Porter County Emergency Management Agency

Porter County Emergency Management Agency Contact information, map and directions, contact form, opening hours, services, ratings, photos, videos and announcements from Porter County Emergency Management Agency, Public Service, 1995 S State Road 2, Valparaiso, IN.

Operating as usual

It's hard to believe it has been 20 years since that traumatic day on September 11, 2001. Our lives were forever changed...
09/11/2021

It's hard to believe it has been 20 years since that traumatic day on September 11, 2001. Our lives were forever changed as we witnessed the horrors of that morning. Performing life-saving duties, 412 First Responders lost their lives. In total, 2,977 people would parish that day and 6,000 more would be injured.
The losses for our first responders did not end on that day. According to the World Trade Center Health program, another 3,496 deaths of first responders have been associated with a variety of illnesses related to the attacks on 9/11.
In addition, 1,106 victim remains still have not been found.
Our grief as a nation endures not just for those we lost that day, but also for those we continue to lose.
Porter County Emergency Management asks that you join us in a moment of silence to remember all those who lost their lives that day, as well as the losses we continue to experience.
We salute, honor, and remember all those first responders who gave their lives on 9/11 so that others might live. They gave the ultimate sacrifice and deserve the ultimate honor.

WE WILL NEVER FORGET.

It's hard to believe it has been 20 years since that traumatic day on September 11, 2001. Our lives were forever changed as we witnessed the horrors of that morning. Performing life-saving duties, 412 First Responders lost their lives. In total, 2,977 people would parish that day and 6,000 more would be injured.
The losses for our first responders did not end on that day. According to the World Trade Center Health program, another 3,496 deaths of first responders have been associated with a variety of illnesses related to the attacks on 9/11.
In addition, 1,106 victim remains still have not been found.
Our grief as a nation endures not just for those we lost that day, but also for those we continue to lose.
Porter County Emergency Management asks that you join us in a moment of silence to remember all those who lost their lives that day, as well as the losses we continue to experience.
We salute, honor, and remember all those first responders who gave their lives on 9/11 so that others might live. They gave the ultimate sacrifice and deserve the ultimate honor.

WE WILL NEVER FORGET.

On Wednesday September 8, 2021, Dave Stilwell, a volunteer here at Porter County Emergency Management Agency, officially...
09/09/2021

On Wednesday September 8, 2021, Dave Stilwell, a volunteer here at Porter County Emergency Management Agency, officially retired from service. He was awarded a Certificate of Appreciation from Porter County Emergency Management Director Lance Bella for his dedication and over 10 years of service to our agency. Throughout his tenure, Dave responded to a variety of hazardous incidents at the county, state, and district levels. During that time, Volunteer Stilwell excelled at accomplishing any task he was assigned, no matter how challenging. His service, dedication and spontaneous humor will be truly missed at our agency.
We at Porter County Emergency Management salute Dave’s service to our county.
God’s speed to you in your future endeavors!

On Wednesday September 8, 2021, Dave Stilwell, a volunteer here at Porter County Emergency Management Agency, officially retired from service. He was awarded a Certificate of Appreciation from Porter County Emergency Management Director Lance Bella for his dedication and over 10 years of service to our agency. Throughout his tenure, Dave responded to a variety of hazardous incidents at the county, state, and district levels. During that time, Volunteer Stilwell excelled at accomplishing any task he was assigned, no matter how challenging. His service, dedication and spontaneous humor will be truly missed at our agency.
We at Porter County Emergency Management salute Dave’s service to our county.
God’s speed to you in your future endeavors!

September is National Emergency Preparedness Month. Today we are focusing on challenging you and those in your family to...
09/08/2021

September is National Emergency Preparedness Month. Today we are focusing on challenging you and those in your family to BUILD A KIT. BUILDING A KIT for you and your family is essential to ensure your safety in a disaster or other critical incident. Read below to learn how to build your own disaster preparedness kit.

-Disaster kits are intended to provide families necessary supplies and resources needed to survive until emergency personnel can provide rescue.
-Disaster kits should be tailored to a family’s specific needs.
-Disaster kits should be designed to have enough supplies for at least three days.
-Some of the basic supplies that should be included are:
-Non-perishable food
-Water (One gallon of water per person per day. This is both for drinking and sanitary purposes.)
-Food
-Three day supply of non-perishable food.
-Make sure to store foods that require no preparation, no refrigeration, and very little water if any.
-Protein bars
-Canned meats
-Dry cereal
-Dry milk
-Peanut butter
-Baby Formula (if applicable)
-Crackers, etc.
First aid kit
-Latex gloves
-Scissors
-Tweezers
-Petroleum jelly
-Sterile dressings
-Adhesive bandages
-Thermometer
-Soap or hydrogen peroxide
-Antibiotic ointment
-Sunscreen
-Prescription medication and supplies
-Over-the-counter pain reliever
-Anti-diarrhea medication
-Antacid
-Battery-powered or hand-crank radio
-Flashlight
-Batteries
-Local maps
-Extra clothing
-Wrench to Shut Off Gas and Water
-Can Opener (manual not powered)
-Eating Utensils
-Paper Cups, Plates, & Towels
-Flashlight and Extra Batteries (NO candles - open flames could cause an explosion if there is a gas leak.)
-Dust Mask
-Plastic Sheeting
-Duct Tape
-Garbage Bags
-Fire Extinguisher
-Matches in a Waterproof Case
-Blanket
-Important Documents in Waterproof Container (birth certificates, Social Security card, deed, bonds, etc.)
-Cash (keep small bills because no power = no ATM or credit cards)
-Clothes (Strong shoes, long-sleeve shirt, jeans, extra socks)
-Entertainment for Kids (If applicable)
-Extra Baby Supplies (If applicable)

September is National Emergency Preparedness Month. Today we are focusing on challenging you and those in your family to BUILD A KIT. BUILDING A KIT for you and your family is essential to ensure your safety in a disaster or other critical incident. Read below to learn how to build your own disaster preparedness kit.

-Disaster kits are intended to provide families necessary supplies and resources needed to survive until emergency personnel can provide rescue.
-Disaster kits should be tailored to a family’s specific needs.
-Disaster kits should be designed to have enough supplies for at least three days.
-Some of the basic supplies that should be included are:
-Non-perishable food
-Water (One gallon of water per person per day. This is both for drinking and sanitary purposes.)
-Food
-Three day supply of non-perishable food.
-Make sure to store foods that require no preparation, no refrigeration, and very little water if any.
-Protein bars
-Canned meats
-Dry cereal
-Dry milk
-Peanut butter
-Baby Formula (if applicable)
-Crackers, etc.
First aid kit
-Latex gloves
-Scissors
-Tweezers
-Petroleum jelly
-Sterile dressings
-Adhesive bandages
-Thermometer
-Soap or hydrogen peroxide
-Antibiotic ointment
-Sunscreen
-Prescription medication and supplies
-Over-the-counter pain reliever
-Anti-diarrhea medication
-Antacid
-Battery-powered or hand-crank radio
-Flashlight
-Batteries
-Local maps
-Extra clothing
-Wrench to Shut Off Gas and Water
-Can Opener (manual not powered)
-Eating Utensils
-Paper Cups, Plates, & Towels
-Flashlight and Extra Batteries (NO candles - open flames could cause an explosion if there is a gas leak.)
-Dust Mask
-Plastic Sheeting
-Duct Tape
-Garbage Bags
-Fire Extinguisher
-Matches in a Waterproof Case
-Blanket
-Important Documents in Waterproof Container (birth certificates, Social Security card, deed, bonds, etc.)
-Cash (keep small bills because no power = no ATM or credit cards)
-Clothes (Strong shoes, long-sleeve shirt, jeans, extra socks)
-Entertainment for Kids (If applicable)
-Extra Baby Supplies (If applicable)

09/07/2021

This is a test of the Porter County Emergency Alert System. In the event of an emergency, this system would bring you important information.

Many people travel during the holidays. It important to keep awareness high during times where people become distracted ...
08/31/2021

Many people travel during the holidays. It important to keep awareness high during times where people become distracted by holiday stress. Read below some important tips on safe holiday travel.
• File a travel plan. Let someone you trust know where you are going, what route you are taking, and when you arrive at your destination contact them. If the plan changes, let that person know.
• Travel with friends, as there is safety in numbers.
• Make your house appear lived in when are away. Lock doors, windows, and put your lights (inside and outside) on timers.
• Trim outside greenery so thieves do not have a place to hide.
• Have a neighbor park a car in your driveway so it seems that someone is home.
• Have a friend or neighbor pick up your mail or newspapers or have these held.
• Invest in an alarm system.
• When you are at your hotel, use the hotel locks and other security features even when you are in the room.
• Don’t tell strangers the name of your hotel, your room number, or other personal data.
• Guard your room key and do not leave them unattended or visible at restaurants, pools, or clubs.
• Don’t leave your door propped open or open your door to strangers. Use the peep hole before opening your door.
• Do not leave your purse or bags unattended.
• Do not carry large amounts of cash and limit the number of credit cards your carry. Carry money separate from credit cards.
• Keep purses closed and held tightly against the body. Men, keep their wallets in front pants pocket or coat pocket.
• Know your routes and keep to well lighted and traveled areas.
• If you feel threatened, get away and call for help, or go to a crowded place.
• Always let someone else know where you are going, who you are with, and when you are returning.
• Avoid going somewhere with strangers, and always use the buddy system.
• Avoid using alcohol or drugs which can impair your judgement.
• Select an ATM in well lighted and visible areas.

Many people travel during the holidays. It important to keep awareness high during times where people become distracted by holiday stress. Read below some important tips on safe holiday travel.
• File a travel plan. Let someone you trust know where you are going, what route you are taking, and when you arrive at your destination contact them. If the plan changes, let that person know.
• Travel with friends, as there is safety in numbers.
• Make your house appear lived in when are away. Lock doors, windows, and put your lights (inside and outside) on timers.
• Trim outside greenery so thieves do not have a place to hide.
• Have a neighbor park a car in your driveway so it seems that someone is home.
• Have a friend or neighbor pick up your mail or newspapers or have these held.
• Invest in an alarm system.
• When you are at your hotel, use the hotel locks and other security features even when you are in the room.
• Don’t tell strangers the name of your hotel, your room number, or other personal data.
• Guard your room key and do not leave them unattended or visible at restaurants, pools, or clubs.
• Don’t leave your door propped open or open your door to strangers. Use the peep hole before opening your door.
• Do not leave your purse or bags unattended.
• Do not carry large amounts of cash and limit the number of credit cards your carry. Carry money separate from credit cards.
• Keep purses closed and held tightly against the body. Men, keep their wallets in front pants pocket or coat pocket.
• Know your routes and keep to well lighted and traveled areas.
• If you feel threatened, get away and call for help, or go to a crowded place.
• Always let someone else know where you are going, who you are with, and when you are returning.
• Avoid going somewhere with strangers, and always use the buddy system.
• Avoid using alcohol or drugs which can impair your judgement.
• Select an ATM in well lighted and visible areas.

Being outdoors with any frequency this time of year, you may notice that bees and stinging insects are more numerous and...
08/30/2021

Being outdoors with any frequency this time of year, you may notice that bees and stinging insects are more numerous and aggressive. Read below how you can become more aware of this summer and fall hazard and what you can do to protect yourself. Those that are allergic to bees and stinging insects need to be especially aware.
• The National Pest Management Association reported that over 500,000 people are sent to the emergency room every year due to insect stings.
• Stinging insect colonies can have up to 4000 members.
• Yellow jackets can sting a person several times, and are not normally aggressive unless their nest is threatened.
• Wasps can exhibit unprovoked aggression.
o Wasps nest on ceiling beams in attics, garages, and sheds.
• Africanized “killer bees” are confused with honeybees but their venom is more dangerous and will attack in large numbers if their nest, which is often in tires or empty cars, is threatened.
• Honeybees rarely sting except when stepped on or roughly handled.
• Stinging insects are busier in the late summer and early fall due to:
o Populations are at their largest size.
o They are helping their queen prepare their hives and nests for the winter and as a result are more protective of those hives.
o Natural food sources, such as flowers and insects, are starting to deplete in cooler weather.
o Dietary needs change from requiring proteins to requiring carbs and therefore more artificial food sources are sought out from picnics and other outdoor food gatherings.
o People are outdoors more, such as doing work around their homes, which leads to more run-ins.

Being outdoors with any frequency this time of year, you may notice that bees and stinging insects are more numerous and aggressive. Read below how you can become more aware of this summer and fall hazard and what you can do to protect yourself. Those that are allergic to bees and stinging insects need to be especially aware.
• The National Pest Management Association reported that over 500,000 people are sent to the emergency room every year due to insect stings.
• Stinging insect colonies can have up to 4000 members.
• Yellow jackets can sting a person several times, and are not normally aggressive unless their nest is threatened.
• Wasps can exhibit unprovoked aggression.
o Wasps nest on ceiling beams in attics, garages, and sheds.
• Africanized “killer bees” are confused with honeybees but their venom is more dangerous and will attack in large numbers if their nest, which is often in tires or empty cars, is threatened.
• Honeybees rarely sting except when stepped on or roughly handled.
• Stinging insects are busier in the late summer and early fall due to:
o Populations are at their largest size.
o They are helping their queen prepare their hives and nests for the winter and as a result are more protective of those hives.
o Natural food sources, such as flowers and insects, are starting to deplete in cooler weather.
o Dietary needs change from requiring proteins to requiring carbs and therefore more artificial food sources are sought out from picnics and other outdoor food gatherings.
o People are outdoors more, such as doing work around their homes, which leads to more run-ins.

Summer is a great time to enjoy being outdoors! Warmer weather can bring fun times as well as new dangers. Excessive hea...
08/27/2021

Summer is a great time to enjoy being outdoors! Warmer weather can bring fun times as well as new dangers. Excessive heat is a significant risk to people’s health including heat stroke and heat exhaustion which can be fatal. Excessive heat is composed of excessively hot temperatures and oppressive humidity that lasts for two or more days. Read below how you and your family can stay safe over the summer.

1. Know and understand the differences between the
various excessive heat watches and warnings.
• Heat Advisory- Typically issued within one to three
days of the onset of dangerous heat and is in effect
until the danger subsides. There is a high certainty
that the danger will occur.
• Excessive Heat Watch- Issued two to five days
ahead of possible dangerous heat conditions.
Lower than a warning.
• Excessive Heat Warning- Sometimes given after an
Excessive Heat Watch and is issued one to three
days of the onset of extremely dangerous heat
conditions and is in effect until the extreme danger
subsides. The certainty that the event will occur is
high.

2. The Heat Index
• Way to measure how hot it actually feels when
humidity and temperature are considered together.

3. During a heat wave
• Slow down
+ Reduce, eliminate, or reschedule strenuous
activities until the coolest time of the day.
Youth, the elderly, and anyone with health
problems should stay in the coolest available
space, which may not be indoors.

• Dress for summer
+ Wear lightweight, loose fitting, light colored
clothing so that heat can be reflected.

• Eat light
+ Choose easy to digest foods such as fruit and
salad If you decide to pack food. Use a cooler
or use an ice pack. Be aware that meat and
dairy products can spoil quickly.

• Drink plenty of water (not very cold)
+ Focus on non-alcoholic and decaffeinated
fluids. Even if you are not thirsty drink water. If
you are on a fluid restrictive diet or have fluid
retention issues, consult a physician before
increasing your consumption.

• Use air conditioners
+ Spend time in air conditioned areas where you
are able to social distance.

• Use portable electric fans
+ Fans dispel air from rooms or draw in cooler
air.
+ Do not direct the flow of fans towards yourself
when the room temperature is greater than 90
degrees Farenhight. The dry blowing air will
dehydrate you faster, endangering your health.
Fans do not reduce body temperature.

• Minimize direct sun exposure.
• Take cool bath or showers.
• Only take salt tablets if directed by your physician.
• Be aware of infants, older, sick, or frail individuals
and pets. Do not leave children, disabled adults, or
pets in your car.
• Use shades or window coverings.

Summer is a great time to enjoy being outdoors! Warmer weather can bring fun times as well as new dangers. Excessive heat is a significant risk to people’s health including heat stroke and heat exhaustion which can be fatal. Excessive heat is composed of excessively hot temperatures and oppressive humidity that lasts for two or more days. Read below how you and your family can stay safe over the summer.

1. Know and understand the differences between the
various excessive heat watches and warnings.
• Heat Advisory- Typically issued within one to three
days of the onset of dangerous heat and is in effect
until the danger subsides. There is a high certainty
that the danger will occur.
• Excessive Heat Watch- Issued two to five days
ahead of possible dangerous heat conditions.
Lower than a warning.
• Excessive Heat Warning- Sometimes given after an
Excessive Heat Watch and is issued one to three
days of the onset of extremely dangerous heat
conditions and is in effect until the extreme danger
subsides. The certainty that the event will occur is
high.

2. The Heat Index
• Way to measure how hot it actually feels when
humidity and temperature are considered together.

3. During a heat wave
• Slow down
+ Reduce, eliminate, or reschedule strenuous
activities until the coolest time of the day.
Youth, the elderly, and anyone with health
problems should stay in the coolest available
space, which may not be indoors.

• Dress for summer
+ Wear lightweight, loose fitting, light colored
clothing so that heat can be reflected.

• Eat light
+ Choose easy to digest foods such as fruit and
salad If you decide to pack food. Use a cooler
or use an ice pack. Be aware that meat and
dairy products can spoil quickly.

• Drink plenty of water (not very cold)
+ Focus on non-alcoholic and decaffeinated
fluids. Even if you are not thirsty drink water. If
you are on a fluid restrictive diet or have fluid
retention issues, consult a physician before
increasing your consumption.

• Use air conditioners
+ Spend time in air conditioned areas where you
are able to social distance.

• Use portable electric fans
+ Fans dispel air from rooms or draw in cooler
air.
+ Do not direct the flow of fans towards yourself
when the room temperature is greater than 90
degrees Farenhight. The dry blowing air will
dehydrate you faster, endangering your health.
Fans do not reduce body temperature.

• Minimize direct sun exposure.
• Take cool bath or showers.
• Only take salt tablets if directed by your physician.
• Be aware of infants, older, sick, or frail individuals
and pets. Do not leave children, disabled adults, or
pets in your car.
• Use shades or window coverings.

Address

1995 S State Road 2
Valparaiso, IN
46385-9044

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 4pm
Tuesday 8am - 4pm
Wednesday 8am - 4pm
Thursday 8am - 4pm
Friday 8am - 4pm

Telephone

(219) 462-8654

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Comments

The Porter County Sheriff’s Office is seeking the public’s assistance in locating the below missing individual: Rodrick (Rod) Moore, 75 years of age. Last seen leaving his residence on Mississnewa Court at approximately 7:45 p.m. this evening. We are told he suffers from dementia. Believed to be wearing a baseball hat, grey long sleeved shirt, light colored shorts, and tennis shoes. If you have any information, please contact us at 219-477-3000 or Submit a Tip via our App. Thank you!
Still no help from law enforcement. I was told i might be able to get the report Tuesday...this happened last wednesday. I plan on being very loud about this and have a ton of support. I demand justice #JusticeforEcho
Did anyone ever find out why your computer initiated a test message at 11PM on Tues the 6th?
i live in porter co and work in lake co and u guys agencies are great at upating us. thanx so much!
u guys need to update your website, comments and info. a list of storm shelters as well, thanks
Reason for current siren activation?
Were there emergency sirens being tested this morning in Jackson Twp.?
Just heard there were shots fired at Ameriplex in Portage, anyone knowing what is going on there?
Will the outdoor warning sirens be tested on the 4th?
I would like to take a minute to thank your organization for what you do. I am the Operations Manager at SERVPRO in Porter County and have been heavily involved in a very large local commercial fire loss that you have assisted with. I personally run a service operation that prides itself on efficiency, safety, and professionalism. In my experience as a business owner, and also as a disaster coordinator and manager, I fully understand the work, training, and resources that go into a well established organization. Your organization has far exceeded my expectations, it was an absolute honor to watch your operation while assisting in this situation. The support that Porter County Emergency Management provided to the emergency personnel and to the community was fantastic. I am sure much of the general public are not aware of the services you provide, but I wanted to publicly thank you for what you do. It is good to see that tax dollars are being put to use in areas that are truly needed in our communities. With sincere regards, Thank You.