Porter County Emergency Management Agency

Porter County Emergency Management Agency Contact information, map and directions, contact form, opening hours, services, ratings, photos, videos and announcements from Porter County Emergency Management Agency, Public Service, 1995 S State Road 2, Valparaiso, IN.
(12)

Operating as usual

This time of year, many people are venturing out to beaches and Lake Michigan. It is important to become educated on the...
07/12/2021

This time of year, many people are venturing out to beaches and Lake Michigan. It is important to become educated on the different types of warnings for beach and water areas to keep you and your family safe. Read below the various types of water related warnings near Lake Michigan and other Great Lakes.
Coastal/lakeshore hazards
• Coastal Flood Warning – Coastal flooding from ocean water being forced inland from the nearby body (caused by either nor'easters, tropical cyclones or thunderstorms) is occurring, imminent or highly likely within 12 to 24 hours, and poses a serious threat to life and/or property. Weather forecast organizations may occasionally issue warnings valid after the second forecast period of the date of validity if a strong likelihood of the event exists or when a longer advance notice is needed for public response.
• Coastal Flood Watch – Coastal flooding from ocean water being forced inland from the nearby body is possible within 12 to 48 hours, creating significant impacts to life and/or property.
• Coastal Flood Advisory – Minor coastal flooding or tidal overflow is occurring or is imminent within 12 hours. Flooding will not pose a serious threat to lives or property, but will create a nuisance for pedestrian and vehicle travel in the affected area.
• Lakeshore Flood Warning – Lakeshore flooding that poses a serious threat to life and/or property is occurring or is imminent in the next 12 to 24 hours.
Seiche Warning– Rapid, large fluctuations in water level
in the Great Lakes (similar to the sloshing in a bath tub)
caused by storms or high winds, resulting in both
lakeshore flooding and critically low water levels at
different times. Issued as a Lakeshore Flood Warning with
reference of being a Seiche Warning.
• Lakeshore Flood Watch – Lakeshore flooding that could pose a serious threat to life and/or property is possible within the next 12 to 48 hours.
• Lakeshore Flood Advisory – Minor lakeshore flooding that may pose a threat to life and/or property is occurring or is imminent in the next 12 hours.
• Lake Wind Warning – Sustained wind speeds of 40 miles per hour (64 km/h) or greater are expected on area lakes that may cause impairment for maritime travel or damage small boats; wind speeds meeting warning criteria may vary depending on the county warning area. The use of this is determined by each Weather Forecast Office.
• Lake Wind Watch – Sustained wind speeds of 40 miles per hour (64 km/h) or greater are expected within the next few days or sooner on area lakes that may cause impairment for maritime travel or damage small boats; wind speeds meeting warning criteria may vary depending on the county warning area. The use of this is determined by each Weather Forecast Office.
• Lake Wind Advisory– Sustained wind speeds of 20 to 29 miles per hour (32 to 47 km/h) are forecast to persist for one hour or longer on area lakes that may cause hazards for maritime travel; wind speeds meeting advisory criteria may vary depending on the county warning area. The use of this is determined by each Weather Forecast Office.
• Rip Current Statement – Describes a risk of rip currents present in the specified area; may be issued as a Beach Hazards Statement.
• Beach Hazards Statement – Issued for rip or longshore currents, or other hazards (including chemical or biological hazards) may create life-threatening conditions in lake or ocean.
• Low Water Advisory – Critically below average water levels over the Great Lakes, coastal marine zones or other tidal marine area, waterway, or river inlet within or adjacent to a marine zone have been observed, and potentially present a hazard to maritime navigation.
• Marine Weather Statement– The equivalent of a special weather statement at sea, indicating potentially hazardous marine conditions.
• Special Marine Warning – A warning to mariners of short-duration hazardous weather conditions (lasting up to two hours) including thunderstorms or squalls with wind gusts of 34 knots (39 mph; 63 km/h) or more, hail 1 inch (2.5 cm) diameter or larger, or waterspouts affecting coastal areas not adequately covered by existing marine warnings. Short-duration mesoscale events (such as a strong cold front, gravity wave or squall line) expected to last two hours or less and produce criteria wind speeds, or volcanic ashfall may also warrant issuance.
Particularly Dangerous Situation Special Marine Warning
– A warning to mariners of hazardous weather conditions
that present a considerable threat to life and property.

This time of year, many people are venturing out to beaches and Lake Michigan. It is important to become educated on the different types of warnings for beach and water areas to keep you and your family safe. Read below the various types of water related warnings near Lake Michigan and other Great Lakes.
Coastal/lakeshore hazards
• Coastal Flood Warning – Coastal flooding from ocean water being forced inland from the nearby body (caused by either nor'easters, tropical cyclones or thunderstorms) is occurring, imminent or highly likely within 12 to 24 hours, and poses a serious threat to life and/or property. Weather forecast organizations may occasionally issue warnings valid after the second forecast period of the date of validity if a strong likelihood of the event exists or when a longer advance notice is needed for public response.
• Coastal Flood Watch – Coastal flooding from ocean water being forced inland from the nearby body is possible within 12 to 48 hours, creating significant impacts to life and/or property.
• Coastal Flood Advisory – Minor coastal flooding or tidal overflow is occurring or is imminent within 12 hours. Flooding will not pose a serious threat to lives or property, but will create a nuisance for pedestrian and vehicle travel in the affected area.
• Lakeshore Flood Warning – Lakeshore flooding that poses a serious threat to life and/or property is occurring or is imminent in the next 12 to 24 hours.
Seiche Warning– Rapid, large fluctuations in water level
in the Great Lakes (similar to the sloshing in a bath tub)
caused by storms or high winds, resulting in both
lakeshore flooding and critically low water levels at
different times. Issued as a Lakeshore Flood Warning with
reference of being a Seiche Warning.
• Lakeshore Flood Watch – Lakeshore flooding that could pose a serious threat to life and/or property is possible within the next 12 to 48 hours.
• Lakeshore Flood Advisory – Minor lakeshore flooding that may pose a threat to life and/or property is occurring or is imminent in the next 12 hours.
• Lake Wind Warning – Sustained wind speeds of 40 miles per hour (64 km/h) or greater are expected on area lakes that may cause impairment for maritime travel or damage small boats; wind speeds meeting warning criteria may vary depending on the county warning area. The use of this is determined by each Weather Forecast Office.
• Lake Wind Watch – Sustained wind speeds of 40 miles per hour (64 km/h) or greater are expected within the next few days or sooner on area lakes that may cause impairment for maritime travel or damage small boats; wind speeds meeting warning criteria may vary depending on the county warning area. The use of this is determined by each Weather Forecast Office.
• Lake Wind Advisory– Sustained wind speeds of 20 to 29 miles per hour (32 to 47 km/h) are forecast to persist for one hour or longer on area lakes that may cause hazards for maritime travel; wind speeds meeting advisory criteria may vary depending on the county warning area. The use of this is determined by each Weather Forecast Office.
• Rip Current Statement – Describes a risk of rip currents present in the specified area; may be issued as a Beach Hazards Statement.
• Beach Hazards Statement – Issued for rip or longshore currents, or other hazards (including chemical or biological hazards) may create life-threatening conditions in lake or ocean.
• Low Water Advisory – Critically below average water levels over the Great Lakes, coastal marine zones or other tidal marine area, waterway, or river inlet within or adjacent to a marine zone have been observed, and potentially present a hazard to maritime navigation.
• Marine Weather Statement– The equivalent of a special weather statement at sea, indicating potentially hazardous marine conditions.
• Special Marine Warning – A warning to mariners of short-duration hazardous weather conditions (lasting up to two hours) including thunderstorms or squalls with wind gusts of 34 knots (39 mph; 63 km/h) or more, hail 1 inch (2.5 cm) diameter or larger, or waterspouts affecting coastal areas not adequately covered by existing marine warnings. Short-duration mesoscale events (such as a strong cold front, gravity wave or squall line) expected to last two hours or less and produce criteria wind speeds, or volcanic ashfall may also warrant issuance.
Particularly Dangerous Situation Special Marine Warning
– A warning to mariners of hazardous weather conditions
that present a considerable threat to life and property.

07/06/2021

This is a test of the Porter County Emergency Alert System. In the event of an emergency, this system would bring you important information.

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY!Porter County EMA wishes everyone a happy and safe Independence Day. May we all appreciate and ce...
07/04/2021

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY!

Porter County EMA wishes everyone a happy and safe Independence Day. May we all appreciate and celebrate the land of the Free and home of the Brave. LET FREEDOM RING!

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY!

Porter County EMA wishes everyone a happy and safe Independence Day. May we all appreciate and celebrate the land of the Free and home of the Brave. LET FREEDOM RING!

Learning about the different types of currents that occur on Lake Michigan can help save your life or the life of a love...
07/01/2021

Learning about the different types of currents that occur on Lake Michigan can help save your life or the life of a loved one. Read below about the different types of currents on Lake Michigan and how you can stay safe!

1. Rip currents
 Strong current that can pull you offshore into deeper
water.
 Account for nearly half of current related incidents.
 Forms within gaps on sandbars, especially as wave
heights get to three feet or greater.
 Escape by swimming with the flow of the water until
the current dissipates and swim parallel to the
shoreline. When you are out of the current, head
back towards the shore.

2. Outlet currents
 Forms at outlets like river, stream, creek mouths, or
power plants.
 Can take you offshore into deeper water.
 Account for 6% of incidents on the Great Lakes.
 Escape by going away from the current.

3. Longshore currents
 Current that moves parallel to the beach.
 Can make it hard to keep your feet on the ground.
 Can carry you into dangerous areas like piers or
break walls.
 Account for 1% of incidents on the Great Lakes.
 Escape by moving forward towards the beach.

4. Structural Currents
 Develop as a longshore current that intersects a
breakwall or peninsula. When caught in this type of
current, swimmers can be moved towards the lake,
parallel to breakwall or other structures.
 No easy escape route. Therefore, avoid swimming
near break walls or other structures.

5. Channel Currents
 Flows over the sandbar connecting the beach to an
offshore feature like rocks or an island.
 These currents can push you off a sandbar into the
water.
 Account for 3% of incidents on the Great Lakes.
 To get out of a channel current, swimmers should
move toward shore, rather than swimming back to
the unstable sandbar.

Learning about the different types of currents that occur on Lake Michigan can help save your life or the life of a loved one. Read below about the different types of currents on Lake Michigan and how you can stay safe!

1. Rip currents
 Strong current that can pull you offshore into deeper
water.
 Account for nearly half of current related incidents.
 Forms within gaps on sandbars, especially as wave
heights get to three feet or greater.
 Escape by swimming with the flow of the water until
the current dissipates and swim parallel to the
shoreline. When you are out of the current, head
back towards the shore.

2. Outlet currents
 Forms at outlets like river, stream, creek mouths, or
power plants.
 Can take you offshore into deeper water.
 Account for 6% of incidents on the Great Lakes.
 Escape by going away from the current.

3. Longshore currents
 Current that moves parallel to the beach.
 Can make it hard to keep your feet on the ground.
 Can carry you into dangerous areas like piers or
break walls.
 Account for 1% of incidents on the Great Lakes.
 Escape by moving forward towards the beach.

4. Structural Currents
 Develop as a longshore current that intersects a
breakwall or peninsula. When caught in this type of
current, swimmers can be moved towards the lake,
parallel to breakwall or other structures.
 No easy escape route. Therefore, avoid swimming
near break walls or other structures.

5. Channel Currents
 Flows over the sandbar connecting the beach to an
offshore feature like rocks or an island.
 These currents can push you off a sandbar into the
water.
 Account for 3% of incidents on the Great Lakes.
 To get out of a channel current, swimmers should
move toward shore, rather than swimming back to
the unstable sandbar.

Porter County Tornado Siren Polygon ActivationThis may be a lengthy article but please read until the end to fully under...
07/01/2021

Porter County Tornado Siren Polygon Activation

This may be a lengthy article but please read until the end to fully understand. Remember when you would hear a tornado siren blaring and would look up to see nothing but blue sky overhead? That was because somewhere in our county there was a real threat for severe weather, but not for your neighborhood, and our Tornado Sirens could only be activated county-wide. No doubt you have seen severe thunderstorms or tornado warning polygons on television broadcasts or on the internet. So, just what are those polygons, and what do they mean for you?

In the past, severe thunderstorm, tornado, and flash flood warnings were issued for entire counties. On October 1, 2007, the National Weather Service began issuing warnings in the shape of a polygon, which are intended to warn only the locations and people inside the polygon of impending severe weather.

Warning polygons represent state-of-the-art NWS capabilities and understanding of severe weather, which enables them to specify the locations that are most likely to be affected by a severe thunderstorm, flash flood, or tornado. Forecasters are continually monitoring the radar, following storms, and watching for signs that the storm may be trouble. At the point which most storms become severe, forecasters have monitored them for a while and know where the storms will track and how they will behave. Based on this information, NWS forecasters then draw a polygon that defines the locations that are threatened by the storm.

So what does this mean for you? Well, as you can see in the photo from Saturday, June 26th, the warned area is much smaller than it used to be. This goes for our sirens as well. In 2017, Porter County completed an upgrade that aligned our sirens with the National Weather Service polygon alerting protocol, and only the sirens in the warned area, or warned zone will be activated. When the sirens sound, or you become aware of a severe weather warning for your area, you need to act quickly! If it is dark and ominous, go to your shelter immediately. If the sun is out, or the weather is benign, tune to your NOAA Weather Radio All-Hazards or your favorite local media outlet to get more details on the storm.

It is our goal that only those inside the polygon should take action. As technology in outdoor sirens and personal warning devices advances, we hope to minimize your personal false alarm rate or the number of times you are alerted for impending severe weather when it does not actually affect your location. If ever in doubt over whether you are at risk, seek additional weather information immediately.

Porter County Tornado Siren Polygon Activation

This may be a lengthy article but please read until the end to fully understand. Remember when you would hear a tornado siren blaring and would look up to see nothing but blue sky overhead? That was because somewhere in our county there was a real threat for severe weather, but not for your neighborhood, and our Tornado Sirens could only be activated county-wide. No doubt you have seen severe thunderstorms or tornado warning polygons on television broadcasts or on the internet. So, just what are those polygons, and what do they mean for you?

In the past, severe thunderstorm, tornado, and flash flood warnings were issued for entire counties. On October 1, 2007, the National Weather Service began issuing warnings in the shape of a polygon, which are intended to warn only the locations and people inside the polygon of impending severe weather.

Warning polygons represent state-of-the-art NWS capabilities and understanding of severe weather, which enables them to specify the locations that are most likely to be affected by a severe thunderstorm, flash flood, or tornado. Forecasters are continually monitoring the radar, following storms, and watching for signs that the storm may be trouble. At the point which most storms become severe, forecasters have monitored them for a while and know where the storms will track and how they will behave. Based on this information, NWS forecasters then draw a polygon that defines the locations that are threatened by the storm.

So what does this mean for you? Well, as you can see in the photo from Saturday, June 26th, the warned area is much smaller than it used to be. This goes for our sirens as well. In 2017, Porter County completed an upgrade that aligned our sirens with the National Weather Service polygon alerting protocol, and only the sirens in the warned area, or warned zone will be activated. When the sirens sound, or you become aware of a severe weather warning for your area, you need to act quickly! If it is dark and ominous, go to your shelter immediately. If the sun is out, or the weather is benign, tune to your NOAA Weather Radio All-Hazards or your favorite local media outlet to get more details on the storm.

It is our goal that only those inside the polygon should take action. As technology in outdoor sirens and personal warning devices advances, we hope to minimize your personal false alarm rate or the number of times you are alerted for impending severe weather when it does not actually affect your location. If ever in doubt over whether you are at risk, seek additional weather information immediately.

Address

1995 S State Road 2
Valparaiso, IN
46385-9044

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 16:00
Thursday 08:00 - 16:00
Friday 08:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(219) 462-8654

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Porter County Emergency Management Agency posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Nearby government services


Other Public Services in Valparaiso

Show All

Comments

The Porter County Sheriff’s Office is seeking the public’s assistance in locating the below missing individual: Rodrick (Rod) Moore, 75 years of age. Last seen leaving his residence on Mississnewa Court at approximately 7:45 p.m. this evening. We are told he suffers from dementia. Believed to be wearing a baseball hat, grey long sleeved shirt, light colored shorts, and tennis shoes. If you have any information, please contact us at 219-477-3000 or Submit a Tip via our App. Thank you!
Still no help from law enforcement. I was told i might be able to get the report Tuesday...this happened last wednesday. I plan on being very loud about this and have a ton of support. I demand justice #JusticeforEcho
Did anyone ever find out why your computer initiated a test message at 11PM on Tues the 6th?
i live in porter co and work in lake co and u guys agencies are great at upating us. thanx so much!
u guys need to update your website, comments and info. a list of storm shelters as well, thanks
Reason for current siren activation?
Were there emergency sirens being tested this morning in Jackson Twp.?
Just heard there were shots fired at Ameriplex in Portage, anyone knowing what is going on there?
Will the outdoor warning sirens be tested on the 4th?
I would like to take a minute to thank your organization for what you do. I am the Operations Manager at SERVPRO in Porter County and have been heavily involved in a very large local commercial fire loss that you have assisted with. I personally run a service operation that prides itself on efficiency, safety, and professionalism. In my experience as a business owner, and also as a disaster coordinator and manager, I fully understand the work, training, and resources that go into a well established organization. Your organization has far exceeded my expectations, it was an absolute honor to watch your operation while assisting in this situation. The support that Porter County Emergency Management provided to the emergency personnel and to the community was fantastic. I am sure much of the general public are not aware of the services you provide, but I wanted to publicly thank you for what you do. It is good to see that tax dollars are being put to use in areas that are truly needed in our communities. With sincere regards, Thank You.