Prince William Forest Park

Prince William Forest Park Founded in 1936, these woods and streams welcome campers, hikers, bikers and nature lovers. area.
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Prince William Forest Park offers 4 campgrounds, 5 cabin camps, 37 miles of hiking trails, and 21 miles of bicycle-accessible trails. The park is the largest preserved green space in the Washington, D.C. The park also offers a rich history spanning from the American Revolution to present day and intersects with two national trails. More information about the park's history and recreational opport

unities can be found on our official website. Prince William Forest Park is managed by the National Park Service (NPS) under the Department of the Interior (DOI). While this is an open forum, it is also meant to be one in which individuals of all ages, life stages, and backgrounds are encouraged to participate in a respectful manner. The National Park Service and the Department of the Interior encourage inclusion, respect, and comfort in all aspects of visitor enjoyment, including their virtual experience. The administrators of this page will strictly enforce the National Park Service’s social media policy which can be found at www.nps.gov/subjects/digital/social-media.htm

If you hike across the Pyrite Mine Road Bridge and look downstream, you'll notice where the two forks of Quantico Creek ...
11/30/2023

If you hike across the Pyrite Mine Road Bridge and look downstream, you'll notice where the two forks of Quantico Creek join together as they flow down towards the Potomac River. The bridge near the confluence of the two creek forks is where the trail names change, with the South Valley Trail following the South Fork of Quantico Creek and the North Valley Trail following the main branch. Baptisms for residents of Batestown and Hickory Ridge, two early communities located within what is now the park, were performed at this confluence where the two branches of Quantico Creek meet. Visiting this area today on quiet winter's day one can see why early park residents chose this location! To learn more about early park communities, visit https://www.nps.gov/prwi/learn/historyculture/hickory-ridge-joplin-and-batestown.htm

Recently, park volunteers completed a trash pickup and survey of trash found along popular trails and parking areas in P...
11/28/2023

Recently, park volunteers completed a trash pickup and survey of trash found along popular trails and parking areas in Prince William Forest Park. While we are happy to note that there is not much trash along the trails, the majority of the trash volunteers found was small bits of plastic from food packaging as well as larger paper tissue pieces, with the majority of the trash being found in the picnic areas. Big or small all trash left behind has an impact on the forest environment. Just a reminder that next time you're visiting the forest or even just walking around your neighborhood, be mindful of all the small bits of trash you carry with you and pack out any trash pieces you pack in!


📷: TH

November is Native American Heritage Month, celebrating the rich traditions, languages, and contributions of Indigenous ...
11/26/2023

November is Native American Heritage Month, celebrating the rich traditions, languages, and contributions of Indigenous people across the country. The land that became Prince William Forest Park was home to the Doeg people, an Algonquian speaking people who lived on the northern edges of the Powhatan chiefdom. While villages were closer to larger bodies of water like the Potomac River, the Doeg people camped on the banks of Quantico Creek for hunting expeditions. While the forest here has regrown, the Doeg people would have wandered among much of the same rock formations along Quantico Creek as the trails pass by today. To learn more about the Doeg people and Native American Heritage Month, visit https://www.nps.gov/prwi/learn/historyculture/americanindian.htm or https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/native-american-heritage-month.htm

Happy Thanksgiving! In the theme of the holiday, next time you go hiking in Prince William Forest Park, keep an eye out ...
11/23/2023

Happy Thanksgiving! In the theme of the holiday, next time you go hiking in Prince William Forest Park, keep an eye out for the elusive wild turkeys, but also watch for the much more common turkey tail mushrooms growing on fallen logs or dead trees. Named for their similar appearance to the fanned tail of a turkey, substances found in turkey tail mushrooms have been used in medicines to improve response to cancer medicines and radiation. Enjoy the holidays and keep an eye out for turkey tails! While the visitor center and park offices will be closed for the holiday today, trails will remain open as normal from sunrise to sunset.

Today is Red Shawl Day, an annual national effort to bring attention to acts of violence committed against Indigenous pe...
11/19/2023

Today is Red Shawl Day, an annual national effort to bring attention to acts of violence committed against Indigenous people. According to the Department of Justice, American Indian and Alaska Native women are missing and murdered at a rate of more than 10 times the national average. Throughout the week surrounding November 19, people are encouraged to wear red as a symbol of the loss of sacred lifeblood through violence. Learn more about Red Shawl Day by visiting https://www.nps.gov/articles/000/red-shaw-day.htm

Did you know that today is National Take a Hike Day? With 37 miles of hiking trails in Prince William Forest Park, there...
11/17/2023

Did you know that today is National Take a Hike Day? With 37 miles of hiking trails in Prince William Forest Park, there are lots of hikes to choose from to get outdoors and enjoy nature in fall. Which trail will you hike today?

Recently, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names approved the change of the name of a tributary of Quantico Creek from "Mary...
11/14/2023

Recently, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names approved the change of the name of a tributary of Quantico Creek from "Mary Bird Branch" to Mary Byrd Branch to more closely reflect the correct spelling of the name of the African American woman this waterway is named after. Conversations with local residents and deed research by park staff have also recently confirmed the location of Mary Byrd's old home site. In Prince William Forest Park's oral histories, neighbors and her family remembered Mary Byrd as “a nice lady” who was always willing to “give us stuff out the garden” and who “raised the kids, the nieces and nephews, and she would just give the food away” to anyone who needed it. The only named tributary of Quantico Creek in the park, Mary Byrd Branch flows parallel to parts of the Scenic Drive and can be accessed from the Mary Byrd Branch Trail, which connects Turkey Run Parking Area to Parking Lot E along Scenic Drive.

Happy Veteran's Day! We'd like to thank all veterans for their service, especially our park employees and volunteers for...
11/11/2023

Happy Veteran's Day! We'd like to thank all veterans for their service, especially our park employees and volunteers for their service in the Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force. In honor of all veterans, today there are no entrance fees for anyone visiting Prince William Forest Park and other national parks across the country. Veterans are also welcome to stop by the visitor center at Prince William Forest Park with documentation of their service to pick up a free lifetime pass to visit all national parks. Thank you to all our veterans!

The final fee free day of the year is tomorrow! In honor and recognition of all veterans, tomorrow, November 11, no entr...
11/10/2023

The final fee free day of the year is tomorrow! In honor and recognition of all veterans, tomorrow, November 11, no entry fees will be charged for anyone entering national parks on Veteran's Day. Come enjoy the fall trails in Prince William Forest Park, and if you are a veteran, stop by the visitor center to be issued a free veteran's lifetime pass to explore your national parks!

While peak fall color may have already passed, there are still plenty of leaves changing color on the trees in Prince Wi...
11/06/2023

While peak fall color may have already passed, there are still plenty of leaves changing color on the trees in Prince William Forest Park! Several factors influence this color change every year including the length of night, weather, and the leaf pigments themselves. As the days shorten and nights lengthen with the onset of fall, deciduous trees slow down and stop their production of chlorophyll, which gives leaves their green color throughout most of the year. This allows the other pigments in leaves like carotenoids (yellow, orange, and brown) and anthocyanins (shades of red) to show their colors, leading to the brilliant fall displays seen every year. Share a picture of your favorite fall leaves seen in the park this year!

As the time changes tomorrow, so too do our visitor center hours! Starting tomorrow, November 5th, the visitor center wi...
11/04/2023

As the time changes tomorrow, so too do our visitor center hours! Starting tomorrow, November 5th, the visitor center will be open from 8:00am to 4:00pm on Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. It will be closed on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday until March 10, 2024. The park itself and trails will remain open from sunrise to sunset.

If you're looking for something to do this weekend, come visit Cabin Camp 2 from 10:00am to 3:00pm to check out OSS Day!...
11/02/2023

If you're looking for something to do this weekend, come visit Cabin Camp 2 from 10:00am to 3:00pm to check out OSS Day! Learn more about the what was happening at Prince William Forest Park in the 1940s when the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) trained spies here! A rugged two mile hike off-trail with a ranger to an old OSS training ground leaves at either 10:00 am or 1:00 pm. Park ranger tours of the cabin camp to learn more about the history of the OSS in the park also leave at either 10:00am or 1:00pm. Bring bug spray and wear sturdy shoes, long sleeves, and pants if you plan on going on the off-trail hike. Cabin Camp 2 is located at 17175 Mawavi Road, Triangle, VA, about 4 miles north on Joplin Rd (VA 619) from the main park entrance. Hope to see you there!

Happy Halloween! While these aren't the Jack-o'-Lantern's you may see decorating house porches tonight, they are a Jack-...
10/31/2023

Happy Halloween! While these aren't the Jack-o'-Lantern's you may see decorating house porches tonight, they are a Jack-o'-Lantern mushroom that you may see growing in Prince William Forest Park. These poisonous mushrooms can be found growing in clusters at the base of oak or other hardwood trees and have a bright orange-yellow color. They are also faintly bioluminescent, since when they're fresh, the gills may sometimes give off a faint greenish glow at night. Enjoy the holiday and keep an eye out for the eerie Jack-o'-Lantern next time you're hiking in the forest!

One of the reasons researchers in Prince William Forest Park monitor bats in the park is because of the presence of whit...
10/29/2023

One of the reasons researchers in Prince William Forest Park monitor bats in the park is because of the presence of white-nose syndrome (WNS) in bat populations in Virginia. White nose syndrome is a fungal disease that has drastically impacted bat populations across the country. The fungus that causes WNS is a cold loving organism that thrives in caves that many bats hibernate in over the winter. It grows on infected bats’ skin (especially on their faces and wings) disturbing that hibernation by causing them to wake up more often and use more energy than normal, which can cause them to starve to death. It also damages their wings by weakening the skin and causing flakiness or tears in the membrane, which can make survival more difficult. This damage can be seen in a bat captured at Prince William Forest Park a few summer's ago (first picture) by shining a light through the wing and looking for lighter splotches or holes in the membrane. Compare that wing to the photo from a healthy bat captured by the Fish & Wildlife Service (second picture), and you can see more light ‘spots’ on the bat captured in Prince William Forest Park.


Photo 1 Credit: NPS/Mark Ford
Photo 2 Credit: Jonathan Reichard, USFWS

It's na na na na na na na na Bat Week! If you've ever been hiking in Prince William Forest Park near the creek around su...
10/28/2023

It's na na na na na na na na Bat Week! If you've ever been hiking in Prince William Forest Park near the creek around sunset or stayed in one of the campgrounds or cabin camps, you may have spotted one of our flying, furry friends swooping to catch insects at dusk. In the eastern part of the US, several National Parks are among the last places where the threatened northern long-eared bat still forms maternity colonies during the summer months to reproduce. Researchers from Virginia Tech, U.S. Geological Survey and National Park Service have been tracking these bats during the summers at Fire Island National Seashore, Rock Creek Park and Prince William Forest Park to find their day-roost trees where they’re raising their young. These day-roost trees are used repeatedly over the years by the same bats, making protecting them a top priority for the parks.


Photo 1 Credit: Cal Cary
Photo 2 Credit: Sam Freeze

With the holidays just around the corner, now is a great time to check out the country store in the visitor center for g...
10/26/2023

With the holidays just around the corner, now is a great time to check out the country store in the visitor center for gift giving ideas! Run by a nonprofit cooperating association, Eastern National, the country store has mugs for your favorite warm beverage, cookbooks and books on wildlife and park history, park souvenirs, and t-shirts and sweatshirts for the whole family. Come into the visitor center and explore what the store has to offer and remember that purchases in the country store support education projects at Prince William Forest Park!

'Tis the season for...fall colors! If you haven't stopped by Prince William Forest Park yet to enjoy the yellow, orange,...
10/22/2023

'Tis the season for...fall colors! If you haven't stopped by Prince William Forest Park yet to enjoy the yellow, orange, and red changing leaves, you might want to take a short walk, a scenic drive, or a long hike to enjoy the beauty of autumn in the forest. Take a deep breath of the crisp, cool fall air and relish the sound of leaves falling from the trees. When hiking, watch your step as the leaves often obscure roots and other tripping hazards and can be slick when wet. What is your favorite spot or hike to enjoy fall colors in the forest?

We'd like to thank everyone who participated in the photo contest to pick the photo that would be featured on the 2024 P...
10/19/2023

We'd like to thank everyone who participated in the photo contest to pick the photo that would be featured on the 2024 Prince William Forest Park annual park pass! The winning photo features a scarlet tanager perched on a flowering dogwood taken in the park in the spring. These colorful birds are often mistaken for cardinals and can sometimes be seen in the park in spring and summer. Look for this lovely photo on Prince William Forest Park Annual Passes sold starting January 1, 2024.


📷: © grobinette

Today is the 51st anniversary of the Clean Water Act, passed on October 18, 1972 to protect water quality and regulate p...
10/18/2023

Today is the 51st anniversary of the Clean Water Act, passed on October 18, 1972 to protect water quality and regulate pollutant discharge into waters of the United States. Its passage definitely had an impact on Prince William Forest Park, which protects a large part of the Quantico Creek watershed, and in particular the remains of the Cabin Branch Pyrite Mine area within the park. When the mine closed in 1920, the shafts and tailings piles had been left open and exposed to the elements, causing the sulfuric acid present in the iron pyrite as well as heavy metals to erode into Quantico Creek. Between 1971 and 1994, eight reclamation projects and studies were completed at the site as well as projects in 1995 through 2003 to plant trees, cap off the mine shafts, and rehabilitate the area to improve the water quality of Quantico Creek. Today the Cabin Branch Pyrite Mine area looks very different from the open exposed area it once was and the park continues to monitor the water quality of the creeks.


📷: Old photos of Cabin Branch Pyrite Mine area when the trees were being planted along Quantico Creek and an open mine shaft in the park (it has since been capped off)

Prince William Forest Park is home to historic cabin camps that were built in the 1930s and have been used by campers al...
10/15/2023

Prince William Forest Park is home to historic cabin camps that were built in the 1930s and have been used by campers almost every year since then. Occasionally, the park will be contacted by campers who still have fond memories of their days attending or staffing one of these camps. Some of the Bluebird Campfire Girls, who attended and staffed Camp Mawavi (now known as Cabin Camp 2) in the 1950s, recently took a tour of the camp and reminisced about the songs they sang around the campfire, the cabins where both counselors and campers stayed, the lake they swam in, and the mess hall where they enjoyed many meals. Do you have any fond memories of camp at Prince William Forest Park?


📷: Bluebird Campfire Girls

Did you know that this week is National Fire Prevention Week? As we head into a weekend of perfect weather for camping, ...
10/13/2023

Did you know that this week is National Fire Prevention Week? As we head into a weekend of perfect weather for camping, we'd like to remind everyone that:

🔥 Fires, including grills and charcoal briquettes, are only permitted where there is a designated metal fire ring or grate.
🔥 Never leave a fire unattended.
🔥 Extinguish your fire by dousing it with water and stirring the ashes until there is no more heat, smoke, or embers.
🔥 Allow equipment such as stoves, lanterns, and grills to cool before storing.
🔥 Avoid spilling flammable substances and store fuel away from appliances.

And...on a final note, enjoy those s'mores this weekend!

To learn more about how fire effects the forests at Prince William Forest Park, visit https://www.nps.gov/articles/000/fire-and-the-future-of-the-forests-at-prince-william-forest-park.htm

Starting on January 1, 2024, all Interagency and Prince William Forest Park Annual Passes will have one signature line. ...
10/11/2023

Starting on January 1, 2024, all Interagency and Prince William Forest Park Annual Passes will have one signature line. These passes will still be valid for entrance fees for the pass holder and up to 15 accompanying passengers in a private vehicle. This change will ensure consistency and fairness among all Interagency Passes and Park-Specific Annual Passes (for example, currently the Military, Senior, Access, and digital passes only have one pass holder signature line). The revenue from these pass sales helps provides funding to improve and enhance visitor services. To learn more about projects funded with fee dollars at Prince William Forest Park, visit https://nps.gov/prwi/learn/management/yourdollarsatwork.htm

Have you ever been walking along a trail in Prince William Forest Park and wanted a spot to sit and rest? Six western re...
10/09/2023

Have you ever been walking along a trail in Prince William Forest Park and wanted a spot to sit and rest? Six western red cedar benches have now been installed at different scenic areas along the trails in the park, with a few more left to place. Can you find them all?

If you're looking for something to do this weekend, come to Cabin Camp 2 at Prince William Forest Park to watch living h...
10/06/2023

If you're looking for something to do this weekend, come to Cabin Camp 2 at Prince William Forest Park to watch living history reenactors show you a day in the life of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)! Explore one of the historic cabin camps and watch the reenactors demonstrate skills used to build and upkeep them. You can also see exhibits of 1930s CCC era tools and uniforms. This is a drop-in program from 9:00am to 5:00pm on both Saturday and Sunday, come and leave when you want. Cabin Camp 2 is located 4 miles north of the main park entrance on Joplin Road (Hwy 619). Cabin Camp 2's address is 17175 Mawavi Road, Triangle, VA 22172. Hope to see you there!

Big and small, national parks like Prince William Forest Park protect a vast variety of animal species including Eastern...
10/04/2023

Big and small, national parks like Prince William Forest Park protect a vast variety of animal species including Eastern fence lizards. They can be found in patches of sun on the benches near the visitor center or climbing the outside walls of the cabins in the cabin camps. Named for their habit of basking on fence rails, the Eastern fence lizard is a common reptile spotted in the park. Today is World Animal Day, a day to celebrate the welfare of all animals, including these small lizards. What native animal do you hope to spot in the park in the future?

Did you know a couple of national trails run through Prince William Forest Park? Today is the 55th anniversary of the Na...
10/02/2023

Did you know a couple of national trails run through Prince William Forest Park? Today is the 55th anniversary of the National Trails System Act, passed on October 2, 1968 to institute trails to "provide for the ever-increasing outdoor recreation needs of an expanding population and in order to promote the preservation of, public access to, travel within, and enjoyment and appreciation of the open-air, outdoor areas and historic resources of the Nation." Sections of two of the trails created under this act run through the park: the Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail and the Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail. Which trail will you hike on the anniversary of this act?

You can follow the Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route in the park along sections of the Crossing Trail and the Birch Bluff Trail. The entirety of this National Historic Trail follows around 600 to 700 miles of the the route taken by the 14 armies of General George Washington and Count Rochambeau between Newport, Rhode Island, and Yorktown, Virginia, in 1781 and 1782.

The Potomac Heritage trail in the park follows sections of the park's Scenic Drive, Laurel Loop Trail, South Valley Trail, North Valley Trail, and Burma Road. The entirety of this National Scenic Trail follows around 704 to 710 miles of the Potomac River corridor.

To learn more about the National Trails System Act and the trails it protects, visit https://www.nps.gov/subjects/nationaltrailssystem/index.htm

Have you ever wanted to learn more about the trails at Prince William Forest Park? Download the NPS App to take self-gui...
09/27/2023

Have you ever wanted to learn more about the trails at Prince William Forest Park? Download the NPS App to take self-guided tours of some trails and have a virtual map with you when you're hiking! Downloading a park (like Prince William Forest Park) offline will also allow you to know where you are on the trails here even when you don't have cell service. Best of all, this app is free to download and use!

Have you become a Junior Ranger at Prince William Forest Park yet? Stop by the visitor center to pick up your Junior Ran...
09/24/2023

Have you become a Junior Ranger at Prince William Forest Park yet? Stop by the visitor center to pick up your Junior Ranger book to learn about the park and earn a badge. Most national parks across the country have a Junior Ranger program, so you can earn over 100 different badges as these kids have by traveling to different parks! A great rainy day activity, the Junior Ranger book can be completed using the information from exhibits in the visitor center and is available to kids of any age (or even adults!). If you can't make it to the park, many parks can mail out the books or have their Junior Ranger books available for download on their websites. Where have you become a Junior Ranger?

Happy 30th birthday 🎉 to National Public Lands Day! This entrance fee free day has fallen on the fourth Saturday of Sept...
09/23/2023

Happy 30th birthday 🎉 to National Public Lands Day! This entrance fee free day has fallen on the fourth Saturday of September every year since the first one in 1994. In addition to paying no entrance fees to explore parks, National Public Lands Day also brings together volunteers for the largest single-day volunteer effort on public lands in the U.S. We'd like to thank all the volunteers in Prince William Forest Park for all the work they've done and continue to do to help park employees maintain the trails, help visitors, and take care of our campgrounds and cabin camps!

Did you know that this coming Saturday is the 30th anniversary of National Public Lands Day? National Public Lands Day i...
09/20/2023

Did you know that this coming Saturday is the 30th anniversary of National Public Lands Day? National Public Lands Day is the nation's largest single-day volunteer effort on public lands! In addition to being an entrance fee free day for all park visitors, this year, interested visitors can also join the Spooky Beavers Crew from the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC) to help replace an old footbridge on South Valley Trail. To volunteer to help out on Saturday, September 23rd, sign up at https://www.meetup.com/patcvolunteerevents/events/292203446/?_xtd=gqFyqTEzNDMyMjQ2MqFwo2FwaQ%253D%253D&from=ref. Thank you to all our volunteers for all their hard work!

Do you want your photo to be featured on the Prince William Forest Park Annual pass next year? A photo contest is curren...
09/19/2023

Do you want your photo to be featured on the Prince William Forest Park Annual pass next year? A photo contest is currently running through the end of September to pick the photo we'll use on the 2024 Annual Pass for the park. Enter your best nature or wildlife photo taken in the park at https://www.challenge.gov/?challenge=2024-prince-william-forest-park-annual-pass-photo for a chance for it to be featured on next year's park annual pass!

While there are many trees in the forest at Prince William Forest Park, the pawpaw is perhaps one of the most fascinatin...
09/14/2023

While there are many trees in the forest at Prince William Forest Park, the pawpaw is perhaps one of the most fascinating! Producing the largest edible fruit native to North America, the pawpaw is a tropical plant that enjoys humid climates and is highly frost tolerant, which means it can be found farther north than most tropical plants. The pawpaw fruits ripen and fall from late August to early October and are a favorite of many animals. Edible for people as well as animals, the fruits taste like the cross between a banana and a mango and contain several inedible large brown seeds. With a short shelf life, pawpaw fruits should be eaten within hours of being picked. What's your favorite way to enjoy pawpaw fruit?

As a reminder, while you can pick pawpaws in the park, possession of fruits and berries is limited to one pint of each species per person per day.

09/11/2023

The nation changed forever on September 11, 2001. Many Americans remember a country before and a country after, and for many young Americans, only a country after. For months following September 11, people came together to grieve family, friends, and strangers. More than 20 years later, we still do. Sometimes called “Patriots Day” or “Day of Remembrance”, September 11 has become an annual day for many Americans to remember, reflect, honor, and mourn.

Join us for a day of remembrance by visiting a national park or following the September 11 Observation at Flight 93 National Memorial. Or participate in the national 9/11 Day of Service by volunteering at national parks throughout the country. Learn more at: https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/september-11.htm

Beginning at 9:40 am, you can watch the "Moment of Remembrance" livestream at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhnNCIftAik

Image: The Tower of Voices at Flight 93 National Memorial is a monumental, ninety-three feet tall musical instrument holding forty wind chimes, representing the forty passengers and crew members.

Staying hydrated by bringing a water bottle when hiking the trails at Prince William Forest Park is always an excellent ...
09/08/2023

Staying hydrated by bringing a water bottle when hiking the trails at Prince William Forest Park is always an excellent idea! A reusable bottle is great for the environment and can express your personal style, whether it holds water or electrolytes (or coffee or tea for those short early-morning jaunts). Using reusable water bottles saves, on average, around 150 disposable bottles per person from ending up in the trash every year and can save hundreds of dollars in grocery bills. You can fill up your reusable bottles with water at the visitor center, picnic areas, or campgrounds in the park. Big or small, colorful, decorated, or insulated, what's your favorite reusable water bottle to bring along on a hike?

Day, night, dusky bright, what animals have you seen tonight? Though the park is open from dawn to dusk for day-use visi...
09/07/2023

Day, night, dusky bright, what animals have you seen tonight? Though the park is open from dawn to dusk for day-use visitors, campers in the campgrounds and cabin camps at Prince William Forest Park may be lucky to spot some of the park's more nocturnal animals as the light fades after dusk (or if they wake up before the early morning dawn). If you're camping in the cabin camps, one of the best spots to see wildlife is around the small lakes near these camps. Visitors may spot osprey swooping to catch a fish, and at dusk, bats dart through the air, catching the many insects that enjoy the lake's (mostly) still waters. Throughout both day and night, frogs and insects often serenade visitors to this quiet retreat. While dawn brings the gradual lightening of a new day in this green summer forest, dusk provides a more muted palette of colors as the sky and forest darken. Which is your favorite time of day: dusk or dawn?

Prince William Forest Park is conducting a visitor use survey to determine what park amenities visitors enjoy the most. ...
09/05/2023

Prince William Forest Park is conducting a visitor use survey to determine what park amenities visitors enjoy the most. On September 8-10 and September 15-17, park visitors may be asked to fill out a brief questionnaire at various locations around the park. To help the park improve the visitor experience, if asked, please fill out these visitor surveys so we can determine how to provide better customer service at Prince William Forest Park. Thank you in advance for your participation!

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18170 Park Entrance Road
Triangle, VA
22172

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