The Woodlands Water Agency

The Woodlands Water Agency The Woodlands Water Agency
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Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Coralberry (Symphoricarpos orbiculatus). This is a small, mound-sha...
04/19/2021

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Coralberry (Symphoricarpos orbiculatus). This is a small, mound-shaped, deciduous shrub. It has shredding bark on older wood and brown to purplish branchlets covered with short hairs visible under a 10x hand lens. This plant usually grows to 2 ft. but can reach 6 ft. Its smooth, dull green leaves are opposite and roughly oval, tapering about equally to tip and base, up to 2 inches long but often less than 1 inch, with smooth, turned down margins and a rounded or broadly pointed tip. The greenish-white flower clusters are not as showy as the clusters of coral-pink to purple berries up to 1/4 inch in diameter which remain on the plant through winter. It is particularly common in Post Oak woods, Coralberry forms extensive colonies and spreads by rooting at the nodes where it touches the ground. A good choice for woodland gardens. Songbirds, ground birds, small mammals, and browsers use this plant for food, cover, and nesting sites.

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Coralberry (Symphoricarpos orbiculatus). This is a small, mound-shaped, deciduous shrub. It has shredding bark on older wood and brown to purplish branchlets covered with short hairs visible under a 10x hand lens. This plant usually grows to 2 ft. but can reach 6 ft. Its smooth, dull green leaves are opposite and roughly oval, tapering about equally to tip and base, up to 2 inches long but often less than 1 inch, with smooth, turned down margins and a rounded or broadly pointed tip. The greenish-white flower clusters are not as showy as the clusters of coral-pink to purple berries up to 1/4 inch in diameter which remain on the plant through winter. It is particularly common in Post Oak woods, Coralberry forms extensive colonies and spreads by rooting at the nodes where it touches the ground. A good choice for woodland gardens. Songbirds, ground birds, small mammals, and browsers use this plant for food, cover, and nesting sites.

From our email for the week of 4/19... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: One-half inch lawn irrigation recommende...
04/19/2021

From our email for the week of 4/19... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: One-half inch lawn irrigation recommended. There's a 60% chance of rain Friday, and we did receive an average of about an inch of rain last week, so you will be okay with irrigating a half-inch this next seven days. However, if it does rain on Friday, try not to water your yard a second time. Also, please check out the Texas Drought Monitor. Most of Montgomery County is now in a MODERATE DROUGHT STAGE, but the far eastern part of the county is in SEVERE DROUGHT. Additionally, the EXTREME DROUGHT and EXCEPTIONAL DROUGHT stages are fully established in the western, southern Texas, parts of the Panhandle, and two other small areas, one in north-central (Croyell County) another along the coast of Brazoria and Matagorda Counties.

From our email for the week of 4/19... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: One-half inch lawn irrigation recommended. There's a 60% chance of rain Friday, and we did receive an average of about an inch of rain last week, so you will be okay with irrigating a half-inch this next seven days. However, if it does rain on Friday, try not to water your yard a second time. Also, please check out the Texas Drought Monitor. Most of Montgomery County is now in a MODERATE DROUGHT STAGE, but the far eastern part of the county is in SEVERE DROUGHT. Additionally, the EXTREME DROUGHT and EXCEPTIONAL DROUGHT stages are fully established in the western, southern Texas, parts of the Panhandle, and two other small areas, one in north-central (Croyell County) another along the coast of Brazoria and Matagorda Counties.

Careful management of #groundwater resources is necessary to meet current #water needs, protect future supplies, and min...
04/15/2021
Regional Groundwater Science Partnership - Houston Advanced Research Center

Careful management of #groundwater resources is necessary to meet current #water needs, protect future supplies, and minimize land #subsidence impacts on #infrastructure, #flooding, and private property. Learn more about the work of the Regional Groundwater Science Partnership -> https://bit.ly/3pTH2vR.

The Regional Groundwater Science Partnership announces a report summarizing the first phase of review regarding groundwater and subsidence in the region.

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Missouri Violet (Viola missouriensis). Violets are a sign that spri...
04/05/2021

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Missouri Violet (Viola missouriensis). Violets are a sign that spring has arrived, and this is often one of the most common violets found within its range. It prefers well-drained woodland soil, where it can colonize via rhizomes to send up numerous glowing purple blossoms in early spring. Any well-drained sand, loam, clay, or limestone. Will go dormant during droughts. Photo by R.W. Smith, courtesy of Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Missouri Violet (Viola missouriensis). Violets are a sign that spring has arrived, and this is often one of the most common violets found within its range. It prefers well-drained woodland soil, where it can colonize via rhizomes to send up numerous glowing purple blossoms in early spring. Any well-drained sand, loam, clay, or limestone. Will go dormant during droughts. Photo by R.W. Smith, courtesy of Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Drought coming? Please check the Texas Drought Monitor (link below). Montgomery County, along with our surrounding count...
04/05/2021
United States Drought Monitor > Current Map > State Drought Monitor

Drought coming? Please check the Texas Drought Monitor (link below). Montgomery County, along with our surrounding counties and most of East and Central Texas are now in moderate drought stage. Certain parts of the state (West Texas, South Texas, and parts of the panhandle) are in either extreme drought or exceptional drought stage. It's been nine years since our last drought ended. For those of you who are new to our area, Texas has a history of flood years and drought years. Some climatologists are predicting that we are about due for another drought. Remember to use water wisely.
https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/CurrentMap/StateDroughtMonitor.aspx?TX

The Drought Monitor focuses on broad-scale conditions. Local conditions may vary. See accompanying text summary for forecast statements.

From our email for the week of 4/5... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: The National Weather Service predicts a 4...
04/05/2021

From our email for the week of 4/5... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: The National Weather Service predicts a 43% chance of rain on Wednesday, while other weather services predict a little higher percentage. According to experts, you can begin fertilizing your lawn now. Here are a few tips on fertilization:
1. Spread 1/4 inch of good organic compost across your lawn. Aerate before if you feel that is necessary. Use the back of a rake to make sure the compost gets into contact with the soil.
2. Water your lawn. Remember to use the cycle and soak method to get the maximum amount of water into the soil. And follow the Defined Irrigation Schedule.
3. Before your next scheduled irrigation time, fertilize your yard. If possible, use an organic fertilizer. DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY ON W**D AND FEED PRODUCTS!
4. Water your lawn again thoroughly, again using the cycle and soak method.

From our email for the week of 4/5... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: The National Weather Service predicts a 43% chance of rain on Wednesday, while other weather services predict a little higher percentage. According to experts, you can begin fertilizing your lawn now. Here are a few tips on fertilization:
1. Spread 1/4 inch of good organic compost across your lawn. Aerate before if you feel that is necessary. Use the back of a rake to make sure the compost gets into contact with the soil.
2. Water your lawn. Remember to use the cycle and soak method to get the maximum amount of water into the soil. And follow the Defined Irrigation Schedule.
3. Before your next scheduled irrigation time, fertilize your yard. If possible, use an organic fertilizer. DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY ON W**D AND FEED PRODUCTS!
4. Water your lawn again thoroughly, again using the cycle and soak method.

Careful management of #groundwater resources is necessary to meet current #water needs, protect future supplies, and min...
04/03/2021
Regional Groundwater Science Partnership - Houston Advanced Research Center

Careful management of #groundwater resources is necessary to meet current #water needs, protect future supplies, and minimize land #subsidence impacts on #infrastructure, #flooding, and private property. Learn more about the work of the Regional Groundwater Science Partnership -> https://bit.ly/3pTH2vR.

The Regional Groundwater Science Partnership announces a report summarizing the first phase of review regarding groundwater and subsidence in the region.

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Partridge berry (Mitchella repens): Partridge Berry is a native per...
03/29/2021

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Partridge berry (Mitchella repens): Partridge Berry is a native perennial, a small, woody, trailing vine with 6 to 12 inch, slender, trailing stems that do not climb but lay prostrate on the forest floor. The dark-green, evergreen leaves are simple, opposite, ovate, with a pale yellow midrib, ½ inch across, with a short stalk. In late spring, a pair of white flowers (with a single calyx) appears. Each small, fragrant flower has four brilliant white petals that are pubescent and unite into a funnel-shaped tube that is also fringed with hairs. Partridge berry is a fairly common inhabitant of deciduous and coniferous forests in rich organic soils with dappled sunlight to complete shade. Depending on latitude and elevation Partridge Berry flowers from late spring to early summer. The plant is pollinated by insects. The ensuing scarlet berry contains eight seeds. The fruits are tasteless and generally survive through winter and into the following spring. Birds are the primary consumer of these fruits and the subsequent distribution of seeds. It will grow in most soils and is drought tolerant once established.

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Partridge berry (Mitchella repens): Partridge Berry is a native perennial, a small, woody, trailing vine with 6 to 12 inch, slender, trailing stems that do not climb but lay prostrate on the forest floor. The dark-green, evergreen leaves are simple, opposite, ovate, with a pale yellow midrib, ½ inch across, with a short stalk. In late spring, a pair of white flowers (with a single calyx) appears. Each small, fragrant flower has four brilliant white petals that are pubescent and unite into a funnel-shaped tube that is also fringed with hairs. Partridge berry is a fairly common inhabitant of deciduous and coniferous forests in rich organic soils with dappled sunlight to complete shade. Depending on latitude and elevation Partridge Berry flowers from late spring to early summer. The plant is pollinated by insects. The ensuing scarlet berry contains eight seeds. The fruits are tasteless and generally survive through winter and into the following spring. Birds are the primary consumer of these fruits and the subsequent distribution of seeds. It will grow in most soils and is drought tolerant once established.

From our email for the week of 3/29... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: While there is a 50-60 percent chance of...
03/29/2021

From our email for the week of 3/29... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: While there is a 50-60 percent chance of rain tomorrow and Wednesday, you should probably irrigate at least one evening this week, but do it sparingly. Remember, though, too much water now will bring on diseases later in the spring and summer. Every time I can, I try to remind everyone that there are 40 million acres of lawn in this country. Lawn grass is the second largest crop overall in the nation. At an inch a week, that comes to 2 billion acre-feet of water a year. that translates to over 13 trillion gallons of water per year for lawns. Perhaps we need to look at a different paradigm.

From our email for the week of 3/29... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: While there is a 50-60 percent chance of rain tomorrow and Wednesday, you should probably irrigate at least one evening this week, but do it sparingly. Remember, though, too much water now will bring on diseases later in the spring and summer. Every time I can, I try to remind everyone that there are 40 million acres of lawn in this country. Lawn grass is the second largest crop overall in the nation. At an inch a week, that comes to 2 billion acre-feet of water a year. that translates to over 13 trillion gallons of water per year for lawns. Perhaps we need to look at a different paradigm.

A message from Tachus in response to the town hall meeting in The Woodlands this week...
03/25/2021

A message from Tachus in response to the town hall meeting in The Woodlands this week...

A message from Tachus in response to the town hall meeting in The Woodlands this week...

The theme of World Water Day 2021 is valuing water. The value of water is about much more than its price – water has eno...
03/22/2021

The theme of World Water Day 2021 is valuing water. The value of water is about much more than its price – water has enormous and complex value for our households, food, culture, health, education, economics and the integrity of our natural environment. If we overlook any of these values, we risk mismanaging this finite, irreplaceable resource.

The theme of World Water Day 2021 is valuing water. The value of water is about much more than its price – water has enormous and complex value for our households, food, culture, health, education, economics and the integrity of our natural environment. If we overlook any of these values, we risk mismanaging this finite, irreplaceable resource.

Community Impact: "Public forum on Tachus fiber internet drilling operations to be held in The Woodlands on March 23." S...
03/19/2021
Public forum on Tachus fiber internet drilling operations to be held in The Woodlands on March 23

Community Impact: "Public forum on Tachus fiber internet drilling operations to be held in The Woodlands on March 23." Since Jan. 1, Woodlands Water has recorded around 100 water line failures and $100,000 in damage to water infrastructure attributed to Tachus' local drilling work.
https://communityimpact.com/houston/the-woodlands/government/2021/03/18/public-forum-on-tachus-fiber-internet-drilling-operations-to-be-held-in-the-woodlands-on-march-23/

The meeting was announced March 18 by Montgomery County Precinct 3. It will center on the fiber internet company's local construction practices.

FIX A LEAK WEEKShowerheadsA showerhead leaking at 10 drips per minute wastes more than 500 gallons per year. That's the ...
03/18/2021

FIX A LEAK WEEK
Showerheads
A showerhead leaking at 10 drips per minute wastes more than 500 gallons per year. That's the amount of water it takes to wash 60 loads of dishes in your dishwasher. Some leaky showerheads can be fixed by making sure there is a tight connection between the showerhead and the pipe stem and by using pipe tape to secure it. Pipe tape, also called Teflon tape, is available at most hardware stores, is easy to apply, and can help control leaks. For more complicated valve leaks in showers that drip when not in use, contact an experienced handyperson or licensed plumber.

FIX A LEAK WEEK
Showerheads
A showerhead leaking at 10 drips per minute wastes more than 500 gallons per year. That's the amount of water it takes to wash 60 loads of dishes in your dishwasher. Some leaky showerheads can be fixed by making sure there is a tight connection between the showerhead and the pipe stem and by using pipe tape to secure it. Pipe tape, also called Teflon tape, is available at most hardware stores, is easy to apply, and can help control leaks. For more complicated valve leaks in showers that drip when not in use, contact an experienced handyperson or licensed plumber.

Address

2455 Lake Robbins Dr
The Woodlands, TX
77380

General information

The Woodlands Joint Powers Agency is the central management agency for the eleven Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs) that currently serve The Woodlands in Montgomery County. The services we provide are water distribution, wastewater collection, storm drainage and tax collection services. The principal objective of TWJPA is to provide the MUDs we serve with professional, reliable and quality services consistent with fiscal responsibility. We are also committed to improving our efficiency and effectiveness at maintaining the utility infrastructure and enhancing communication with our customers.

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 17:00
Thursday 08:00 - 17:00
Friday 08:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(855) 426-7283

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Our mission is to be your resource for water use, costs, quality and conservation in The Woodlands.

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