Round Table NJ

Round Table NJ Are you looking for more business in the Mercer County Area? We can help you grow your business! Meetings Start Promptly On Time. Non Refundable.
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We Meet Every Thursday Mornings From 8:00am To 9:00am At The Robbinsville Fire House. Networking Before And After The Meeting Is Strongly Encouraged. Cost For A Yearly Membership is only $100. Cost Is Pro-rated For Those Who Join At Different Times Of The Year. We Ensure That Only One Company Or Service Is Represented At A Time In The Group.

Happy National Chocolate Chip Cookie Day.   .com/memorymakers
05/15/2023

Happy National Chocolate Chip Cookie Day. .com/memorymakers

ATTENTION Local Businesses: HTRBA needs your support! If you would like to sponsor a team or would like to see your busi...
02/17/2023

ATTENTION Local Businesses: HTRBA needs your support! If you would like to sponsor a team or would like to see your business logo on a sign in the outfield, please reach out. The contact information is on the second picture⚾️

02/06/2023

Qualifying For The Home Office Deduction

In recent years, many people have pivoted to working from home, and that brings up tax questions. If you’re one of those people, you might wonder, “Can I claim the home office deduction on my 2022 tax return?”

The short answer is: only if you’re self-employed. Employees can’t currently claim home office expenses, and even self-employed taxpayers must follow strict rules to claim deductions.

Numerous write-offs

If you qualify, you can deduct the “direct expenses” of a home office. This includes the costs of painting or repairing the home office and depreciation deductions for furniture and fixtures used there. You can also deduct the “indirect” expenses of maintaining the office. This includes the allocable share of utility costs, depreciation and insurance for your home, as well as the allocable share of mortgage interest, real estate taxes and casualty losses.

In addition, if your home office is your “principal place of business,” the eligible costs of traveling between your home office and other work locations are deductible transportation expenses, rather than nondeductible commuting costs.

Tests for deductibility

You can deduct your expenses if you meet any of these three tests:

1. Principal place of business. You’re entitled to deductions if you use your home office, exclusively and regularly, as your principal place of business. Your home office is your principal place of business if it satisfies one of two tests. You satisfy the “management or administrative activities test” if you use your home office for administrative or management activities of your business, and you meet certain other requirements. You meet the “relative importance test” if your home office is the most important place where you conduct business, compared with all the other locations where you conduct that business.

2. Meeting place. You’re entitled to home office deductions if you use your home office, exclusively and regularly, to meet or deal with patients, clients or customers. The patients, clients or customers must physically come to the office.

3. Separate structure. You’re entitled to home office deductions for a home office, used exclusively and regularly for business, that’s located in a separate unattached structure on the same property as your home. For example, this could be in an unattached garage, artist’s studio or workshop.

You may also be able to deduct the expenses of certain storage space for storing inventory or product samples. If you’re in the business of selling products at retail or wholesale, and if your home is your sole fixed business location, you can deduct home expenses allocable to space that you use to store inventory or product samples.

Know the limitations

The amount of home office deductions for self-employed taxpayers is subject to various limitations. Proper planning is key to claiming the maximum deduction for your home office expenses. Contact us if you’d like to discuss your situation.

01/23/2023

A Tax Break For Educators Gets An Update
Teachers who are setting up their classrooms for a new school year often pay for some of their classroom supplies out-of-pocket. They can recoup some of that cost by taking advantage of a special tax break for educators. This deduction gained new importance after the 2017 passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). For 2022, the deduction amount has increased for the first time since it was enacted.

The old-school way

Before 2018, employees who had unreimbursed out-of-pocket expenses could potentially deduct them if they were ordinary and necessary to the “business” of being an employee. A teacher’s out-of-pocket classroom expenses could qualify. Those expenses were claimed as a miscellaneous deduction, subject to a 2% of adjusted gross income (AGI) floor. That meant that only taxpayers who itemized deductions could enjoy a tax benefit, and then only to the extent that their deductions exceeded the 2% floor.

For 2018 through 2025, the TCJA has suspended miscellaneous itemized deductions subject to the 2% of AGI floor. Fortunately, qualifying educators can still deduct some unreimbursed out-of-pocket classroom costs using the educator expense deduction.

The new-school way

Back in 2002, Congress created the above-the-line educator expense deduction. An above-the-line deduction is one that’s subtracted from your gross income to determine your AGI. It can be claimed even by taxpayers who don’t itemize deductions. This is especially significant because, under the TCJA, the standard deduction has nearly doubled, which means that fewer taxpayers now itemize deductions.

For 2022, qualifying elementary and secondary school teachers and other eligible educators (such as counselors and principals) can deduct up to $300 of qualified expenses. This is up from $250 for 2021. Two married educators who file a joint tax return can deduct up to $600 of unreimbursed expenses, limited to $300 each.

Qualified expenses include amounts paid or incurred during the tax year for books, supplies, computer equipment, related software, services, and other equipment and materials used in classrooms. The cost of certain professional development courses may be deductible. Also, protective items to prevent the spread of COVID-19 such as hand sanitizers, disinfectant and other items recommended by the Centers for Disease Control for this purpose are also deductible. However, homeschooling supplies and nonathletic supplies for health or physical education courses aren’t deductible.

More details

Some additional rules apply to the educator expense deduction. If you’re an educator or you know one who might be interested in this tax break, please contact us for more details.

01/12/2023

6 Key Tax Questions for 2023

Right now, you may be more concerned about your 2022 tax bill than you are about how to handle your personal finances in the new year. However, as you deal with your annual tax filing, it’s a good idea to also familiarize yourself with pertinent amounts that may have changed for 2023.

Not all tax figures are adjusted for inflation. And even if they are, during times of low inflation the changes may be slight. When inflation is higher, as it currently is, the changes are generally more substantial. In addition, some tax amounts can change only with new tax legislation. Here are the answers to six commonly asked questions about 2023 tax-related figures:

1. How much can I contribute to an IRA for 2023? If you’re eligible, you can contribute up to $6,500 for 2023 to a traditional or Roth IRA (up from $6,000 for 2022). If you’re age 50 or older, you can make another $1,000 “catch-up” contribution.

2. I have a 401(k) plan through my job. How much can I contribute to it? For 2023, you can contribute up to $22,500 to a 401(k) or 403(b) plan. You can make an additional $7,500 catch-up contribution if you’re age 50 or older. (These figures for 2022 were $20,500 and $6,500, respectively).

3. I sometimes hire a babysitter and a cleaning person. Do I have to withhold and pay F**A tax on the amounts I pay them? The threshold for when a domestic employer must withhold and pay F**A for babysitters, house cleaners and other domestic employees has increased to $2,600 for 2023 (up from $2,400).

4. How much do I have to earn in 2023 before I can stop paying Social Security tax on my salary? The Social Security tax wage base is $160,200 for 2023, up from $147,000 for 2022. That means that you don’t owe Social Security tax on amounts earned above that. (You must pay Medicare tax on all amounts that you earn.)

5. On my last income tax return, my itemized deductions didn’t exceed my standard deduction. What’s my standard deduction for 2023? If the total amount of your itemized deductions (such as charitable gifts and mortgage interest) is less than your applicable standard deduction amount, itemizing won’t save you taxes. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act eliminated the tax benefit of itemizing for many people by increasing the standard deduction and reducing or eliminating various itemized deductions. For 2023, the standard deduction amount is $27,700 for married couples filing jointly (up from $25,900 for 2022). For single filers, the amount is $13,850 (up from $12,950), and, for heads of households, it’s $20,800 (up from $19,400).

6. How much can I give to one person without having to file a gift tax return for 2023? The annual gift tax exclusion for 2023 is $17,000 (up from $16,000 in 2022). This amount is adjusted only in $1,000 increments, so it typically increases only every few years.

These are only some of the tax figures that may apply to you. For more information about your tax picture, or if you have questions, don’t hesitate to contact us.

12/31/2022

Wishing my staff, clients, friends and their families a Happy and Blessed New Year! May you have good health, prosperity and happiness in the coming year! God bless everyone!

11/11/2022

Thank you to all of our heroes that have served and protected us, our country and the beliefs we hold.

10/10/2022

After Filing Your Taxes, What Records Can You Toss?

If you’ve filed your 2021 tax return, you may want to do some spring cleaning, starting with tax-related paper clutter. Paring down is good. Just be careful to hold on to essential records that may be needed in the event of an IRS audit. Some documents may be needed to help you collect a future refund or assist with filing your return next year. Before you start tossing or shredding documents, read the rules to learn what must be kept (and for how long) and what can be safely discarded.

The general rules

At a minimum, you should keep tax records for as long as the IRS can audit your tax return or assess additional taxes. That’s usually three years after you file your return. This means you potentially can get rid of most records related to tax returns for 2018 and earlier years.

However, the statute of limitations extends to six years for taxpayers who understate their adjusted gross income by more than 25%. What constitutes an understatement may go beyond simply not reporting items of income. So, to be safe, a general rule of thumb is to save tax records for six years from filing.

Keep some records longer

You need to hang on to some tax-related records beyond the statute of limitations. For example:

Keep the tax returns themselves indefinitely, so you can prove to the IRS that you did file a legitimate return. (If you didn’t file a return or if you filed a fraudulent return, there’s no statute of limitations.)
Retain W-2 forms until you begin receiving Social Security benefits. That may seem long, but if questions arise regarding your work record or earnings for a particular year, you’ll need your W-2 forms to help provide the documentation needed.
Keep records related to real estate or investments for as long as you own the assets, plus at least three years after you sell them and report the sales on your tax return (or six years if you want extra protection).
Hang on to records associated with retirement accounts until you’ve depleted the accounts and reported the last withdrawal on your tax return, plus three (or six) years.
If you’re still not sure about a specific document, feel free to ask us.

Other reasons to retain records

Keep in mind that these are the federal tax record retention guidelines. Your state and local tax record requirements may differ. In addition, lenders, co-op boards and other private parties may require you to produce copies of your tax returns as a condition of lending money, approving a purchase or otherwise doing business with you. Contact us with questions or concerns about recordkeeping.

10/03/2022

Internal Controls Reduce Check Kiting Risk

A check kiting scheme relies on “float” time, which is the period between when a check is deposited and when the bank collects the funds on the check. In recent years, the float time has narrowed, but there’s still opportunity to capitalize on that delay. So it’s important for businesses to put internal controls in place to protect against this fraud risk.

No small matter

Check kiting schemes typically involve two or more banks, though some schemes can involve multiple accounts at one bank if there’s a lag in how the institution processes checks. The perpetrator’s goal is to falsely inflate the balance of a checking account so that written checks that otherwise would bounce, clear.

Check kiting is a federal crime that can lead to up to 30 years in federal prison, plus hefty fines. Even if a bank doesn’t press charges, it may close the account and report the incident to ChexSystems (similar to a credit bureau), making it difficult to open a new business account.

Strategies for grounding the kite

Here are five strategies your organization can implement to keep people from using your company’s accounts for check kiting:

1. Educate employees about bank fraud. Describe the types of transactions that qualify as bank fraud and their red flags. That makes workers aware of suspicious activities and demonstrates management’s commitment to preventing fraud.

2. Rotate key accounting roles. Segregate accounting duties. Rotate tasks among staffers if possible to help uncover ongoing schemes and limit opportunities to steal.

3. Reconcile bank accounts daily. Make sure someone trustworthy, who isn’t involved in issuing payments, reconciles every company bank account.

4. Maintain control of paper checks. Store blank checks in a locked cabinet or safe and periodically inventory the blank check stock. Also limit who’s allowed to order new ones.

5. Go digital. The most effective way to prevent most check fraud is to stop using paper checks altogether. Consider replacing them with ACH payments or another form of electronic payments.

Tighten up

Check kiting is relatively easy to perpetrate, particularly if your company isn’t vigilant about its check stock and bank account activity. For help tightening your internal controls, contact us.

09/28/2022

Beware of “Wash Sales” When Selling Securities

If you’re planning to sell stock or other securities at a loss to offset gains you realized earlier in the year, beware of the “wash sale” rule. It comes into play when an investor wants to realize a loss on a security for tax purposes while continuing to invest in the security. Under the wash rule, selling securities for a loss and buying back substantially identical securities within 30 days before or after the sale date means the loss can’t be claimed for tax purposes.

The rule

The wash sale rule is designed to prevent taxpayers from benefiting from a loss without actually parting with ownership. Note that the rule applies not only to buying back stock within 30 days after selling it but also to a 30-day period before the sale date to prevent “buying the stock back” before it’s even sold.

Although the loss can’t be claimed on a wash sale, the disallowed amount is added to the cost of the new stock to increase its tax basis. So, the disallowed amount can be claimed when the new stock is finally sold at some point in the future (other than in a wash sale).

An example

Assume you buy 500 shares of XYZ Inc. for $10,000 and sell them on November 1 for $3,000. On November 15, you buy 500 shares of XYZ again for $3,200. Because the shares were “bought back” within 30 days of the sale, the wash sale rule applies. Therefore, you can’t claim a $7,000 loss. Your basis in the new 500 shares is $10,200: the actual cost plus the $7,000 disallowed loss.

If only a portion of the stock sold is repurchased, only that portion of the loss is disallowed. In the example above, if 60% of the shares sold were bought back, you’d be able to claim 40% of the loss on the sale. The remaining loss would be disallowed and added to your cost basis of the repurchased shares.

No surprises

The wash sale rule can deliver a nasty surprise at tax time. Contact us with questions as you’re contemplating year-end tax planning strategies for your investment portfolio.

09/25/2022

L'Shanah Tovah

To all of our Jewish clients and friends a Happy New Year! May God's blessings be with you today and everyday.

09/21/2022

Living the Dream of Early Retirement

Many people dream of retiring early so they can pursue activities other than work, such as volunteering, traveling and pursuing their hobbies full-time. But making this dream a reality requires careful planning and diligent saving during the years leading up to the anticipated retirement date.

It all starts with retirement savings accounts such as IRAs and 401(k)s. Among the best ways to retire early is to build up these accounts as quickly as possible by contributing the maximum amount allowed by law each year.

From there, consider other potential sources of retirement income, such as a company pension plan. If you have one, either under a past or current employer, research whether you can receive benefits if you retire early. Then factor this income into your retirement budget.

Of course, you’re likely planning on Social Security benefits composing a portion of your retirement income. If so, keep in mind that the earliest you can begin receiving Social Security retirement benefits is age 62 (though waiting until later may allow you to collect more).

The flip side of saving up enough retirement income is reducing your living expenses during retirement. For example, many people strive to pay off their home mortgages early, which can possibly free up enough monthly cash flow to make early retirement feasible.

By saving as much money as you can in your retirement savings accounts, carefully planning your Social Security strategies and cutting your living expenses in retirement, you just might be able to make this dream a reality. Contact our firm for help.

09/19/2022

Every Business Owner Needs an Exit Strategy

As a business owner, you have to keep your eye on your company’s income and expenses and applicable tax breaks. But you also must look out for your own financial future. And that includes creating an exit strategy.

Buy-sell agreement

When a business has more than one owner, a buy-sell agreement can be a powerful tool. The agreement controls what happens to the business if a specified event occurs, such as an owner’s retirement, disability or death. A well-drafted agreement provides a ready market for the departing owner’s interest in the business and prescribes a method for setting a price for that interest. It also allows business continuity by preventing disagreements caused by new owners.

A key issue with any buy-sell agreement is providing the buyer(s) with a means of funding the purchase. Life or disability insurance often helps fulfill this need and can give rise to several tax issues and opportunities. One of the biggest advantages of life insurance as a funding method is that proceeds generally are excluded from the beneficiary’s taxable income, provided certain conditions are met.

Succession within the family

You can pass your business on to family members by giving them interests, selling them interests or doing some of each. Be sure to consider your income needs, the tax consequences, and how family members will feel about your choice.

Under the annual gift tax exclusion, you can currently gift up to $15,000 of ownership interests without using up any of your lifetime gift and estate tax exemption. Valuation discounts may further reduce the taxable value of the gift.

With the gift and estate tax exemption approximately doubled through 2025 ($11.4 million for 2019), gift and estate taxes may be less of a concern for some business owners. But others may want to make substantial transfers now to take maximum advantage of the high exemption. What’s right for you will depend on the value of your business and your timeline for transferring ownership.

Get started now

To be successful, your exit strategy will require planning well in advance of retirement or any other reason for ownership transition. Please contact us for help.

09/14/2022

Information About IRS Notices

It's a moment any taxpayer dreads. An envelope arrives from the IRS — and it's not a refund check. But don't panic. Many IRS letters can be dealt with simply and painlessly.

Each year, the IRS sends millions of letters and notices to taxpayers to request payment of taxes, notify them of a change to their account or request additional information. The notice you receive normally covers a very specific issue about your account or tax return. Each letter and notice provides specific instructions explaining what you should do if action is necessary to satisfy the inquiry. Most notices also give a phone number to call if you need further information.

Most correspondence can be handled without calling or visiting an IRS office, if you follow the instructions in the letter or notice. However, if you have questions, call the telephone number in the upper right-hand corner of the notice, or call the IRS at 1-800-829-1040. Have a copy of your tax return and the correspondence available when you call so your account can be readily accessed.

Before contacting the IRS, review the correspondence and compare it with the information on your return. If you agree with the correction to your account, no reply is necessary unless a payment is due. If you do not agree with the correction the IRS made, it is important that you respond as requested. Write an explanation why you disagree, and include any documents and information you wish the IRS to consider. Mail your information along with the bottom tear-off portion of the notice to the address shown in the upper left-hand corner of the IRS correspondence. Allow at least 30 days for a response.

Sometimes, the IRS sends a second letter or notice requesting additional information or providing additional information to you. Be sure to keep copies of any correspondence with your records. If you've received a notice and are confused about what to do next, please contact us and we can help!

09/12/2022

Refund, Where's My Refund?

Are you expecting a tax refund from the Internal Revenue Service this year? If you file a complete and accurate paper tax return, your refund should be issued in about six to eight weeks from the date IRS receives your return. If you file your return electronically, your refund should be issued in about half the time it would take if you filed a paper return — even faster when you choose direct deposit.

You can have a refund check mailed to you, buy up to $5,000 in U.S. Series I Savings Bonds with your refund, or you may be able to have your refund electronically deposited directly into your bank account (either in one account, or in multiple accounts). Direct deposit into a bank account is more secure because there is no check to get lost. And it takes the U.S. Treasury less time than issuing a paper check. If you prepare a paper return, fill in the direct deposit information in the “Refund” section of the tax form, making sure that the routing and account numbers are accurate. Incorrect numbers can cause your refund to be misdirected or delayed. Direct deposit is also available if you electronically file your return.

A few words of caution — some financial institutions do not allow a joint refund to be deposited into an individual account. Check with your bank or other financial institution to make sure your direct deposit will be accepted.

You may not receive your refund as quickly as you expected. A refund can be delayed for a variety of reasons. For example, a name and Social Security number listed on the tax return may not match the IRS records. You may have failed to sign the return or to include a necessary attachment, such as Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement. Or you may have made math errors that require extra time for the IRS to correct.

To check the status of an expected refund, use "Check your Federal Refund" an interactive tool available on our Links page. Simple online instructions guide you through a process that checks the status of your refund after you provide identifying information from your tax return. Once the information is processed, results could be one of several responses.

08/31/2022

Large Cash Business Transactions Must Be Reported To The IRS

If your business receives large amounts of cash or cash equivalents, you may be required to report these transactions to the IRS. Here are some details.

The requirements

Each person who, while operating a trade or business, receives more than $10,000 in cash in one transaction (or at least two related transactions), must file Form 8300. What constitutes “related transactions?” Related transactions are conducted within a 24-hour period. But transactions that occur in a greater than 24-hour period may also be deemed related if the recipient knows, or has reason to know, that the transactions are connected.

To complete a Form 8300, you’ll need certain information about the person making the payment. This includes a Social Security or taxpayer identification number.

Reasons behind the reporting

Although many cash transactions are legitimate, the IRS explains that “information reported on (Form 8300) can help stop those who evade taxes, profit from the drug trade, engage in terrorist financing and conduct other criminal activities. The government can often trace money from these illegal activities through the payments reported on Form 8300 and other cash reporting forms.”

It’s important to keep a copy of each Form 8300 for five years from the date you file it, according to the IRS.

“Cash” and “cash equivalents” defined

For Form 8300 reporting purposes, cash includes U.S. currency and coins, as well as foreign money. It also includes cash equivalents such as cashier’s checks (sometimes called bank checks), bank drafts, traveler’s checks and money orders. Money orders and cashier’s checks under $10,000, when used in combination with other forms of cash for a single transaction that exceeds $10,000, are defined as cash for Form 8300 reporting purposes.

Note: Under a separate reporting requirement, banks and other financial institutions report cash purchases of cashier’s checks, treasurer’s checks and/or bank checks, bank drafts, traveler’s checks and money orders with a face value of more than $10,000 by filing currency transaction reports.

Options for filing

Businesses required to file reports of large cash transactions on Form 8300 should know that in addition to filing on paper, e-filing is an option. The form is due 15 days after a transaction and there’s no charge for the e-file option. Businesses that file electronically get an automatic acknowledgment of receipt when they file.

The IRS also reminds businesses that they can “batch file” their reports. This is especially helpful to those required to file many forms.

Setting up an electronic account

To file Form 8300 electronically, a business must set up an account with FinCEN’s Bank Secrecy Act E-Filing System. For more information, visit: bsaefiling.fincen.treas.gov or contact us with questions.

08/29/2022

Offset Nursing Home Costs With Possible Tax Breaks

If you have a parent entering a nursing home, taxes are probably the last thing on your mind. But you should know that several tax breaks may be available to help offset some of the costs.

Medical expense deductions

The costs of qualified long-term care (LTC), such as nursing home care, may be deductible as medical expenses to the extent they, along with other qualified expenses, exceed 7.5% of adjusted gross income (AGI). But keep in mind that the medical expense deduction is an itemized deduction. And itemizing deductions saves taxes only if total itemized deductions exceed the applicable standard deduction.

Amounts paid to a nursing home are deductible as medical expenses if a person is staying at the facility principally for medical, rather than custodial care. Also, for those individuals, only the portion of the fee that’s allocable to actual medical care qualifies as a deductible expense.

If the individual is chronically ill, all qualified LTC services are deductible. Qualified LTC services are those required by a chronically ill individual and administered by a licensed health care practitioner. They include diagnostic, preventive, therapeutic, curing, treating, mitigating and rehabilitative services, and maintenance or personal-care services.

For your parent to qualify as chronically ill, a physician or other licensed health care practitioner must certify him or her as unable to perform at least two activities of daily living (ADLs) for at least 90 days due to a loss of functional capacity or severe cognitive impairment. ADLs include eating, toileting, transferring, bathing, dressing and continence.

Qualifying as a dependent

If your parent qualifies as your dependent, you can add medical expenses you incur for him or her to your own medical expenses when calculating your deduction. We can help with this determination.

If you aren’t married and you meet the dependency tests for your parent, you may qualify for head-of-household filing status, which has a higher standard deduction and lower tax rates than filing as single. You may be eligible to use this status even if the parent for whom you claim an exemption doesn't live with you.

Selling your parent’s home

In many cases, a move to a nursing home also means selling the parent’s home. Fortunately, up to $250,000 of gain from the sale of a principal residence may be tax-free. To qualify for the $250,000 exclusion, the seller must generally have owned the home for at least two years of the five years before the sale.

Also, the seller must have used the home as a principal residence for at least two of the five years before the sale. However, there’s an exception to the two-of-five-year use test for a seller who becomes physically or mentally unable to care for him- or herself during the five-year period.

LTC insurance

Perhaps your parent is still in good health but is paying for LTC insurance (or you’re paying LTC insurance premiums for yourself). If so, be aware that premiums paid for a qualified LTC insurance contract are deductible as medical expenses (subject to limits) to the extent that they, when combined with other medical expenses, exceed the 7.5%-of-AGI threshold. Such a contract doesn’t provide payment for costs covered by Medicare, is guaranteed renewable and doesn't have a cash surrender value.

The amount of qualified LTC premiums that can be included as medical expenses is based on the age of the insured individual. For 2022 for those 61 to 70 years old, the limit on deductible premiums is $4,510 and for those over 70, the limit is $5,640.

Need more information?

This is just a brief overview of tax breaks that may help offset nursing home and related costs. Contact us if you need more information or assistance.

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1049 US Highway 130
Robbinsville, NJ
08691

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We meet every Thursday morning from 8:00am To 9:00am at the Robbinsville Fire House, with the exception of the Thursday following the Mid-Jersey Chamber of Commerce Breakfast Meeting (the first Wednesday of the month). Meetings start promptly. Networking before and after the meeting is strongly encouraged. The cost for a yearly membership is only $100 and there is a one-time $100 non-refundable initiation fee. Membership is limited to only one service provider in the group at a time (ie. only one CPA; only one realtor)

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