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New Jersey State Parks, Forests & Historic Sites

New Jersey State Parks, Forests & Historic Sites The official page for the New Jersey Division of Parks & Forestry, State Park Service No matter what your interest is, there is something for everyone!

The New Jersey State Park Service administers over 438,000 acres of land comprising parks, forests, historic sites and other recreation areas. We strive to provide our visitors with a variety of recreational opportunities including hiking, biking, camping, swimming, boating and picnicking. Our historic sites offer the visitor the opportunity to journey back through time to experience life of a for

The New Jersey State Park Service administers over 438,000 acres of land comprising parks, forests, historic sites and other recreation areas. We strive to provide our visitors with a variety of recreational opportunities including hiking, biking, camping, swimming, boating and picnicking. Our historic sites offer the visitor the opportunity to journey back through time to experience life of a for

Operating as usual

01/30/2023
Franklin D. Roosevelt - CCC

🎉 Happy birthday Franklin D. Roosevelt 🎉

Thank you for creating the Civilian Conservation Corps, commonly referred to as the CCC. The CCC consisted of hundreds of thousands of young men who worked on environmental projects during The Great Depression. These men helped build many of our park's trails, cabins and other facilities, while practicing forest management strategies and fighting forest fires.

🤝 Many of these structures and strategies are still used in New Jersey's state parks and forests today!

❗️Virtual Public Meeting Announcement - Wharton State Forest Visitor and Vehicle Use - February 8 at 5:30 p.m.The New Je...
01/26/2023

❗️Virtual Public Meeting Announcement - Wharton State Forest Visitor and Vehicle Use - February 8 at 5:30 p.m.

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection will present the Wharton State Forest Visitor and Vehicle Use Survey and gather public input during the second in a series of virtual public meetings on Wednesday, Feb. 8, on the development of a plan for public access while protecting natural resources and ensuring public safety in the state forest.

1,610 surveys were received by the State Park Service which were submitted online, by email and through traditional mail between Sept. 28 and Nov. 11, 2022. After a presentation of survey results, the public will be invited to provide comment.

🔗 Register for the virtual public meeting and learn more: https://njparksandforests.org/wharton/

📰 Press Release: https://nj.gov/dep/newsrel/2023/23_0006.htm

  – Whitesbog Village Historic SiteThis National and State registered Historic Site is home to New Jersey’s first ever c...
01/26/2023

– Whitesbog Village Historic Site

This National and State registered Historic Site is home to New Jersey’s first ever cultivated blueberry and is an outstanding representation of life in the early 1900’s. The site includes 25 historic buildings and over 3,000 acres of cranberry bogs, blueberry fields, reservoirs, sugar sand roads and Pine Barrens forests.

👨‍🌾 Owned and operated by Joseph White, a very successful cranberry production ruled the farm. White’s daughter Elizabeth, who worked on the farm, began experimenting with blueberry production to compliment the already flourishing cranberry industry. In 1916, she and Dr. Frederick Coville collaborated to develop the first cultivated blueberry in NJ and marketed them to the world.

Today the Whitesbog Preservation Trust members, along with other volunteers, work diligently at Whitesbog Village to restore, protect and enhance the land. Specifically, a selective pruning project has been ongoing since 2019 and is led by Whitesbog Preservations landscape and gardening crew, Trustees and volunteers. Together, they have maintained and enhanced many areas in the site and are finally seeing success of the “fruits of our labors”!

If you would like to learn more about the history, native plants and pruning process with the botanical crew, join staff on the following Saturdays; Jan 28, Feb 18 & Feb 25. Spend an hour or the whole day!

🔗 Learn more about the site:
https://nj.gov/dep/parksandforests/historic/whitesbogvillage.html

📅 Learn about upcoming events:
https://whitesbog.square.site/?fbclid=IwAR0wEVtvLxR1npmU5yVfCmRGXmi61nLq5uc3XVlJNRWR3oXbuyW2No1sMuQ

Photo: Elizabeth White (Courtesy of Whitesbog Preservation Trust)

Winter Weather Advisory: New Jersey State Parks, Forests & Historic SitesDue to poor weather conditions the following pa...
01/25/2023

Winter Weather Advisory: New Jersey State Parks, Forests & Historic Sites

Due to poor weather conditions the following parks are closed at this time:
❄ Hacklebarney State Park
❄️ High Point State Park and New Jersey Veterans' Memorial
❄ Round Valley Recreation Area
❄ Spruce Run Recreation Area
❄ Voorhees State Park
❄ Wawayanda State Park

Park reopening updates will be posted on our page.

01/25/2023
MUSKRAT


Muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) are aquatic rodents about the size of guinea pigs. They have thick brown waterproof fur and webbed feet, but primarily swim by undulating their rat-like tails. They are found in marshes throughout the United States and Canada. Muskrat prefer freshwater wetlands to salt marsh.

If you drive or walk through the freshwater wetlands of New Jersey in the winter, you are bound to see what looks like miniature beaver lodges made of grass, reeds and mud. These mini lodges may be 2 feet tall and 3 feet wide and often have waterfowl resting on top.

Article by Matt Pellegrine, Resource Interpretive Specialist, Cape May Point State Park

01/24/2023
Reindeer Moss


Reindeer moss (one of its common names)- is actually a lichen formed through relationship between fungus and algae. It grows in both hot and cold climates in well-drained, open environments. It is extremely cold-hardy and resilient. You can find it growing in the sandy soils of the pine forests of South Jersey.

❗ Attention New Jerseyans who participated in a 2023 First Day Hike ❗ Out of the 41 states that hosted First Day Hikes n...
01/24/2023

❗ Attention New Jerseyans who participated in a 2023 First Day Hike ❗

Out of the 41 states that hosted First Day Hikes nationally, New Jersey ranked 5th in BOTH distance hiked and number of participants! Let us give a final round of applause to those who started 2023 off on the right foot. 👏

We hope to see more nature loving New Jerseyans hiking in 2024! 🚶‍♂️

01/23/2023
Wagging Tails, Saving Trails

🐾 Wagging tails are saving trails! 🐾

You may have heard of cadaver, explosive and search and rescue dogs, but have you heard of Conservation Dogs?

The Department of Environmental Protection’s Office of Natural Lands Management has teamed up with the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference’s Conservation Dogs program to survey for the elusive small-whorled pogonia in Norvin Green State Forest and Ringwood State Park.

Small-whorled pogonia is an extremely rare orchid that occurs from Georgia to Maine, with New Hampshire supporting the most populations. It is listed threatened federally and is endangered in New Jersey. Only a few sites support small populations in New Jersey, and it is hoped that using conservation dogs will help find new and re-locate historical populations of the plant.

The Conservation Dogs program is the first of its kind in the Northeast. These dogs can detect twice the number of invasive plants, sniff out infested areas and assist in surveying rare or endangered species much faster than humans.

🔗Don't believe us? See for yourself: https://fb.watch/i9imJQe2ss/
🐶 Learn more about the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference Conservation Dogs Program: https://www.nynjtc.org/content/conservation-dog-program
🌱 Learn more about the Office of Natural Lands Management: https://njparksandforests.org/natural

❗ Scheduled Website Maintenance – Sunday, January 22 ❗ The State Park Service’s online campground registration and park ...
01/20/2023

❗ Scheduled Website Maintenance – Sunday, January 22 ❗

The State Park Service’s online campground registration and park pass websites will be offline for scheduled maintenance from 7 a.m. – 3 p.m. on Sunday, January 22.

During this maintenance period, campground reservations will not be able to be made and Mobile Sport Fishing Vehicle Permits will not be able to be purchased.

  – Twin Lights Historic Site 🎉 Check out the newly updated display in the Powerhouse building at Twin Lights Historic S...
01/19/2023

– Twin Lights Historic Site

🎉 Check out the newly updated display in the Powerhouse building at Twin Lights Historic Site! 🎉

Visitors often admire the sites' displays and historical artifacts- but does anyone think about the hard work and meticulous planning that goes into creating them? With the support from staff and volunteers, the 131 year-old and nearly 250-pound lighthouse clockwork drive has been transported to its new home. Along with the drive, an incandescent oil-vapor lamp, its fuel tanks and new signage followed.

After nearly 9 months of planning and construction for the new location, the display has been completed. Be sure to stop in and see it for yourself anytime between 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.!

📸 In the meantime, enjoy some photos of this process!

🔗 Learn more:
https://nj.gov/dep/parksandforests/historic/twinlights.html

 GREBEAn intriguing, winged winter visitor to New Jersey you may see while looking out over frosty lakes and ponds is a ...
01/18/2023


GREBE
An intriguing, winged winter visitor to New Jersey you may see while looking out over frosty lakes and ponds is a grebe. Grebes are diving birds in the family Podicipedidae, which translates from Latin as, “vented foot”. This translation describes the unique foot structure on a grebe, which are rounded, lobed toes instead of the fused, webbed toes common on most waterfowl. Lobed toes are also a trait found on coots.
Though similar to ducks, grebes are not in the same family. They are medium-sized duck-like birds with elongated necks, red eyes, and lobed toes instead of webbed. Grebes are much better swimmers and divers than they are flyers. As does the webbing on the feet of a duck, lobed toes are used as a propelling method to help grebes achieve greater depths as they dive.

A grebes’ plumage is waterproof and changes color depending on the season. In females and non-breeding males, the plumage is in shades of dull brown, grey and white, whereas breeding plumage on a male grebe is an eye-catching shower of reds, yellows, blacks, and oranges.

As grebes forage by diving deep into the water for fish and crustaceans, they need to find bodies of water that have not frozen over in the winter, and travel south from their northern habitats to do so. In New Jersey, grebes can be found in both freshwater and saltwater ponds, rivers, lakes, and coastal inlets during the colder months of the year.

Species of grebes you may see in New Jersey while out on a winter bird walk are the horned grebe (Podiceps auritus), pied-billed grebe (Podilymbus podiceps), red-necked grebe (Podiceps grisegena), eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis), and western grebe (Aechmophorus occidentalis).

Article by Sarajane Bruno, Naturalist, Liberty State Park
Photos courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Digital Library

❗ Full-time vacancy reminder - Application closing date is 01/23/2023 ❗
01/18/2023

❗ Full-time vacancy reminder - Application closing date is 01/23/2023 ❗

Have you ever wanted to work for the State Park Service managing one of New Jersey’s 54 state parks, forests or recreation areas? Then the position of Superintendent might be for you!

The New Jersey Civil Service Commission has published a job announcement for Superintendent 1 – Parks & Forestry, which is open for applications until 4 p.m. on January 23.

A Superintendent 1 is responsible for the overall operation/administration of a state park or forest; supervise/oversee permanent and seasonal staff, park budget and capital projects; and ensure the protection of natural, cultural and historic resources for the health and safety of the visiting public and staff.

The position is open to applicants nationwide, however if hired the individual has one year after the date they take their office, position or employment to relocate their residence to New Jersey.

Note: This posting will determine whether you qualify to test for the Superintendent 1 position. Your score may be based on a comparison of your background with the job requirements, and/or an examination. This posting is not a direct job posting but can lead to an interview for a job after the list is created.

🔗 Learn more: https://info.csc.state.nj.us/jobannouncements/DefaultJobAnnouncement/ViewCompetitiveJobDescription?guid=35318

 COMETA recently discovered comet known as C/2022 E3 is passing our way in the next few weeks. Currently visible with a ...
01/17/2023


COMET
A recently discovered comet known as C/2022 E3 is passing our way in the next few weeks. Currently visible with a telescope, E3 is expected to get brighter and easier to see as it approaches Earth.
Comets are clumps of frozen gases, rock and dust, but when heated on approach to the Sun, they release gases and dust to form their recognized shape: a glowing core and long flame-like tail.
E3 reached its closest point to the Sun on Jan. 12, 2023. Its trajectory has it passing Earth at a distance of 26 million miles on Feb. 1. In the weeks surrounding its approach, it may be visible with the naked eye or with binoculars.
Viewers in the Northern Hemisphere will have the best chance of spotting the comet near dawn in the northwestern sky. Without a telescope, comet E3 will most likely look like a faint, greenish smudge in the sky. Locations with minimal light pollution will be best for viewing.
Modeling suggests the last time C/2022 E3 passed by Earth was during the Upper Paleolithic period, so may have last been by early homo sapiens alive during the ice age.

PARK ADVISORY: Island Beach State Park A major construction project is expected to begin at Island Beach State Park the ...
01/17/2023

PARK ADVISORY: Island Beach State Park

A major construction project is expected to begin at Island Beach State Park the week of January 22. The project will be the installation of a new sewer line in the north bound lane, traveling from the park gatehouse to the nature center. There will be intermittent lane closures from the gatehouse to the nature center for the duration of the project.

The project is expected to take approximately 9 months to complete and will cause delays when visiting the park. The project is expected to be completed mid to late September.

Mobile traffic lights will be set up as the road will be reduced to one lane where the crews are working. Please proceed with caution. Vehicles, bicycles and pedestrians who do not abide by the traffic lights and signs will be subject to fines.

Today, the Dr. James Still Office Historic Site commemorated the accomplishments and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr...
01/16/2023

Today, the Dr. James Still Office Historic Site commemorated the accomplishments and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with a Day of Service.

Who was Dr. James Still?
Historically referred to as the “Black Doctor of the Pines,” Dr. James Still was self-taught, and performed medical diagnoses and distributed treatments in an office in Medford where he developed and dispensed herbal and homeopathic remedies. One of 18 children, Dr. James Still was born in 1812 in Burlington County to enslaved African Americans.

In 2006, through Green Acres funding the Department of Environmental Protection purchased Dr. Still’s former office for preservation and interpretation. In 2020, much needed stabilization and restoration work began on the former office.

Thank you to all that participated in the nature trail clean up event today!

🎉 Congratulations to K9 Officer Truelove and his partner K9 Pepper as well as K9 Officer McDermott and his partner K9 Je...
01/14/2023

🎉 Congratulations to K9 Officer Truelove and his partner K9 Pepper as well as K9 Officer McDermott and his partner K9 Jetty. 🎉

Yesterday, they graduated from the Cape May County Sheriff’s Office K9 Academy. We wish them all the best as they hit the road patrolling and assisting you in our State Parks, Forests, and historic sites!

  – Island Beach State Park In 1942, the Persephone was torpedoed by German U Boat U-593 and sank three miles off the so...
01/12/2023

– Island Beach State Park

In 1942, the Persephone was torpedoed by German U Boat U-593 and sank three miles off the southern tip of Island Beach State Park. The unarmed and unsuspecting US ally motor tanker ship, owned by Panama Transport Co, was carrying 80,000 barrels of crude oil from Aruba to New York. The Persephone had already made 39 wartime shipments of oil.

None of the 37 officers and men onboard ever saw the U-boat that meticulously stalked her. The attack, led by lieutenant Gerd Kelbing, began with a torpedo that ripped through the engine room. Approximately 45 seconds later, a second torpedo burst into the No. 8 tank along the starboard side. Captain Quistgaard onboard the Persephone, quickly gave the order to abandon ship. Twenty eight survivors- made up mostly of Belgians and Scandinavians included all ship officers. With them, was the ships mascot, a scruffy little puppy.

While the US Coast Guard and local private fishing boats managed the rescue efforts, naval blimps and bombing planes dropped depth bombs in the area of the attack. U-boat 593 was later sunk in the Mediterranean Sea by the US destroyer USS Wainwright and the British es**rt destroyer HMS Calpe in December 1943.

Today, the wreck of the Persephone is described as an exciting shallow water diving adventure. The wreck is broken up over a large area and is good for lobster diving, and spearfishing black fish and sea bass.

Stop in and visit Island Beach State Park's Interpretive Center, nearly 6 miles south of the main gate, to learn more about the hundreds of shipwrecks that occurred along the coast!

Exploring Cape May Point State Park today with one of our park naturalists, Matt Pelligrine. Some of you may recognize h...
01/11/2023

Exploring Cape May Point State Park today with one of our park naturalists, Matt Pelligrine. Some of you may recognize him from our "Notes From Our Naturalists" and "Wildlife Wednesday" video series.

Stop in Cape May Point State Park's visitor center and explore what the park has to offer!

🔗 Learn more:
https://nj.gov/dep/parksandforests/parks/capemaypointstatepark.html

 Beavers in WinterHave you ever wondered how a beaver survives the winter? The American Beaver, Castor canadensis, does ...
01/11/2023


Beavers in Winter

Have you ever wondered how a beaver survives the winter? The American Beaver, Castor canadensis, does not hibernate and instead spends the winter huddled up with its family inside their well-insulated lodges. In order to prepare for the colder months beavers spend a lot of time in the fall building and maintaining their lodges. These cone shaped homes are built of twigs, logs, rocks and mud with the entrance underwater. They are typically located in the deepest, quiet part of the water for protection from predators and so when the water freezes over, they can still swim underwater to access food under the ice.

Not only do beavers spend a lot of time maintaining their lodges, they also are busy with caching, or storing food in the fall. In the summertime beavers eat a lot of fresh vegetation but once the cold hits they have to transition their diet, relying more on the bark and twigs of softwood trees. They often collect these twigs and store them underwater near the entrance of their lodge. The snow and ice make it harder for the beavers to travel longer distances so having the food supply nearby is essential. This helps them not spend too much energy or lose too much heat while out in the cold. This is also where their thick coat of fur comes in handy. When a beaver must make a dive in the freezing water for food their thick coat insulates them and keeps them warm. They also rub castor oil, which they produce, all over their fur to make it waterproof.

Winter is also the start of the mating season for the American beaver which lasts from January to March. Gestation lasts about three months and there can be anywhere from one to four newborns known as kits. In the lodge typically reside the two parents, yearlings and newborns. Mating in the winter ensures that the mother has enough time to nurse before the busy season starts back up again in the spring.

As you are out hiking this winter, one simple way to know if a lodge is occupied is to see if the snow on top has melted. Inside the lodge is well insulated and can get up to 34 degrees Fahrenheit, just warm enough to melt the snow off the top of the lodge. So be sure to keep an eye out!

Article by Nicole Bendixen- Seasonal Naturalist at Brendan T. Byrne State Forest

In 2022, NJDEP acquired 9 miles of abandoned rail line spanning throughout Essex and Hudson counties with the intent to ...
01/10/2023

In 2022, NJDEP acquired 9 miles of abandoned rail line spanning throughout Essex and Hudson counties with the intent to create a thriving recreation and transportation corridor. This year, we begin turning that dream into a reality by creating the Essex-Hudson Greenway with the help of our Public Land Administration & Parks team and State of New Jersey.

“In a state as small and dense as ours, this project exemplifies our belief that we can take previously underutilized or overlooked properties and turn them into points of civic pride to better our communities and environment.”
- Governor Phil Murphy

🔗To learn more about the plans for the park visit https://nj.gov/dep/parksandforests/parks/thegreenway.html

In 2022, NJDEP acquired 9 miles of abandoned rail line spanning throughout Essex and Hudson counties with the intent to create a thriving recreation and transportation corridor. This year, we begin turning that dream into a reality by creating the Essex-Hudson Greenway with the help of our Public Land Administration & Parks team and State of New Jersey.

“In a state as small and dense as ours, this project exemplifies our belief that we can take previously underutilized or overlooked properties and turn them into points of civic pride to better our communities and environment.”

-

🔗To learn more about the plans for the park visit https://nj.gov/dep/parksandforests/parks/thegreenway.html

 Hibernation and TorporWhile dusting off your winter coat and stocking your kitchen for a potential snowstorm, consider ...
01/10/2023


Hibernation and Torpor

While dusting off your winter coat and stocking your kitchen for a potential snowstorm, consider what the animals outside do in order to survive in an ever-changing environment. Animals that cannot migrate must adapt to the decreased availability of food and the variable temperatures that come with seasonal changes. Often times these animals conserve energy and survive by entering a state of hibernation or torpor.

In some species, decreasing daylight and hormonal changes trigger a voluntary state of energy conservation called hibernation. During hibernation, heart rate, breathing rate and the rate an animal uses energy, slows and its body temperature decreases. Animals hibernating may occasionally become active for short periods of time. The eastern chipmunk (Tamias striatus) will wake up occasionally to eat from its winter food storage!

Other animals enter a similar, but involuntary state of inactivity called torpor. During torpor the animal’s heart rat, breathing rate and metabolic rate decreases, however its body temperature does not drop as low as that of a hibernating animal. Torpor does not last as long as hibernation and it might be helpful to think of it as a “light hibernation”. Some animals enter a state of torpor when temperatures drop at night!

Contrary to popular belief, American black bears (Ursus americanus) do not truly hibernate. On mild winter days they may leave their den and can be easily awakened if disturbed! Females even wake to give birth!

Article by Ally Horan, Seasonal Naturalist
Images from the USFWS National Digital Library

Did you know that today is National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day? 👮‍♂️ The New Jersey State Park Service would like ...
01/09/2023

Did you know that today is National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day? 👮‍♂️

The New Jersey State Park Service would like to show appreciation to our colleagues in the New Jersey State Park Police who patrol and protect the state’s 54 parks, forests, recreation areas and historic sites, as well as 130 Natural Lands Trust Preserves. Together these lands encompass 453,785 acres of New Jersey and are visited by more than 17 million people each year.

Thank you, Officers, past and present! 🤝

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Mail Code: 501-04, 501 E State Street, PO Box 420
Trenton, NJ
08608

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CAREFUL EVERYONE!
Sign me In... Always like to keep updated on our State Parks Always ready to help !! Join in Events etc

Keep up the Good Work... Could not sign in ...
Add me on.. Will send profile
Nice to see the pages working
Marguerite Gargiulo
Roxbury NJ ~
New park https://portfourchon.com/glpc-announces-the-opening-of-the-coastal-wetlands-park-tidal-creek/provides a place for people to kayak, meanwhile in NJ NJ State Parks and NJ's Pinelands Preservation Alliance refuse to even acknowledge NJ's Exemplary and Historic Rancocas Creek is the largest Western Outflow of the NJ Pine Barren's, has been a Documented Water Trail used as a destination for visitors since the 1870's and is the salient multi-use natural feature flowing through Rancocas State Park
YESSSSSSSSSSSSSSS!
There used to be a feature on the site where you could look at the parks based on things they offered. For example camping. It not only gave you the break down on which offered camping but a further breakdown of what types of camping (shelters, lean-to's, primitive, cabins). Is this still on there somewhere and I'm just missing it?
South Branch NJ's Rancocas State Park. Tidewater wild rice marsh and woodlands kayaking. Our Day on a Delaware River Estuary feeder waterway. Delaware River Estuary - Discover it's Secrets. Even if your in Trenton. RT 5 hours kayaking and paddling. 8 Miles Covered.
Not this particular one,but i was Kayacking on the Barnegst bay yesterday 7/23/two thoudand twnty one ------afternoon.I kayaked 6 miles, stopped for a break looked over and saw a bright pinkish tall bird,i immediately noticed the beak.
Pulled out my celphone to get picture of the Loner in the middle of large group of egrets,herons,seagulls.
Soon as i get my Camera/phone out my waterproof bag a ,mosquito helicopter flew over head ,scared the whole.group heading southeast direction
Our Shared Waters - Rancocas Creek Water Trail Mount Holly Paddlesport and Kayak Festivus. Paddle on Down. Discover, Explore and Visit NJ's Water Trail Town. Help Support the Rancocas Creek's Nomination as a National Water Trail. Help Spread de Word. Paddlesports - Part Deaux. There will be a workshop on public access for all.
Monarchs are back at Melpine Landing, Rancocas Creek Water Trail Mile 19, Rancocas State Park. Help protect and restore monarch butterfly populations. Enhance awareness by reading NJDEP Monarch Guide. Go 1 Step Further. Keep Landing Free of garbage and debris. Respect natures resources. https://www.nj.gov/dep/docs/monarch-guide.pdf
Canistear Road
Summer season

ROAD TRIPS ARE THE EQUIVALENT OF HUMAN WINGS. ASK ME TO GO ON ONE, ANYWHERE. WE’LL STOP IN EVERY SMALL TOWN AND LEARN THE HISTORY AND STORIES, FEEL THE GROUND, AND CAPTURE THE SPIRIT. THEN WE’LL TURN IT INTO OUR OWN STORY THAT WILL LIVE INSIDE OUR HISTORY TO CARRY WITH US, ALWAYS. BECAUSE STORIES ARE MORE IMPORTANT THAN THINGS.
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