Porter County Emergency Management Agency

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Operating as usual

Stinging Insect Prevention and Treatment • Prevention          o Take care when drinking sweet beverages outside.       ...
09/05/2020

Stinging Insect Prevention and Treatment

• Prevention
o Take care when drinking sweet beverages outside.
o Use wide open cups so you can see if there is a stinging insect in it.
o Inspect cans and straws before drinking.
o Tightly cover food containers and trash.
o Clear away garbage and fallen fruit, or pet or wild animal feces (flies attract wasps)
o Wear closed toed shoes when outside.
o Do not wear bright colors as they attract stinging insects.
o Do not wear lose clothing as this can trap stinging insects.
o Keep car windows rolled up.
o Be aware of insect activity on or just above the ground. This may indicate the presence of a ground hive.
o Have hives and nests removed by a professional.
o If there are stinging insects around you:
 If a few bees are flying around stay calm and walk away. Do not swat at them.
 In the event of a swarm, cover your mouth and nose and quickly exit the area and find an enclosed place. This is because when bees sting, they release a chemical that attracts other bees.
• Treatment
o Mild reaction
 If a stinger is present in the skin, AVOID USING TWEEZERS to remove. Instead, use a credit card to scrape the surface, going against the direction of the stinger, to ‘stand up’ the stinger and flick it away from the skin. **Squeezing the stinger could inject more venom into the skin.
 Wash the sting area with soap and water.
 Apply a cold compress.
o Moderate reaction
 Use the above method for stinger removal. Remember than not every stinging insect leaves a stinger behind.
 Wash the sting area with soap and water.
 Apply a cold compress.
 Take an over the counter pain reliever as needed.
 Elevate the stung area if it is an arm or leg.
 Apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to ease redness or swelling.
 Take an oral antihistamine if itching or swelling is a problem.
 Do not scratch the stung area, as this can worsen the itching and swelling and lead to infection.

Reactions to Stinging Insect Stings Last week, we discussed how stinging insects like wasps and bees are more frequently...
09/04/2020

Reactions to Stinging Insect Stings

Last week, we discussed how stinging insects like wasps and bees are more frequently an issue this time of the year. This week, we will share reactions to stinging insect bites and how you can deal with those if you or a loved one is stung. Read below the steps you can take to take care of stings. If you are allergic you need to take extra precautions.
o Do not assume the reaction will be mild even if it was in the past. It could be more severe. It is possible to have different reactions to different bee stings.
o Adults tend to have more severe reactions than children and are more likely to die of anaphylaxis (severe reactions) than children are.
• Types of reactions
o Mild reactions
 Instant sharp, burning pain at the site.
 A red welt in the stinging area.
 Slight swelling around the sting area.
 For most, the swelling and pain go away within a few hours.
o Moderate reactions
 Extreme redness.
 Swelling at the site of the sting that gradually enlarges over the next day or two.
 Resolves over five to ten days.
o Severe allergic reaction (Anaphylaxis)
 Potentially life threatening.
 Sometimes these symptoms of an allergic reaction can develop quickly.
 Skin reactions, including hives, itching, and flushed or pale skin.
 Difficulty breathing.
 Swelling of the throat and tongue.
 A weak, rapid pulse.
 Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.
 Dizziness or fainting.
 Loss of consciousness.
• People who have a severe allergic reaction to a bee sting have a 25% to 65% chance of anaphylaxis the next time they are stung.
• If you have a severe reaction, discuss with your doctor about immunotherapy to avoid a similar severe reaction if you get stung again.
• Multiple bee stings
o Most stinging insects aren’t aggressive and sting in self-defense.
o Sometimes groups of stinging insects are active and a swarm or hive can become agitated.
o If you get stung more than a dozen times, the accumulation of venom can cause a toxic reaction or symptoms listed below.
 Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.
 Headache.
 A feeling of spinning (vertigo).
 Convulsions.
 Fever.
 Dizziness or fainting.
o Multiple stings can be a medical emergency in children, older adults, and people who have heart or breathing problems.
• Visit a doctor when the case is more severe.
• Call 911 if there is a serious reaction to a sting that suggests anaphylaxis, even if there are only one or two symptoms. If you are prescribed an emergency epinephrine auto injector (EpiPen, Auvi-Q, etc), use it right away as your doctor has directed you.
• Make an appointment with your doctor if
o Stinging insect symptoms do not go away for a few days.
o You have had other symptoms of an allergic response to a bee sting.

Make A Plan September is National Emergency Preparedness Month. In this first week, we are focusing on challenging you a...
09/02/2020

Make A Plan

September is National Emergency Preparedness Month. In this first week, we are focusing on challenging you and those in your family to MAKE A PLAN. Having an All Hazards Preparedness Plan for you and your family is essential to ensure your safety in a disaster or other critical incident. Read below to learn the steps to making a plan.

• Put a plan together by discussing the questions below with your family, friends, and others in your household to create your emergency plan.
o How will I receive emergency alerts and warnings?
 Smart 911 app https://www.smart911.com/
 National Weather Service app
 Weather Alert Radio
o What is my plan for sheltering?
 Stay at home.
 Mass care shelter (Red Cross).
 Shelter in place.
o What is my evacuation route?
 Plan how you will leave and where to go.
 Consider how coronavirus may affect those plans.
 Do not forget to take cleaning items with you.
 Take into account alternate routes.
 Take your go bag and emergency supply kit.
 Follow evacuation routes as shortcuts may be blocked.
 Be on the alert for road hazards such as washed out bridges and downed power lines.
o What is my family communication plan?
o Check with the Centers for Disease Control and update any emergency plan you have due to the Coronavirus.
 Get face coverings for everyone over two years of age, disinfectants, and check your sheltering plan.
• Consider the specific needs of your household.
o Different ages and members.
o Those needing assistance.
o Medical, disability, and dietary needs.
o Pets and service animals.
o Children.
• Fill out an emergency plan.

• Practice your plan with your household.
• For more information, go to https://www.ready.gov/plan

09/01/2020

This is a test of the Porter County Emergency Alert System. In the event of an emergency, this system would bring you important information.

Reminder today is our monthly test at 11am
09/01/2020

Reminder today is our monthly test at 11am

Why Are Bees and Other Stinging Insects More Active in the Fall?Being outdoors with any frequency this time of year, you...
08/27/2020

Why Are Bees and Other Stinging Insects More Active in the Fall?

Being outdoors with any frequency this time of year, you may notice that bees and stinging insects are more numerous and aggressive. Read below how you can become more aware of this summer and fall hazard, and what you can do to protect yourself. Those that are allergic to bees and stinging insects need to be especially aware.
• The National Pest Management Association reported that over 500,000 people are sent to the emergency room every year due to insect stings.
• Stinging insect colonies can have up to 4000 members.
• Yellow jackets can sting a person several times, and are not normally aggressive unless their nest is threatened.
• Wasps can exhibit unprovoked aggression.
o Wasps nest on ceiling beams in attics, garages, and sheds.
• Africanized “killer bees” are confused with honeybees but their venom is more dangerous and will attack in large numbers if their nest, which is often in tires or empty cars, is threatened.
• Honeybees rarely sting except when stepped on or roughly handled.
• Stinging insects are busier in the late summer and early fall due to:
o Populations are at their largest size.
o They are helping their queen prepare their hives and nests for the winter and as a result are more protective of those hives.
o Natural food sources, such as flowers and insects, are starting to deplete in cooler weather.
o Dietary needs change from requiring proteins to requiring carbs and therefore more artificial food sources are sought out from picnics and other outdoor food gatherings.
o People are outdoors more, such as doing work around their homes, which leads to more run-ins.

COVID-19 has put more people than ever online utilizing remote services. We have distance workplaces, distance business ...
08/20/2020

COVID-19 has put more people than ever online utilizing remote services. We have distance workplaces, distance business transactions, distance doctor appointments and distance classrooms. Now more than ever, extra caution is needed when navigating online. Learning basic cybersecurity principles can help to identify threats online and keep you and the important information you have safe. Read below some of these tips to help keep you and your private information safe.
• Keep security software current as this is the best defense against viruses, malware, and any other threats online.
o Security software
o Web browser
o Operating system
• Automate software updates
• Protect all devices that connect to the Internet to protect from malware and viruses.
• If you plug it into a computer, make sure to have your security software scan it as external devices and USBs can also be affected by viruses and malware.
• Secure your accounts: Ask for protection beyond passwords such as two factor identification.
• Combine capital and lowercase letters with numbers and symbols to create a more secure password.
• Unique account, unique password: Separate passwords for every account.
• Keep a list of your passwords that are stored in a safe, secure place away from your computer.
• Set the privacy and security settings on websites to your comfort level for information sharing.
• Links in email, tweets, posts, and online advertising are often the way cybercriminals compromise your computer. If it looks suspicious, even if you know the source, it is best to delete or if appropriate, mark as junk email.
• Limit the type of business you conduct and adjust the security settings on your device to limit who can access your machine.
• When banking and shopping, check to be sure the sites are security enabled. Look for web addresses with “https://,” which means the site takes extra measures to help secure your information. “Http://” is not secure.
• Check trusted websites for the latest information on how to stay safe online. Share with friends, family, and colleagues and encourage them to be web wise.
• Be wary of any communications that implore you to act immediately, offer something that sounds too good to be true, or ask for personal information.
• Protect your valuable work, music, photos, and other digital information by making an electronic copy and safely storing it.
• What you do online has the potential to affect everyone – practice good online skills.
• Post only about others what you would want them to post about you.
• Help the authorities fight cybercrime: Report stolen finances, identities and cybercrime to your local FBI.
• Limit what information you post on social media—from personal addresses to where you like to grab coffee. These seemingly random details are all that criminals need to know to target you, your loved ones, and your physical belongings—online and in the real world.
• Keep Social Security numbers, account numbers, and passwords private, as well as specific information about yourself, such as your full name, address, birthday, and even vacation plans.
• Disable location services that allow anyone to see where you are—and where you aren’t—at any given time.
• Properly secure the wireless network you use to connect Internet-enabled devices. Consider placing these devices on a separate and dedicated network.

Severe Weather Safety:  Tornadoes• Flying debris is most dangerous• Winds can exceed 200 mph• Seek a sturdy shelter in a...
08/10/2020

Severe Weather Safety: Tornadoes

• Flying debris is most dangerous
• Winds can exceed 200 mph
• Seek a sturdy shelter in an interior room, away from windows, in a basement or lowest level, and cover your head.
• Listen to a local area radio station, NOAA or NWS for the most current weather conditions for your area.
• If driving, pull over and park, keeping your seatbelt on and car running in the event of strong winds and flying debris. Stay away from bridge/highway overpasses.

The Porter County Emergency Management Agency would like to thank Family Express, in particular Barb (@ the Aberdeen sto...
08/06/2020

The Porter County Emergency Management Agency would like to thank Family Express, in particular Barb (@ the Aberdeen store) , and Earl (Cravin's To Order Brand Ambassador) for the surprise lunch delivery yesterday!! They sent us a delicious pizza as a token of their appreciation for what EMA does for Porter County. Well, we appreciate you, too! Thank you, Family Express! Together we make Porter County Strong!

The following warnings are specific related to Marine Weather conditions to enhance boating safety on Lake Michigan.  • ...
08/03/2020

The following warnings are specific related to Marine Weather conditions to enhance boating safety on Lake Michigan.

• Small Craft Advisory – A warning to mariners of high sustained winds or frequent gusts and/or significant sea or wave heights that may damage or capsize small boats.
• Small Craft Advisory for Hazardous Seas – An advisory to mariners of wave or sea conditions that are potentially hazardous to small boats because of wave height, wave period, steepness, or swell direction, even if wind speeds are expected to fall below locally defined small craft advisory criteria.
• Small Craft Advisory for Rough Bar – Waves in or near harbor or river entrances are expected to be especially hazardous to mariners due to the interaction of swell, tidal and/or river currents in relatively shallow water.
• Small Craft Advisory for Winds – Wind speeds may pose potential hazards for maritime activity. Wave heights must remain below standard Small Craft Advisory criteria to merit the issuance of a wind-based advisory.
• Brisk Wind Advisory – Sea or lake ice is expected and may be hazardous to small marine craft. May be issued as a Small Craft Advisory with reference of being a Brisk Wind Advisory.
• Gale Warning – Sustained surface winds or frequent gusts of 34 to 47 knots (39 to 54 mph; 63 to 87 km/h) is either forecast within 24 to 48 hours or is occurring in marine areas. The wind speeds must not be directly associated with a tropical cyclone.
• Gale Watch – A gale-force wind event affecting marine areas producing sustained surface winds or frequent gusts of 34 to 47 knots (39 to 54 mph; 63 to 87 km/h) is forecast within the next few days, but its occurrence, location and/or specific timing remains uncertain.
• Low Water Advisory – Critically below average water levels over the Great Lakes, coastal marine zones or other tidal marine area, waterway, or river inlet within or adjacent to a marine zone have been observed, and potentially present a hazard to maritime navigation.
• Marine Weather Statement – The equivalent of a special weather statement at sea, indicating potentially hazardous marine conditions.
• Special Marine Warning – A warning to mariners of short-duration hazardous weather conditions (lasting up to two hours) including thunderstorms or squalls with wind gusts of 34 knots (39 mph; 63 km/h) or more, hail 1 inch (2.5 cm) diameter or larger, or waterspouts affecting coastal areas not adequately covered by existing marine warnings. Short-duration mesoscale events (such as a strong cold front, gravity wave or squall line) expected to last two hours or less and produce criteria wind speeds).
• Particularly Dangerous Situation Special Marine Warning – A warning to mariners of hazardous weather conditions that present a considerable threat to life and property.
• Lake Wind Warning – Sustained wind speeds of 40 miles per hour (64 km/h) or greater are expected on area lakes that may cause impairment for maritime travel or damage small boats; wind speeds meeting warning criteria may vary depending on the county warning area.
• Lake Wind Watch – Sustained wind speeds of 40 miles per hour (64 km/h) or greater are expected within the next few days or sooner on area lakes that may cause impairment for maritime travel or damage small boats; wind speeds meeting warning criteria may vary depending on the county warning area.
• Lake Wind Advisory – Sustained wind speeds of 20 to 29 miles per hour (32 to 47 km/h) are forecast to persist for one hour or longer on area lakes that may cause hazards for maritime travel; wind speeds meeting advisory criteria may vary depending on the county warning area.

Address

1995 S State Road 2
Valparaiso, IN
46385-9044

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 16:00
Thursday 08:00 - 16:00
Friday 08:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(219) 462-8654

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Comments

The Porter County Sheriff’s Office is seeking the public’s assistance in locating the below missing individual: Rodrick (Rod) Moore, 75 years of age. Last seen leaving his residence on Mississnewa Court at approximately 7:45 p.m. this evening. We are told he suffers from dementia. Believed to be wearing a baseball hat, grey long sleeved shirt, light colored shorts, and tennis shoes. If you have any information, please contact us at 219-477-3000 or Submit a Tip via our App. Thank you!
Still no help from law enforcement. I was told i might be able to get the report Tuesday...this happened last wednesday. I plan on being very loud about this and have a ton of support. I demand justice #JusticeforEcho
Did anyone ever find out why your computer initiated a test message at 11PM on Tues the 6th?
i live in porter co and work in lake co and u guys agencies are great at upating us. thanx so much!
u guys need to update your website, comments and info. a list of storm shelters as well, thanks
Reason for current siren activation?
Were there emergency sirens being tested this morning in Jackson Twp.?
Just heard there were shots fired at Ameriplex in Portage, anyone knowing what is going on there?
Will the outdoor warning sirens be tested on the 4th?
I would like to take a minute to thank your organization for what you do. I am the Operations Manager at SERVPRO in Porter County and have been heavily involved in a very large local commercial fire loss that you have assisted with. I personally run a service operation that prides itself on efficiency, safety, and professionalism. In my experience as a business owner, and also as a disaster coordinator and manager, I fully understand the work, training, and resources that go into a well established organization. Your organization has far exceeded my expectations, it was an absolute honor to watch your operation while assisting in this situation. The support that Porter County Emergency Management provided to the emergency personnel and to the community was fantastic. I am sure much of the general public are not aware of the services you provide, but I wanted to publicly thank you for what you do. It is good to see that tax dollars are being put to use in areas that are truly needed in our communities. With sincere regards, Thank You.