The Woodlands Water Agency

The Woodlands Water Agency The Woodlands Water Agency
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Operating as usual

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Smooth Sumac (Rhus glabra) - The colony-forming smooth sumac is a 1...
02/02/2021

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Smooth Sumac (Rhus glabra) - The colony-forming smooth sumac is a 10-20 ft. shrub with short, crooked, leaning trunks and picturesque branches. The pinnately compound leaves are alternate, with 13-30 sharp-toothed leaflets on each side of the midrib. Deciduous leaves become extremely colorful in early fall. On female plants, yellow-green flowers are followed by bright-red, hairy berries in erect, pyramidal clusters which persist throughout winter. The only shrub or tree species native to all 48 contiguous states. The plant does well in sun, part shade or shade. It has low water requirements, prefers soils that are on the dry side. Most dry soils (sandy, loam, clay-loam, or even caliche). This is the dominant sumac of backland prairies. A dwarf variety is becoming popular in cultivation. In a planned landscape, the species is most effective when drifts or colonies, typical of natural settings, are allowed to establish. Colonies can be rejuvenated every few years by cutting them to the ground in mid-winter. Sumacs will grow in dry waste areas, such as impossible slopes where even junipers struggle. They are fast-growing, generally pest and disease-free, and drought-tolerant. Colonies are often single-sexed, formed from a single, suckering parent. Only female plants produce flowers and berries. The seeds remain firmly attached for a long time without noticeable deterioration and are often used in large decorative arrangements and are consumed by birds of many kinds and small mammals, mainly in winter. Deer browse the twigs and fruit throughout the year. Raw young sprouts were eaten by Native Americans as a salad. The sour fruit, mostly seed, can be chewed to quench thirst or prepared as a drink similar to lemonade. Smooth sumac is the larval host for the Hairstreak butterfly.

From our email for the week of 2/1... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: Some Irrigation recommended. Folks, it's ...
02/02/2021

From our email for the week of 2/1... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: Some Irrigation recommended. Folks, it's been unusually dry for the last week and a half. We're recommending that you do a cycle and soak each zone twice for 10 minutes for one of your two days of irrigation. But don't go overboard. Run your system manually to accomplish this. Too much water is as problematic as too little water anytime, but this time of the year is a fragile period when roots are developing and expanding. And remember...rain (when it does arrive) does not need watering!

UPDATE. 7:14 PM: Repairs are complete. Water service is restored in the area. Once the repaired area is backfilled, and ...
01/28/2021

UPDATE. 7:14 PM: Repairs are complete. Water service is restored in the area. Once the repaired area is backfilled, and the street/area is cleaned, the traffic lane will be reopened.
ALERT, 1:42 PM: A contractor not associated with Woodlands Water hit a 12-inch water line along the south side of Lake Woodlands Drive, east of Pinecroft Drive. Woodlands Water and San Jacinto River Authority SJRA crews are on site and SJRA’s on-call contractor will be working to restore water service. The contractor did not contact Woodlands Water or SJRA before digging. Customers in the area may experience low to no water pressure while repairs are being made. An update will be provided as soon as possible. If you work or live in the affected service area, please plan to run your water for a few minutes after service is restored to flush air pockets and iron and other naturally occurring minerals. Thank you for your patience.

01/25/2021
Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Sassafras (Sassafras albidum).The aromatic sassafras is a 35-50 ft....
01/25/2021

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Sassafras (Sassafras albidum).The aromatic sassafras is a 35-50 ft. deciduous tree with horizontal branching in cloud-like tiers. The mahogany-brown bark is deeply ridged and furrowed. Little bunches of yellow-green flower balls are scattered profusely over the female tree, more sparsely on the male. Dark-blue fruits on scarlet stalks appear on female plants in late summer. Bright-green, mitten-shaped, oval, or three-lobed leaves have excellent fall color. The roots and root bark supply oil of sassafras (used to perfume soap), and sassafras tea have been used to flavor root beer. Very drought tolerant and will grow in sun to shade. Prefers moist, acidic soils, but almost any soil (rich, moist, sandy loams. Sassafras can sucker into a small grove but is easily controlled as a single tree. It is an appropriate tree to introduce into disturbed sites with infertile soil. It grows most quickly in fertile soil, and though it prefers well-drained situations, it will tolerate soggy feet. Except for occasional iron chlorosis caused by high pH soils, the tree is relatively free of problems. Sassafras is allelopathic and can discourage the growth of certain other plants within its root zone. Birds like the fruit. A tea is made from young roots. Sweeten to taste. Only moderate amounts should be drunk. A spicy jelly can be made from strong tea with lemon juice, sugar, and pectin. Green winter buds and young leaves can be added to salads. The bark produces an orange dye, and the roots yield aromatic oil of sassafras, which has been used as a fragrance in soaps and perfumes.

From our email for the week of 1/25... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: No irrigation recommended. We've receive...
01/25/2021

From our email for the week of 1/25... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: No irrigation recommended. We've received enough mist and rain in the last week to soak the ground pretty thoroughly, so we're not recommending irrigation this week. On another topic, Arbor Day was a success Saturday. It was a drive-through event and volunteers passed out thousands of native tree seedlings. Thanks to The Woodlands Township's Environmental Services Department, the Township's workforce and the many volunteers who worked really hard distributing the trees to over 500 residents.

ALERT: 11:15 AM - A contractor not associated with Woodlands Water hit a water line along Palmer Woods Drive. Crews are ...
01/21/2021

ALERT: 11:15 AM - A contractor not associated with Woodlands Water hit a water line along Palmer Woods Drive. Crews are working to repair the line and restore water service. Customers in the area may experience low to no water pressure while repairs are being made. An update will be provided as soon as possible. If you work or live in the affected service area, please plan to run your water for a few minutes after service is restored to flush air pockets and iron and other naturally occurring minerals. Thank you for your patience.

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Mexican Buckeye (Ungnadia speciosa). Mexican-buckeye, an 8-12 ft., ...
01/18/2021

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Mexican Buckeye (Ungnadia speciosa). Mexican-buckeye, an 8-12 ft., deciduous tree, can reach 30 ft. in height. It is often multi-trunked with light gray to brown bark, smooth on young branches, becoming fissured with age. Leaves up to 12 inches long, with a central axis supporting 2 to 6 paired leaflets and a terminal one; leaflets up to 5 inches long, ovate to narrower with an elongate tip, rounded base, and serrate margins. Pinnate foliage turns golden yellow in fall. Clusters of bright-pink, fragrant flowers appear before or with the leaves from the axils of the previous season. The fruit is distinctive becoming a light reddish brown when ripe with a 3-lobed capsule containing 1 to 3 dark brown to black, shiny seeds 1/2 inch in diameter. The walls of the capsule often persisting through the winter. The seeds are mildly poisonous. From a distance, the plants in full flower resemble redbuds or peaches. Any well-drained soil. Mexican buckeye produces a beautiful show when it blooms. The foliage turns a clear yellow in the fall. Foliage, flowers, and dense branching makes this species an outstanding small specimen tree or tall background shrub. Rapid-growing, drought-resistant, resistant to cotton root rot. Prune to encourage a single trunk if desired. The growth characteristics of this tree vary greatly with the site it's planted in. This plant is a showy, aromatic, accent shrub. It is conspicuous in the fall. Used by wildlife: bees, moths, and butterflies are attracted to its flowers. Small mammals and birds eat the seeds. Mexican buckeye is the larval host for Henry's Elfin butterfly. The plant is deer resistant.

From the Woodlands Water email for the week of 1/18... Irrigation recommendations by Bob Dailey: No irrigation recommend...
01/18/2021

From the Woodlands Water email for the week of 1/18... Irrigation recommendations by Bob Dailey: No irrigation recommended. St. Augustine grass goes dormant at 55 degrees F. Since October 1, 2020, we have had 67 days when the temperature dropped well below 55 degrees. And, there are more cool days to come. Our grass is dormant now. The only things active are the roots. However, if we do not receive any rain in the next week, we'll probably recommend some irrigation then.

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Texas Mountain Laurel (Sophora secundiflora). Texas mountain laurel...
01/12/2021

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Texas Mountain Laurel (Sophora secundiflora). Texas mountain laurel is an evergreen, usually multi-trunked shrub or small tree ranging from just a few feet tall to more than 30 ft. in height, though its usual height at maturity is 10-15 ft. The dense, dark-green, and glossy compound leaves are composed of 7-9 shiny, leathery leaflets that are rounded on the ends. The leaflets are up to 2 inches or more long, tapering more gradually to the base than to the tip, and arranged along an axis terminated by a single leaflet. The bluish lavender flowers, in 3-7 in. drooping clusters, are very showy and fragrant (many people think the fragrance is like grape cool aid). The fruit is a semi-woody pod with extremely hard bright red poisonous seeds. It is very popular as a native evergreen ornamental tree within its range, valued for its handsome, dark green foliage and lush early spring blooms. It is drought-tolerant, prefers rocky limestone soil but grows well in any well-drained soil, and tolerates alkaline soils. It is native from central Texas west to New Mexico and south to San Luis Potosi in Mexico. Like many woody plants native to rocky soils, it is slow-growing. It will grow in full sun to part shade. Flowers attract many pollinators. It grows well in The Woodlands, as long as it is in well-drained soil.

From the Woodlands Water email for the week of 1/11... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: No irrigation recommende...
01/12/2021

From the Woodlands Water email for the week of 1/11... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: No irrigation recommended. In the last seven days, we've received an average of 1.85 inches of precipitation. I say precipitation, because, as you know, some of what came down yesterday was in the form of sleet. Parts of the north county... parts of Willis, Montgomery, and around the northwestern part of Lake Conroe received a little snow (I drove around some late Sunday afternoon).

01/10/2021
UPDATE: 8:35 AM: Water service was restored overnight, but will be shut off temporarily today while final repairs are ma...
01/07/2021

UPDATE: 8:35 AM: Water service was restored overnight, but will be shut off temporarily today while final repairs are made. Thank you for your patience.

ALERT: 4:41 PM: Crews are repairing a water main break along Deer Lake Court in the village of Panther Creek in The Woodlands. Customers in the area may experience low to no water pressure while repairs are being made. An update will be provided as soon as possible. If you work or live in the affected service area, please plan to run your water for a few minutes after service is restored to flush air pockets and iron and other naturally occurring minerals. Thank you for your patience.

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Eve's Necklace (Sophora affinis or Styphnolobium affine). The dark ...
01/05/2021

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Eve's Necklace (Sophora affinis or Styphnolobium affine). The dark lustrous green leaves are borne in a rounded to upright oval crown. In spring it produces rosy-pink, one-inch flowers that hang in wisteria-like, six-inch clusters, followed by fruit pods in late summer and fall that resemble a black string of beads, giving it its common name. Eve's Necklace can grow in sun or as an understory tree; in dense woods, it can even be vine-like. It is a member of the Fabacea (Legume) family and is deciduous, unlike its cousin, Texas Mountain Laurel, (Sophora secundiflora), which is evergreen. The plant does well as an understory tree and tolerates shade. However, it must have well-drained soil. This plant is used by butterflies, birds, and small mammals. Birds often choose this plant to make their nests in. Dr. David Creech, Stephen F. Austin State University professor emeritus of agriculture and the director of the SFA gardens prefers Eve's Necklace to crepe myrtle, mainly because of the crepe myrtle bark scale.

From our email for the week of 1/4... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: No irrigation recommended. The Woodlands ...
01/05/2021

From our email for the week of 1/4... Irrigation Recommendation by Bob Dailey: No irrigation recommended. The Woodlands received an average of 3.3 inches of rain during the last week. The ground is still wet. Here's a thought for today: Irrigation of the land by seawater desalinated by fusion power is ancient. It's called rain!

UPDATE, 6:38 PM: The water line has been repaired and service is restored.ALERT, 4:10 PM: Crews are repairing a water ma...
01/04/2021

UPDATE, 6:38 PM: The water line has been repaired and service is restored.

ALERT, 4:10 PM: Crews are repairing a water main break along E. Wandering Oak Drive in the village of Panther Creek in The Woodlands. Customers in the area may experience low to no water pressure while repairs are being made. An update will be provided as soon as possible. If you work or live in the affected service area, please plan to run your water for a few minutes after service is restored to flush air pockets and iron and other naturally occurring minerals. Thank you for your patience.

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Mexican Plum (Prunus mexicana). Mexican plum is a single-trunked, n...
12/28/2020

Water-saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Mexican Plum (Prunus mexicana). Mexican plum is a single-trunked, non-suckering tree, 15-35 ft. tall, with fragrant, showy, white flowers displayed before the leaves appear. Mature trunks become satiny, blue-gray with darker, horizontal striations. Leaves up to 5 inches long and 2 inches wide, ovate to narrower with serrate margins; minute glands on the petiole near the base of the blade. Plums turn from yellow to mauve to purple as they ripen from July through September. Mexican Plum will grow in any well-drained soil from sand to clay although it grows best in drier locations. It is a common wild plum of the forest-prairie border from Missouri and eastern Kansas to Texas. The fruit is eaten fresh and made into preserves and is also consumed by birds and mammals. Larval host for the Tiger Swallowtail butterfly and Cecropia moth.

From our email for the week of 12/28... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: No irrigation recommended. There is a 7...
12/28/2020

From our email for the week of 12/28... Irrigation recommendation by Bob Dailey: No irrigation recommended. There is a 75% chance of rain on Thursday, although that depends on how fast the next front comes rumbling down from the west coast. That should be enough rain to satisfy the need to irrigate your lawn this week. However, you may want to give your potted plants a drink. Assuming that this New Year will be very similar to all the past ones, anticipate people drinking and driving. Please drive carefully this week and this weekend.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEThree New Trustees Join The Woodlands Water Agency BoardTHE WOODLANDS, Texas, Dec. 28, 2020 – The W...
12/28/2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Three New Trustees Join The Woodlands Water Agency Board

THE WOODLANDS, Texas, Dec. 28, 2020 – The Woodlands Water Agency Board of Trustees welcomed three incoming members at the December 2020 regular board meeting.

The newly seated trustees are:

• Scott Custer (MUD 46)
• Laura Norton (MUD 47)
• Bob Lux (MUD 60)

They were each selected by their respective boards to represent their MUD at the Woodlands Water Agency board. The WWA trustee selection is considered every two years following the MUD elections in May. This year, all local elections were delayed from May until the November general election due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The outgoing trustees were:

• Mark Vonderau (MUD 46)
• Arthur Bredehoft (MUD 47)
• Albert Tomchesson (MUD 60)

James M. Stinson, P.E., General Manager of The Woodlands Water Agency, said, “We welcome the new trustees and acknowledge the dedicated service and leadership each of these outgoing trustees provided to Woodlands Water. The accomplishments of the agency during their service included organizational improvements, implementing a name and logo change to The Woodlands Water Agency, and updating the agency vision and mission statements. The length of service for outgoing trustees was impressive – Mark Vonderau served 24 years, Albert Tomchesson served nine years, and Arthur Bredehoft served five years. We believe the new trustees will help build on our existing momentum.”

12/23/2020

UPDATE, 7:27 AM: Service has been restored in the area of a water line leak near Woodlands Parkway and 2978 in The Woodlands. Contractors will be back onsite today for final site activities and clean up. Thank you for your patience during this unexpected interruption.

12/23/2020

UPDATE: 10:28 PM: Contractors are on site tonight and continue repairs on a water line leak near Woodlands Parkway and 2978 in The Woodlands. Crews are working to restore service in the area. Updates will be posted as new information becomes available. Thank you for your patience during this unexpected interruption.

12/22/2020

ALERT: 5:07 PM: San Jacinto River Authority SJRA has been notified of a water line leak at Woodlands Parkway and FM 2978. The Woodlands Water Agency and SJRA contractors are on site. Unfortunately service will be impacted during the repair. An update will be provided as soon as possible. Thank you for your patience during this unexpected interruption.

Water-Saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Texas Wild Olive or Mexican Olive (Cordia boissieri). Wild olive gr...
12/21/2020

Water-Saving Native Plant of the Week by Bob Dailey: Texas Wild Olive or Mexican Olive (Cordia boissieri). Wild olive grows in any soil including clay soils if well-drained. Very drought tolerant and does best in full sun. Thrives in hot and dry locations and is typically 12-15 feet tall but can reach 20 feet on rare occasions. Native to South Texas to almost Austin at the northern end of its range. However, it can and will do well in The Woodlands and other areas in southeast Texas if grown in well-drained soil in a sunny, dry spot. It blooms almost all year with very showy 3-inch white flowers that have a yellow throat. A good nectar plant for bees and butterflies and the fruit is good for wildlife and livestock.

Address

2455 Lake Robbins Dr
The Woodlands, TX
77380

General information

The Woodlands Joint Powers Agency is the central management agency for the eleven Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs) that currently serve The Woodlands in Montgomery County. The services we provide are water distribution, wastewater collection, storm drainage and tax collection services. The principal objective of TWJPA is to provide the MUDs we serve with professional, reliable and quality services consistent with fiscal responsibility. We are also committed to improving our efficiency and effectiveness at maintaining the utility infrastructure and enhancing communication with our customers.

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 17:00
Thursday 08:00 - 17:00
Friday 08:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(855) 426-7283

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Our mission is to be your resource for water use, costs, quality and conservation in The Woodlands.

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