The Woodlands Water Agency

The Woodlands Water Agency The Woodlands Water Agency
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Operating as usual

Water-Saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) - A woody, deciduous...
11/03/2020

Water-Saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) - A woody, deciduous vine, Virginia Creeper can be high-climbing or trailing, 3-40 ft. the structure on which it climbs is the limiting factor. Virginia Creeper climbs by means of tendrils with disks that fasten onto bark or rock. Its leaves, with 5 leaflets, occasionally 3 or 7, radiating from the tip of the petiole, coarsely toothed, with a pointed tip, and tapered to the base, up to 6 inches long. Leaves provide early fall color, turning brilliant mauve, red and purple. It is a member of the grape family. Inconspicuous flowers small, greenish, in clusters, appearing in spring. Fruit bluish, about 1/4 inch in diameter. Grows in any well drained soil including caliche from full sun to shade. Drought tolerant once established. The fruits are used by many birds through the winter (chickadees, nuthatches, mockingbirds, catbirds, finches, flycatchers, tanagers, swallows, vireos, warblers, woodpeckers, and thrushes). It is also a larval host for several species of sphinx moths. Note: In the right conditions this vine can become invasive. Virginia Creeper is sometimes mistaken as poison ivy. However poison ivy has three leaves, while Virginia Creeper has five. Virginia Creeper does not contain urushiol, the irritating substance in poison ivy.

From the Woodlands Water email for the week of 11/02... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: This little cool snap w...
11/03/2020

From the Woodlands Water email for the week of 11/02... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: This little cool snap we've had certainly makes it easy to differentiate native Texas from our neighbors who have moved her from the upper Midwest or the East. I saw a lady wrapped in a ski parka and gloves entering a convenience store (Texas plates). A guy left the store at the same time wearing a t-shirt and shorts. He got into an SUV with Michigan plates. And, I thought I saw a pickup with Texas plates sporting snow tires. Be that as it may, we've still got some cool weather continuing, with highs in the high 70's and lows in the low 50s, which means that our lawns are going dormant. Irrigation recommendations: "do not water your yard this week."

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week by Bob Dailey: Gulf Coast Muhly (Muhlenbergia capillaris). Gulf muhly is one of my...
10/26/2020

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week by Bob Dailey: Gulf Coast Muhly (Muhlenbergia capillaris). Gulf muhly is one of my favorite plants. It's showy in the fall, when other plants start flagging. Muhly also a perennial, which will give you years of fall color. This is a native grass know as "Gulf Coast Muhly or Pink Muhly". It grows 3-4’ tall by 2-3’ wide in good conditions, and is native to the Gulf Coast and east Texas and much of N. America. It is almost evergreen, root hardy, long dark green needles, perennial grass, very elegant, use in large mass plantings. Grows in deep sand or in heavy black soil even if poorly drained, but drought tolerant once established. Prefers full sun, looks good in perennial flowers gardens in single clumps or in groups of three, blooms are rosy pink in early to mid-fall, when back lit it is a breathtaking sight. Only mow once a year (if at all) around Valentine's Day, can grow in sugar sand or clay that holds water a week or more, works best as a groundcover in Southeastern Texas, 1 gallon pots can be divided and plugs planted 12-18" apart for a solid cover, panicles turn pink in fall and look hazy as if plants are shrouded in smoke.

From our email for the week of 10/26... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: Weather services are not predicting rai...
10/26/2020

From our email for the week of 10/26... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: Weather services are not predicting rain until possibly this weekend, but there is a strong front coming in from the northwest, bringing snow into the Panhandle, and rain into northern and central Texas. At least one forecasting service indicates rain here as early as tomorrow. Harry Truman once said, "Give me a one-handed economist. All my economists say, 'on one hand...,' then 'but on the other..." Sometimes I think we might say the same thing about weather forecasters (although in their defense, I have exceeded their incorrect predictions quantitatively.) However, Winter Storm Billy is already pulling moisture from the Gulf, so we'll have to see what happens. I would wait until your second day of irrigation to decide if your lawns and plants need a little watering.

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week by Bob Dailey: Cross Vine (Bignonia capreolata) – Crossvine is a native perennial ...
10/19/2020

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week by Bob Dailey: Cross Vine (Bignonia capreolata) – Crossvine is a native perennial climbing, woody vine. It can reach 50 ft. long. Its showy, orange-red, trumpet-shaped flowers 2 inches long and 1.5 inches across hang in clusters of two to five. They are sometimes seen high in a tree, as the vine climbs by means of tendrils. Claws at the end of its tendrils allow cross vine to cling to stone, bricks and fences without support. Leaves are opposite and bifoliolate. Leaflets are 4-6 inches long by 1-1/2 inches wide, with a third leaflet modified into a tendril. Persistent glossy, semi-evergreen leaves change from dark green in summer to reddish-purple in winter. Grows best when tops are in sun or part sun. Any soil from sand to clay as long as it is well drained. Prefers soils on the dry side but it will also tolerate seasonal flooding. An early nectar source for butterflies and hummingbirds as the spring bloom often coincides with the hummingbird immigration. B. c. `Atrosanguinea' - red flowering form, bright scarlet flowers May-June Cultivar `Tangerine Beauty' has beautiful red and yellow flowers to tangerine flowers, evergreen, vigorous, pest-free sun to partial shade.

From our email for the week of 10/19... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: Although most of west Texas and the pan...
10/19/2020

From our email for the week of 10/19... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: Although most of west Texas and the panhandle are in serious drought, east and most of central Texas Texas seem to be in pretty good shape. (Refer to Texas Drought Monitor.) The Woodlands received an average of 1.96 inches (most of it early this morning). Factoring in the evapo-transpiration data from the nearby Texas A&M ET Station, the true reading is 1.6 inches. Since St. Augustine and Zoysia need only an inch of water a week, our recommendation is NO irrigation this week.

ALERT, 5:23 PM: Crews are repairing a broken water line valve along Grogan’s Point Road, between N. Longspur Road and Wa...
10/14/2020

ALERT, 5:23 PM: Crews are repairing a broken water line valve along Grogan’s Point Road, between N. Longspur Road and Watertree Drive. Customers in the area may experience low to no water pressure while repairs are being made. An update will be provided as soon as possible. If you work or live in the affected service area, please plan to run your water for a few minutes after service is restored to flush air pockets and iron and other naturally occurring minerals. Thank you for your patience.

AMI Crews have essentially completed installing the new meters in MUD 39 and are now working on MUDs 1 and 7.
10/13/2020

AMI Crews have essentially completed installing the new meters in MUD 39 and are now working on MUDs 1 and 7.

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week, by Bob Dailey. Texas Clematis, Scarlet Clematis or Scarlet Leather Flower(Clemati...
10/13/2020

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week, by Bob Dailey. Texas Clematis, Scarlet Clematis or Scarlet Leather Flower
(Clematis texensis) - This is a native perennial vine common in Central Texas and Edwards plateau. It likes hot summers, blooms late summer-fall, red pitcher shaped flowers. This plant provides a subtle, beautiful accent to a shady moist area. It grows in any well-drained soil including alkaline calcareous soils, plumed seed balls, very showy, 6-8 ft. tall. Texas clematis is hardy to Z-5. It grows best with morning sun and afternoon shade. The plant is known to tolerate full sun, loose fertile highly organic soils with even moisture but it is very drought tolerant once established. The 1" long pitcher shaped flowers, bloom June/July to late autumn, often takes 2-3 years to establish before good blooms commence, will grow to 9' tall, often dies to ground in winter. It is host plant to the fatal metalmark buterfly (Calephelis nemesis). A few well known cultivars are: `Duchess of Albany', clear pink trumpets August-fall, vigorous climber 8-10', `Etoile Rose' - deep rose with paler center and margins `Gravetye Beauty' - star shaped flowers are deep satiny ruby red `Princess of Wales' - gleaming cherry red `Ladybird Johnson' - deeper huskier red.

From the Woodlands Water email for the week of 10/12... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: We all thought we would...
10/13/2020

From the Woodlands Water email for the week of 10/12... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: We all thought we would get some moisture from Hurricane Delta but there was no appreciable rainfall in "The Bubble." Some areas along the Ship Channel and east of I-69 received from a half inch to almost an inch of rain, but for us... nada. The good news is that it's close to mid-October, and that means that our turf grass is going into dormancy and requires less water. However, since it's been unseasonably dry, you may want to keep an eye on your turf, and run your irrigation system perhaps once a week IF NEEDED.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEAn Important Message from The Woodlands Water Agency Regarding the Continued Safety of the Local Wa...
10/09/2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

An Important Message from The Woodlands Water Agency Regarding the Continued Safety of the Local Water Supply

THE WOODLANDS, Texas, Oct. 9, 2020 – The Woodlands Water Agency reminded customers today that the water supply in The Woodlands is not affected by recent contamination incidents in the Houston area.

The water supply in The Woodlands, as provided by the 10 municipal utility districts (MUDs) in our area, continues to be certified by the State of Texas as a “Superior Water System.”

On Thursday, the San Jacinto River Authority, which provides wholesale surface water sourced from Lake Conroe to The Woodlands, advised customers in response to a contamination incident in the City of Lake Jackson that the SJRA water system is fully compliant with safe drinking water regulations and meets Texas Commission on Environmental Quality’s drinking water requirements.

According to the SJRA, “The water from Lake Conroe receives a high degree of monitoring, treatment, and disinfection prior to being distributed to customers. We screen for various bacteria and employ a robust treatment process that includes granulated activated carbon, micro filtration, air stripping, and chlorine disinfection that filters contaminants down to the size of viruses and bacteria to produce the highest quality drinking water.”

The Woodlands Water Agency also reconfirmed that waterborne pathogens such as COVID-19 virus and amoebas that cause brain illnesses are controlled by disinfection and standard treatment and disinfectant processes in the water supply.

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week, by Bob Dailey: Trumpet Creeper or Trumpet Vine (Campsis radicans). This is a pere...
10/05/2020

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week, by Bob Dailey: Trumpet Creeper or Trumpet Vine (Campsis radicans). This is a perennial native to eastern North America as far north as Ohio and South Dakota into Central Texas. It is often cultivated for its attractive, reddish orange flowers and can escape cultivation, sometimes colonizing so densely it seems a nuisance, particularly in the southeast, where its invasive qualities have earned it the names Hellvine and Devils Shoestring. Its rapid colonization by suckers and layering makes it useful for erosion control. Trumpet vine's magnificent flowers never fail to attract Rubythroated Hummingbirds within its range. Trumpet creeper grows tall with support. It climbs by means of aerial rootlets, which, like English Ivy, can damage wood, stone, and brick. To keep it in check, plant it near concrete or an area that you can mow. Mowing down the suckers will discourage them. Trumpet vine does well drained soil and is drought-tolerant within its range. It blooms best in full sun. The flowers attract hummingbirds and it is the larval host plant for the Trumpet Vine Moth.

From our email for the week of 10/5... Irrigation Recommendation, by Bob Dailey: We have received no appreciable rain fo...
10/05/2020

From our email for the week of 10/5... Irrigation Recommendation, by Bob Dailey: We have received no appreciable rain for the last 7 days here in The Woodlands nor in the entire southern part of the county. The recommendation for this week is to irrigate according to the normal Woodlands Water Defined Irrigation Schedule. And enjoy the gorgeous weather, blue skies, and coming fall colors.

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week, by Bob Dailey: Muscadine Grape (Vitas rotundifolia): Last week, we featured Musta...
09/29/2020

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week, by Bob Dailey: Muscadine Grape (Vitas rotundifolia): Last week, we featured Mustang Grapes, a wild cousin of the equally wild muscadine grape. The Muscadine Grape comes in blonde (Scuppernong) and dark varieties. Native to southeastern US, muscadine grapes contain more "resveratrol", a natural antioxidant that helps increase good cholesterol, than European wine grapes. This antioxidant is highest in skins and seeds. Purees made from whole grape contain this beneficial chemical. Grows in any well-drained soil in full- to part-sun. Fruits are eaten by many species of birds and mammals. This grape has a high sugar content and can be eaten fresh from the vine or used to make jellies and jams. It is also know to make many wines including some very good Ports. A few cultivars are: `Ison'- black, self fertile 20% sugar `Cowart'- black, self fertile, 19% sugar `Carlos' - bronze, self fertile, 16% sugar `Magnolia'- bronze, self fertile, 16% sugar `Triumph'- bronze, self fertile, 16% sugar 'Fry' - bronze, very sweet with up to almost 30% sugar. Wild muscadines also grow on edges of wooded areas and along roadways in The Woodlands and throughout Montgomery County.

From the Woodlands Water email for the week of 9/28... Irrigation Recommendation, by Bob Dailey: According to the Harris...
09/29/2020

From the Woodlands Water email for the week of 9/28... Irrigation Recommendation, by Bob Dailey: According to the Harris County Flood Warning System, The Woodlands received an average of 3.24 inches of rain in the last 7 days. That means that, in one week, we almost equaled the average rainfall for September (the average rainfall for September is 3.75 inches.) Plus, we have the added advantage of a cool front which swept in early this morning. Early fall? Mother Nature messing with us? An anomaly? A glitch in the Matrix? Who knows? Regardless of the reason(s), the recommendation is don't irrigate this week.

Houston Chronicle / The Woodlands Villager: "Candidates for seats on 4 MUDs in The Woodlands on Nov. 3 ballot."https://w...
09/24/2020
In a rare change to normal state elections, candidates for 4 local MUD boards will be on Nov. 3 ballot

Houston Chronicle / The Woodlands Villager: "Candidates for seats on 4 MUDs in The Woodlands on Nov. 3 ballot."
https://www.chron.com/neighborhood/woodlands/news/article/Candidates-for-seats-on-4-MUDs-in-The-Woodlands-15594692.php

The Nov. 3 election will have an odd twist due to the pandemic, voters will be able to choose candidates for four local MUDs on the ballot. The MUD elections normally occur in May but the pandemic changed that in 2020.

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week by Bob Dailey: Mustang Grape (Vitis mustangensis). Not to be confused with muscadi...
09/22/2020

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week by Bob Dailey: Mustang Grape (Vitis mustangensis). Not to be confused with muscadine grape, mustang grape is a common and easily recognized native grape with a white, velvety surface on the lower side of the leaves. The plant has two forms of leaves: one form is unlobed or shallowly lobed, and the other form deeply lobed. The deeply-lobed leaves are not as common and form on rapidly growing shoots. The lower surface of the unlobed leaves often concave. Mustang produces grapes up to 3/4 inch in diameter, few to the bunch. They ripen in August and September to dark purple. Like muscadines they are tart, but popular with makers of homemade wine/jellies/jam. Mustang grape grows in any well drained soil from full sun to part sun. Birds and small mammals love the fruits. In nature it grows on the edge of woodlands to any opening along thickets or river banks. LIke all grapes, it is a vine. It has a habit of climbing over shrubs and into trees and often shading their leaves. Mustang grapes can often be seen growing on fences. In Montgomery County the vine grows on trees bordering roadways.

From the Woodlands Water email for the week of 9/21... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: As of 3 p.m. Monday, we'...
09/22/2020

From the Woodlands Water email for the week of 9/21... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: As of 3 p.m. Monday, we've received enough rain to satisfy irrigation requirements for the entire week. AND...there's more to come as Tropical Storm Beta (that's β - for all you Greek scholars) plows inland. In fact, the main body of the storm is just arriving here. By the time the storm heads to points northeast, the ground will be saturated. DO NOT IRRIGATE THIS WEEK, PLEASE!

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week, by Bob Dailey: Carolina Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens). This plant is native ...
09/14/2020

Water-saving Native Plant of The Week, by Bob Dailey: Carolina Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens). This plant is native from Virginia to Florida and west to Arkansas and east. It reaches as far south as Guatemala.Carolina Jessamine is a twining, perennial, evergreen vine, 10-20 ft. long, that will climb trees, scramble over fences and structures, or develop a mound of tangled stems if left to its own devices. Lustrous, dark-green foliage develops a slight yellow or purple cast in winter. Auxiliary clusters of very fragrant, yellow, trumpetshaped flowers. The fruit is a 1 1/2 in. long capsule. This high-climbing vine is very common in parts of the South, frequently found in abandoned fields and climbing high into the canopies of pine forests. It is quite adaptable and tenacious, with no serious disease or insect problems. These qualities, along with its glossy, evergreen leaves and waxy, trumpet-shaped flowers, have made it a mainstay of the suburban landscape in the Southeast. Grows is sun to part shade, any well drained humus rich soil from sand to clay. Drought tolerant once established. It is one of the first native flowers to bloom in the spring.

Address

2455 Lake Robbins Dr
The Woodlands, TX
77380

General information

The Woodlands Joint Powers Agency is the central management agency for the eleven Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs) that currently serve The Woodlands in Montgomery County. The services we provide are water distribution, wastewater collection, storm drainage and tax collection services. The principal objective of TWJPA is to provide the MUDs we serve with professional, reliable and quality services consistent with fiscal responsibility. We are also committed to improving our efficiency and effectiveness at maintaining the utility infrastructure and enhancing communication with our customers.

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 17:00
Thursday 08:00 - 17:00
Friday 08:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(855) 426-7283

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