VFW Post 4562 Texarkana, Arkansas

VFW Post 4562  Texarkana, Arkansas Currently VFW post 4562 is open on Friday nights with a live band. One of the biggest dance floors around.

Operating as usual

01/06/2022

***NOTICE***
VFW Post 4562 will be closed
January 7th and 14th, 2022.
Sorry for the late notice.
Please help us spread the word‼️

January 6, 2022
01/06/2022

January 6, 2022

January 6, 2022

From our VFW 4562 home to yours, we wish a Very Merry Christmas to you and yours ‼️
12/19/2021

From our VFW 4562 home to yours, we wish a Very Merry Christmas to you and yours ‼️

From our VFW 4562 home to yours, we wish a Very Merry Christmas to you and yours ‼️

12/13/2021
12/12/2021

VFW 4562 will be closed CHRISTMAS EVE, December 24, 2021, to allow everyone to spend time with family and friends…but the next week, NEW YEARS EVE, December 31, 2021, the house will be rockin with DURANGO as we say goodbye to 2021 and welcome in 2022‼️‼️‼️. Reserve your table now or at the door. 🎉🎉🎉

Reserve your table soon before your favorite spot is taken ‼️‼️
12/12/2021

Reserve your table soon before your favorite spot is taken ‼️‼️

Reserve your table soon before your favorite spot is taken ‼️‼️

11/26/2021

Just a reminder…there will not be a dance held tonight. We will pick up next week with our regular band rotation!

11/25/2021
Photos from VFW Post 4562  Texarkana, Arkansas's post
11/14/2021

Photos from VFW Post 4562 Texarkana, Arkansas's post

Shoutout to Sam’s Club today for their Fallen Soldier Table ❤️
11/14/2021

Shoutout to Sam’s Club today for their Fallen Soldier Table ❤️

Shoutout to Sam’s Club today for their Fallen Soldier Table ❤️

WooHoo 2nd place Veterans Day Parade float ‼️
11/14/2021

WooHoo 2nd place Veterans Day Parade float ‼️

WooHoo 2nd place Veterans Day Parade float ‼️

11/14/2021
One of the best traits a service member can have is often the ability to navigate change.  Believe it or not, military s...
11/09/2021

One of the best traits a service member can have is often the ability to navigate change. Believe it or not, military service, and a canoe navigating a river have much more in common than most people realize. Just like a canoe on a river, once you join the military, a servicemember is often at the mercy of the current. In both situations you can make slight alterations to your path, but in both you are often just along for the ride. There is no better example of this concept than the military career of Michael Rhodes, the current Commander of VFW Post 4562.

In 1991 Mr. Rhodes joined the Navy, and was first trained to be a cook. However, after arriving at his first duty station in Japan, instead of cooking, Mr. Rhodes volunteered for the Dependent Assistance Team. This group was charged with helping the families of those service members currently on deployment navigate the chaos that deployment can bring. Because Mr. Rhodes has a servant’s heart, and a desire to help those around him, this position was an immediate fit. During this same time period the base had a shortage of shore patrol officers, and seeing the need…the servant’s heart kicked in once again, and Mr. Rhodes volunteered to assume the additional duties of a shore patrol officer. Mr. Rhodes never stopped trying to help those in need, he always believed he could make a difference. During his time in Japan Mr. Rhodes became fluent in Japanese, so when the local civilian police force needed officers that could speak both English and Japanese, he volunteered and joined as a translator. Mr. Rhodes knew that by eliminating the language barrier, it often helped deescalate situations that could otherwise get out of control.

In 1993, Mr. Rhodes volunteered to go to Kuwait, initially as a Dependent Assistance Team member, but when the need arose, he ended up on the U.S.S. Blueridge…as a personal cook for an admiral. Luckily, the three-month tour on the U.S.S. Blueridge went without incident, and he returned to Japan to continue his many duties. During his six years in Japan, Mr. Rhodes taught English, coached soccer, and if that wasn’t enough, became an on base taxi driver.

At the completion of his time in Japan, Mr. Rhodes was assigned to the U.S.S. Nimitz, an aircraft carrier stationed in Bremerton, Washington. Once he arrived at the ship, he volunteered for assignment in the supply department, and was assigned as a shore-based supply officer. After the ship received orders to deploy to the Persian Gulf, Mr. Rhodes and his team flew to Kuwait to meet up with the ship to continue his duties as a supply officer. While in Kuwait awaiting transfer to the ship, an issue with timing forced the convoy to the ship to leave earlier than expected. Had the convoy left on time, Mr. Rhodes would very likely have been killed, as at the time the convoy was originally scheduled to depart, a car bomb detonated outside the hotel destroying the area where he was staying.

During the Persian Gulf deployment, the U.S.S. Nimitz’s mission was to provide air superiority for the Gulf theater. As was typical, the sailors would often go to a catwalk area of the flight deck to watch the planes takeoff and land. It was during a routine landing that Mr. Rhodes supervisor was tragically killed when an arresting cable broke at full tension. This loss hit Mr. Rhodes hard, as the supervisor had been an integral part in his growth and development. After a detour from the Gulf towards China, the Nimitz returned to Washington to enter drydock for much needed upgrades, and Mr. Rhodes time with the ship ended.

You would think that serving as a cook, shore patrol officer, and a supply officer would be enough for anyone…but for Mr. Rhodes, this was not the case. After his time with the Nimitz was complete, Mr. Rhodes volunteered to become a SEABEE. To accomplish this, he made the transfer from active duty to reserve status, and was assigned to NMSB28 in Little Rock, Arkansas. During his time as a SEABEE, he learned to operate many forms of construction equipment. His time as a SEABEE was the happiest of his military career. So now…surely…after being a cook, shore patrol officer, a supply officer, and a SEABEE, Mr. Rhodes could confidently call it a career. Well…not so quick…not satisfied with calling it a career, he discharged from the Navy and joined the Arkansas Army National Guard as an engineer. Sadly, not long after joining the Guard, a training related injury caused his military career to come to an end. However, this is not the end of his story.

While his military career may have ended, the fight for veterans mental and physical well being had just began. Between his active duty advocacy, and his post-military activities with the VFW, Mr. Rhodes has dedicated almost 30 years to ensuring veterans and their families receive the help and resources that they need. During his time as VFW State District 10 Commander, and continuing with his time a Commander of VFW Post 4562, Mr. Rhodes has made mental heath and su***de prevention a cornerstone of his leadership agenda. While his military service is something to be thankful for, it is his actions after leaving the service that have made such a positive impact on the local veteran community. We want to thank Michael Rhodes, not only for his sixteen years of military service, but for his almost thirty years of advocating for our local veterans.

One of the best traits a service member can have is often the ability to navigate change. Believe it or not, military service, and a canoe navigating a river have much more in common than most people realize. Just like a canoe on a river, once you join the military, a servicemember is often at the mercy of the current. In both situations you can make slight alterations to your path, but in both you are often just along for the ride. There is no better example of this concept than the military career of Michael Rhodes, the current Commander of VFW Post 4562.

In 1991 Mr. Rhodes joined the Navy, and was first trained to be a cook. However, after arriving at his first duty station in Japan, instead of cooking, Mr. Rhodes volunteered for the Dependent Assistance Team. This group was charged with helping the families of those service members currently on deployment navigate the chaos that deployment can bring. Because Mr. Rhodes has a servant’s heart, and a desire to help those around him, this position was an immediate fit. During this same time period the base had a shortage of shore patrol officers, and seeing the need…the servant’s heart kicked in once again, and Mr. Rhodes volunteered to assume the additional duties of a shore patrol officer. Mr. Rhodes never stopped trying to help those in need, he always believed he could make a difference. During his time in Japan Mr. Rhodes became fluent in Japanese, so when the local civilian police force needed officers that could speak both English and Japanese, he volunteered and joined as a translator. Mr. Rhodes knew that by eliminating the language barrier, it often helped deescalate situations that could otherwise get out of control.

In 1993, Mr. Rhodes volunteered to go to Kuwait, initially as a Dependent Assistance Team member, but when the need arose, he ended up on the U.S.S. Blueridge…as a personal cook for an admiral. Luckily, the three-month tour on the U.S.S. Blueridge went without incident, and he returned to Japan to continue his many duties. During his six years in Japan, Mr. Rhodes taught English, coached soccer, and if that wasn’t enough, became an on base taxi driver.

At the completion of his time in Japan, Mr. Rhodes was assigned to the U.S.S. Nimitz, an aircraft carrier stationed in Bremerton, Washington. Once he arrived at the ship, he volunteered for assignment in the supply department, and was assigned as a shore-based supply officer. After the ship received orders to deploy to the Persian Gulf, Mr. Rhodes and his team flew to Kuwait to meet up with the ship to continue his duties as a supply officer. While in Kuwait awaiting transfer to the ship, an issue with timing forced the convoy to the ship to leave earlier than expected. Had the convoy left on time, Mr. Rhodes would very likely have been killed, as at the time the convoy was originally scheduled to depart, a car bomb detonated outside the hotel destroying the area where he was staying.

During the Persian Gulf deployment, the U.S.S. Nimitz’s mission was to provide air superiority for the Gulf theater. As was typical, the sailors would often go to a catwalk area of the flight deck to watch the planes takeoff and land. It was during a routine landing that Mr. Rhodes supervisor was tragically killed when an arresting cable broke at full tension. This loss hit Mr. Rhodes hard, as the supervisor had been an integral part in his growth and development. After a detour from the Gulf towards China, the Nimitz returned to Washington to enter drydock for much needed upgrades, and Mr. Rhodes time with the ship ended.

You would think that serving as a cook, shore patrol officer, and a supply officer would be enough for anyone…but for Mr. Rhodes, this was not the case. After his time with the Nimitz was complete, Mr. Rhodes volunteered to become a SEABEE. To accomplish this, he made the transfer from active duty to reserve status, and was assigned to NMSB28 in Little Rock, Arkansas. During his time as a SEABEE, he learned to operate many forms of construction equipment. His time as a SEABEE was the happiest of his military career. So now…surely…after being a cook, shore patrol officer, a supply officer, and a SEABEE, Mr. Rhodes could confidently call it a career. Well…not so quick…not satisfied with calling it a career, he discharged from the Navy and joined the Arkansas Army National Guard as an engineer. Sadly, not long after joining the Guard, a training related injury caused his military career to come to an end. However, this is not the end of his story.

While his military career may have ended, the fight for veterans mental and physical well being had just began. Between his active duty advocacy, and his post-military activities with the VFW, Mr. Rhodes has dedicated almost 30 years to ensuring veterans and their families receive the help and resources that they need. During his time as VFW State District 10 Commander, and continuing with his time a Commander of VFW Post 4562, Mr. Rhodes has made mental heath and su***de prevention a cornerstone of his leadership agenda. While his military service is something to be thankful for, it is his actions after leaving the service that have made such a positive impact on the local veteran community. We want to thank Michael Rhodes, not only for his sixteen years of military service, but for his almost thirty years of advocating for our local veterans.

11/08/2021
Support Our Veterans I VFW Post 4562

A huge thank you to John and Anna with 103.9 The Pig radio for their support!! We are so lucky to have such wonderful community partners.

11/02/2021

***ATTENTION CURRENT MEMBERS ***

VFW Post 4562 Veterans and VFW Post 4562 Auxiliary Members are cordially invited to bring one guest and attend a fellowship to honor our member veterans and in celebration of Veterans Day.
November 11, 2021
6:30 - 8:00 pm
Fried catfish, fries, hushpuppies, slaw, and tea will be served followed by cake and ice cream. Additional beverages will be available for purchase.

RSVP
is appreciated by
comment here to allow
for ample servings

A short joint meeting will follow the festivities at 8:00pm

Thankfully not every story includes combat.  Thankfully not every story includes the horrors of war.  Thankfully not eve...
10/20/2021

Thankfully not every story includes combat. Thankfully not every story includes the horrors of war. Thankfully not every story includes loss. But, what each and every veteran’s story includes is the concept of sacrifice. Very few young people are willing to walk away from the only thing they know…home. Not everyone is willing to commit to years of service in which you have little to no control of the outcome. The truth is, no one that serves exists the military as the same person that went in…it changes you. Military services changes the way you think, it changes the way you carry yourself, it changes the way you see the world. The willingness to serve, and if need be, give your own life in the defense of your country is something that deserves our respect.

With the passage of time, it is easy to forget just how much fear the Cold War brought to the U.S.. From stockpiling non-perishable food, to constructing bomb shelters in our basements, Americans grew increasingly weary of the Soviet threat. This week’s veteran spotlight focuses on John Hicks, a man that played a role in the protection of our homeland, from both home and abroad.

Mr. Hicks lost his mother at an early age. The loss of his mother, combined with the stress the long hours his father had to put in at work to keep the family together left him lost and looking for direction. It was at this low point in his life that Mr. Hicks finally found his pathway, he joined the Army.

In 1959 the Korean War was over, but the rebuilding of South Korea was just beginning. Many of the structures near the DMZ still showed the scars of years of relentless battle. Being an infantryman, Mr. Hicks first assignment was to an infantry unit near the DMZ. While the peace was holding, it was on the edge of everyone’s mind whether the north would continue to honor the agreement. Luckily the peace held, and Mr. Hicks had a peaceful deployment.

When he went back to the U.S., Mr. Hicks thought he would transition to a National Guard unit and return home to Hope, Arkansas, and a more normal life. However, fate had other plans. When he first enlisted in the National Guard Unit, the unit was at their annual summer training, so Mr. Hicks was unaware that the unit had been tasked for an upcoming deployment. When the unit completed training, the unit, along with Mr. Hicks, were federalized and deployed to provide military support and protection for New Orleans…Mr. Hicks was back on active duty.

As the Cuban threat was ramping up, the U.S. called on the military to protect the homeland. As a member of one of these units Mr. Hicks, now a rigger, provided support to the ships that would later allow the U.S. to successfully blockade Cuba and prevent the further escalation of the Cuban crisis. It was later discovered that these units would have been early targets if the Cuban situation not ended the way it did.

After serving a year in New Orleans, Mr. Hicks finally made it back to his home in Hope, Arkansas to finish out the remainder of his National Guard commitment. Throughout the interview Mr. Hicks kept mentioning the pride he felt in being able to play even a small role in helping keep our great nation safe. He felt like the military gave him the sense of direction he had been missing. Mr. Hicks, you should be proud of yourself, you were willing to serve during a time that so many others were not, and for that we thank you.

Thankfully not every story includes combat. Thankfully not every story includes the horrors of war. Thankfully not every story includes loss. But, what each and every veteran’s story includes is the concept of sacrifice. Very few young people are willing to walk away from the only thing they know…home. Not everyone is willing to commit to years of service in which you have little to no control of the outcome. The truth is, no one that serves exists the military as the same person that went in…it changes you. Military services changes the way you think, it changes the way you carry yourself, it changes the way you see the world. The willingness to serve, and if need be, give your own life in the defense of your country is something that deserves our respect.

With the passage of time, it is easy to forget just how much fear the Cold War brought to the U.S.. From stockpiling non-perishable food, to constructing bomb shelters in our basements, Americans grew increasingly weary of the Soviet threat. This week’s veteran spotlight focuses on John Hicks, a man that played a role in the protection of our homeland, from both home and abroad.

Mr. Hicks lost his mother at an early age. The loss of his mother, combined with the stress the long hours his father had to put in at work to keep the family together left him lost and looking for direction. It was at this low point in his life that Mr. Hicks finally found his pathway, he joined the Army.

In 1959 the Korean War was over, but the rebuilding of South Korea was just beginning. Many of the structures near the DMZ still showed the scars of years of relentless battle. Being an infantryman, Mr. Hicks first assignment was to an infantry unit near the DMZ. While the peace was holding, it was on the edge of everyone’s mind whether the north would continue to honor the agreement. Luckily the peace held, and Mr. Hicks had a peaceful deployment.

When he went back to the U.S., Mr. Hicks thought he would transition to a National Guard unit and return home to Hope, Arkansas, and a more normal life. However, fate had other plans. When he first enlisted in the National Guard Unit, the unit was at their annual summer training, so Mr. Hicks was unaware that the unit had been tasked for an upcoming deployment. When the unit completed training, the unit, along with Mr. Hicks, were federalized and deployed to provide military support and protection for New Orleans…Mr. Hicks was back on active duty.

As the Cuban threat was ramping up, the U.S. called on the military to protect the homeland. As a member of one of these units Mr. Hicks, now a rigger, provided support to the ships that would later allow the U.S. to successfully blockade Cuba and prevent the further escalation of the Cuban crisis. It was later discovered that these units would have been early targets if the Cuban situation not ended the way it did.

After serving a year in New Orleans, Mr. Hicks finally made it back to his home in Hope, Arkansas to finish out the remainder of his National Guard commitment. Throughout the interview Mr. Hicks kept mentioning the pride he felt in being able to play even a small role in helping keep our great nation safe. He felt like the military gave him the sense of direction he had been missing. Mr. Hicks, you should be proud of yourself, you were willing to serve during a time that so many others were not, and for that we thank you.

Address

4700 East 9th Street
Texarkana, AR
71854

Opening Hours

7pm - 12am

Telephone

(870) 772-1772

Website

http://vfw.org

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Comments

Congratulations to VFW post #4562! We received 2nd place for this years Veterans Day Parade. Thank you all who took part in getting this done, it looked great! Congrats to the DAV, post #222 for winning 1st place!
The VFW Post 4562 Texarkana, Arkansas supports our veterans and our community. The complete interview--->https://bit.ly/3kcptGv
VFW Post 4562 Texarkana, Arkansas will be headquarters for the "Operation Daily Battle Rally" August 27-29. There will be lots for all to do, and if you know any veterans that have not looked into the VFW, now is a really good time to visit with them. https://texarkanafyi.com/texarkana-vfw-motorcycle-group-operation-daily-battle-rally-set-for-august-27-29/
Hi folks, it's Jesse Lynch, bass player and founding member of Locked & Loaded. I just wanted to take this opportunity to say thank you to the management and the members of the post for your support. We agreed to work with the post on the monetary issues facing the post, and the generosity of the dancers has made it worthwhile for us. We love playing there, we love how the dancers fill the floor and how nice everybody is to us. One of our own is going through a medical procedure soon, and will not be with us for a few weeks, but we have lined up a very capable replacement to fill in for him. We promise to provide good dance music for you, and appreciate your confidence in us. Thank you.
We are hoping that you would add our flyer to your event page and calendar. We would also like to invite you to our event. Thanks Brick
We are hoping that you would post our flyer to your event page and calendar, we would like to invite you to our event also, thanks Brick VNVLV MC
We are hoping that you would post this on you event page and your calendar. Also that your member's will attend our event. Thank you Brick.
The members of Locked & Loaded would like to thank the members and management of the VFW for a great year of performing for you. We always enjoy playing there, makes a band feel really good when the dance floor is full on every song. We appreciate you using us as one of your regular bands, and we hope it continues for a long time. Thanks again, and we'll see you in 2020 !