Ray County Library

Ray County Library Ray County Library is located in Richmond, Missouri and serves all Ray County residents with an educational and information technology needs.
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LIBRARY SERVICES: Curbside Items Pick-Up, Interlibrary Loans, Outreach, Technology and Tools Accessibility, etc. LIBRARY SERVICES:
Curbside Items Pick-Up
The curbside item pick-up process is:
• Patrons can place holds on items online at www.raycountlibrary.com, by calling the library at 816-776-5104, or email to [email protected].
• When making phone and email requests, include your

LIBRARY SERVICES: Curbside Items Pick-Up, Interlibrary Loans, Outreach, Technology and Tools Accessibility, etc. LIBRARY SERVICES:
Curbside Items Pick-Up
The curbside item pick-up process is:
• Patrons can place holds on items online at www.raycountlibrary.com, by calling the library at 816-776-5104, or email to [email protected].
• When making phone and email requests, include your

Operating as usual

The Ray County Library will be closed on Monday, May 31st, in observance of Memorial Day.
05/31/2021

The Ray County Library will be closed on Monday, May 31st, in observance of Memorial Day.

The Ray County Library will be closed on Monday, May 31st, in observance of Memorial Day.

The Ray County Library will be closed on Friday, May 7th, in honor of Missouri's Truman Day holiday.
05/07/2021

The Ray County Library will be closed on Friday, May 7th, in honor of Missouri's Truman Day holiday.

The Ray County Library will be closed on Friday, May 7th, in honor of Missouri's Truman Day holiday.

The Ray County Library is closed on Friday, April 30th, for the Mushroom Festival.
04/30/2021

The Ray County Library is closed on Friday, April 30th, for the Mushroom Festival.

The Ray County Library is closed on Friday, April 30th, for the Mushroom Festival.

Join the Ray County Library for virtual Money Smart Week  -- a week of virtual financial capability programming to be he...
04/10/2021

Join the Ray County Library for virtual Money Smart Week -- a week of virtual financial capability programming to be held Saturday, April 10 through Saturday, April 17, 2021. View more details at www.moneysmartweek.org.

This week-long free virtual campaign aims to help people better manage their personal finances with a focus on those hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic.

This year’s line-up includes:
• Saturday, April 10 @ 10:00 a.m. CST |
Talking Cents (The University of Chicago Financial Education Initiative)
• Sunday, April 11 @ 10:00 a.m. CST |
Saving (FINRA Investor Education Foundation)
• Monday, April 12 @ 12:00 p.m. CST |
Basic Banking (The Economic Awareness Council)
• Tuesday, April 13 @ 12:30 p.m. CST |
Student Loans (U.S. Department of Education, Federal Student Aid)
• Wednesday, April 14 @ 1:00 p.m. CST |
Fraud Protection (Internal Revenue Service)
• Thursday, April 15 @ 1:00 p.m. CST |
Personal Finance (Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center (GFLEC))
• Friday, April 16 @ 12:00 p.m. CST |
Housing Protections + Resources (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau)
• Saturday, April 17 @ 10:30 a.m. CST |
Budgeting (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Division of Extension)

Events are free and open to the public, but registration is advised. Questions for the panelists can be submitted during the registration process.

Join the Ray County Library for virtual Money Smart Week -- a week of virtual financial capability programming to be held Saturday, April 10 through Saturday, April 17, 2021. View more details at www.moneysmartweek.org.

This week-long free virtual campaign aims to help people better manage their personal finances with a focus on those hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic.

This year’s line-up includes:
• Saturday, April 10 @ 10:00 a.m. CST |
Talking Cents (The University of Chicago Financial Education Initiative)
• Sunday, April 11 @ 10:00 a.m. CST |
Saving (FINRA Investor Education Foundation)
• Monday, April 12 @ 12:00 p.m. CST |
Basic Banking (The Economic Awareness Council)
• Tuesday, April 13 @ 12:30 p.m. CST |
Student Loans (U.S. Department of Education, Federal Student Aid)
• Wednesday, April 14 @ 1:00 p.m. CST |
Fraud Protection (Internal Revenue Service)
• Thursday, April 15 @ 1:00 p.m. CST |
Personal Finance (Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center (GFLEC))
• Friday, April 16 @ 12:00 p.m. CST |
Housing Protections + Resources (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau)
• Saturday, April 17 @ 10:30 a.m. CST |
Budgeting (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Division of Extension)

Events are free and open to the public, but registration is advised. Questions for the panelists can be submitted during the registration process.

Story Time
03/15/2021
Storytime

Story Time

Storytime for K-2nd grades. This week's presentation features "The Princess in Black" by Shannon Hale.

The Ray County Library will be resuming additional services beginning on March 15th.  Library services will include appo...
03/11/2021

The Ray County Library will be resuming additional services beginning on March 15th. Library services will include appointments for in-library browsing and technology usage, as well as, curbside services.

The Ray County Library will be resuming additional services beginning on March 15th. Library services will include appointments for in-library browsing and technology usage, as well as, curbside services.

The Ray County Library will be temporarily closed from Feb. 8th, 2021 to Feb. 23rd, 2021 to upgrade and install a new el...
02/04/2021

The Ray County Library will be temporarily closed from Feb. 8th, 2021 to Feb. 23rd, 2021 to upgrade and install a new electrical system. We apologize for the inconvenience, for the safety of our customers and staff we are unable to provide in-library services during this time. All due dates will be extended and overdues will be waived through March 21st, 2021. Please access the library's online services at www.raycountylibrary.com/resources.

The Ray County Library will be temporarily closed from Feb. 8th, 2021 to Feb. 23rd, 2021 to upgrade and install a new electrical system. We apologize for the inconvenience, for the safety of our customers and staff we are unable to provide in-library services during this time. All due dates will be extended and overdues will be waived through March 21st, 2021. Please access the library's online services at www.raycountylibrary.com/resources.

The Library will have a delayed opening at 10:00 am today, due to inclement weather.
01/27/2021

The Library will have a delayed opening at 10:00 am today, due to inclement weather.

The Library will have a delayed opening at 10:00 am today, due to inclement weather.

The Ray County Library will be closed today, January 18, 2021 in observance of Martin Luther King Jr Day.
01/18/2021

The Ray County Library will be closed today, January 18, 2021 in observance of Martin Luther King Jr Day.

The library will be closed today (Jan. 15th, 2021) due to inclement weather.
01/15/2021

The library will be closed today (Jan. 15th, 2021) due to inclement weather.

The Ray County Library will be closed on Dec. 31st and Jan. 1st in observance of New Year's Eve and New Year's Day.
12/30/2020

The Ray County Library will be closed on Dec. 31st and Jan. 1st in observance of New Year's Eve and New Year's Day.

The Library will be closing at 3:00 pm today due to inclement weather.
12/29/2020

The Library will be closing at 3:00 pm today due to inclement weather.

The Ray County Library will be closed on December 24th and 25th in observance of Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.
12/23/2020

The Ray County Library will be closed on December 24th and 25th in observance of Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.

The Ray County Library will begin the process of resuming curbside library services beginning Monday, November 30th, 202...
11/29/2020

The Ray County Library will begin the process of resuming curbside library services beginning Monday, November 30th, 2020.

In the spirit of community, do you know how Ray County got its name?John Ray, born in Maryland in 1730, was a member of ...
11/28/2020

In the spirit of community, do you know how Ray County got its name?
John Ray, born in Maryland in 1730, was a member of the Missouri House of Representatives and served as a member of the first Constitutional Convention of Missouri. Ray was also good friends with mythologized frontiersman Daniel Boone. It is confirmed by the Daughters of the American Revolution that Ray also served as a Private during the war. Ray died in St. Louis in 1820.
What a wonderful journey can be had through history and books - let them both be a door that you can open and discover brand new worlds through the power of words.

Here on the Ray County Public Library page, Fridays will be dedicated to some of our favorite authors, discussion of var...
11/27/2020

Here on the Ray County Public Library page, Fridays will be dedicated to some of our favorite authors, discussion of various genres, and other literary things of interest. Today’s post features a poet who once wrote:
Not yesterday I learned to know
The love of bare November days
Before the coming of the snow,
But it were vain to tell her so,
And they are better for her praise.
The section above is from "My November Guest" by today’s featured author: Robert Frost. Born in San Francisco, California, Frost became known and appreciated for his ability to fuse together descriptions of human and physical nature. Despite being born in California, many of Frost’s beloved poems reference scenery from his New England life. Frost received many awards and accolades for his work. Awards and recognition include the following: four Pulitzer Prizes in Poetry (1924, 1931, 1937, 1943), the Congressional Gold Medal (1960), and Vermont Poet Laureate from 1961 until his death in 1963. Prior to his death, Frost also served as the inaugural poet for John F. Kennedy where he recited the poem “The Gift Outright”. Robert Frost died in 1963 less than a year after his final book of poems In the Clearing was published. He was 88.
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Happy Thanksgiving All! We here at Ray County Library wish you and your loved ones a happy and safe holiday filled to th...
11/26/2020

Happy Thanksgiving All! We here at Ray County Library wish you and your loved ones a happy and safe holiday filled to the brim with thankfulness and too much mashed potatoes! Though we know there's no such thing.
In the changing climate of celebration, please take a moment to remember the successes, the struggles, the laughter and joy, as well as the pain and strife of this year. What sort of things are you thankful for? What's your favorite Thanksgiving dish? Got a quirky tradition?
If you can believe it, we are almost a month away from signing our dates with 2021.
As we continue to maneuver the ongoing pandemic together, through community, and through the power of language and story, we can make it through. Be well, be safe, and take good care.

Are you a writer? What do you think constitutes a writer? Is it as simple as being someone who writes? Do you have to ha...
11/25/2020

Are you a writer? What do you think constitutes a writer? Is it as simple as being someone who writes? Do you have to have get a special certificate? I wonder if that’s why they call it poetic license. Regardless of whether you consider yourself a writer or not, it’s important to stretch those creative muscles, and we here at Ray County Library happily support creativity and encourage you all to develop your artistic voice. As such, Wednesdays from now on will be known as Writing Prompt Wednesdays.
This first prompt is called Narrative “Break”down. To begin, think back on this past month, October, up until now, three weeks into November already. Write a reflection that details a life lesson you’ve learned during the course of this time.
Make sure to write about a specific memory with as focused detail as possible. Think about:
Where were you?
Who were you with?
Why is important to you?
That sort of thing. The first reflection should be five-to-six sentences.
Then, write the same story, but this time you only get three sentences.
Lastly, write the same story, but you only get one word.
After doing this activity, think about what sort of things you noticed about your narrative, especially when you were asked to shorten the length of your reflection. What did you notice? Which one proved challenging?

Are you a writer? What do you think constitutes a writer? Is it as simple as being someone who writes? Do you have to ha...
11/25/2020

Are you a writer? What do you think constitutes a writer? Is it as simple as being someone who writes? Do you have to have get a special certificate? I wonder if that’s why they call it poetic license. Regardless of whether you consider yourself a writer or not, it’s important to stretch those creative muscles, and we here at Ray County Library happily support creativity and encourage you all to develop your artistic voice. As such, Wednesdays from now on will be known as Writing Prompt Wednesdays.
This first prompt is called Narrative “Break”down. To begin, think back on this past month, October, up until now, three weeks into November already. Write a reflection that details a life lesson you’ve learned during the course of this time.
Make sure to write about a specific memory with as focused detail as possible. Think about:
Where were you?
Who were you with?
Why is important to you?
That sort of thing. The first reflection should be five-to-six sentences.
Then, write the same story, but this time you only get three sentences.
Lastly, write the same story, but you only get one word.
After doing this activity, think about what sort of things you noticed about your narrative, especially when you were asked to shorten the length of your reflection. What did you notice? Which one proved challenging?

Tuesdays here at Ray County Library's page will be dedicated to providing some tips and tricks to assist our pa...
11/24/2020

Tuesdays here at Ray County Library's page will be dedicated to providing some tips and tricks to assist our patrons maximize their library experience. We hope that these posts are helpful and provide some direction in convenient, easy-to-read posts. Here at Ray Country Library, we have a variety of online resources available at our patrons' disposal. One such available program is our EBSCO databases, a resource that enables access to online articles, magazines, literary journals and much more. You can access this resource here: https://raycountylibrary.com/online-resources. After inputting one's library ID number, options abound. What will you discover today?

On Mondays you might find yourself feeling like a particularly beloved orange cat who loved lasagnas, but had quite the ...
11/23/2020

On Mondays you might find yourself feeling like a particularly beloved orange cat who loved lasagnas, but had quite the disdain for Mondays. That’s Garfield if you’re playing at home.
So, if that’s the case, here’s a dose of Monday Motivation, and today’s line comes from current Vermont poet laureate Mary Ruefle, from her lecture “Someone Reading a Book is a Sign of Order in the World” found in her book Madness, Rack, and Honey (Wave Books 2012). Ruefle writes:
We are all one question, and the best answer seems to be love – a connection between things. This bit of arcane knowledge is respoken every day into the ears of readers of great books, and also appears to perpetually slip under a carpet, utterly forgotten. In one sense, reading is a great waste of time. In another sense, it is a great extension of time, a way for one person to live a thousand and one lives in a single life span…
So go on, extend your life, and find a good book, and remember we here at Ray County Library would be happy to find that next good book.

The Ray County Library is temporarily closed due to a potential COVID-19 exposure.  We look forward to resuming services...
10/16/2020

The Ray County Library is temporarily closed due to a potential COVID-19 exposure. We look forward to resuming services as soon as we are able. Stay well!

The library will be closed on Monday, October 12th, in observance of Columbus Day.
10/11/2020

The library will be closed on Monday, October 12th, in observance of Columbus Day.

Banned Books Week:Friday’s here and, while that excitedly means the weekend is upon us, it also means that Banned Books ...
10/02/2020

Banned Books Week:
Friday’s here and, while that excitedly means the weekend is upon us, it also means that Banned Books Week is nearing its close. Today’s featured writer is Margaret Atwood; Atwood was born in the 1939 in Ottawa, Canada, and has published over fifty books of fiction, poetry, criticism, and even graphic novels. Her most-recent book, The Testaments, was the co-winner of the 2019 Booker Prize. Other awards bestowed upon Atwood include a Guggenheim Fellowship (1981), the Los Angeles Times Fiction Award (1986), Arthur C. Clarke Award for best Science Fiction (1987), and the Companion of Honour (2019), among others. She has also been awarded over twenty honorary degrees from a wide variety of institutions. Atwood’s novels include Surfacing (1972), Cat’s Eye (1988), Oryx and Crake (2003), and today’s featured novel The Handmaid’s Tale (1985). She currently lives in Toronto, Canada and has a collection of poems, Dearly, that will be published in November 2020.
The Handmaid’s Tale (1985) is a novel that tells of a near-future totalitarian state known as Gilead. The novel is an exploration of severely limited human rights, especially women, who can no longer read, write, or handle money. The novel explores the life of its central protagonist Offred. The novel also reveals clearly defined social roles – Commanders, Commanders’ Wives, Handmaids, and so forth. The novel won the 1985 General Governor’s Award for English in addition to the 1987 Arthur C. Clarke Award, in addition to receiving multiple nominations for varying prizes. The book is often challenged for the use of profanity, vulgarity, and sexual overtones.

Banned Books Week:As we move into a new month, we’re heading toward the home stretch of Banned Books Week, and we here a...
10/01/2020

Banned Books Week:
As we move into a new month, we’re heading toward the home stretch of Banned Books Week, and we here at Ray County Public Library want to thank you for your continued reading. Today’s featured novelist is Ralph Ellison. Ellison’s work include today’s featured novel, Invisible Man, Shadow and Act (1964), Going to the Territory (1986), and posthumous novel Juneteenth which was published in 1999. A central figure in the Harlem Renaissance, Ellison won the United States National Book Award for Fiction (1953) and the National Medal of Arts (1985), among other awards. He was well-regarded for his work in fiction, social commentary, and essay-writing. Ralph Ellison died in 1994 in New York City.
Invisible Man, published in 1952, is a novel that investigates the struggle of African-Americans throughout the 20th century, as well struggles with identity and individuality. The narrator is unnamed and falls victim to social invisibility. The novel also explores physical and psychological journey, or what Ellison (by way of American theorist Kenneth Burke) called “purpose to passion to perception.” (The Paris Review, The Art of Fiction No. 8) The novel is often banned because of profanity, as well as images of violence and sexuality.

Banned Books Week:Now that we are almost halfway through Banned Books Week, it is time to share another author, and toda...
09/30/2020

Banned Books Week:
Now that we are almost halfway through Banned Books Week, it is time to share another author, and today’s featured author is J.D. Salinger. The success of Salinger’s first novel, and today’s featured book, The Catcher in the Rye, paved way for a life of reclusiveness and legal battles. While Salinger wrote and published several more books including Franny and Zooey in 1961, his last published work was a novella published with The New Yorker in 1965. The most prominent of Salinger’s legal battles was with British critic Ian Hamilton, and as a result, much of the work that Salinger produced in the years after Catcher in the Rye was published became public. In his words, it was “[Just] a work of fiction…that’s all.” J.D. Salinger died in 2010 in New Hampshire.
Holden Caulfield, the main character and narrator, of The Catcher in the Rye became a symbol of teenage angst and rebellion. The novel’s themes include innocence, identity, belonging, and depression, among others. Despite these themes, The Catcher in the Rye became the most censored book in high schools and libraries in the United States in the early 1960s. Most consistent reasons include vulgar language, sexual references, and promotion of drinking and smoking, among others. The novel has also been connected to the shootings of John Lennon, Rebecca Schaeffer, and Ronald Reagan.

Address

215 E Lexington St
Richmond, MO
64085

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5:30am
Tuesday 9am - 5:30am
Wednesday 9am - 5:30am
Thursday 9am - 5:30am
Friday 9am - 5:30am

Telephone

+18167765104

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Comments

Have the summer reading program winners been picked? We were curious, but hadn't seen any posts about that yet. 😊
Was there any book damage?