Friends of Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site

Friends of Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site “America’s truest heroes, the Tuskegee Airmen who changed the world. Meet them. Hear them.

Friends of Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site provides museum and hangar tours to the Tuskegee, AL area.

The Tuskegee Airmen were committed to improving civil rights for all African Americans, and their efforts helped open up...
09/06/2023

The Tuskegee Airmen were committed to improving civil rights for all African Americans, and their efforts helped open up opportunities for African Americans in the military and in civil aviation.

The P-51 Mustang flown by the Tuskegee Airmen was the first combat aircraft that African Americans were allowed to fly i...
08/29/2023

The P-51 Mustang flown by the Tuskegee Airmen was the first combat aircraft that African Americans were allowed to fly in US military service. The P-51 was an American fighter aircraft that was used during World War II and the Korean War. It was widely regarded as one of the greatest combat aircraft ever created and was the most widely used fighter by the air forces of the Allied powers. The P-51 flown by the Tuskegee Airmen was armed with six .50 caliber machine guns and could reach a maximum speed of 437 mph. In addition, the Mustang could climb to a maximum altitude of 37,500 feet and had a range of 1,650 miles. The Tuskegee Airmen flew the Mustang in over 1500 combat missions, destroying over 200 German aircraft in the process. They were credited with saving thousands of American lives by escorting bombers deep into N**i territory. The Tuskegee Airmen and their P-51 Mustangs remain a beacon of hope and inspiration to African Americans, demonstrating that they too could become heroes with the opportunity to prove their bravery and skill in combat.

The Tuskegee Airmen flew more than 100 allied bombing missions in Europe and the Mediterranean during World War II. They...
08/22/2023

The Tuskegee Airmen flew more than 100 allied bombing missions in Europe and the Mediterranean during World War II. They destroyed more than 100 German planes in air-to-air combat and escorted bombers to their targets during their tour of duty.

One of the most important moments of the Tuskegee Airmen was the first mission they completed with the 97th Fighter Squa...
08/01/2023

One of the most important moments of the Tuskegee Airmen was the first mission they completed with the 97th Fighter Squadron in April 1943. They provided air support to Allied soldiers and the pilots of the 99th were given credit for shooting down numerous enemy fighters.

Moton Field is named for Tuskegee University's second President, Dr. Robert R. Moton who served with distinction from 19...
06/22/2023

Moton Field is named for Tuskegee University's second President, Dr. Robert R. Moton who served with distinction from 1915-1935. The Airmen were deployed during the presidential administration of Dr. Frederick Douglas Patterson (1935-1953).

The military selected Tuskegee Institute to train pilots because of its commitment to aeronautical training. Tuskegee ha...
05/03/2023

The military selected Tuskegee Institute to train pilots because of its commitment to aeronautical training. Tuskegee had the facilities, and engineering and technical instructors, as well as a climate for year round flying. The first Civilian Pilot Training Program students completed their instruction in May 1940. The Tuskegee program was then expanded and became the center for African-American aviation during World War II.

On April 3, 1939, President Roosevelt approved Public Law 18, that provided for an expansion of the Army Air Corps. One ...
04/12/2023

On April 3, 1939, President Roosevelt approved Public Law 18, that provided for an expansion of the Army Air Corps. One section of the law offered hope for those African Americans who wanted to advance their military careers beyond the kitchen or the motor pool.
https://www.fdrlibrary.org/tuskegee

The names of many women who figure prominently in American history are instantly recognizable: Harriet Tubman, Rosa Park...
03/20/2023

The names of many women who figure prominently in American history are instantly recognizable: Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, Susan B. Anthony. But so many others, who led equally courageous lives, are less well-known.

Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune's friendship with first lady Eleanor Roosevelt led to the desegregation of pilot training programs.

Women's History Month • Willa Brown Audio Described
03/15/2023

Women's History Month • Willa Brown Audio Described

Join Ranger Frank as he shares some history about the first African American woman to earn a pilot's license in the United States- Willa Brown and her connec...

And There Were Women...In the 1920s Bessie Coleman (1892—1926) was known as a barnstormer—a pilot who flew aerobatic stu...
03/09/2023

And There Were Women...In the 1920s Bessie Coleman (1892—1926) was known as a barnstormer—a pilot who flew aerobatic stunts to amaze audiences in airshows all over the southern United States. Before she could do that, she had to get her pilot’s license. No school in the US would teach her to fly. Bessie worked hard to save money and got help from prominent Chicago African Americans to go to France for flight instruction. In 1921 she became the first American to earn an international pilot’s license. Bessie worked towards opening her own flight school where other African Americans could pursue the dream of flight. She died at age 34 in a crash during a test flight in 1926, but her legacy lives on as she inspired other African American aviation pioneers and even had clubs, a flight school, and an airplane manufacturing company named after her. Bessie Coleman was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 2006.
One person to follow in Bessie Coleman’s footsteps was Willa Brown (1906—1992). A high-school teacher by age 21, she started flight lessons at Aeronautical University in Chicago in 1934. Over the next few years, Willa Brown became a certified master mechanic, earned an MBA from Northwestern University, and became the first African American woman to receive a private pilot’s lesson in the United States. She and her husband Cornelius Coffey opened the Coffey School of Aeronautics near Chicago. The Coffey school trained pilots for the Civilian Pilot Training Program (CPTP) and sent students on to the Army Air Force program at Tuskegee as both cadets and pilot instructors. As director of the Coffey School, Willa Brown was responsible for training over 200 future Tuskegee Airmen and was an advocate for inclusion of African American pilots in the CPTP and the armed forces.
Another female pilot was even more closely connected with Tuskegee. Mildred Hemmons Carter (1921—2011) earned her BA in business from Tuskegee when she was only 19. Being at Tuskegee gave her the opportunity to learn to fly from head flight instructor Chief Anderson. Mildred Hemmons graduated with the first class of Civilian Pilot Training Program and went on to earn her private pilot’s license in 1941. She also met her husband, Herbert Carter, during this time. As cadets, they were unable to date. Instead, they would make plans to meet in the air with Mildred flying a Piper Cub and Herbert flying whatever plane was scheduled for a maintenance flight check. They would meet at a designated time over Lake Martin. Mildred and Herbert married in 1942 after his graduation and appointment as a lieutenant.
Due to the war and her gender, Mildred could not get training to fly more advanced military airplanes. However, she was the first civilian hired by the Army Air Corps. She literally cleared the way for the airmen by bulldozing the trees off the site of the airstrip. Her husband nicknamed her “Mike” due to her tomboy way of dressing, and even had the name painted on his plane during the war. Although her husband was a fighter pilot during World War II, Mildred herself was integral to the success of the Tuskegee program. From creating the documents to equip the base at Tuskegee to rigging parachutes to various administrative duties, she continued working at Tuskegee Army Air Field throughout the war. She applied to be a WASP, one of the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots who delivered planes during WWII. Qualified, she was rejected due to her race. Mildred later served as a mentor to other African American women pilots and continued to fly into her sixties. Seventy years after earning her pilot’s license, Mildred Carter was designated a WASP for her services. Additionally, she is a Designated Original Tuskegee Airman.

Join Us TODAY for Tuskegee Airmen Day Celebration!!The Friends of the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site are invitin...
03/06/2023

Join Us TODAY for Tuskegee Airmen Day Celebration!!

The Friends of the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site are inviting you to a special celebration of the Tuskegee Airmen.
March 7th is Alabama's Tuskegee Airmen Day each year. For this year we are celebrating with a special Commemoration Ceremony, that will be virtual.
You can view it on one of the following social media links:
https://www.youtube.com/
Meeting link: meet.google.com/dwe-wyvg-adb
When: Tuesday Mar 7, 2023 ⋅ 6:30pm – 7:30pm (Central Time - Chicago)

Please Mail Donations to:  Friends of Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site  PO Box 831199, Tuskegee, AL 36083More than...
03/06/2023

Please Mail Donations to: Friends of Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site PO Box 831199, Tuskegee, AL 36083
More than 90% of our donations go directly to the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site where a variety of programs such as interpretation, education, fundraising, and maintenance all contribute to various projects to help keep the site alive. Each and every donation is tax-deductible since we're a 501(c)(3) charitable organization.
Thank you for your generosity & support, your Friends appreciate you!!

Black History Month: Honoring the Tuskegee Airmen.  The Tuskegee Airmen were a distinguished group of WWII pilots who we...
02/28/2023

Black History Month: Honoring the Tuskegee Airmen. The Tuskegee Airmen were a distinguished group of WWII pilots who were the first Black pilots to fly in the U.S. military.

The Tuskegee Airmen were a distinguished group of WWII pilots who were the first Black pilots to fly in the U.S. military.

02/28/2023
02/27/2023

  The Tuskegee Airmen are celebrated today both as war heroes and as the first Black aviators in American military service. With American involvement in World War II looming, 13 men entered tr…

https://www.defense.gov/News/Feature-Stories/Story/Article/3305851/tuskegee-airman-discusses-distinguished-service/One o...
02/23/2023

https://www.defense.gov/News/Feature-Stories/Story/Article/3305851/tuskegee-airman-discusses-distinguished-service/
One of the last surviving Tuskegee Airmen, Brig. Gen. Enoch "Woody" Woodhouse, visited the Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport in Rhode Island on Feb. 6 to share his military and life experiences with the workforce, as part of the command's Black History Month celebration.

One of the last surviving Tuskegee Airmen, Brig. Gen. Enoch "Woody" Woodhouse, shared his military and life experiences as part of a Black History Month celebration in Newport, R.I.

The Tuskegee Airmen were the first Black military aviators in the U.S. Army Air Corps (AAC), a precursor of the U.S. Air...
02/21/2023

The Tuskegee Airmen were the first Black military aviators in the U.S. Army Air Corps (AAC), a precursor of the U.S. Air Force. Trained at the Tuskegee Army Air Field in Alabama, they flew more than 15,000 individual sorties in Europe and North Africa during World War II. Their impressive performance earned them more than 150 Distinguished Flying Crosses, and helped encourage the eventual integration of the U.S. armed forces. They were the subject of the 2012 film Red Tails.

Solemnly announcing a new member of the "Lonely Eagle Chapter, DOTA Robert "Bob" Hughes.  1924 - December 28, 2022Not ma...
02/08/2023

Solemnly announcing a new member of the "Lonely Eagle Chapter, DOTA Robert "Bob" Hughes. 1924 - December 28, 2022

Not many people can say that they did everything they desired and did it their way. But that was only one special thing about Bob Hughes, he did.

He was born and grew up in Los Angeles, but immediately following high school he enlisted in the Air Force because flying would be his passion. In January 1944, Hughes was one of the few White Officers that was sent to Tuskegee Army Air Field as a Flight Instructor for the Tuskegee Experience. Bob is a Documented Original Tuskegee Airman because he was one of the original instructors and has been active in that organization for many years.

After 23 years in the service and 14 different assignments, Bob and his wife, Pat retired to Florida in 1965. He continued his love of flying and even had joint ownership in his own high-wing plane. Bob retired from the USAF in 1965 at the rank of Lt Col. In reflecting on his military career, Bob was quoted as saying “One of my most memorable moments was; watching the first group of Black cadet’s graduate that I helped train.” On March 29, 2007, Hughes was among the 300 Documented Original Tuskegee Airmen to receive the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor from President George W. Bush at the ceremony in the U.S. Capitol rotunda, the highest Civilian Honor that Congress can bestow.

Bob was a member of the Gen. Daniel “Chappie” James, Jr. Chapter in Orlando, FL, where he spent his time speaking to students and throughout the community. Bob would help nearly anyone, but don’t ask for a handout. He had no problem telling anyone, especially his kids, that hard work was the only solution - so do something - even if it was wrong!

A memorial service was held at Suntree United Methodist Church in Melbourne, FL on February 3, 2023. Fond memories and expressions of sympathy may be shared at www.FountainheadFuneralHome.com for the Hughes family.

The Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, at Moton Field in Tuskegee, Ala., commemorates the contributions of African ...
02/01/2023

The Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, at Moton Field in Tuskegee, Ala., commemorates the contributions of African American airmen in World War II.

Moton Field was the site of primary flight training for the pioneering pilots known as the Tuskegee Airmen, and is now operated by the National Park Service to interpret their history and achievements. It was constructed in 1941 as a new training base. The field was named after former Tuskegee Institute principal Robert Russa Moton, who died the previous year.

Established on Nov. 6, 1998, the National Historic Site was placed on the National Register of Historic Places the same day. The site has a temporary visitor center. Hangar One has been restored and the grand opening of the site was Oct. 10, 2008.

There are displays at various points around the site that tell the story of the Tuskegee Airmen. Donations given to the Tuskegee airmen national historic site will go directly to new projects for the site involving interpretation, maintenance, fundraising projects, and education.

https://fb.watch/ih0IPyl_XH/Friends of Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, at Moton Field in Tuskegee, Alabama, comm...
01/25/2023

https://fb.watch/ih0IPyl_XH/
Friends of Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, at Moton Field in Tuskegee, Alabama, commemorates the contributions of African-American airmen in World War II. Moton Field was the site of primary flight training for the pioneering pilots known as the Tuskegee Airmen. It was constructed in 1941 as a new training base. The field was named after former Tuskegee Institute principal Robert Russa Moton, who died the previous year.

The last living Delaware native to serve as a Tuskegee Airman has quite a story to tell. It all begins with a framed sep...
12/06/2022

The last living Delaware native to serve as a Tuskegee Airman has quite a story to tell. It all begins with a framed sepia-toned photo showing Nathan O. Thomas in his full uniform. The picture was taken on the very day he enlisted as a Tuskegee Airman.

The last living Delaware native to serve as a Tuskegee Airman has quite a story to tell.

The Friends of Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site hopes that everybody has a safe & Happy Thanksgiving.
11/22/2022

The Friends of Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site hopes that everybody has a safe & Happy Thanksgiving.

11/18/2022

A new roadway at Newark Airport will be named in honor of New Jersey native Colonel Lawrence E. Roberts.

11/10/2022

We visit Arlington National Cemetery to honor the brave men who broke barriers and expectations as Tuskegee Airmen. There are 33 Tuskegee Airmen buried here ...

Seymour Johnson AFB hosts Strive 4th: a Project Tuskegee, AIM initiative.  The intent is to reinforce the historical con...
11/08/2022

Seymour Johnson AFB hosts Strive 4th: a Project Tuskegee, AIM initiative. The intent is to reinforce the historical connection between Tuskegee Airmen and Air Force Global Strike Command.

The 4th Fighter Wing and Air Force Global Strike Command hosted Strive 4th: A Project Tuskegee and aviation inspiration mentorship initiative.

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was very interested in the work at the Tuskegee Institute, particularly in the aeronautical...
11/03/2022

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was very interested in the work at the Tuskegee Institute, particularly in the aeronautical school. During a highly publicized 1941 visit to the Tuskegee Army Air Field, she asked to take a flight with one of the Tuskegee pilots.

Although the Secret Service was anxious about the ride, Chief Civilian Flight Instructor Charles Alfred Anderson, known today as “The Father of Black Aviation,” piloted Mrs. Roosevelt over the skies of Alabama for over an hour.

Flying with Anderson demonstrated the depth of Eleanor Roosevelt’s support for black pilots and the Institute’s training program. Press coverage of her adventure in flight helped advocate for the competency of these pilots and boosted the Institute's visibility. Roosevelt was so impressed with the program that she established and maintained a long-term correspondence with some of the airmen.

In his new book, "Half American", author, Matthew F. Delmont explores the contributions and sacrifices of the Black Amer...
10/20/2022

In his new book, "Half American", author, Matthew F. Delmont explores the contributions and sacrifices of the Black American Soldiers in World War II and the iconic case of that is the Tuskegee Airmen. https://www.pbs.org/wnet/amanpour-and-company/video/americas-black-soldiers-in-wwii-6mp6ef/

“Years of movies and books focusing on D-Day and platoons in frontline combat have presented a misleading version of how the war was won,” writes Delmont. “The hypocrisy Black men and women faced in the service of their country was palpable … Even America’s allies questioned how a nation that upheld racial apartheid at home could claim to fight for a free world abroad.” Delmont relates the experiences of the men who served in combat, including the legendary Tuskegee Airmen, the 761st “Black Panther” Tank Battalion, the 92nd Infantry Division, the “Harlem Hellfighters,” and the Montford Point Marines — not only their military accomplishments, but their efforts to even be granted the privilege of fighting and dying. Though these names will be familiar to some, the grace with which Delmont weaves them into a broader narrative of contemporary Black experience sheds a harsh light on the pervasive — and often unsuccessful — struggle for fair treatment at every level of the American military.

992 pilots were trained in Tuskegee from 1941 to 1946. 450 were deployed overseas, and 150 lost their lives in accidents...
10/18/2022

992 pilots were trained in Tuskegee from 1941 to 1946. 450 were deployed overseas, and 150 lost their lives in accidents or combat. The toll included 66 pilots killed in action or accidents, 84 killed in training and non-combat missions and 32 captured as prisoners of war. The Tuskegee Airmen were credited by higher commands with their numerous accomplishments.

The Tuskegee Airmen achieved a number of successes during World War II. The 332nd Fighter Group was awarded the Distingu...
10/11/2022

The Tuskegee Airmen achieved a number of successes during World War II. The 332nd Fighter Group was awarded the Distinguished Unit Citation for their actions on March 24, 1945.

On their way to Berlin, Germany, the Red Tails destroyed three German ME-262’s. In all, the Tuskegee Airmen earned eight Purple Hearts, fourteen Bronze Stars, three Distinguished Unit Citations, and 96 Distinguished Flying Crosses.

Your contributions are much appreciated in order for us to keep the history of The Tuskegee Airmen alive. Thank you in advance from your Friends of Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, located right in Tuskegee, Alabama.

10/04/2022

Brig. Gen. Enoch “Woody” Woodhouse Jr. is one of the last surviving members of the Tuskegee Airmen, the first group of all-Black military aviators.Subscribe ...

Before Their Tails Were "Red"Before the first African American military pilots became known as the "Red Tails" they wore...
09/28/2022

Before Their Tails Were "Red"

Before the first African American military pilots became known as the "Red Tails" they wore striped tails as they began their flight training in the Army's PT-17 Stearman bi-plane. Their flying adventure started at Moton Field, in Tuskegee, Alabama, where the Army Air Corps conducted a military test to determine if African Americans could be trained to fly combat aircraft

Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site Orientation Video.

Anything you can do to help us will ensure that the bravery of the Tuskegee airmen will be known to the world. Everyone ...
09/21/2022

Anything you can do to help us will ensure that the bravery of the Tuskegee airmen will be known to the world. Everyone can know more about their sacrifices and what it means to be true Americans. https://www.friendsoftuskegeeairmennhs.org/donate

Tuskegee Airmen, black servicemen of the U.S. Army Air Forces who trained at Tuskegee Army Air Field in Alabama during World War II. They constituted the first African American flying unit in the U.S. military. In January 1941 the War Department formed the all-black 99th Pursuit Squadron of the U.S....

Tony Dungy Praises his father's service as member of the Tuskegee Airmen, Red Tails Classic, and HBCU Football.
08/26/2022

Tony Dungy Praises his father's service as member of the Tuskegee Airmen, Red Tails Classic, and HBCU Football.

Pro Football Hall of Fame head coach praised his father's service and the Tuskegee Red Tails Classic.

At the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, we get a truly legendary perspective of the airmen after they've been dep...
08/26/2022

At the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, we get a truly legendary perspective of the airmen after they've been deployed overseas. You can see for yourself a P-51 Mustang suspended from the ceiling in the Hangar 2 Museum. This was a spectacular World War II fighter plane flown by the fantastic Tuskegee Airmen Red Tails.
With the support of our donors we are able to work on new projects for the site involving interpretation, maintenance, fundraising projects, and education.

Address

1744 Gen. B. O. Davis Jr. Drive, Suite B
Tuskegee, AL
36083

Opening Hours

Wednesday 9am - 4pm
Thursday 9am - 4pm
Friday 9am - 4pm
Saturday 9am - 4pm

Telephone

+12514946246

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