: http://ow.ly/tDgp50zSPR4
http://ow.ly/IBAx50zSPR2

#USGS #workwithus #jobposting #apply #science #physicalscientist #scientist #sciencejobposting

Marine geology expertise helps explain #NaturalHazards in Puerto Rico.Just months after a series of damaging earthquakes...
05/26/2020

Marine geology expertise helps explain #NaturalHazards in Puerto Rico.
Just months after a series of damaging earthquakes began affecting communities in southern Puerto Rico, USGS and University of Puerto Rico scientists have discovered evidence of a series of previously unknown faults in the deep ocean off the island’s south shore, near the epicenters of the recent quakes.
Learn more about how marine geology is used to address earthquake hazards.
#USGS #marinegeology #tectonics #geophysics

Just months after a series of damaging earthquakes began affecting communities in southern Puerto Rico, USGS and University of Puerto Rico scientists have discovered evidence of a series of previously unknown faults in the deep ocean off the island’s south shore, near the epicenters of the recent quakes.

Puerto Rico and neighboring islands are located in a geologically active, tectonically complex region where the Caribbean and North American Plates are both in motion. USGS geophysicist Uri ten Brink, an expert on undersea faults and their consequences, has mapped undersea features north and east of Puerto Rico, but little was known about the seafloor south of the island. Shortly after two significant quakes occurred there Dec. 28 and Jan. 7, followed by many aftershocks, ten Brink organized a research cruise aboard the 43-foot University of Puerto Rico R/V Sultana, from the port of La Parguera.

From March 7 to 13 the scientists aboard Sultana used a device called a sparker to generate sound waves and an array of 32 listening devices called hydrophones to map 135 nautical miles’ worth of geologic features on and under the sea floor off southern Puerto Rico. Preliminary data found evidence of at least one undersea fault in Guayanilla Bay—perhaps an extension of a known fault on land—and several more faults about four and nine miles offshore, in water up to about 3,300 feet deep and within areas identified as the epicenters of some of the recent earthquakes.

In these early March photos, taken before USGS scientists began practicing social distancing, 1) USGS marine technicians Alex Nichols (L) and Eric Moore (R) deploy the hydrophone array. 2) USGS research geologist Jason Chaytor (L) and marine technicians Alex Nichols (center) and Eric Moore (R) deploy the sparker. Map shows the survey routes (black lines) and evidence of possible faults (red lines). All images credit: Uri ten Brink, USGS

USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center
05/20/2020

USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center

May is American Wetlands Month! Wetlands are important ecosystems that are home to a diverse array of #wildlife and help provide coastal protection for humans. They can also absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, allowing for cleaner air.

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists recently published work in Plos One exploring the vulnerability of these critical #habitats to storms and long-term change in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey: http://ow.ly/TZyG50zJkd5. They found several factors that help stabilize #wetlands including higher elevations, higher tide range, sediment supply, and undisturbed vegetation. These factors all help keep these important #ecosystems stable and allow them to continue providing habitat and #coastal protection in the face of storms and coastal change.

Photo: Kathryn Smith, USGS

#AmericanWetlandsMonth #WetlandsMonth #marsh #estuary

U.S. Department of the Interior: Ocean, Great Lakes and Coasts
05/20/2020

U.S. Department of the Interior: Ocean, Great Lakes and Coasts

Save the Date!
Register Now!
Capitol Hill Ocean Week
June 9, 2020

Capitol Hill Ocean Week (CHOW), the nation's premier ocean and Great Lakes policy conference, is going VIRTUAL in 2020!
With the accessible virtual format, Capitol Hill Ocean Week (CHOW) 2020 is an opportunity for people from across the U.S. and the globe to come together for a conversation on how we can work together to conserve the variety of life on Earth for the long term health of our communities and the planet.
CHOW will offer a full day of activities, including plenaries with outstanding speakers, concurrent breakout sessions, and virtual exhibit hall and closing happy hour.

CHOW 2020 will focus on the global issue of protecting biodiversity. The breadth of life in our ocean and Great Lakes is astounding. Building a sustainable global economy that protects nature is critical to people’s health and well-being.

Learn more and register now at: capitolhilloceanweek.org

#network #earthisblue #DOIOcean #DOICoasts #DOIGreatLakes #DOIBluePortfolio #biodiversity #deepsea #explore #learn #grow #CHOW2020 #partners #colleagues

Curious about water quality and public safety at beaches? The USGS has been working with partners to develop predictive ...
05/18/2020

Curious about water quality and public safety at beaches?

The USGS has been working with partners to develop predictive models for public beach management and safety.

#Beach inspection programs have been established in some public beaches to monitor bacteria levels, such as Escherichia coli (E.coli) which have the potential to cause sickness and disease in humans. State health officials have needed data and tools to understand the occurrence of bacteria at public beaches in order to make informed management decisions. Through a collaborative agreement, USGS and other entities collected environmental and bacterial data which were used to generate predictive models to understand the likely mechanisms for increased E. coli levels during the beach season.
Read more: https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/sir20195111
#publicsafety #ScienceforSafety #Ecoli #modeling #NaturalHazards #waterquality @USGSCoastChange #dynamiccoasts #partners #ourcoasts #publicbeaches #publichealth

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