Lincoln Home National Historic Site

Lincoln Home National Historic Site At Lincoln Home National Historic Site you can follow in the footsteps of the father, husband, lawyer Please be considerate of other fan's opinions.
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Effective January 2, 2024, the Lincoln Home Visitor Center will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
01/02/2024

Effective January 2, 2024, the Lincoln Home Visitor Center will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

It's New Year's Day! What are you going to do today? The Lincolns couldn't watch football or parades, but they had their...
01/01/2024

It's New Year's Day! What are you going to do today? The Lincolns couldn't watch football or parades, but they had their own traditions and activities to keep them busy. Mr. Lincoln, and Robert when he was older, were expected to visit (or "call") on as many friends, family, and neighbors as they could that day. They would leave their calling cards (pictured here) with the butler, if there was one, or on a tray near the front door to show that they had called. The Lincoln men would visit only the ladies of the house, because the gentlemen were out calling on Mary Lincoln and her friends. Mary, meanwhile, would have a buffet laid out for all of her callers, including real eggnog. The younger boys would be out playing with their friends, shooting off firecrackers and guns, and generally making a lot of noise to welcome in the new year.

Eliza Leslie's "Directions for Cookery" provides an Egg Nogg [sic] recipe: Beat separately the yolks and whites of six eggs. Stir the yolks into a quart of rich milk or thin cream and add a half pound of sugar. Then mix in a pint of rum or brandy. Flavor it with grated nutmeg. Lastly, stir in gently, the beaten whites of the eggs. It should be mixed in a china bowl. (Disclaimer: since the eggs are not cooked in this recipe, we don't recommend trying it for yourself!)

Alt-text: images show two small cream-colored cards with thin script in black ink: "A. Lincoln" and "Robert T. Lincoln".

Happy 2024!!!  Lincoln Home National Historic Site is closed today. We will reopen tomorrow at 9:00 (please note the tim...
01/01/2024

Happy 2024!!! Lincoln Home National Historic Site is closed today. We will reopen tomorrow at 9:00 (please note the time change). Until then, please enjoy a healthy and happy New Year's Day.

Happy Holidays from the staff and volunteers at Lincoln Home National Historic Site! We are closed today but hope to wel...
12/25/2023

Happy Holidays from the staff and volunteers at Lincoln Home National Historic Site! We are closed today but hope to welcome you back tomorrow when the Visitor Center opens at 8:30.

Today is National   day! Have you already made batches and batches of your favorite holiday cookies? And have already ea...
12/18/2023

Today is National day! Have you already made batches and batches of your favorite holiday cookies? And have already eaten all of those and had to make more to share with friends and family? 😄 If you haven't made your cookies or need to make more, here's your chance! Although there is no specific documentation to what each of the Lincolns' favorite cookies were, we have an idea that at least some of them liked macaroons. The Lincolns purchased macaroon pyramids more than once from Watson's Confectionary store downtown, usually coinciding with some sort of party at their house. Today, we have a much less sticky (and very fake) coconut macaroon pyramid on exhibit as part of the holiday decorations.

Mary Lincoln had a recipe for "Cocoa-Nut Maccaroons" [sic] in her Eliza Leslie's cookbook that were a little different from both the pyramid we show, and what most people think of now. If you are feeling experimental, given the lack of exact measurements in the recipe, and want to make these cookies, please let us know how they turn out!

Cocoa-nut Maccaroons--Beat to a stiff froth the whites of six eggs, and then beat into it very hard a pound of powdered loaf-sugar. Mix with it a pound of grated cocoa-nut, or sufficient to make a stiff paste. Then flour your hands, and mike it up into little balls. Lay them on sheets of buttered white paper, and bake them in a brisk oven; first grating loaf-sugar over each. They will be done in a few minutes. (Eliza Leslie "Directions for cookery in its Various Branches [reprint], pg. 352.)

Good Luck with the "Maccaroons" or tell us what your favorite holiday cookie is instead!

Alt text: Photo 1: detail of photo showing cut Styrofoam balls covered in paper shreds piled into a pyramid. Brown hot glue is drizzled all over with artificial holly berries and leaves scattered. Photo 2: Photo of wooden table holding desserts including a pumpkin pie wreathed in holly leaves, fruit piled up in a white basket-like holder, a white macaroon pyramid, a white cake with almonds on a glass pedestal wreathed in holly, a brown roll cake dusted with "sugar" on a plate, and a small glass pedestal bowl filled with nuts.

Have you ever started to walk over to something and forgotten what you've gone over there for?? It seems to happen to ev...
12/11/2023

Have you ever started to walk over to something and forgotten what you've gone over there for?? It seems to happen to everyone at one time or another. Caretaker Osborn Oldroyd appears to be lost in thought as he stands in front of the Lincoln Home around 1890. Is he contemplating a new paint job for the Home (it does look a little faded), or perhaps searching for a lost visitor? (He had set up a "museum" of sorts in several rooms to display his extensive collection of Lincoln and Civil War artifacts and memorabilia.) Or maybe he saw the photographer setting up in the street and decided to photobomb the view. (You thought that was just a 21st Century thing?? ☺ )

Whatever the reason, we're happy to have this photo in the collection to record not only the appearance and condition of the Lincoln Home, but also the actual caretaker. Osborn Oldroyd is the only one of the many caretakers that was photographed at the Home. So he may have ruined the photographer's shot, but Oldroyd gave us a unique image in Lincoln Home history.

Alt-text: Sepia tone photo shows west (front) & south sides of Lincoln Home; large tree in front, other houses immediately next to and behind, other outbuildings in back; A man in a bowler hat stands near corner, looking away from camera. A hitching post is visible on the left at end of sidewalk.

Lincoln Home National Historic Site will host the play “A Message at Midnight” December 8 at 6p.m., December 9 at 3p.m.,...
12/07/2023

Lincoln Home National Historic Site will host the play “A Message at Midnight” December 8 at 6p.m., December 9 at 3p.m., and December 10 at 3p.m. in the Visitor Center, 426 S 7th Street. Featuring Randy Duncan as Abraham Lincoln, Pam Brown as Mary Lincoln and Dennis Rendleman as Ulysses S. Grant. Play lasts approximately 45 minutes, admission free.

Audiences will be taken back in time to December 24, 1864. The play follows President Lincoln as he waits for General Grant to arrive at the White House on Christmas Eve. Amid all the festivities, the Civil War still drags on. Lincoln and Grant hope to hear news from General Sherman of his campaign towards Savannah. News of victory will help ensure the passage of the 13th amendment and provide a much-needed morale boost for the North. News of defeat may be the final blow to the hopes of national reunion and freedom of the enslaved. The play begins as Lincoln paces and midnight approaches.

ALT TEXT Photo 1: a promotional image for the play, showing the NPS Arrowhead logo above a Christmas Tree. Beneath reads: "A Message at Midnight: A Holiday Play. December 8 at 6 pm, December 9 at 3 pm & December 10 at 3 pm. At Visitor Center. Attendance is free and open to the public."

ALT TEXT Photo 2: A photo depicting the three cast members of the play in costume during a performance. Randy Duncan as Lincoln shakes hands with Dennis Rendleman as Ulysses S. Grant while Pam Brown as Mary Lincoln looks out happily toward the audience.

Remember the Beanie Baby craze in the 1990s? Did you know that there was a "Lincoln" version at one time? (unofficially,...
12/04/2023

Remember the Beanie Baby craze in the 1990s? Did you know that there was a "Lincoln" version at one time? (unofficially, of course--this is not an actual Beanie Baby). This Lincoln doll, and later a Mary Lincoln version, were all the rage in Springfield. One thing no one could figure out though, was why he was wearing a gray suit. Lincoln was never photographed in a gray suit. Oh well, that must be "artistic license."

Alt-text: plush doll shaped like a man wearing a gray suit and top hat. The doll's hair and beard are also plush fabric and sewn in place.

It's   day! Apparently, this references a Broadway musical about the International Ladies Garment Workers Union that ran...
11/27/2023

It's day! Apparently, this references a Broadway musical about the International Ladies Garment Workers Union that ran from 1937-1940 and rarely since. However, at Lincoln Home NHS, we're taking it a face value to highlight some of the many sewing accessories we have around the Lincoln Home, and to highlight Mary Lincoln's sewing skills! During restorations and archeology around the Home, hundreds of pins, needles, buttons, beads, and cloth have been found and carefully saved. It might seem a little silly to save such commonplace items, but they tell us a valuable story. We knew Mary Lincoln sewed and enjoyed some fine embroidery hobbies, but we weren't always sure where she would work on projects in the house. Finding all of these in the floorboards in two places in the Home gave us proof of where she was sewing--the upper hall with a large bright west window and a view of the street for keeping an eye on the boys, and in her bedroom with two north windows for a softer, more indirect light, perfect for fine stitching.

Do you like to sew? Or are you more of an embroiderer? Next time you're working on a hand-stitched project, think of Mary Lincoln and feel the kinship! ☺️

Alt text: Photo 1: triangular-shaped pincushion covered in black fabric, with black tassels on points and two silver pins stuck in center. Photo 2: corroded pile of metal straight pins found in floor of Mary Lincoln's bedroom. Photo 3: paper packet with white label marked "H. MILWARD & SONS PATENT HELIX NEEDLES, SHARPS 10 PATENT WRAPPERS, J.F. MILWARD SOLE AGENT"

Have you ever wanted to read 200 year old documents and help tell the story of the first U.S. veterans? Well now you can...
11/21/2023

Have you ever wanted to read 200 year old documents and help tell the story of the first U.S. veterans? Well now you can! In honor of America's upcoming 250th birthday, the National Park Service is collaborating with the National Archives to transcribe more than 80,000 pension records of American Revolution soldiers and their families – handwritten stories of their service and lives. The National Park Service is in search of citizen volunteer archivists to transcribe these records so their stories can be told. If you are interested in volunteering or just want more information about the project, you can visit https://go.nps.gov/RevWarPensionProject

Alt text:
Image 1: A drawing of an American Revolutionary War soldier in uniform with the text, "I need you to help tell my story."
Image 2: A drawing of a mother and child with the text, "I need you to help tell my story."

Image Credits: NPS

US National Archives

A few weeks after Abraham Lincoln was elected President, the Illinois Republicans held a ratification meeting in Springf...
11/20/2023

A few weeks after Abraham Lincoln was elected President, the Illinois Republicans held a ratification meeting in Springfield. Lincoln did not speak but helped write the principal speaker's address. Lincoln may not have attended the meeting at all as he was busy talking to the local "Wide-Awakes" who had paraded in front of his house on their way to the meeting. (The Wide-Awakes were groups of young men and boys who supported Lincoln and the Republican party throughout the country.) They most likely serenaded the Lincolns with some of the songs listed from the "Wide-Awake Vocalist," which had been distributed nationally to the groups. Most of the tunes were familiar to the groups--it was just the words that were changed to reflect the issues and people running in the campaign.

None of these songs are going to hit the Billboard Top 100 today because they are so event-specific and wouldn't really make sense in today's society. Some of the songs unfortunately also use language that is offensive--a reminder that history isn't always what we wish it would be.

On this day, November 19th, we celebrate the 160th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. The Gettysburg A...
11/19/2023

On this day, November 19th, we celebrate the 160th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. The Gettysburg Address became one of the most famous speeches in United States history and is recognized as one of the most powerful expressions of freedom and liberty.

Following the bloody Battle of Gettysburg, several states felt their soldiers deserved better resting places than the original shallow graves on Gettysburg Battlefield. Gettysburg citizen David Wills convinced Pennsylvania to purchase seventeen acres of the battlefield to have the soldiers properly buried. The dedication of Gettysburg National Cemetery occurred on November 19, 1863. At the dedication ceremony, famed orator Edward Everett was the featured speaker, with President Lincoln asked to offer a few remarks. Approximately 15,000 people heard Everett's two hour speech and Lincoln's two minute speech. In two minutes, Lincoln was able to connect the current struggle to the signing of the Declaration of Independence, mentioning the principles the United States was founded on. He also tied both events to the abolition of slavery and the maintenance of representative government. The Gettysburg Address was an important point in the Civil War, and Lincoln's words still inspire people today, 160 years later.

Alt Text:
Image 1: Illustrated depiction of Abraham Lincoln delivering the Gettysburg Address to a large crowd of people.
Image 2: The Gettysburg Address given by Abraham Lincoln on November 19, 1863.

Image Credits:
Image 1: Library of Congress
Image 2: NPS

What time is it?   time of course! This week we are answering the ever-popular question, "Did the Lincolns host events a...
11/17/2023

What time is it? time of course! This week we are answering the ever-popular question, "Did the Lincolns host events at their home?"

The short answer is yes, they did! Mary Lincoln loved to entertain guests, and her southern hospitality made her a popular hostess. Abraham Lincoln was also a popular politician and lawyer who lived in Illinois's state capital which meant that there were always events to attend or host. Once, Mary invited 500 guests to a party hosted in the Lincoln Home. To her disappointment, only 300 of them attended, but their friend Orville H. Browning described it as a "large and pleasant party." This may seem like a very large gathering (and it is), but it illustrates Lincoln's social and political ambitions.

There were also several seasonal events that were popular at the time. One of these was known as Receiving Day, which was a popular holiday tradition that involved hosting and attending open houses on New Year's Day. A part of this tradition was the presentation of calling cards when visiting someone's home. The calling cards were often placed on a silver dish or in a basket. The size of a card differed on the basis of the s*x of the caller--a man's card was half the size of a woman's card. Cards with their upper right-hand corner folded over were sent to inform the receiver of a visit. Cards with their upper left-hand corner folded over were sent to inform the receiver of any necessary congratulations. The Lincolns also took part, both as hosts and visitors, in the New Year's tradition. In 1860 Mary Lincoln wrote to her friend Hanna Shearer "tomorrow I must rise early, as it is receiving day."

There were many traditions and events hosted at the Lincoln Home. To learn more about these visit us today!

Alt Text:
Image 1: A holiday food and drink display in the Lincoln's sitting room with a tea set, fruit, cake, pie, and other desserts on a table.
Image 2: A tan colored Receiving Day calling card with "A. Lincoln" written on it.

Image Credits: NPS

We're buggin' out over here! Well, not really, but there are lots of bugs outside! Just like any outdoor space, the Linc...
11/15/2023

We're buggin' out over here! Well, not really, but there are lots of bugs outside! Just like any outdoor space, the Lincoln Home National Historic Site is home to lots of little bug guys. Most of the insects that you will find around here are common to Illinois, but that doesn't make them any less special. Just remember that it's okay to take pictures of our bug friends but let them be, this is their home too!

Alt Text:
Image 1: An orange monarch butterfly with black accents and white spots perched on a plant.
Image 2: A green stink bug with black spots and orange accents on a white fence.
Image 3: Two brownish grey cicada shells attached to tree bark.
Image 4: A greenish brown mantis sitting on a fence post.
Image 5: A black-and-yellow mud dauber wasp sitting on a white fence.

Image Credits: NPS

After Abraham Lincoln was elected, newspapers published hundreds of stories about him and his family. Images of the Linc...
11/13/2023

After Abraham Lincoln was elected, newspapers published hundreds of stories about him and his family. Images of the Lincoln Home appeared throughout publications, which is great for historians and preservationists today because we get many ideas of what the house looked like at the time. We also get a chance to see some great advertisements of the time--look at the range of things listed! Everything from sewing and washing machines to pianos and men's shirts...and a few "interesting" products as well. Some of the products are still familiar today--Singer Sewing Machines and Smith & Wesson guns are around today. Not sure the Essenwein's Tar and Wood Naphtha or J.R. Stafford's Iron and Sulphur powders should really be best sellers today--they sound a little dangerous to a person's health!

See anything you wish you could still buy today?

Yay, it's Friday! Even better, it's  ! That means that you have a question, and we have an answer. This week's question ...
11/10/2023

Yay, it's Friday! Even better, it's ! That means that you have a question, and we have an answer. This week's question is, "What happened to the other Lincoln children?"

Abraham and Mary Lincoln had four boys, but only one of them lived into adulthood. Robert Lincoln, the oldest, lived into adulthood and had a family of his own. The three younger children did not fare the same fates, unfortunately. Edward "Eddie" Lincoln was the second Lincoln child, born on March 10, 1846. Eddie passed away at a very young age, dying at the age of three after a long illness in the family home on February 1, 1850. William "Willie" Lincoln was the third Lincoln son, born on December 21, 1850. Willie passed away in the White House at the age of 11 on February 20, 1862 from an illness as well. Thomas "Tad" Lincoln was the youngest Lincoln child, born on April 4, 1853. Tad lived the second longest of the boys, passing away at the age of 18 on July 15, 1871 from an illness acquired during a return trip from Europe. Each death impacted the Lincoln family profoundly and shaped their lives in different ways.

To learn more about the Lincoln children, visit the Lincoln Home today!

Alt Text: Willie and Tad Lincoln posing for a photo with their older cousin Lockwood Todd.

Image Credit: Library of Congress (1861)

It's Election Day 1860. No matter what the outcome, the Lincolns lives had changed.  How could they spend the day quietl...
11/06/2023

It's Election Day 1860. No matter what the outcome, the Lincolns lives had changed. How could they spend the day quietly at work in their office, sewing up a hole in the knee of a boy's pants, or playing with Fido and the cats after school? Nonetheless, it appears that that is exactly what the Lincolns did. The only change was that around 3:00, Lincoln walked out of his temporary office at the State House (now the Old State Capitol State Historic Site) to the polling place in the courthouse across the street, cut his name off of the ballot and voted a straight Republican ticket. Check! That's done!

in 1860, Lincoln was elected the 16th President of the United States.

Alt-text: Photo of a reversed U.S. flag. The upper right corner is solid blue without stars. The rest of the flag is alternating red and white stripes with "Lincoln and Hamlin" on the three middle white stripes.

Today is a very special day in Lincoln history! Not for any historical significance, but for personal importance. Today ...
11/04/2023

Today is a very special day in Lincoln history! Not for any historical significance, but for personal importance. Today is the Lincolns' 181st wedding anniversary! Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd were married on November 4, 1842 in Springfield, IL. Mary's wedding ring was inscribed with the words, "A.L. to Mary, Nov. 4, 1842. Love is Eternal." They had been married for 22 years when Abraham Lincoln passed away in April 1865. Today we celebrate the relationship between Abraham and Mary Lincoln and the family that they created here in Springfield!

Alt Text: A floral graphic with photos of Abraham and Mary Lincoln and text reading "Happy 181st Wedding Anniversary Abraham and Mary Lincoln, November 4, 1842".

Image Credit: NPS

Hello one and all, welcome back to another   post! This week the question we will be answering from visitors at the Linc...
11/03/2023

Hello one and all, welcome back to another post! This week the question we will be answering from visitors at the Lincoln Home is, "How much did Lincoln make as a lawyer?"

Many people know that Abraham Lincoln was a lawyer before he became president. Recently, we discussed Lincoln's legal career and the types of cases that he worked on. A natural follow up question to this could be, "how much money did he make from these?" If you visit the Lincoln Home, you might also be impressed by the size and design of his home, or the decorations and furniture inside of it and wonder the same thing.

Lincoln's first law partner was John Todd Stuart. Stuart and Lincoln kept an office fee book as a record of their legal fees. According to their fee book, the partners generally received $5 to $10 for legal fees. Stuart and Lincoln typically divided the fees equally. Lincoln's final law partner was William Herndon. Lincoln and Herndon typically charged their clients $5 to $20 for legal fees. Unfortunately, there are only a few years that Lincoln and his partners actually documented their legal fees.

To learn more about Abraham Lincoln's law career or to ask any other questions you may have, visit the Lincoln Home!

Alt Text: Abraham Lincoln portrait taken in Danville, IL while he worked as a traveling lawyer.

Image Credits: Amon T. Joslin, Library of Congress (1857)

This past weekend was our annual Halloween event! Thank you to everyone who volunteered to make this event possible and ...
11/02/2023

This past weekend was our annual Halloween event! Thank you to everyone who volunteered to make this event possible and all of the generous donors who provided candy! Another thanks to those of you that came out to celebrate with us! Also, a shoutout to the Cool Cruisers car club for arriving in style and bringing their vehicles to display, and the Springfield Amateur Radio Club for bringing their equipment out. Even though it ended up being a very rainy night, we made the most of it! Enjoy some of the photos from before the rain, and we look forward to seeing you all again next year!

Alt Text:
Image 1: A wagon with hay bales and pumpkins parked in front of the Lincoln Home.
Image 2: A person passing out candy to children in Halloween costumes.
Image 3: Two people in "Scream" costumes passing out candy to children in Halloween costumes.
Image 4: Two people in clown costumes standing behind a fence and passing out candy to children in Halloween costumes.
Image 5: Three people standing on a house porch with bowls for Halloween candy.
Image 6: A group of people passing out candy to children in Halloween costumes.
Image 7: Abraham and Mary Lincoln actors posing with a child in a Halloween costume in front of the Lincoln Home.
Image 8: Two people passing out Halloween candy and a person dressed as a scary pumpkin.
Image 9: Old cars parked in a row at the Lincoln Home National Historic Site as part of the car show.
Image 10: Large skeleton and large spider Halloween decorations next to a historic home.

Image Credits: NPS

Cool Cruisers

Have you ever had the opportunity to look inside an old clock? It's tradition that anyone making repairs to an old clock...
10/30/2023

Have you ever had the opportunity to look inside an old clock? It's tradition that anyone making repairs to an old clock is supposed to add their signature and at least the year of the repair. On this circa 1845 clock, the signatures, all in pencil, are on the back of the mirrored section and are somewhat illegible. One signature that is clear, however, is the manufacturer: C. Boardman from Connecticut. Although we do not choose to wind it, it is in working order.

"Spooky" fact: the hands used to be set at 7:22, the time Lincoln died on the morning of April 15th. However, since this is not Lincoln-associated, nor was it appropriate to imply something supernatural with it, it was decided to change the hands and eliminate any questions about a potentially haunted clock!

Alt-text: Wooden framed shelf clock with round clock face, open in center to show brass works, in a square frame. The numbers are all Roman numerals. Under the clock face is a rectangular mirror. Set against floral wallpaper from the Lincoln Home Dining Room.

Last weekend the Lincoln Home hosted an adoption event in partnership with the Animal Protective League (APL)! Not only ...
10/29/2023

Last weekend the Lincoln Home hosted an adoption event in partnership with the Animal Protective League (APL)! Not only did people come out to see some cute cats and dogs, but some furry friends even found new homes! Big thanks to the APL for making this event possible!

Alt Text:
Image 1: Two people standing and one person kneeling while holding a small black and white kitten in front of a mobile adoption unit.
Image 2: A person sitting in the grass with a brown dog.
Image 3: A Mary Lincoln actor sitting on a bench next to a sign advertising an adoption event with a mobile adoption unit in the background.

Image Credits: NPS

Animal Protective League

The spookiest day of the year has finally arrived! No, not Halloween, the Lincoln Home Halloween Event! Make sure to sto...
10/28/2023

The spookiest day of the year has finally arrived! No, not Halloween, the Lincoln Home Halloween Event! Make sure to stop by the Lincoln Home National Historic Site today (October 28th) from 5:30-7 pm for trick-or-treating, a costume contest, food drive, Abraham and Mary Lincoln actors, and other activities. If you love Halloween, candy, or Abraham Lincoln, come to the Lincoln Home (located at 426 S. 7th Street, Springfield IL 62701) for a frightfully fun evening!

Alt Text: A spooky, Halloween graphic advertising the Lincoln Home Halloween event with a jack-o-lantern, dog in a ghost costume, and fall photo of the Lincoln Home. Text states: "Lincoln Home trick or treat. October 28, 5:30-7 pm. Free candy, costume contest, food drive, Abraham and Mary Lincoln actors, and other activities!"

Happy Friday everyone! It is time for the one, the only,  . This week will be answering the important question, "What ba...
10/27/2023

Happy Friday everyone! It is time for the one, the only, . This week will be answering the important question, "What background did Mary come from?"

Most people know Abraham Lincoln's story. He was born in a log cabin in Kentucky, received less than a year of formal education, and taught himself how to read. Mary Todd came from almost an opposite background. Mary was born on December 13, 1818, in Lexington, Kentucky to a wealthy, political family. Her father, Robert Smith Todd was a prominent businessman and politician who provided Mary and her siblings with social standing, education, and material advantages. Mary attended Ward's Academy for school, and when she was fourteen started at Madame Mentelle's French School for Girls. This boarding school provided her with an extensive education and a fluency in French. The large home Mary was raised in was maintained by enslaved men and women. It was there that Mary met and spoke with influential political and business guests. Mary grew up in a world of privilege and prestige, very different from her husband's humble beginnings.

To learn more about Mary or to see the home she lived in with her husband, visit Lincoln Home today!

Alt Text:
Image 1: A large, red Victorian style home that is the SITE of the birth and childhood home of Mary Todd in Lexington, KY. The home was torn down and replaced with the one pictured below.
Image 2: A two-story, brick building that is the teen-years home of Mary Todd in Lexington, KY.

Image Credits (1-2): Carol M. Highsmith, Library of Congress (2020)

Join us this Sunday (October 29, 2023) at 3:00 pm for a Mary Lincoln Q and A! This Sunday in Theater 1 inside of the Lin...
10/26/2023

Join us this Sunday (October 29, 2023) at 3:00 pm for a Mary Lincoln Q and A! This Sunday in Theater 1 inside of the Lincoln Home National Historic Site Visitor Center, a Mary Lincoln actor will be sharing stories and answering audience questions. If you are interested in hearing stories about the Lincolns, learning more about their family, or have a question you've always wished you could ask Mary, come down to the Lincoln Home this weekend!

Alt Text: A blue graphic with Mary Lincoln actor and the text, "Q and A with Mary Lincoln. Sunday, October 29th, 3:00 PM. Theater 1 in the Visitor Center, Lincoln Home National Historic Site. 426 South 7th Street, Springfield, IL. A Mary Lincoln actor will be sharing stories and taking audience questions! Come prepared with any topics or inquiries you want answered!"

Image Credit: NPS

Did you know that   in 1915, the first national horseshoe throwing championship was held in Kellerton, Iowa? Before you ...
10/23/2023

Did you know that in 1915, the first national horseshoe throwing championship was held in Kellerton, Iowa? Before you head out to the court to celebrate by pitching a few games, take a moment to take some of the luck of a horseshoe with you--always displayed ends up to keep the luck from spilling out, of course. But why is a horseshoe considered lucky anyway? According to the Kentucky Derby Museum, "horseshoes became synonymous with luck in 969 AD when St. Dunstan, the patron saint of blacksmiths in the Catholic Church, tricked the devil. There are several versions to the story, but all agree that in the legend St. Dunstan shoed the Devil’s own cloven hoof with great force and pain. After the excruciating ordeal, the devil agreed to never enter over a threshold with a horseshoe nailed above it, being fearful of the tiny crescent-shaped object."

This horseshoe was found, along with several others, near the site of a small blacksmith shop across the street and a little south of the Lincoln Home. The shop burned down over 100 years ago, and a shed/barn built over the site, but the remnants of the work that was done in the shop are now well documented. That's very lucky for historians!!

Of course in Springfield, a horseshoe has an entirely different, much cheesier, meaning...😁

Address

426 S 7th Street
Springfield, IL
62701

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 9am - 5pm
Saturday 9am - 5pm
Sunday 9am - 5pm

Telephone

+12174924241

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