New Jersey State Parks, Forests & Historic Sites

New Jersey State Parks, Forests & Historic Sites The official page for the New Jersey Division of Parks & Forestry, State Park Service The New Jersey State Park Service administers over 438,000 acres of land comprising parks, forests, historic sites and other recreation areas.

We strive to provide our visitors with a variety of recreational opportunities including hiking, biking, camping, swimming, boating and picnicking. Our historic sites offer the visitor the opportunity to journey back through time to experience life of a foregone era. No matter what your interest is, there is something for everyone! We invite you to take advantage of all our recreational, natural and historical resources and Open your Doorway to Adventure!

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Start 2022 off on the right foot by visiting a state park, forest or historic site on January 1 for a First Day Hike! Ne...
12/23/2021

Start 2022 off on the right foot by visiting a state park, forest or historic site on January 1 for a First Day Hike!

New Jersey State Parks, Forests & Historic Sites is hosting 28 hikes and one lighthouse climb on New Year’s Day as part of America's State Parks First Day Hikes program. A full list of hikes can be found on our website here: https://njparksandforests.org/firstdayhikes/

In 2020, more than 2,000 hikers traveled 5,625 miles on First Day Hikes throughout New Jersey’s vast network of trails.

#NJStateParks

Start 2022 off on the right foot by visiting a state park, forest or historic site on January 1 for a First Day Hike!

New Jersey State Parks, Forests & Historic Sites is hosting 28 hikes and one lighthouse climb on New Year’s Day as part of America's State Parks First Day Hikes program. A full list of hikes can be found on our website here: https://njparksandforests.org/firstdayhikes/

In 2020, more than 2,000 hikers traveled 5,625 miles on First Day Hikes throughout New Jersey’s vast network of trails.

#NJStateParks

Park Advisory - D&R Canal State ParkQuaker Road (Princeton) has reopened for vehicular traffic. Park visitors are asked ...
12/23/2021

Park Advisory - D&R Canal State Park
Quaker Road (Princeton) has reopened for vehicular traffic.

Park visitors are asked to use caution if trying to traverse this section of the D&R Canal Towpath due to muddy conditions until path has received its top coat of stone.

BREAKING NEWS~Santa’s Sleigh Pulled by Girl Power! While the Christmas TV shows and movies may have all of us believing ...
12/22/2021

BREAKING NEWS~Santa’s Sleigh Pulled by Girl Power!

While the Christmas TV shows and movies may have all of us believing Santa’s reindeer are male, Mother Nature tells a different story. Reindeer, also known as caribou, are the only deer species where both male and female’s grow antlers. Antlers differ from horns in a few ways but most notably, antlers are grown and shed every year, while horns are permanent and may continue to grow throughout the animal’s life.

Male reindeer shed their antlers by early December at the end of mating season, while the females smaller antlers will remain attached into the spring. This is so the expected mothers can defend their feeding grounds during times when food is scarce. Therefore, if Santa’s sleigh is carried by flying, antlered reindeer on Christmas Eve they would have to be females!

In NJ, we do not have wild reindeer, but we do have an overabundance of white-tailed deer. Like reindeer, the male deer (bucks), grow and shed their antlers every year after the breeding season. Considering that half of the deer population is male you can start to wonder, “Where are all the antlers?”. Nothing goes to waste in nature. Antlers are bones that are full of calcium, phosphorus and other minerals that are in high demand by the squirrels, mice and other rodents living in the wild. The antlers are quickly found and eaten. The antlers provide rodents with a nutritious snack and help to wear down their ever-growing front teeth.

Keep an eye on the forest floor from mid-December to March, you may get lucky and spot one before the squirrels do.

Fun Facts about Antlers:

Moose can grow the heaviest antlers of all deer species, weighing in at up to 70 pounds.

Antlers are the fastest growing animal tissue on Earth, growing up to an inch a day.

Antler size is controlled by genetics and diet, not by age.



Article by Stephane Fox, Resource Interpretive Specialist, D and R Canal State Park

12/21/2021

#NotesFromOurNaturalists

American Holly (Ilex opaca) not only makes a lovely ornamental tree, but it is an important fall and early winter food source for birds! By January, hollies have often been picked clean by American robins (Turdus migratorius) and cedar waxwings (Bombycilla cedrorum). Consider adding this holiday favorite to your yard and put out the welcome mat for wildlife! Just remember, only the female tree produces fruit! Incidentally, don’t try the fruit yourself. The human stomach is not as tolerant. The berries cause stomach ache!

12/15/2021

#WildlifeWednesday

MARBLED SALAMANDER, TOO CUTE FOR ITS OWN GOOD

The marbled salamander is a beautiful, harmless creature (unless you are a small insect!) often found under logs in the woods. The salamanders have a unique breeding strategy. Females migrate to the bogs in the fall, crawl under a log and lay their eggs. The female then curls her body around the eggs and patiently waits for autumn rains to fill the bog with clean rainwater. Marbled salamander females protect their eggs by keeping them moist. They will even attack shrews and other small predators.

Once the bog is flooded, the female’s job is done. The eggs hatch into carnivorous salamander tadpoles. Unlike frog tadpoles, salamander tadpoles have a mane of feather-like gills. Salamander tadpoles pop out their front legs first. Frogs pop their powerful back legs first. Also, frog tadpoles are usually vegetarian (although there are exceptions). In the spring, the tadpoles transform into tiny, marbled salamanders. Most frogs, toads, and salamanders breed in the spring, so perhaps this enables the marbled salamander tadpoles to avoid competition for food.

Dry falls are a problem for marbled salamanders. Their other problem is that they are cute and harmless. They are very tempting to pocket but please leave them in the wild where they belong!

By Matt Pelligrine, Park Naturalist, Cape May Point State Park

#NotesFromOurNaturalists Feeding Winter BirdsWinter can be a difficult time for birds as they may have trouble finding f...
12/14/2021

#NotesFromOurNaturalists

Feeding Winter Birds

Winter can be a difficult time for birds as they may have trouble finding food; insects are scarce and other natural food sources are limited or covered with snow. This makes winter the perfect time to put up a birdfeeder!

Different types of feeders and seeds will attract different species of birds. Platform and hanging feeders with a mix of seeds will attract chickadees, cardinals, wrens, nuthatches, titmice, and jays to name a few. These species go crazy for black oil sunflower seeds, millet, peanuts, and thistle which provide both protein and fat. Meal worms on a platform feeder will attract bluebirds. Ground-feeding birds, such as mourning doves and towhees, will eat what falls on the ground.

Suet is another great food to offer. It is high energy and pure fat – invaluable in winter when insects are hard to find, and birds need more calories to keep warm. A suet cake in a cage feeder is very easy to hang and is less messy than other feeders.
Birds like to have nearby perching places to check out your offerings before eating, so place your feeder near shrubs or trees. This also provides them with cover to retreat to. Some species of birds will grab a seed then fly to nearby perch to crack it open before returning for more.

If you don’t have space for a birdfeeder but still want to see winter birds, check out the Cornell FeederWatch Cam at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/cams/cornell-lab-feederwatch/ . You can view their bird feeding station where they have a variety of feeders and seeds to attract the birds in the area. You may even get inspired to put out a feeder of your own.

Gina Provenzano, Naturalist

#NotesFromOurNaturalists

Feeding Winter Birds

Winter can be a difficult time for birds as they may have trouble finding food; insects are scarce and other natural food sources are limited or covered with snow. This makes winter the perfect time to put up a birdfeeder!

Different types of feeders and seeds will attract different species of birds. Platform and hanging feeders with a mix of seeds will attract chickadees, cardinals, wrens, nuthatches, titmice, and jays to name a few. These species go crazy for black oil sunflower seeds, millet, peanuts, and thistle which provide both protein and fat. Meal worms on a platform feeder will attract bluebirds. Ground-feeding birds, such as mourning doves and towhees, will eat what falls on the ground.

Suet is another great food to offer. It is high energy and pure fat – invaluable in winter when insects are hard to find, and birds need more calories to keep warm. A suet cake in a cage feeder is very easy to hang and is less messy than other feeders.
Birds like to have nearby perching places to check out your offerings before eating, so place your feeder near shrubs or trees. This also provides them with cover to retreat to. Some species of birds will grab a seed then fly to nearby perch to crack it open before returning for more.

If you don’t have space for a birdfeeder but still want to see winter birds, check out the Cornell FeederWatch Cam at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/cams/cornell-lab-feederwatch/ . You can view their bird feeding station where they have a variety of feeders and seeds to attract the birds in the area. You may even get inspired to put out a feeder of your own.

Gina Provenzano, Naturalist

Island Beach State Park will accept Christmas tree donations on Saturday, January 8, 2022, for sand dune restoration pro...
12/03/2021

Island Beach State Park will accept Christmas tree donations on Saturday, January 8, 2022, for sand dune restoration projects throughout the park.

Due to the overwhelming popularity of this program, donors must preregister in advance. Once 300 donors register, Island Beach will not accept any additional trees.

🌲 Christmas trees aide in the stabilization and enhancement of the existing dune system throughout Island Beach State Park by holding wind-blown sand in place, allowing for the accelerated development of dunes.

🌲 Register to donate a tree, or register to volunteer placing trees: https://www.islandbeachnatureprograms.org/events/2022-christmas-tree-recycling-project-l6zd7

#NJStateParks

Island Beach State Park will accept Christmas tree donations on Saturday, January 8, 2022, for sand dune restoration projects throughout the park.

Due to the overwhelming popularity of this program, donors must preregister in advance. Once 300 donors register, Island Beach will not accept any additional trees.

🌲 Christmas trees aide in the stabilization and enhancement of the existing dune system throughout Island Beach State Park by holding wind-blown sand in place, allowing for the accelerated development of dunes.

🌲 Register to donate a tree, or register to volunteer placing trees: https://www.islandbeachnatureprograms.org/events/2022-christmas-tree-recycling-project-l6zd7

#NJStateParks

#WildlifeWednesday  The ruddy duck is a common winged winter visitor to New Jersey during the winter months. Its scienti...
12/01/2021

#WildlifeWednesday
The ruddy duck is a common winged winter visitor to New Jersey during the winter months. Its scientific name, Oxyura jamaicensis, translates to “stiff-tail”. Both the common and scientific name describe noticeable traits on this duck – “ruddy” for the reddish-brown color of its plumage and “stiff-tail” for its long, pointed tail that appears rigid and inflexible, no matter what position the duck is in.

A small duck, a ruddy is approximately fifteen inches long with a wingspan of two feet. Male ruddy ducks, during breeding season, sport the rich red plumage of its name, along with a bright blue bill. Non-breeding males and females have feathers which are more of a brownish-grey color.

Ruddy ducks are deep divers that feed on aquatic insects and crustaceans, and can be found on ponds, lakes, and rivers that do not freeze over in the winter. A ruddy duck will dive nearly to the bottom of the water and push its bill through the mud to stir up the prey hidden within the murky depths. A better swimmer than flier, a ruddy will dive instead of fly in order to escape predators.

During breeding season, male ruddy ducks perform elaborate courtship displays, and can be very aggressive when pursuing a female. Ruddy ducks are usually monogamous, but a few may have more than one mate in a breeding season. Though they are a small species of waterfowl, ruddy ducks are known for the large size eggs they lay. They nest in marshlands within tall grasses to keep hidden from predators.

Next time you’re out on an exploration for winter birds during the colder months of the year, keep your eyes peeled for this pretty little waterfowl on the water’s surface.

Article by Sarajane Bruno, Liberty State Park
Photos courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Digital Library

Mobile Sport Fishing Vehicle Permits for the 2022 season are available for online purchase – today!Mobile Sport Fishing ...
12/01/2021

Mobile Sport Fishing Vehicle Permits for the 2022 season are available for online purchase – today!

Mobile Sport Fishing Vehicle Permits grant the permit holder’s all-wheel drive vehicle access to drive on to the beaches at Island Beach State Park, North Brigantine Natural Area and Corson’s Inlet State Park for the sole purpose of fishing.

Permit types and fees are as follows:
🚗🎣 Island Beach State Park – Annual – NJ Resident $195 / Non-NJ $225
🎣 🚗 North Brigantine Natural Area – Annual – NJ Resident $50 / Non-NJ $75
🚗🎣 Corson’s Inlet State Park – Annual – NJ Resident $50 / Non-NJ $75

Please be aware that an additional $5 transaction fee will be added on to all permit purchases.

🔗 Purchase your permit today: https://yourpassnow.com/ParkPass/nj

3 Day Permits from Island Beach State Park are not available online at this time. Please contact the Island Beach State Park Office directly to inquire: 732-793-0506

#NJStateParks

Mobile Sport Fishing Vehicle Permits for the 2022 season are available for online purchase – today!

Mobile Sport Fishing Vehicle Permits grant the permit holder’s all-wheel drive vehicle access to drive on to the beaches at Island Beach State Park, North Brigantine Natural Area and Corson’s Inlet State Park for the sole purpose of fishing.

Permit types and fees are as follows:
🚗🎣 Island Beach State Park – Annual – NJ Resident $195 / Non-NJ $225
🎣 🚗 North Brigantine Natural Area – Annual – NJ Resident $50 / Non-NJ $75
🚗🎣 Corson’s Inlet State Park – Annual – NJ Resident $50 / Non-NJ $75

Please be aware that an additional $5 transaction fee will be added on to all permit purchases.

🔗 Purchase your permit today: https://yourpassnow.com/ParkPass/nj

3 Day Permits from Island Beach State Park are not available online at this time. Please contact the Island Beach State Park Office directly to inquire: 732-793-0506

#NJStateParks

#NotesFromOurNaturalists At Spruce Run Recreation Area, we had to spruce up our Winter Boat Storage Area and this meant ...
11/30/2021

#NotesFromOurNaturalists
At Spruce Run Recreation Area, we had to spruce up our Winter Boat Storage Area and this meant raking the leaves and overgrown lawn away from the concrete parking bumpers so the numbers and lines could be seen. Moths and praying mantises, fuzzy woolly bear caterpillars and smooth walking centipedes, even a squirm of jumping worms and congress of lungless red back, lead back, and longtail salamanders were all feeling quite affronted by their sudden exposure to the cold autumn air.

My well-meaning cleaning efforts ultimately destroyed the homes of mother nature's beloved little critters. I assuaged my guilt by “leaving the leaves” nearby, carefully ushering the little critters away from the predatory teeth on my rake and into the "messy" lawn.

It’s all about finding a balance. If I left the leaves in the parking lot, then the salamanders and insects would have been crushed by the busy boat traffic. If I bagged the leaves and threw them away, our wildlife friends would have nowhere warm to hibernate for the winter. Instead, I left the leaves in the lawn, a short flight, scuttle, or wiggle away from the dangerous parking lot.

This fall we hope you please consider looking for a corner of your property or gardens where you wouldn’t mind leaving some leaves. Maybe even add a couple large rocks and logs and see what kinds of tiny yet wonderful wildlife you can welcome into your neighborhood! Remember, Monarchs migrate to Mexico for the winter but our NJ State Butterfly, the Black Swallowtail, overwinters in your leftover garden stalks and fallen leaves. There will be plenty of time for spring cleaning after the last frost in April!

Article by Deidre Supple, Spruce Run Recreation Area

Mobile Sport Fishing Vehicle Permits for 2022 will be available for purchase online starting Wednesday, December 1. Perm...
11/29/2021

Mobile Sport Fishing Vehicle Permits for 2022 will be available for purchase online starting Wednesday, December 1.

Permit types and fees are as follows:
🚗🎣 Island Beach State Park – Annual – NJ Resident $195 / Non-NJ $225
🎣 🚗 North Brigantine Natural Area – Annual – NJ Resident $50 / Non-NJ $75
🚗🎣 Corson’s Inlet State Park – Annual – NJ Resident $50 / Non-NJ $75

Please be aware that an additional $5 transaction fee will be added on to all permit purchases.

Mobile Sport Fishing Vehicle Permits grant the permit holder’s all-wheel drive vehicle access to drive on to the beaches at Island Beach State Park, North Brigantine Natural Area and Corson’s Inlet State Park for the sole purpose of fishing.

🔗 Permit purchases will begin at 12 a.m. December 1: https://yourpassnow.com/parkpass/nj

#NJStateParks

Mobile Sport Fishing Vehicle Permits for 2022 will be available for purchase online starting Wednesday, December 1.

Permit types and fees are as follows:
🚗🎣 Island Beach State Park – Annual – NJ Resident $195 / Non-NJ $225
🎣 🚗 North Brigantine Natural Area – Annual – NJ Resident $50 / Non-NJ $75
🚗🎣 Corson’s Inlet State Park – Annual – NJ Resident $50 / Non-NJ $75

Please be aware that an additional $5 transaction fee will be added on to all permit purchases.

Mobile Sport Fishing Vehicle Permits grant the permit holder’s all-wheel drive vehicle access to drive on to the beaches at Island Beach State Park, North Brigantine Natural Area and Corson’s Inlet State Park for the sole purpose of fishing.

🔗 Permit purchases will begin at 12 a.m. December 1: https://yourpassnow.com/parkpass/nj

#NJStateParks

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Mail Code: 501-04, 501 E State Street, PO Box 420
Trenton, NJ
08608

Telephone

+18008436420

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CAREFUL EVERYONE!
Sign me In... Always like to keep updated on our State Parks Always ready to help !! Join in Events etc Keep up the Good Work... Could not sign in ... Add me on.. Will send profile Nice to see the pages working Marguerite Gargiulo Roxbury NJ ~
New park https://portfourchon.com/glpc-announces-the-opening-of-the-coastal-wetlands-park-tidal-creek/provides a place for people to kayak, meanwhile in NJ NJ State Parks and NJ's Pinelands Preservation Alliance refuse to even acknowledge NJ's Exemplary and Historic Rancocas Creek is the largest Western Outflow of the NJ Pine Barren's, has been a Documented Water Trail used as a destination for visitors since the 1870's and is the salient multi-use natural feature flowing through Rancocas State Park
YESSSSSSSSSSSSSSS!
There used to be a feature on the site where you could look at the parks based on things they offered. For example camping. It not only gave you the break down on which offered camping but a further breakdown of what types of camping (shelters, lean-to's, primitive, cabins). Is this still on there somewhere and I'm just missing it?
South Branch NJ's Rancocas State Park. Tidewater wild rice marsh and woodlands kayaking. Our Day on a Delaware River Estuary feeder waterway. Delaware River Estuary - Discover it's Secrets. Even if your in Trenton. RT 5 hours kayaking and paddling. 8 Miles Covered.
Not this particular one,but i was Kayacking on the Barnegst bay yesterday 7/23/two thoudand twnty one ------afternoon.I kayaked 6 miles, stopped for a break looked over and saw a bright pinkish tall bird,i immediately noticed the beak. Pulled out my celphone to get picture of the Loner in the middle of large group of egrets,herons,seagulls. Soon as i get my Camera/phone out my waterproof bag a ,mosquito helicopter flew over head ,scared the whole.group heading southeast direction
Our Shared Waters - Rancocas Creek Water Trail Mount Holly Paddlesport and Kayak Festivus. Paddle on Down. Discover, Explore and Visit NJ's Water Trail Town. Help Support the Rancocas Creek's Nomination as a National Water Trail. Help Spread de Word. Paddlesports - Part Deaux. There will be a workshop on public access for all.
Monarchs are back at Melpine Landing, Rancocas Creek Water Trail Mile 19, Rancocas State Park. Help protect and restore monarch butterfly populations. Enhance awareness by reading NJDEP Monarch Guide. Go 1 Step Further. Keep Landing Free of garbage and debris. Respect natures resources. https://www.nj.gov/dep/docs/monarch-guide.pdf
Canistear Road Summer season ROAD TRIPS ARE THE EQUIVALENT OF HUMAN WINGS. ASK ME TO GO ON ONE, ANYWHERE. WE’LL STOP IN EVERY SMALL TOWN AND LEARN THE HISTORY AND STORIES, FEEL THE GROUND, AND CAPTURE THE SPIRIT. THEN WE’LL TURN IT INTO OUR OWN STORY THAT WILL LIVE INSIDE OUR HISTORY TO CARRY WITH US, ALWAYS. BECAUSE STORIES ARE MORE IMPORTANT THAN THINGS.